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Structurally ragtime harmony is pretty much classical tonal harmony, but there are of course some idiomatic specificities that give ragtime its characteristic sound. One progression very characteristic of ragtime is the so called... ragtime progression (although it was used before, even in classical music, it was mostly popularized in ragtime). It's made ...


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I'm going to tell you what I observe in very layman's terms without music theory terms. Let's for simplicity we're in the key of C. A lot of them have this progression: (F F#° or Ab7 /) C/G A7 D7 G7 C especially towards the end of a section. A possible "verse" (very common) is C / / / | / / / / | F / / / | C / / / C / G/B / | Am / Am7/G / | D7 / / / | G ...


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C# major's relative minor key is A# Minor. These two keys both contain the same notes but a different tonic (in this case the tonic being C# and A#, accordingly) C♯(i) D♯ E♯ F♯(iv) G♯(v) A♯ B♯ A♯(i) B♯ C♯ D♯(iv) E♯(v) F♯ G♯ This doesn't really have any bearing on how you write a song in a major key, but it does help us to understand the relationship ...


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Something that's related to your question is the mode theory. Here's a nice article on that! It boils down to: > If you play your scale (e.g. C major [C D E F G A B]) on a set of chords with a tonal centre of C major, and you focus on the relative position of the notes towards the C in the scale, it will sound happy (Ionian) > If you play your scale ...


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As suspected by alephzero, the word "tono" (in Spanish) or "tom" (in Portuguese) refers in this context to the "church modes", i.e. the Gregorian modes of the plainchant tradition. In The Evolution of Organ Music in the 17th Century: A Study of European Styles, John R. Shannon describes Musical Flowers for keyboard instrument and harp, the chef d'ouvre of ...


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A major scale is a diatonic scale. The sequence of intervals between the notes of a major scale is: whole, whole, half, whole, whole, whole, half.where "whole" stands for a whole tone (a red u-shaped curve in the figure), and "half" stands for a semitone (a red broken line in the figure). A major scale may be seen as two identical tetrachords separated by a ...



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