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20

One option if you're primarily interested in representing the individual digits of pi is to use a representation in a base other than 10. For example pi base 12 would have an individual digital for each chromatic note. Here's a website that might help get you started: http://www.virtuescience.com/pi-in-other-bases.html


12

The number 10 doesn't necessarily map well to values in traditional musical theory. (For instance, there are 12 chromatic pitches per octave, using conventional divisions of the octave; diatonic scales have seven pitches; note durations are related as powers or negative powers of 2). So, for this reason, the world is your oyster! I guess you can choose any ...


11

He is referring to the harmonic minor scale. Each minor scale has three variations: The Natural Minor - the exact notes of the relative major: C Major: CDEFGABC A Minor: ABCDEFGA The Harmonic Minor - Used for harmony in Western Classical, as it better implies a resolution from the V - I, since it involves the leading tone, which has a ...


6

The most correct notation for a C7 chord would be C E G Bb and not C E G A#. Note that both Bb and A# are practically the same, but A is the 6th of C whereas B is the 7th of C. Those notes that sound the same but are written different are called Enharmonic notes. So, if you had a chord with these notes: C E A#, then that would be a C augmented sixth chord, ...


5

The scale you mentioned appears to be a double harmonic with a flat 3rd added. This flat 3rd, in combination with the flat 2nd of the double harmonic, can give it a kind of phrygian mode feel, but then there's the leading tone too, so it's not completely phrygian mode. Ely was right in that octatonic scales contain 8 notes. However, not all octatonic ...


4

In common-practice music the seventh scale degree is usually raised, but not always. It's raised when it's part of a V or viio chord, and often during rising melodic lines. It is usually back to its natural minor state however in III chords and i7 chords and generally during descending melodic lines. The sixth degree also sometimes get raised in minor. In ...


4

One Idea I haven't seen mentioned is rhythm. Perhaps you can use some of the spare digits as a change in pace (f.e. switch from eights to quavers). Or you could map the spare digits to pre-conceived rhythmic motives. Another idea would be to use the digits that are not mapped to a note to switch instrument. HTH.


4

Pi can also be expressed through various infinite series. I like François Viète series discovered in 1593: Square root from 2 is half octave distance. Maybe it is possible to represent the series as some sequence of sounds? Or maybe some other series would fit better? This might reproduce the spirit of Pi even better than replaying its decimal ...


3

Why use base 10? You have to make some compromise somewhere, and since π is already transcendental, there is no rational radix that will accurately represent π. If you use heptary, π ≈ 3.0663651432036134110263402244652226643520650240155443215426431025161154565220002622436103301443233631. These digits map perfectly to the seven pitches in an octave. Using ...


3

One of the main reasons that a whole-tone scale works so well to indicate dreaming and rootlessness is that it's a symmetrical structure that divides the octave into equal parts. Multiple notes can therefore work equally well as a "tonic" which kind of means that they're also equally bad at being tonic. A symmetrical structure makes it much easier to avoid ...


3

There are already a lot of answers pertaining to this question on this site. However, briefly, the harmonic minor uses the notes from its relative major, with one change. In A minor, for example, the notes of C major are used, with a change of G going to G#. This is because the leading note sounds like it's leading better from one semitone below the tonic. ...


3

Seems to be in G minor, with the slightly odd sounding 4th fret 4th string note being the leading note (F#), part of a D chord, the V of Gm. The reason you thought D was that the first note is indeed a D. There are many pieces of music that do not use the key note to start. Most will use it to finish.As this actually does ! So the key's G minor, but that ...


3

tl;dr: This is gonna be a lengthy one :-) My suggestion My suggestion would be to start with the pentatonic aeolean (minor) pattern over the whole fretboard - the most natural one on the guitar would be the A minor scale or E minor also aligns pretty nice with the tuning and the markers. My approach is to get used to the basic fret positions and then ...


3

Those aren't the same song. Brahms (to take your example) composed entire sets of "Hungarian Dances," simply labeled Hungarian Dance #1, #2, etc. Often these are referred to by the key they are in: thus everyone knows which particular Hungarian Dance you mean when you say Hungarian Dance in F#m. (It's #5, I believe.)


2

Is there a funk scale, akin to the blues scale? If you use the blues scale, you won't be going too far wrong. The defining feature of funk is its rhythms. If you're looking for a specific tonal feature of funk, try this guitar tab, a simplified version of the riff which forms the vast majority of the song Another Brick in the Wall Part 2 (We ...


2

An option which no one has really mentioned is to use those extra digits for special purposes (ie Change tempo, another instrument). If the primary instrument is a piano, I'd imagine that simply assigning a digit to the snare, bass and cymbal would add a lot of flair to your final music. In fact, adding new instruments will open you up to a bunch of new ...


2

The style of the impressionist can be very dreamy. Listen to Le Plus Que Lent by Debussy, or perhaps Ondine. A number of his preludes create this dreamy ambiance too. As far as Ravel goes, La Valse does a good job of presenting a foggy, distorted version of the main theme. If I were to summarize these techniques briefly, parallelism and extended tertian ...


2

The notes from the Lydian dominant, containing a b7 and a #4 (#11) work over the dominant chords, as in 7th, 9th and 13ths. As with any scale with a #4 - plain Lydian is an example - that actual note gives a dissonance to the phrase it's used in, therefore needs to be used with care. This gives a feeling of tension, sometimes almost signalling a modulation ...


2

If you want to make a nice piece of music (which I presume you do, simply encoding pi would seem a bit wasteful), I'd avoid trying to generate the music mechanically, and instead use pieces of pi as inspiration. For instance: Writing it in 22/7 (an approximation of pi) Using the first 5 or so digits as a motif in some way, and using the others not as ...


1

Other answers have suggested using different bases. For an event in the Physics department, I did play pi in quintal, and there is a video. The sheet was generated using a script and Lilypond. Bonus: also in octal, but this one is not annotated.


1

The octatonic scale contains 8 different notes. It follows an alternating whole/half step pattern. So: C, Db, Eb, Fb, Gb, Abb, Bbb, Cbb C I think.


1

But the C7 (or any 7 chord) is based off of the major scale. It's the V degree of the major scale. So for C major, the V is G7. This is because the V is the only degree that has a major 3rd but a minor 7th. The 7 chord is also known as a dominant chord (so the V degree is known as the dominant of the scale). Based on the phrasing of your question ("the 7th ...


1

From a musical standpoint, learning the 5 pentatonic patterns will yield the most benefit for rock/blues music since the notes in those scales sound good over any chord in that key. They are simple, fun to play, and very versatile, as they can sound cool played both slow and fast. They are the foundation of many, if not most, famous rock solos. From a ...


1

Your best return on investment will come from learning the pentatonic scales (one scale, 2 different starting points/focus (tonal centre)). Plus, the so-called blues scale and major and minor scales and mode are kind of supersets of them, so you'll capitalize on that as well. So know what these look like, know what they sound like, and above all enjoy it. ...



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