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15

Your teacher is referring to the Doctrine of Ethos which was for the Greeks, a belief that listening to a certain type of music influenced your mood or character as a person. Throughout the centuries, this belief has taken various forms - from the key of Eb used in marches for nobility, D major being joyous, C minor being introspective, D minor being "the ...


14

The technical term for the scale seems to be the Minor "Gypsy" Scale and it is also known as the Flamenco Mode. The basic idea is it is a combination of two Phrygian Dominant tetrachords, or a Phrygian Dominant with a Major 7th scale degree. Here are the links that show both scales match the pattern above and includes the root scale of it the Phrygian ...


13

Music has nearly infinite potential for subtlety, and yes, drums might seem more simple on the surface, but after a few years in music school you'll be tuning drum heads every time you sit down at a snare drum, have a mallet collection that weighs 30 pounds, and enjoy discussing the relative merits of different origin rosewood on your marimba. Most people ...


13

There are big differences between those two scales. The C major scale consists of the following notes: C D E F G A B The C minor scale consists of the following notes: C D Eb F G Ab Bb 3 of the 7 notes of the scale are different so it is not a small difference. It sounds to me like you need to take ear training classes. Ear training can make you ...


12

It is so called because B♭ is the 7th note of the C dominant scale (also known as the Mixolydian scale). The 5th is known as the dominant, because it is the "most important" interval (among other things, it's the first harmonic other than the octave). However, try to forget the "English" meaning of the word "dominant" -- otherwise you might expect C to be ...


12

Your fallacy here is in thinking that "people with much less talent than myself are considered stronger musicians just because they know the "right" fingerings?" Listen more closely to what you have actually been told: "they say that the fingerings are an absolute must." Unless you've left something out, they never actually said you are a worse musician for ...


10

What you are asking about doesn't really have to do with modes or accidentals. Essentially what you are talking about is the difference between modern equal temperament on the one hand, and just intonation on the other. Up until the late 1800s, musical instruments could play the traditional Greek modes and scales based on pure intervals, but a given ...


10

I am really not knowledgable in ancient music theory so the following might be riddled with errors, but here is what I've gathered. What are the original Greek modes? Ancient Greek music scale theory was built upon the concept of the "tetrachord" - literally meaning four strings. A tetrachord consists of a group of four notes with three smaller intervals ...


10

When you play a C Major scale and have emphasis on a note other than C, such as D, then it is D Dorian. The player implies that the D note is the root using the notes of the C Major scale. Another thing is the harmony behind the scale. What chords are being used? That would direct your ear in hearing where the root is. If I play Dmin7 chord and use the C ...


9

By staying in the scale of C maj., most notes will work over most chords made from the diatonic C scale.Even an F note over a C chord can be made to sound fine,so yes, stick with C scale notes. Some may sound inappropriate, depending where in the bar they appear. However, taking the second idea, think about, for example, F scale notes - only the Bb is ...


9

The chord progressions you want will depend on the sound you're after. You can do quite a lot of creating songwriting without ever straying from the basic "in-key" chords: I-ii-iii-IV-V-vi-[vii], and if the Top 40 charts are any indication, you can make a pantload of money with very "safe" chord progressions. However, if you don't want to be safe, and want ...


9

The minor scale is not called the "minor scale" because it is the most minor. Names don't have to accurately reflect the definition. Modes are sometimes classified as "minor" or "major" depending on their third (a minor third usually comes with other minor degrees like the flat 7th which is common to all minor modes of the major scale). And of all the minor ...


8

You should focus on chord tones and half-step resolutions. Let's assume the key of C. The 7th chords in this key: Cmaj7: C E G B Dmin7: D F A C Emin7: E G B D Fmaj7: F A C E G7: G B D F Amin7: A C E G Bmin7b5: B D F A Let's use a classic jazz example, the iimin7 | V7 | Imaj7. In C, this would be Dmin7 | G7 | Cmaj7. To ...


8

G Mixolydian is a modal scale, more specifically the 5th mode of the major (Ionian) scale. We can't very well call it a "C" scale because (a) G is the tonic, not C and (b) assuming you meant C (Major), it does not have the same interval pattern as a major scale due to the lowered 7th. As far as its purpose, it can serve many. After all, it's an ordered set ...


8

I'll give this a shot. Some elements contributing to a Medieval sound are Minor-key, modal melody (I think it is Dorian) Melody is catchy and song-like and follows a resolution pattern that resembles old drinking songs or sailor songs. The 6/8 rhythm also contributes to a drinking-song feel. Harmonic voice-leading features prominent parallel motion ...


8

I think you've got a good list already, but I'd quibble with the in order part. I'd recommend splitting up your practice time to work on each of these fronts every day. So for a 1-hour practice, you might do Practice yesterday's scale a few times, pick a new scale and practice it. ~ 10 min. Put on your new favorite pop song and try to transcribe the chord ...


7

E minor is the relative minor of G, just as Am is the relative minor of C. One of the ways these chords are related, is that they share 2/3 of their notes - E-G-B vs G-B-D. The chord shift from a major to its relative minor is a very common one indeed. We can only speculate as to what deeper meaning the lyricist intended (if any).


7

All minor scales have a half step between the 2nd and the 3rd of that scale/key - that is the pattern and what you feel/hear as "minor" when you play a 3 note simple chord with the root/third/fifth. So the third is always lowered in comparison to the major scale. The "model" or "first example" for the minor natural scale is A minor, and it's easy to ...


7

The natural minor is also often called the Aolean mode, dating back to when modal music was the main way of writing. There's a whole history to it but there used to be 6 main modes that were used, and the 2 that survived most into modern times were the Ionian mode and the Aolean mode. Natural Minor Taking a major scale, the relative natural minor scale ...


7

Ok, so if you're looking to take a song on guitar and work out the key the easiest way is to look at the chords being played, and work out the key they all relate to. If the song goes like this: C, F, G, C We can see the that these are the I, IV and V chords of C Major I, IV, V, I Or a different example: Dm, G7, C Is also C Major, with ii, V, I being ...


7

Your formula of half- and whole-steps is correct, but the spelling is not. Different ways of spelling the same pitch are called Enharmonics. You already know that all of the "black key" notes on the piano have more than one name, but you can also alter notes further than a semitone, or make an alteration to two "white keys" that are next to one another. ...


7

Maqam Suzidil (not a very Western name, but if you try to understand Turkish music, this might get you somewhere) says this and some other sites. Looks like they (Arabic, Persian, Turkish) have an interesting way of classifying the scales by decomposing them into (usually) tetrachords which all have their own "personality". I didn't explore this much but ...


7

For me it depends whether I'm on guitar or piano. On piano, I will base everything on the major scale of that key. So to play in C Aeolian, I would start with C major, then say "I'll need to flatten the third (E -> Eb), the 6th (A -> Ab) and the 7th (B -> Bb)" On guitar, that method doesn't work for me. On a guitar, I use the shape corresponding to the ...


7

I would recommend that first of all, you define 'happy', because it means many different things to different people. Here's an exercise I'd use to find out what to do in your own music Find examples of the mood you're trying to set. Write down as much as you can about the tempo, the instrumentation, possibly the scales and types of chords used(from sheet ...


7

Nope! It's not necessarily a mismatch. The major or minor quality of the key a song is in is only one of many, many qualities that determine its emotion. It gets to the point that a major song can be very sad, and a minor song can be very happy, depending on the context. For concrete examples, "Last Train Home" by the Pat Metheny group (listen on Spotify) ...


6

Basically, modes come from a major scale, also known as the Ionian mode. This is your TTSTTTS spacing, note by note, as in Cmaj: CDEFGABC.Starting on the 2nd note, and rising to an octave above it, you get the Dorian mode.The next starts on the 3rd note, E in this scenario.It's the Phrygian mode. The 4th degree start gives the Lydian, the 5th ...


6

Yes, they're using all the same notes, but not necessarily in the right order... C maj. will be CENTRED around C, D Dorian will be CENTRED around D, E Phrygian will be... you get the picture. The home (CENTRED) note will be the mode letter. The chords may well be the same, but their function will be different, i.e. in C maj., the G will be the dominant ...


6

Scales are built on interval formulas. Diatonic scales (no added sharps or flats other than what is in the key signature) use only half steps and whole steps. With a diatonic scale you can follow the same interval pattern for major scales and one for minor scales. These patterns (as seen in the links) are Whole Whole Half Whole Whole Whole Half which is ...


6

Ooooooh there are so many hundreds of tricks and tips that you can use. I'd refer you to my blog, but for now let me give 3 simple ideas that I love to utilise, and go to regularly. These apply to melody-writing and to writing music in general. Make the music reflect the intended message Using text or words, simply write the melody to imitate the natural ...


6

Is it not enough to practice scales alone? If you just want to learn the solos of other players, you don't need any theory, and you don't need to learn any chords. I'm just answering because everyone else it saying that you do. It's not true, a lot of people want to learn guitar because they like the lead guitar parts they hear their favorite artists play. ...



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