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Do notes from non-natural minor scales fit well in the associated major key? They can, depending on context. I wondered if this means that F# and G# would be the "least controversial" notes to add when playing in C major since they come from variants of the associated minor key? i.e. they'd fit quite nicely without sounding too dissonant? ...


1

Yes it fits well. It is basically the same scale that starts on different notes with the exception of the leading tone of the Harmonic minor which is raised by a semi tone and in the case of the Melodic minor both the Sub Mediant and the Leading Tone is raised when going up and also then lowered when going down (Natural Minor).


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In a-minor: G# is coming from the dominant of a-minor (E-G#-B). F# is coming from the subdominant of a-minor (D-F#-A). Generally, the scale is fitted to the harmonic progression in accordance with where the scale moves. Because of the dominant chord used when progressing from G to A, G is augmented to G# in the ascending scale of a melodic minor ...


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This is going into modal territory. There are also 'minor' scales in some of the modes. Obviously the Aeolian, as mentioned, but Dorian and Phrygian also sport that important minor third from the root. The F# mentioned will appear in the C Lydian mode, although it's perceived as a major mode.That F# can also be thought of as a b5 as in blues. Actually, any ...


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I would suggest Irving Berlin's "Blue Skies" as an example of a cheerful song in a minor key. However, it can also be viewed as an extended musical pun on the term "blue" as used in the linguistic phrase that is the title, an indicator of happy circumstances, contrasted with the term as a style of music. A masterful piece, it served as inspiration for Monk's ...


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It is more like a preferred usage and style than being a rule. You can find cheerful songs in minor and dramatic songs in major especially in Baroque and some classical music derived from folk music. Lots of style elements and personal preferencese like harmonic progression, melody structure, use of intervals (especially minor 2nds and pentatonic modes ...


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Learn how to reharmonize the tune, or passages in the tune, with passing chords, secondary dominants, cadences, etc. Then identify tones in each new chord which you use as target tones in your solos. For each passage in your song, identify the tonic chord. Then learn how to use a solo to establish this chord as the harmony of resolution: approaching it and ...


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Everyone's given some great advice, but here's the thing about solos; they're melodies, and melodies are constructed in a certain way. It's possible to figure out that certain way just by playing, but I found it far more useful to actually understand the principles of melody construction ahead of time. Once I did, my solos improved by leaps and bounds. ...


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One-Finger Soloing It's a very simple technique but I came across this recently. You literally choose one finger on your fretting hand - index most likely - and are only allowed to use this finger. The idea is it breaks your ingrained muscle memory of playing scale patterns. And also, following the scale is now no easier in terms of finger movement than ...


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You have probably got more advice than you can use, so I will be brief. I am coming to the conclusion that no matter what type, style or period, the introduction of half-step, non-scale intervals in melodies makes a difference in the interest that music generates in the listener. The appoggiatura is just one kind of half-step ornamentation, and it has its ...


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Just a brief meta-theoretical note: Rockin' Cowboy's answer above recapitulates a whole line of 19th-ct attempts to derive the basic functions of tonal music from the major triad (which at least one theorist called the "Chord of Nature" because of the way it follows the overtone series). In order to do that, they constructed a dualist system: that is, for ...


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The first thing to note is that to specify a key, you need both a root note and a formula. A root note on its own is not sufficient. A minor and C major contain the same notes, so we can say they are different modes of the same scale. Another way of saying this is that A minor is the relative minor of C major, and C major is the relative major of A minor. ...


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Because in a major key: the tonic must not contain the scale's fourth (iv) tone the subdominant must contain the scale's fourth tone but not the seventh the dominant must contain at least the scale's seventh or both the seventh and fourth


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Dom's answer is of course correct, but I think there's a misunderstanding as to what is meant by 'pattern'. In Dom's answer, he refers to the interval structure of a scale as 'pattern'. In this sense he is of course right that the patterns of major and minor pentatonic scales are different. However, I believe that Chris refers to patterns on the neck of the ...


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There's two things going on that you need to understand. The pattern for the major and minor scales are different. If you were to play a C major pentatonic scale you would play the notes C, D, E, G, A. If you were playing the C minor pentatonic you would play the notes C, Eb, F, G, Bb. Both are shown below: There are major and minor pentatonic ...


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To answer my own question after edification from the community, the theory behind why the notes of a chord blend well together and the theory behind which chords in a major key are the major chords that work for that key are basically two different theories. A major chord is comprised of a root, a major 3rd (4 semitones or two whole steps above root) and ...


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You said that it's the relationship between the three notes that makes it sound good. So why do you think picking out those notes individually and basing new chords on them is the way to do it? You lose the relationships that the original chord had. In the key of C Major, the I chord is the C Major chord (C-E-G). The iii chord in C Major is E minor ...


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Lets say you are talking about C major: You say the E (third chord in the scale) and G (fifth chord in the scale) should be major chords. The problem with that lies in the major chord itself. By definition the major chord is a major third (equivalent to two whole steps distance) followed by a minor chord (a distance of a whole step plus a half step). This ...


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The thing is simply, that the structure of major chords and the harmonic pattern I IV V do not depend on the same laws of tonality. A major chord is built with the overtones 4, 5 and 6, and this comes out to be a structure depending on thirds. Meaning in overtone scale the overtones 4, 5 and 6 build up the major chord of the base tone. The harmonic ...


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There are a few misconceptions you have. Let's take a look at your first statement in your question: A major triad (chord) is formed by using the 1 and 3 and 5 notes of the scale in whatever key you are in. This is not true because if you were in a minor key, the 1st, 3rd, and 5th note of the scale would make a minor triad. 1, 3, and 5 are just scale ...


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As others have pointed out, the "1, 3, 5" of a chord are relative to the root of the chord, not the key. It's important to realize that any note in the key (or even outside of it, but let's ignore that) can be the root of a chord. What these numbers mean, is that once you've picked some note of the scale as a root for your chord, you create the rest of the ...


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No. The definition of a major triad in canonical form (in practice it can be spaced out in terms of octaves, inverted and its members doubled, obviously, hence "canonical") is not 1-3-5 in terms of major scale degrees; it is 4 semitones (a major third) and 7 semitones (a perfect fifth) from a given root, any given root. In a major scale, it happens that ...


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Actually, a major chord is formed by using a root, a major third and a perfect fifth. Doesn't necessarily have to be the 1,3 and 5 of the scale. Let's take the C major scale and see for which root notes we have the major third and the perfect fifth: C; the third is E (major third), the fifth is G (perfect) -> Major Chord (I) D; the third is F (minor) E; ...


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Simply consider open strings as the fret 0. And raising a semitone is playing a fret up. 1 2 ... semitones up |----|---| E||-F-|-F#|-G-|-G#|--- e (1st) -||---|---|---|---|--- B (2nd) | -||---|---|---|---|--- G (3rd) | -||---|---|---|---|--- D (4th) |- Strings -||---|---|---|---|--- A (5th) | -||---|---|---|---|--- E (6th) 0 1 2 3 4 ...


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Each and every fret on a guitar represents one semitone. Thus to move from a C, 1st fret, 2nd string, go up to 2nd fret for C#, and 3rd fret for D (+one tone - or two semitones). When the string is, say, an open E, then moving up one semitone by fretting fret 1, it plays F, and another fret up (fret 2) plays F#. Semitones are generally thought of as the ...


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All a piece being in C major tells you is: The home note (tonic) of a piece of music What harmony and set of notes to expect A piece being in C major does not tell you: The time signature The form of a piece The length of a piece The melody itself The overall feel The instrumentation of a piece The overall harmony of a piece (chord progression) The ...


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How can one draw different paintings when the human eye can distinguish just three primary colors? How can one do a unique etching when using only black and white? How can one write original poetry when there are just 26 letters in the alphabet? Frankly, I have a bit of a problem understanding your problem under the premise that you actually have ever ...


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Even if you are just using the tones from one scale, there is no limitation in which order the tones in the scale are used. Even if a piece is in C major, often other tones are brought in, further opening up the possibilities. If you keep the rhythm the same, limit your composition to four tones, keep within one octave and the tones in the C major scale, ...


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This is strictly in C-Major Ionian mode CDEFGABC. If we were using another mode like Dorian (DEFGABCD) would we still use the same chords, or would we have to reformulate our triads based on the 'new' scale? Well, both things are true. If you change to another mode for the very scale (D dorian in your example), you don't need to reformulate ...


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Yeah, most of the basic chords will be the same, but how you use them will differ. Most of the minor-like modes will need some help with leading tones, that is, melodic semitones into the final (the tonic note of the mode), which will add altered chords. Also, you will probably tend to avoid certain progressions so as to keep the tonic from being ...


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The different modes derived from any particular scale will contain the same notes. This means that while staying in the key, you will have the same chords available to you. The main difference between being in one mode vs. another is what we treat as tonic, or home base as I like to refer to it for those that don't know the term tonic. This means that the ...


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The chords available to you in a given key are the same no matter what mode you choose. This is because you're still constructing the chords from the same set of 7 notes. For example, in C major, you have CDEFGAB, and no sharps or flats. That means that (ignoring "fancier" chords"), the chord on C is CEG = C major, the chord on D is DFA = D minor, and so ...


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Bb minor in my experience is as minor as C minor is and F minor is the saddest key of all with only forte, and octave changing the feeling. If I were to attribute different keys to different parts of life I would have it like this: C major, F major, G major: everyday things like going to work or school D minor: Mild sadness in someone G minor: someone ...


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The most standard convention I know of is to change the vowel to "i" for sharping and "e" for flatting. The exception is when flatting "re", in which case you go to "ra".


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Yes, it's the 5th mode of melodic minor, and it's usually called Mixolydian b6 or Mixolydian b13. Other names for this scale, in my opinion slightly less fortunate, are Aeolian Dominant or Hindu scale. You can find even a few more obscure names for it in the article linked above. However, in a jazz context I've only come across the name Mixolydian b6 (or ...


5

I'm hearing two questions: 1) What notes are safe for me to play? 2) What notes are important? While overlapping, these are different questions that will each have a large impact on your solo. The first is easier to answer, but understanding the second will make you a better musician. tl; dr Try them all, but only repeat the notes you like. 1) Safety ...


2

When you wrote C#, by convention, you wrote C# major. And so in C#, the B and A chords are altered. The B and A chords do fit diatonically in C# minor. So you do have some interesting things you can do with this. It might help not to think so much of scales, but rather, neighbor notes and the possibilities you now have. This is especially true for the A ...


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In general you don't need to use the same scale over every chord. This case is a very interesting, but common one in modern music and can be seen in a few songs including Unchanined by Van Halen. If we slightly modify one of the chords, the key becomes apparent. If you change the C# to a C#m it is easy to see the chords C#m, B, and A are in C# minor. Thus ...


0

Any answer that supports the assertion on which this question is based, but which does not explicitly reference a particular instrument or clef is not entirely correct in that regard. There is no really 'central' note in Western music theory (even before atonalism). The popular clefs and the white keys on a 12-EDO keyboard completely facilitate the major ...


0

The mathematical symmetries in our scales, which have D as the symmetry axis, aren't reflected in music because upward and downward intervals do not have symmetrical acoustic functions. If you bang a low C on the piano with the pedal down, you will likely hear the first few notes of the harmonic series, especially C's, G's, and E's. This suggests that the ...



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