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11

You could consider as a scale derived from the F harmonic major scale as the F harmonic major scale contains the notes: F G A Bb C Db E F You can view this scales as just a major scale with a lowered 6th and this type of scale comes up in the Lydian Chromatic Concept.


7

You are correct, the piece is in E major. If you use roman numerals to represent the chords, the progression can be written as: I - III - vi - V The reason that the III chord is major, when it should normally be minor is that it is in fact acting as the "dominant" (V chord) of the following C♯m (vi). It's almost as if you were temporarily shifting ...


7

As pointed out by Dom, it is indeed the second mode of the (F) harmonic major scale. I would just like to add that this scale is often referred to as Dorian b5. Viewing this scale as a Dorian scale with one altered note makes it easy to remember its structure and to come up with appropriate fingerings.


6

There are a few things that can drastically change how you look at this so let's first look at the definition of a scale is defined as: A scale is any set of musical notes ordered by fundamental frequency or pitch. So at heart, a scale is just a set of notes so to carry out the basic calculations, we'll talk about this in more set theory terms. ...


5

Yes you are correct, I'll just put it in simpler terms. The major scale is both diatonic and heptatonic. Heptatonic just means that there are 7 notes per octave in the scale. The diatonic scales just a name for the specific name for scales that contain a specific whole step, half step pattern TTSTTTS in some why, shape, or form. All the 7 natural ...


4

At the end of the day they are all the same scales just the application to learn them is different. Every system has it's own uses and reasons. The CAGED system gets you to focus on how the different barre chords you play and the pentatonic scales they are related to line up. The sweeping patterns is thinking of the scales in terms of the sweeping lead ...


4

All of them. Here's the simple reason why. We use different systems to name, describe, and label scales. Let's just look at the C major scale to start. The C major scale can also be referred to as the C Ionian mode when thinking in modal contexts, but there are more ways to describe the scale then just that. You can describe a scale by pattern i.e. the C ...


3

Nurture/nature. I feel that because in the Western world, most of what we listen to is major or minor, over time we've accepted this - it's become 'instinctive'. It would be different if one had listened to, say, Indian music for a long time. Then that would seem 'instinctive'. It's far more nurture than nature, if a loose definition of 'instinctive' is ...


3

I'm going to put another finger on the scale (though there may be something fishy about these ideas): 1) Nothing requires a scale to repeat within only one octave. 2) While there are theoretically notes too close to each other to be distinguished by (normal) listening, once you add the possibility of multiple notes and beat frequencies you can achieve ...


2

Well if you're only setting yourself 2 years to learn then I wouldn't bother mastering any exotic scales so I'd just stick with the following scales: major natural minor minor pentatonic major pentatonic blues For theory: learn about chord building learn about chord progressions (including cadences) and what notes sound good over a particular chord in ...


2

Why do you require abbreviation? If there's a perfectly good term for this that doesn't use an abbreviation, will it be acceptable? "Notes per octave" or "pitches per octave" seem pretty widely used, universally understood, and tuning-agnostic. As an extension of this, scales themselves can be described as n-tonic, where n is a Greek number (as in, ...


2

A fifth is the smallest non-octave consonant interval, with a frequency ratio of 3:2. If you start stacking pure fifths, the first result reasonably close to stacked octaves (2:1) is 12 fifths, which turns out to be 531441:4096 as opposed to 128:1 for 7 octaves. That's as close as you can get for a reasonable number of notes per octave. So if you are ...


2

I'm going to take a slightly different approach from Dom, defining a "different" scale differently. I'm positing that the pitch of the tonic is irrelevant to the scale's designation. For example, a "Major" scale is a single class, so Cmajor, Dmajor, etc are the same so far as the interval sequence goes. Following that rule (which you may or may not choose ...


2

As already mentioned in Dom's answer, everything you wrote is correct. I'd just like to add a few things concerning the term diatonic. As you said, one meaning of "diatonic scale" is a scale with five whole tones and two half tones where the two half tones are maximally separated, i.e. at least by two whole tones. This includes the major scale and all its ...


1

Back in the early days of Church canon, the third was a decidedly "outside" note. It occurred here and there, but it was by no means afforded the status we give it today. It didn't sound "instinctive." The only sounds/tones that are "instinctive" are the species danger sounds: those sounds that alert us that something higher than us on the food chain is ...


1

If you wish to incorporate their flavours into your playing and this is how you learned the natural modes then definitely yes. I would use the natural caged patterns you have already learned and just sharpen the one note for the harmonic minor scale - then you only have to learn where this particular note is to know the entire scale. The melodic minor I ...


1

I have a similar approach like @Dom but there is one thing I do feel very differently. If it were a major scale in F - the pattern of the 5th, 6th, 7th, 8th that has way more the taste of a minor scale wouldn't be so molesting to my western ears. In german this is also called 'harmonic major' because it resembles both - the major scale and the harmonic ...



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