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8

Theoretically, yes there are five modes that can be derived from the major pentatonic scale and they would be named the same way the other modes contained in the major scale. Let's look at the relative modes instead of parallel as it is slightly easier to see the patter. The C major pentatonic scale consists of the following notes: C, D, E, G, A ...


7

Knowing what modes/scales to use over a chord can be approached a number of ways. Here's an over simplified way to know what scale you can use over a certain chord (DISCLAIMER: THIS IS OVERSIMPLIFIED): Is it Major? (R 3 5 7) Is the fourth sharped? (Yes - you might try Lydian) Otherwise, use Ionian or all of the above Is it Minor? (R b3 5 b7) Is the ...


5

Dom's answer correctly explains what the modes of the pentatonic scale are and how they are (not) used. Since this might give the impression that the pentatonic scale is almost exclusively useful if used as either major or minor pentatonic scale, I would like to add one important application of the pentatonic scale where it is used over a chord whose tonic ...


3

A sample question that you may get at an Music Theory entrance exam could be something like this: Write the A♭ minor scale ascending and descending with key signature. Mark all semitones with a slur and use only semibreves. As a note to the OP, you can buy this book if you are interested in learning scales at a collegiate level. ...


2

Apart from being able to play at least two octaves of a certain scale on your instrument, you are usually also supposed to be able to recognize a scale when you hear it. The required scales would usually be major, minor (natural, harmonic, melodic) and the modes (dorian, phrygian, etc.). One good way of practicing both is to start playing the root on your ...


2

The professor that is teaching me double bass and studied jazz in a conservatory in Berlin, told me that in the entrance exams of the Uni, you have to play a scale two octaves. If I'm not mistaken, the 'scale' could be any of the basics ones, major or minor (natural/harmonic/melodic); they most likely wouldn't ask about scales like the whole-tone or ...


2

First of all, it's not changing key, it's just using chords not strictly in the key. You're allowed to deviate from the 7 notes that are strictly in key, only extremely boring music doesn't. Second, your chords are a little off. The first one is B minor, not D major. The second is A minor, not C major. It's a little noisy so it's hard to hear, but ...


2

Ah, yes! This tip from Joe is one of my all time favorite things to meditate on. I especially like to pick voicings from the Joe Pass chord book, and apply this concept to them. I think that the main idea here is associating different sounds with chord voicings, and developing your ear to hear different harmonic possibilities over chords. Also, developing ...


2

Some music stays in a key. It really only uses the 7 notes diatonic to that key. Some music stays in a key for a while, but then modulates to another key. Then it might modulate to another one (that would be literally multiple key changes). Some music has a clear root note (tonic), but uses notes and chords outside of a seven-note scale built on the tonic ...


1

You asked: A major scale is made up of 8 notes right? Really it's just seven notes, unless you add the repeat of the tonic (first pitch) at the end, at an octave higher. And its obvious to me playing sharps/flats over a song in the key of C major doesn't sound very pleasant. You'll soon learn that playing outside of the key can sound quite ...


1

Here is a link to Jamey Aebersold Jazz http://www.jazzbooks.com/ There is a great pdf that has a book relating to what you may need. http://www.jazzbooks.com/mm5/download/FQBK-handbook.pdf


1

In my opinion, finding a scale fitting in a chord is a nice solution for jazz improvisation. Any scale or modes which does not conflict with the chord is a good option, even if you can not name the scale. The scale you see in the video he used for A7#5b9 is an A Altered scale (thanks to Matt). The concept of this video is, improvise a scale starts from the ...



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