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43

You can divide up the octave however you want, but it turns out that doing what you suggest doesn't really make good sounding music, at least to our western ears. It all has to do with overtones and pleasant ratios of pitches. An interval sounds consonant to us when the ratio of the frequencies is mathematically simple. It causes the waveforms line up and ...


19

The reason is that dividing an octave into 12 notes sounds the best for a very mathematical reason! The frequency of each semi-tone is 21/12 away from its neighbours. Note C × ? Fraction Note C × ? Fraction C 1 1/1 C 2 2/1 C♯/D♭ 1.059 18/17 B 1.888 17/9 D 1.122 9/8 A♯/B♭ 1.782 ...


11

I think your question is largely about the chosen notation for the Western system, which most answers haven't really addressed. The notation we have is actually pretty natural and logical, for a simple reason: there are twelve different notes in the Western system, but only a subset of these -- seven, in fact -- are used in a given scale such as the major ...


9

Most of the answers here appear to be focusing on why we ended up with a seven note scale in western music. This is a great area of inquiry; however, it is worth noting that whatever the answer to this question, the seven note scale is a fundamentally arbitrary product of Western culture. Dissonance and harmony are culturally relative. The idea of the ...


8

What you probably mean by minor and major blues scales are the two following scales (with root C): C Eb F Gb G Bb (minor blues) C D Eb E G A (major blues) These are just the minor and major pentatonic scales with one note added. The minor pentatonic scale gets a b5 (Gb), and the major pentatonic scale gets a b3 (Eb), both to make those pentatonic scales ...


8

The answer to the question "was the diatonic scale designed to make pianos easier to play" is clearly "no", because the diatonic scale precedes the invention of the piano by some thousands of years. Remember, for the vast majority of the history of music, it was not played on keyboard instruments. It was played on wind or string instruments. If you want to ...


5

Would this fall into the boundaries of harmony? The answer is simple and it's yes. There are many kinds of harmony. The blues harmony is different than the jazz which is different than the classical etc.


5

This first part applies to all the string instruments, not just the guitar. Most people that play guitar/bass/double bass etc learn the certain shapes that each scales consist of. This has a great benefit: you can easily transpose to any other key. For instance, if you know the shape for a major scale, and you practice it in C major, you can easily go to ...


5

There is no deep reason. Western "folk music" often only used 5-note scales (approximately C D E G A in modern notation). The song "Amazing Grace" is a well known example. There have been experiments with more notes per octave - 19, 31, and 43 all work quite nicely. People have built playable keyboards for those, and other systems. There are some pictures ...


4

Each mode has a different sound. They have some specific notes that add the color in each of them. Ionian mode is like the major scale Dorian mode is like the natural minor scale, with a major sixth. Phrygian mode is like the natural minor scale, with b2. Lydian mode is like the major scale, with #4. Myxolydian mode is like the major scale, with b7. ...


3

you can rank modes in order of most sharpened to most flattened (or brightest to darkest or most major to most minor). This create a series that follows the circle of fourths. ie: Mode Name -> Difference from Major Scale F Lydian -> 4th is sharpened C Ionian -> nothing sharpened or flattened; this is the major scale G Mixolydian -> flat 7 D Dorian -> ...


3

Conveniently, guitars are set up so major scales can be played using all four fingers on four consecutive frets, to play two octaves. Minor scales can be played similarly, with only one slip down a fret on the 3rd string. All this assumes you start on the bottom string, and work up to the same fret on the top. The obvious (ubiquitous?) scales that work well ...


3

As Wheat Williams indicated, context is everything. Oscillating between E and E-flat is notationally awkward. In the absence of other compelling influences, I would notate this as D-sharp. Similarly, Oscillating between D and D-sharp is awkward; in that context I would notate as E-flat. In the context of a major or minor scale, you should notate in a ...


3

There is a scale using tones all the way - it's called a whole tone scale. Just as there's a scale using semitones - a chromatic scale. Going with your idea of extra black keys - there's no need to change the width of the white ones, a couple of extra blacks would fit in the same way as they do between the existing whites. Trouble is, the pattern is then ...


2

Three musical intervals are special: the octave, the perfect fifth, and the perfect fourth. If one plays a note and its first three harmonics, the intervals among those pitches will be an octave, a fifth, and a fourth. Scales tend to sound good if some of their notes have intervals of perfect or near-perfect fifths or fourths between them. A perfect fifth ...


2

This scale is often called double harmonic scale. In my experience (i.e., in popular music) that's the standard name for that scale. Arguably the most famous use of that scale in popular music is Dick Dale's Misirlou. And, by the way, the double harmonic scale and the Hungarian minor scale are modes of each other.


2

The scale is known as the flamenco mode or Major-Phrygian and as far as I am concerned is the most popular variant of that set of notes. Off the top of my head I don't know any songs that contain this scale, but it is used all the time in flamenco music along with Phrygian dominant. Melody wise, you would probably want to take advantage of how symmetric ...


2

The disconnect between chest and head voice that you experience is completely normal. It is called the passaggio. To minimize the difference in sound between the two vocal registers, you must gradually make them meet in the middle. Chest For your chest voice, try and raise your overall range in half-step increments. Use any of the standard effective ...


2

It depends on the specific scale you are talking about. If the note is not a member of this scale, things become difficult: one would have to decide according to the function it has in a given piece of music, whether it is a flattened or sharpened one. Without any additional information one choice is as good as the other. Your given scale seems close to ...


2

As a formula, it may be better as 1,2,b3,3,5,6.Which actually translates to the same as that of the minor blues, but displaced by a minor third - 3 semitones. (Or, starting at note 6 from the above formula and making IT note no.1, the key note). This will then work for all keys. So, in your speak, it's C-D-Eb-E-G-A.


1

A few steps. Learn the theory so you know what the notes are. This will enable you to figure out the shapes for yourself and get a good idea of what chords will go well with you solo. Learn the shapes Don't stymie creativity by only doing scales in one position. Do them in one, two and three string patterns. Start on your 1st, 2nd and even 4th left hand ...


1

As has been noted above, the guitar is a shape-based instrument. So learn the shapes first. But the shapes tend to connect across the fretboard. So after you learn the shapes, learn to connect shapes adjacent to one another by any string. Now you can play up and down the fretboard. But the strongest notes you can play in a solo are the chord tones ...


1

I agree with others here to learn shapes first. There are plenty of resources on the internet to get diagrams. You will be learning the fretboard as you go along learning shapes. The shapes as you will see connect across the fretboard. Also, you will build muscle memory in the hand and it will be easier to solo in the future.


1

imagine a guitar with lots of strings all tuned exactly a 4th apart. if we map the intervals of a major scale onto a portion of this imaginary guitar we get something like this - where the numbers represent degrees of an (unspecified) major scale. ----------------------- | | | | | 7 3 6 2 5 1 4 ----------------------- 7 3 6 2 5 1 4 | | | | | ...


1

For me: I started with the good old pentatonic & got used to playing that, then quickly added notes 2 & 6 into my memorised "shape" on the fretboard to turn it into a fulsome minor scale. Move the same fret pattern down 3 frets and it struck me that this is the same set of notes as a major scale in the original key. OR you can just sharpen the ...


1

I'm a composition student at UCLA who is in the process of writing his dissertation, which on one level, has a lot to do with modes - so it's on my mind a lot these days (which led me to this site). Here are my thoughts: Robert Fink's answer (above) is an excellent answer. This is the type of answer you would get from someone who has studied music for a ...


1

Certainly Eb is more 'common' than D#. Eb comes as the second changed flat, whereas D# is the 4th. It depends a lot on the key the piece is in. If it's a sharp key, then that note usually gets called D#. If it's a flat key, it's Eb. However, it also depends on what note it changed from. Say a tune is in A major, and it modulates into E for a bar or few, ...


1

I'm not going to answer your first or last question because I believe they are answered in the question you linked. By this logic, I'm assuming that if if I pluck the next 'A', (ie: fifth string, 12th fret), the frequency of the sound generated would be 220Hz. Does this make sense? Yes, this is correct. To get from one A to the next A up, you ...


1

"Now, a piano teacher told me that in some blues the IV chord could be played in the second bar. What kind of blues would that be?" I'm not sure whether it's local terminology but among the jam sessions I frequent, this is called a fast-change blues. You play the IV chord in the second bar then return to I, then go to Iv again after a total of 4 bars as ...


1

The strongest motivation for the ABCDEFGA scale is the SYSTEM of CHORDS which make a major key. For the key of C-Major, the basic chord of C gives us the notes C-E-G-C. Its related chords are F-major, consisting of F-A-C, and G-major, consisting of G-B-D. Putting it all together gives the notes C-D-E-F-G-A-B-C, which are all the white notes on the piano. ...



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