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12

No. A key* is not just a set of notes, it tells you the tonal center** of a piece and the expected harmony and melody of the piece. If that was the case we wouldn't even distinguish between major and minor as they have the same set of notes as do all 7 modes of the diatonic scale. How you use your harmony and melody will define the key and tonal center by ...


4

To establish a modal final (which is what we call a mode's melodic keynote) as a tonic, you've really got three things that you will use: a hierarchy of root relationships within the mode that confirms the tonic; conjunct melodic motion, notably by semitone, that pushes into the tonic; and the stability of the most important harmonies within the mode. ...


4

This is impossible to answer, up-transpose is as legitimate as down-transpose. It completely depends on the purpose of the transposition. For a singer the adjustment may be necessary to match his or her vocal range. It then depends, whether the high notes were the problematic ones or the low ones. The only simple cases are adjusting a given score for a ...


4

No. My college music theory professor always explained it this way: Key only means tonal center. If you say it's in the key of C, then you have to specify whether the mode is C major, C minor, or some other mode. He would insist that there is no such thing as the "key of C major". The correct way to say that is this: the key is C, and the mode is major. So ...


3

It's just 3 octaves of the chromatic scale. Based on what you say it sounds like it is not the scale, but the range given to compose in. The game is just giving you the range from C1 to B3 to play with to create / make music.


3

The stability of a scale or a mode is directly related to the stability of its tonic chord. Locrian is considered unstable because it contains an unstable tonic chord with a flat 5 (m7b5) instead of a perfect fifth. This chord wants to move one, it does not sound resolved. A m7b5 chord is usually perceived as a II chord in minor, not as a I (tonic) chord. ...


2

To me, "mode" is just a word we use instead of "scale" for certain scales. From that point of view, you might as well be asking me if "A minor actually belongs to the key of C major". To me a key is both a scale and a tonal center. A different tonal center means a different key. When you start a piece in A minor and modulate up to C major, you are now ...


1

In regards to any person, be it author or any other, pertaining to the exact history or meaning behind the modes is technically and historically impossible. This is due to the fact the original modes developed by the ancient Greeks goes as far back as 300 or 400 B.C.!!! or the Hellenistic period. Greece was then subsequently through the proceeding ages ...


1

Key signature and note collection notwithstanding, a musical composition that is written in F Lydian is NOT a mode of the key of C major - even though the key signature would be the same as for C major and all of the notes in F Lydian are also in C major. In fact, the so called “key signature” does not always tell you what key a musical work is written ...


1

F lydian has the same key signature as C major (in other words it has the same notes, the same number of sharps and flats, in this case zero.) It also has the same key signature as A minor. However all three are different keys, because they have different tonal centres. A key is named after the note it tends to gravitate to. A passage in A minor clearly ...


1

Are you planning on strumming your cello? If not, i.e. you want to learn the bowed playing patterns, I can assure you there are a number of patterns, depending on the actual progression of notes and the tone/timbre desired. The simplest scales go: open, 1,2or3,4, then open on the next string, etc. Obviously once you get above certain pitches, you ...


1

You are just using the dominat chord of E minor which is the relative minor or V/vi if you were looking at it in Roman numeral analysis. When improvising you would most likely use a variant of the E harmonic minor scale. One you could use is B Phygian Dominant which is the 5th mode of the harmonic minor scale. These scales are very related to the G major ...


1

I don't really understand the connection between the chart picture and the sound file, but the sequence... C, C#, D, D#, E, F, F#, G, G#, A, A#, B ... is the chromatic scale. The numbers next to the letters look to me to be "scientific pitch notation" https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scientific_pitch_notation


1

The key is not only the the harmony as Matt suggests, but also the melody and what notes sound at rest and what notes don't . To demonstrate this, play any Locrian scale. How it will sound is unfinished as in the ascending scale you will want to go up another half step and decending you will want to go back up a half step. You melody will never sound at rest ...



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