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It is in fact a half/whole diminished. It goes up the scale insteps that alternate between a semitone and a tone. The oppo. to this, is, unsurprisingly, the whole/half diminished scale. No prizes for working out the configuration !


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This can be called an F Dimished scale. In classical music theory it would usually be called an Octatonic Scale. It is a mode of limited transposition (it has a constantly repeating tone-semitone interval pattern). It has a number of interesting properties, for instance, the scale contains a pair of diminished 7th arpeggios, a semitone apart. For any ...


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For a great explanation of modes, google "Bernstein what is a mode" and watch his very entertaining explanation. It's nearly 50 years old (he starts singing that great "new" hit "My Baby Does the Hanky Panky" as an example of Lydian mode), but just as entertaining and informative now as it was then. That's how I learned modes back when I was 10.


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If you looked at the scale/mode notes as a circle rather than linear, it may make more sense to you. I can't draw it here, but the CYCLE of notes will be more accurate as music goes round instead of along. By this, I mean go round your circle, starting at, say, C, and the notes are in Ionian. Start at D and you've got D Dorian. Start at E - I hope you ...


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This is not right. The modes of the major scale each have 7 notes; instead you have listed both scales as having all 12 possible pitches, but just starting on different notes. You have listed a chromatic scale on C and a chromatic scale on D. Also, the way you describe a number of the intervals is not correct: for instance C-F# is a 4# (in your notation). ...


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Scale degrees are always made from the notes in the scale so you have a lot of unnecessary notes in your example above. It should look like this. C Ionian: C D E F G A B C 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 1 D Dorian: D E F G A B C D 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 1 They have the same scale degrees because each scale has 7 notes in it, but the distance between the scale degrees may vary ...


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It sounds as if you're trying to plunge into ``real'' music headfirst. You might want to begin with easier pieces instead, designed for beginners to practice. There is plenty of free sheet music for entry level on the web. I myself find Carl Czerny's practical method really helpful in the sense that it is both manageable and challenging for a beginner. Ans ...


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To answer the first part of the question, yes. It is safe to create a melody with the G major scale if the song is in G major. Obviously, if the melody sounds good to you it doesn't really matter what scale you are using. For example, one of the go to scales in rock music is the Pentatonic scale. Quite often musicians will actually use the minor scale of ...


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"Mood For A Day" is an acoustic solo guitar piece by Steve Howe on the Yes album Fragile. It is in B (harmonic) minor. It requires finger-style picking. This piece was my segue to Segovia; it is what I auditioned for my classical guitar teacher, although my performance was not as fluid as the original.


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I think it goes a bit stranger than a notion "of what chords you can use" and still be in a particular key, although of course that is an indicator. Eg Brown Sugar by the Rolling Stones starts in G. Then the main riff begins on a Cmaj .. next chord is an Ebmaj which doens't fit CMaj at all, and the sung notes are generally in line with a Cminor, yet I ...


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When you pick a key for a song and you use the notes in that scale... There are reasons why you would want to move to notes that are not in the scale but for the most part yes you do stay in the notes that form part of the scale. And does the octave of each note matter? I'm not sure what you mean here. Do you mean does it matter which G you play? ...


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Well, of course later on there will bemany more aspects, like modal playing, chromatic runs and so on, but I think this is not the kind of answer you're looking for. To keep it as simple as you did: Basically yes, you use the same notes for all instruments involved, and the octave doesn't matter. If you're in the key of G Major, You can play the notes from ...


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It also teaches the muscles. Muscle memory is an integral part of learning to play an instrument. The novel thing about your muscles is that you can teach them and they can learn but they have no intelligence and will learn bad things if taught badly. You have to approach teaching them like you would teaching a child that is both deaf and blind. So the ...


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Forget the first note for a moment. The D,F,Ab and Bb fall nicely under thumb, index, middle and ring fingers.You then have to move the right hand along, left to right, parallel to the way the music sheet is on the piano.At the same time, the thumb will be moving under the hand, in order to play the next D, and so on.Now, the first Bb. It really doesn't ...


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This is one of the more difficult arpeggios for most people, because of getting the thumb under the fourth finger for a major third. Try playing F and D together with 2-1. Note your hand position. Now, while holding down D with the thumb, play Bb with 4. You should notice that your wrist has to move pretty far laterally. Now, see how far you can ...


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Technically, there is no 'correct' fingering for any arpeggio - there is fingering which is generally accepted as the easiest or most comfortable way to play an arpeggio. However, I would advise against starting on 4, and would suggest starting on 2 as you would in, say, an Eb major scale. Then, I recommend going to 1, which would allow you to: B♭ - D - F ...


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I think the main advantage comes that when you have fingerings cold for whole scales, you are quite less likely to "paint yourself into a corner" with the fingerings when sightreading. For example, if you play an upward scale part with the right hand and utilize the pinky, then you tend to have a problem if the melody goes on. Practising scales will train ...


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Even if your interest may not be in classical music, you need to work on classical harmony, for it is the basis of any tonal music (jazz, etc, included). There are many books on classical harmony, but one I suggest you look at is Tchaikovsky's Guide to the Practical Study of Harmony, as it is short and well explained, and freely (and legally) available at ...


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Matt's is an excellent answer. One idea behind it is to economize on lateral wrist movement. Interestingly, I had the opposite problem when studying scales. I found that passing the thumb under the fingers was more difficult, as I had developed the habit of raising the fingers rather high when playing notes. It stands to reason that this makes it difficult ...


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I don't know if you would find many solos in Rock that is pure Major. Most would reference the Pentatonic, Lydian, or Mixolydian scales. I would say that Jessica or Melissa from Allman Brothers would be solos and licks to check out. I'm thinking Don't Stop Believing from Journey would be one to look at.


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It seems to be difficult to get a straight answer to "how do I solo in major?". I can play the blues blindfolded in my sleep, but soloing over a major progression has been troublesome, and dropping down to the actual "relative minor" position three frets down was disastrous. None of the usual "tricks" seem to work there. I tried reverting back to my modes ...


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To answer your question: evenly. :) That's why we use the fingerings that we do, because they are generally considered "best practice" to get the scales even. Now, I always start the Ab scales with the second finger in the right hand. There's no technical reason to pass the thumb under the fourth finger instead of the third, and for me passing under ...


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I'm not sure what you mean, but I would say that depends of context. The major scale and minor scale are modes of the diatonic scale - Ionian and Aeolian, respectively. In a sense they're exact the same scale, but starting from a different note. They sound exactly the same. If you pick C major and its relative minor (A minor) and play them in a way you ...


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I'm not sure if I understand your question right - my answer would be no, for the following reason. A major scale has intervals: whole-whole-whole-half-whole-whole-half A minor* scale has intervals: whole-whole-half-whole-whole-whole-half By simply starting on a note in the middle of the major scale, you can play the minor scale. The reason you can tell ...


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The cultural sources of the diatonic scales are prehistoric, and attempts to find their origins have included studies of ancient bone flutes. Diatonic scales, including the major mode, do occur in multiple cultures, but do not occur in all cultures. For example, Indonesian gamelan music uses scales called slendro and pelog, which are nothing like the major ...


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There are big differences between those two scales. The C major scale consists of the following notes: C D E F G A B The C minor scale consists of the following notes: C D Eb F G Ab Bb 3 of the 7 notes of the scale are different so it is not a small difference. It sounds to me like you need to take ear training classes. Ear training can make you ...



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