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15

The reason there are multiple names for notes is that the same note may function differently in different contexts. If you just play a single note with no context, then it could have a multitude of different names. For example if you played the note in between F and G you could call it F# or Gb or more obscurely E## or Abbb. They are all valid names and are ...


15

If you're looking for a magic number upon which scales are based, take a look at 1.5. That's the ratio of an interval called a pure fifth. It's also called a just fifth; the terms are interchangeable. (They are not necessarily the same as a perfect fifth, however. And if you're wondering why they're called fifths at all, don't get hung up on that just yet. ...


8

Just to be cautious in case someone is misled by the sharp on the G to think the F should be sharp, and also to be sure it is not confused with the melodic minor, which has an F# on the way up.


6

When you ask about "moods" of keys, it's important to qualify what era of music (or more specifically, what tuning system) you are asking about. This is because a large portion of what gave keys their individual color was the interval relations they contained, as a result of a specific tuning system. In the Baroque Era, when keys had distinct moods because ...


5

You can ask WolframAlpha to identify scales for you. When we ask it about your scale, it tells us that the scale is an F harmonic Neapolitan minor scale. Unfortunately, it doesn't suggest any scales centered around G (except the chromatic scale, but that contains every note).


3

This is a little bit like asking, "when should a sunset be painted orange vs pink?" The word 'should' suggests that there is some normative standard which we can all agree on when it comes to the selection of a key. But there isn't; it's a matter of personal preference. There are some practical considerations that you might consider. Certain combinations of ...


2

There is probably a natural sign given to the F to further emphasize that this is a harmonic minor scale instead of a melodic minor scale. The image from Matt's question is from a wiki page. In common musical notation, an F normally won't be labelled in the key of A minor.


1

Now D♭ major, that's a woody kind of key. The brass likes B♭ and a bit of E♭, but D♭ contains enough flats to act as a brass repellent. Not tinny at all. On the keyboard, it is about the simplest key of all as opposed to C major where all keys feel the same. But the scores read awful. Like the French language: you can speak it when suitably drunk, but ...


1

Western music is mostly built around diatonic scales -- made up of 7 notes from the 12 notes you get by dividing an octave into 12 semitones. The "standard" diatonic scale is the major scale, which is is defined as: root note up 2 semitones up 2 semitones up 1 semitone up 2 semitones up 2 semitones up 2 semitones up 1 semitones (reaches 1 octave from the ...


1

I would say that this distinction is made to separate it from the Melodic Minor scale. In the other chords with an F, it being natural is spelled out in the chord symbol (B dim would have an F by definition, same with the D minor). For the F chord, the chord symbol would not necessarily provide the distinction. I think that it was entirely unnecessary to ...


1

If that F natural is so important to not be confused with F#, which would appear in melodic minor, why hasn't it been notated into the top line, second and fourth chords? It's not necessary, but someone's being helpful - just like in a lot of music, where an accidental is put in a bar, then it's cancelled, i.e. with a natural in the next bar - the barline ...


1

They are indeed equivalent, at least in Equal Temperament (which is the most widely used tuning system in western music). You might prefer one over the other depending on how things modulate. If you're going to modulate to the parallel minor, use C#, since C# minor has 4 sharps, whereas Db minor doesn't really exist (it would have 8 flats--one for each ...


1

The 'original' version appears to be in Cmaj. Chords for verse being G and F. Thus V-IV, going to I. This puts the solo into F#m with B maj.,ending back on the G, straight into the next verse.The solo is using the blues scale of F#m, which could translate as F# Dorian or key of E. There's no V chord that's found usually in a modulation, either into or out ...



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