Hot answers tagged

4

I think in our current times we would say that they are the same. See other answers. Really the answer is "yes, but no". We need to think historically. Where does the Ionaian mode come from? Early music? Gregorian chant? "Modal" music? The Ionian mode is an outgrowth of the Lydian mode for voice leading purposes. In F-Lydian there is a B-natural and in F-...


4

Looking at the site you linked and clicking on each fret to change the pattern, there are actually only 5 (not 9) completely different distinct patterns that repeat. Several are exactly the same notes and some show a slight variation on the same basic "pattern". Allow me to expand on some of the other answers. The basic patterns for the minor ...


4

The other answers here are basically correct: the scale notes of major and Ionian modes are the same, but major is more modern, and tends to use the I-V-I cadence pattern, while Ionian has other cadences possible- for instance, I-ii-I, as in Sumer is icumen in: http://britishlibrary.typepad.co.uk/.a/6a00d8341c464853ef017615c0b763970c-pi Trying to draw a ...


3

The diffrence is simple. When you are talking about the major scale you are talking in a tonal context and when you are talking about Ionian you are talking in a modal context. You won't hear anybody use Ionian to describe a collection of pitches unless it is being used in a modal context. I'm not going to explain all the differences as this answer, but I'll ...


2

I learned the major and minor pentatonic patterns (which are identical except for which note is the root of the scale) by first learning these five patterns: Then I learned to connect the patterns, first by playing each pattern in sequence up and down the neck and then up and down each string. Then I learned to switch between the patterns starting and ...


2

So if you look carefully at the E Major Pentatonic graph, you will notice that the scales are basically overlapping barred chord forms of E (where the nut itself is a bar for open E chord): E pattern; D pattern; C pattern; A pattern; finally G pattern; repeat. By D pattern, I mean the D chord form barred at the second fret (E major). This is, basically, ...


2

There is no difference. The term "Ionian" was invented in 1547 by a Swiss musicologist (Heinrich Glareanus) who decided for some reason that there should be 12 modes, rather than the traditional 8. The four that he added were two versions of the major scale and two versions of the melodic minor, which previously had never been called "modes" by the ...


1

First of there isn't an "official" augmented scale. What people typically call the augmented scale is actually a scale known as the Lydian Augmented scale which is a mode of the ascending melodic minor scale that starts on the third scale degree and in C looks like this: C D E F♯ G♯ A B C There are two different types of diminished scales that are ...


1

Harmony in general is a pretty broad topic and there isn't just one option for how to do harmony. In general, harmony is the simultaneous or "vertical" relation between what is being played. There is the typical Western idea of functional harmony where the Tonic-Dominant relationship (I-V) drives the progressions we encounter, but there is a lot more out ...


1

In such a functional progression it is not helpful to look at each chord in isolation, so you can't just say "I play mixolydian over each dominant seventh chord". The B7 chord is clearly the dominant in the key of E minor. The B mixolydian scale would be a reasonable choice if it resolved to E major. However, in E minor, the standard choice over B7 would be ...


1

The C major and C Ionian scales are the same scale, we have just taken to calling Ionian major. It's the same way that the c natural minor scale is the same as the C aeolian scale, we just call it by a different name. There is no difference in the scales.


1

When you are on a certain chord for a bar, then, yes, it'll work. I presume a bar of C, using C scale notes, then a bar of E (dominant of A), where you could use E scale notes, leading to a bar of A, where A scale notes will work. What you need to bear in mind is that all these keys have some common notes, but they may not be chord notes. For example,all 3 ...


1

Well, it's going to be quite dissonant, because there are going to be a lot of notes clashing. The A major scale has C# and G# whereas the chord C has C and G natural.* So, those notes are going to create a dissonance. It will sound smoothly over the E and A chords, because E is the V of A, so the notes are the same. Keep in mind that the chord progression ...


1

Scales are in essence a series of notes a certain amount of intervals / semitones from each other. You can have the semi tones in any place in the scale. You can have various amount of notes in the scale. 8 notes in the scale is common as it represents all the scale degrees. Major Scales have the semitones between the third and fourth scale degrees and the ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible