Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

27

It is common to use notes that are not in the scale to add color. It's called chromaticism, from the ancient Greek word for color. Think how composers use a G# instead of a G in A minor, for example as a part of an E chord. A semitone creates more tension and the tendency of G# to resolve to (go to) A is more powerful. This is called a chromatic approach ...


10

This chord progression is extremely common in a lot of rock, pop and R&B music and is usually called bVI–bVII–I (where the b's are flat signs). In other words, the A major triad is generally taken as defining A major as the overriding key, but the preceding chords are taken to be major triads built on the lowered sixth and seventh scale degrees. Bob ...


9

You can play any diatonic or modal melodies on white keys only, but anything beyond extremely basic harmonies will require the use of more than seven pitch classes (ABDCEFG). Of course, a virtual piano played on a computer keyboard is extremely limited to begin with, so perhaps playing melodies is all you're interested in. To play a diatonic or modal ...


9

There isn't any hard and fast rule. The first thing is that the key signature narrows it down to two keys. So, for example, if there are no sharps or flats in the key signature, the key is either C major or A minor. Most of the time, the first few measures in the piece will establish whether you're in the major or minor key. Beethoven's 5th symphony is a ...


7

Yes, Ludwig started the Blues. Only kidding, but that note may be considered as part of a secondary dominant. The dominant of A minor is E, maj. or min. The dominant of that is B, with a D#. That's one way to look at it. Another is to say one is not just restricted to writing the notes that are only found in the original key. That's actually quite ...


6

Per Wikipedia, there are three classic octatonic scales which are made up of 2 interlocking diminished seventh chords. The scale that you mention can be described as a diminished seventh chord interlocked with a dominant seventh chord (with note renaming): E - F - G - A - B♭ - C - D♭ - E♭ - E which is created with an Edim7 chord E - G - B♭ - D♭ and an F7 ...


5

Very interesting !! Just listened to the opening bars, and it's in C#minor. That's probably why it sounds like a C#, not a D. Now whether the recording has been slowed down a smidgen is conjecture, or whether the cello is actually tuned differently I don't know. So, yes it sounds like C# 'cos it is. Couldn't find one in 'Dm'.Unless, of course, the tuning was ...


5

The D# could have been a D as well, but a half-step difference creates stronger tension, which is exactly what the composer was (presumably) going for. The same thing often appears in chord schemes, as explained in Tim's answer to a question that I asked a while ago. As to your second question: indeed, E and D# are easier to tell apart (and easier to note ...


5

As you said, the first four chords can be understood as chords from E mixolydian. Note that from then on the chords follow a downward movement in minor thirds (at least enharmonically): E => C# => A#/Bb => G and from there to B, the V of E. The downward movement in minor thirds is equivalent to going from a minor scale to its relative major scale (and that's ...


5

Well, you can think of it in one of two ways. Interpretation 1: Relation to popular music: Popular music tends to be based on the major scale, which you've probably encountered. The major scale has a whole, whole, half, whole, whole, whole, half structure. I'll provide two examples because music theory books always use C major and I think that stunts ...


5

A good starting point is to write out all the notes in the chords you're playing (although if there are more than a few this might be harder). Usually (but not always), these chords are likely to be linked in some way harmonically, and so you may notice that all the notes are within one or more familiar modes or scales. For instance, the notes in the chords ...


4

It depends on how many different chords there are in the song. For jazz, the traditions of chord substitution, use of ii-V progressions, possible polytonality and shifting key centers may mean you have to look at a dozen chords and grok the chord movement to understand the key. But for the overwhelming majority of songs you only need one chord, the final ...


4

Interesting harmonies can often be produced by moving a single chord shape/type around (transposing it), rather than by strictly using chords within a particular mode, scale or key. One example that has always fascinated me, for instance, is transposing major chords by the intervals in a minor pentatonic scale, something that is often done in pop/rock music. ...


3

Chords, I'd say two. One will be the tonic, and the other, usually, the dominant. There are songs that use tonic and sub-dominant, which, funnily enough, is the same relationship, but the other way round.Given a minor key, the dominant may well be major, so it's easier to determine.Obviously, the more the merrier.Working through a song, three could be enough ...


3

Learning how to sing involves mostly learning the technical aspects of singing itself. That is producing a good tone, having a good range, building stamina and confidence. Recognizing the notes or to put it better "feeling" the notes and then reproducing them (as long as they are inside your current comfort zone) is something you discover yourself through ...


2

Assuming everyone is oriented to what music is for most practical purposes of the "western" world (which is code for European and Caucasian), scales are groups of notes whose absence of some of the notes which leaves spaces called intervals gives the scale its identity (regardless of octave where each repeats or key). Modes are said to be scales too, but ...


2

Like many pieces of classical music, this theme features the movable scale degrees 6 and 7 of the minor mode, which can be either major or minor without leaving the key. What makes this theme especially freaky is that, instead of using B-natural in ascending motion toward the tonic (as is typical for melodic minor), this melody repeatedly employs unusual ...


2

A great deal of it is improvised, much in the same sense that Indian Raga is improvised. That is to say, a lot of melodic framework and development is predetermined, but there is a lot of room to work around the predefined bits. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arabic_maqam explains this well. Also: This is question is too wide. You should remove the bits ...


2

As noted by other answers, major keys don't necessarily equate to happiness, nor minor keys to sadness, but with regard to "I dreamed a dream", consider the text. Fantine starts singing in D major about how she used to be happy--almost reminiscing. That continues through the second verse--still in D major chord. But then something changes. There's a ...


2

Have to say I agree with one of @Pat Muchmore's comments here. Although this is an eight-note scale, it is certainly not what I understand to be an octatonic scale (also called a diminished scale), which usually follows a repeated pattern of alternating tones and semitones. Usually, my first port of call when trying to describe a collection of pitches I ...


2

The scale has five unique pitches (hence the name) and they are separated by the intervals: W–W–m3–W–m3 where W is a whole step and m3 is a minor third (3 frets). The last m3 takes you to the starting pitch an octave higher. Example: C–D–E–G–A–C


1

You might want to consider the chord-scale technique too. Take a look at scales that can be used over each chord. Since you are playing major chords without extensions, you can imply an extension from the scale. You may use a G note over the A Major chord or C note of D Major chord for a Dominant/Mixolydian sound. Using Pentatonics over each chord (E major ...


1

Another way to look at it, apart from Bob's as usual, good answer, is to consider that E,D and A are all the major chords found in A major. If you were to solo over a piece in A maj., you'd use A maj. notes. O.k., you'd centre more on A, but probably on, say, E, you'd centre more on E. So the A maj. scale notes will still work, very similarly to how you ...


1

It's taken from the full major scale. Two notes are omitted - the 4th and 7th. So in C, for instance, the notes C,D,E,G and A are used. F and B are not.Those notes are quite likely to clash with chords played in that key, unless the player knows what to do.The simple reason being, no two notes are very close to each other (at least two frets(a tone)). Yes, ...


1

The rule is that if you play a note that's only from the descending scale, the next note has to be lower, and if it's only from the ascending scale, the next note has to be higher. I forget if it's the case in raga, but usually it sounds best if it's one note lower/higher. It's important because certain (usually dissonant) notes lead to the next, and if you ...


1

Bb is the natural scale starter for brass combos, so Bb minor is a natural for funeral marches. Brass instruments are decidedly not equally tempered, so different minors have different characters. If you are playing a natural trumpet (valveless), and that's sort of the instrument type that was quite a bit around when the key associations were established, ...


1

I miss the fundamental distinction between scale and mode in the answers here. A scale is an ordered set of notes (usually functionally repeating after an octave). A mode is the harmonic framework built from it. The difference is similar to that of floor tiles and a floor. Even if the floor contains nothing but floor tiles, it is conceptually different ...


1

A scale is a set of notes. For instance, the D Dorian scale contains the notes D, E, F, G, A, B, C, and D. A mode is a scale or scales with musical functions attached to the notes. For example, the Dorian mode of Gregorian chant (sample here) has D is the tonic A is the reciting note (listen 1:34) B is often replaced by B-flat, especially in progressions ...


1

You could get Barbara Barber's Scales for Advanced Violinists. That's pretty cheap, and has scale and arpeggio patterns for all 12 keys in 3 octaves. I would learn the G, A and Bb scales in one octave, starting with the open G string, the high 1 finger on the G string, which is A, and the low two finger on the G string, which is Bb. In G and A, listen for ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible