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4

At the end of the day they are all the same scales just the application to learn them is different. Every system has it's own uses and reasons. The CAGED system gets you to focus on how the different barre chords you play and the pentatonic scales they are related to line up. The sweeping patterns is thinking of the scales in terms of the sweeping lead ...


1

Well if you're only setting yourself 2 years to learn then I wouldn't bother mastering any exotic scales so I'd just stick with the following scales: major natural minor minor pentatonic major pentatonic blues For theory: learn about chord building learn about chord progressions (including cadences) and what notes sound good over a particular chord in ...


2

Why do you require abbreviation? If there's a perfectly good term for this that doesn't use an abbreviation, will it be acceptable? "Notes per octave" or "pitches per octave" seem pretty widely used, universally understood, and tuning-agnostic. As an extension of this, scales themselves can be described as n-tonic, where n is a Greek number (as in, ...


7

You are correct, the piece is in E major. If you use roman numerals to represent the chords, the progression can be written as: I - III - vi - V The reason that the III chord is major, when it should normally be minor is that it is in fact acting as the "dominant" (V chord) of the following C♯m (vi). It's almost as if you were temporarily shifting ...


1

Modes are just a very old type of scale. It was just the way in which the pre baroque era Medieval music was made. It is in essence the musical system that predates the current classical inspired system. If you want to go in depth about how you can see the different modes for what they are you can always just look where the semi tones in the scale / piece ...


0

The noteworthy differences of the various modes of a scale are the variations in the tonal centers. For example, D-Dorian mode (in C-major scale) will have the tonal center of D instead of C. Depending on the mode, it can be of major & minor tonal center. Ionian, Lydian & Mixolydian are of major tones, whereas Dorian, Phrygian & Aeolian are of ...


0

Modes are differentiated by the interval patterns, or in short by the movement of the notes. The things common to all the modes of a scale are the involved notes. All the modes of a scale will share the same key signature.


0

In my opinion it falls under the definition of a diatonic scale, where two WWH back to back are separated by a W. As said by some of the experienced musicians in the earlier comments, it has similarity to a Mixolydian scale with an exception of the 6th note. This cannot be called a melodic scale because ascending & descending orders appear to be the ...


0

Others have already laid out good practical and technical advice, so my very general answer is that the trick (if you can call it that) is to be inspired. In my experience, if you sit down, whenever, and try to come up with a bunch of riffs, you can write a lot of them but you're going to think most of them are lame, unoriginal or otherwise "uncool". Now, ...


0

I don't have to add a lot, because other users have said it, but here is another book suggestion, Figuring out Melody by David Fuentes. You can find it here. My advice is to sit down (ideally) every day and sketch a melody. One melody can seem to you like "meh, not really interesting" one day, but maybe after few months it could catch your interest when you ...


3

The minor pentatonic scale is just the minor scale without two notes (the 2nd scale degree and the 6th). Any harmony that you can create with the notes of the minor scale also work for the pentatonic scale. So all 6 natural power chords in C minor (C5, Eb5, F5, G5, Ab5, and Bb5) you can use with the minor pentatonic scale as there is at least one note in ...


1

Power chords (As in Root-fifth-octave) don't have a minor or major quality (they lack a third). Buuuut, you could imply a major or minor tonality by following the scale degrees. The Cm pentatonic scale is C Eb F G Bb. If you want to stick to pentatonic, you could use any of the above. For example, C5-F5-G5 would do a I-IV-V progression, which is super ...


4

I do not know where you read this term "highly unstable", but what you are referring to is its function in a chord progression. In the key of C major, G7 is the dominant seventh chord, meaning that it has a particular function. In music theory, the dominant seventh chord appears at the point of the musical phrase that has the most musical tension. After the ...


7

It's because of the dissonant tritone interval B-F that wants to resolve. The B leads to the C (root) and the F leads to the E (major third of the C major triad). This is the traditional view. Note that e.g. in the blues, a dominant seventh chord is not considered unstable; it's used as the basic chord on the I, IV, and V.


0

I would add something that may very well be controversial. I do believe the only difference between the minor pentatonic and the Major pentatonic is the notes they start on and that they are pretty much the same scale. a minor Pentatonic has the same notes as C Major Pentatonic so you could easily move between the two.


1

First it's important to understand when it is appropriate to mix minor and major pentatonic scales. If you have a piece in minor you will want to stick to a minor (pentatonic) scale. If you have a piece in major which is not meant to sound bluesy, you want to stick to a major (pentatonic) scale. You only want to mix the two in a blues context, i.e. either in ...


1

First, let's establish what those notes are. C maj pent. contains C, D, E, G and A. C min pent. has C, Eb, F, G and Bb. So, the common notes are G and funnily enough, C. C, being the root of each, is pivotal, as is the perfect fifth, G. Playing over a C major accompaniment, Eb will hardly sound diatonic, which is why it often gets bent up at least a little, ...


0

It is just a small chromatic motif in the melody. It starts with the dominant chord (E Maj) chord and then moves back to the a minor chord where there is several variations in the picking from the a minor chord. It is used somewhat similar to an upbeat.


2

If you have a hardware instrument with quarter-tone support, you can certainly record audio from it into Garageband. However, none of the virtual instruments in Garageband will support quarter-tones played from a MIDI controller. But within Garageband, you can use any virtual instrument that uses the AU (Apple Audio Unit) protocol. If you can find a ...


3

Well that's not exactly the way to practice scales because that's not how our memory works. A memory is stronger if it is related to more memories. And remember that you are exercising your brain, not your fingers. If the exercise doesn't make you think then it's not a good exercise. Now, the most basic way to practice a scale while making you think is ...



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