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There are many different ways to approach playing bass and depending on what style you are trying to go for it may be all you need to fill the sound. I'll explain a few simple styles and techniques that can spice up a bass line. Octaves Rather simple, but effective. Your still playing only the root note, but changing the octave is a very simple and ...


2

The first suggestion I would make is learn some music theory. While not necessary, music theory can help make sense of what your doing. For example, lets say there is a song that rotates through a very basic I-V-vi-IV progression. Music theory will help you understand not only how the notes of each chord relate to each other but also allow you know what ...


1

For instance this? choord: | D | | G | | D | | note: | D - - - | A - - - | G - - - | - A B C# | D - - A | D E D C# | Bm | | G ... B - - F# | B C# B A | G ... Most commonly, the bass would play the root (1st) and the dominant (5th), and less commonly other notes of the ...


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You can build chords on any scale. You would build chords the same way you build them in the typical major and minor scales. You would take a root note of any scale degree and add the 3rd above the root and the 5th above the root and you get your chord. I'll use the example you've given that is based on the different minors. In A natural minor you have ...


0

The simple answer is that you use whichever one has less sharps or flats. So, five flats over seven sharps, five sharps over seven flats, and either six flats or six sharps (they are both the same). This is just as you would do with major keys. Perhaps the reason you ask the question about minor keys is that a minor key always has either three less ...


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Is it that you'd like to learn to play solos ? If so, try searching google and youtube for the "pentatonic scale" which gives you a way of playing a solo in any key (anywhere on the neck). It's not the be-all-and-end-all but it's a very good place to start. At its most basic, it's an easy way of playing blues solos. You can go very far with it though. Eg ...


0

There are two primary considerations when picking a key: what are you most comfortable writing in, and, more importantly, what is most comfortable for the instrumentalists who will be performing your piece? I recommend you read the top two answers to this question: What's the point of keys others than C and Am? Briefly, which key you pick well slightly ...


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There are actually two aspects to consider in order to answer to this question. One is about the practical aspects related to music which is intended to be played on modern instruments with a basically european heritage. In this regard, there really are two ways to describe one scale (although each way still might lead to different chords being used as ...


0

Just done a trawl through sheet music, to find it's been written with key signatures of C, G and E. The original, which lands on A, has no key sig. Most of the solo work seems to be using E minor pent/blues. It could be construed that it's in E, as that's the chord it gravitates to each verse. Or the chords could be explained (in E) as coming from ...


3

The way the circle of 5ths is setup, you would typically use F# minor instead of Gb minor, C# minor instead of Db minor, G# minor instead of Ab minor, and Bb minor over A# minor. You can uses either either Eb minor or D# minor because of where it falls on the circle. So 3 keys you would use sharps for, 1 you would use flats for, and one is rather ...


3

You typically want to read them in a way that is viewed more closely to the C scale. To contrast the two: Eb D# F E#(F) Gb F# Ab G# Bb A# C B#(C) D C##(D) Eb D# As you can see, more work must be done to translate the D# minor scale to the actual note, with a double sharp (in the melodic minor), meaning the note shown on the scale is C, ...


4

There are many ways to deviate from the pattern. In this example a very common pattern emigres from the circle of 5ths. The chords don't belong to any one key, but rather come from multiple keys. You start with a C and go to G (I to V in the key of C), then you go from a G to a D(I to V in the key of G), then you go from a D to a A(I to V in the key of D), ...


0

Consider understanding Key Signature, Mode and Key. KEY SIGNATURE:: There are essentially 12 distinct Key Signatures: C, the six signatures with sharped notes G D A E B F#, and the five signatures with flatted notes Db Ab Eb Bb F. The order of this listing is such that the signature notes are exactly 7 notes (a Perfect Fifth) apart. Thus the relation to ...


0

This query recalls the tourist in New York City who asked a street local “How do I get to Carnegie Hall?”. The New Yorker replied “Practice, practice, practice!”. You might enjoy beginning in the Wikipedia with this: “guitar”. To whet your search appetite, a few thoughts. GUITAR A standard 6-string guitar is tuned to specific Western Scale notes: E2 A2 D3 ...


1

I've been making music for 30 years, and started formally learning theory last year. Yes, it's easier to learn theory on the piano but there are other ways. I'm assuming you can't play any piano at all, and can either read music or are willing to learn. CAGED Guitar Theory will enhance your ability to translate theory to the fretboard. The general idea is ...


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As a practical observation, when my guitar students obviously and consistently practiced their scales, all their skills appeared to improve. When reading music, knowledge of where the notes should be was improved by knowledge of the scales. When playing notes the practice of scale playing (Typically more repetitive and intense muscle work then learning to ...


0

I am an amateur piano player, took lessons for 6 months...been playing for 3 years not. My instructor did not bother having me learn scales, due to my age(60). We went right into learning songs. However, I taught myself the major scales in one night; just remember "fat cats go down alleys eating birds", and "beadg". This makes it very easy. Do some ...


1

Adding to other answers - there are some good physical reasons. The most consonant interval, apart from octave, is the perfect fifth. Sounds that are perfect fifth apart blend really well, because the lengths of their waves have proportions of 3 to 2, so the basic sound pattern repeats every 6 "basic units" (two vibrations of the lower string take exactly ...


1

There is confusion with the term diatonic. Most sources I've checked refer to the notes in major and minor scales. This is reflected within the key signatures. Thus any note from G major, including F# but not F, will be diatonic. So a tune which uses only those notes, in that key, at that point in the piece, will be diatonic. The minors have a bit of ...


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This system is the result of the specific historical evolution of Western music notation. The five-line staff was not the first try at writing down the pitches being used in European music. The first systems were just mnemonic, consisting of neumes (squiggles, basically) drawn above the words of a religious text, much like the cantillation symbols that ...


4

In the history of western music, the 7 notes came first. The twelve arise from adding the necessary notes to play the 7-note scale starting on any note of the 7-note scale. In the key of C major, no sharps or flats are needed. C D E F G A B C When you modulate a fourth to F, you need to add the soft B or B♭. F G A B♭ C D E F And for each ...


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I don't think there is really a very good reason why it should be those 7 notes rather than the other 5 as well, except for the fact that writing notes in both the lines and the spaces makes the music much easier to read (if you're playing quickly, the notes can blur into each other as it is, with only 5 lines for them to be on!) I suppose also it works ...


1

You are correct. The pattern of tones and semitones that make up a diatonic scale can be transposed to any starting pitch without altering the "diatonic-ness" of the scale. All major and natural minor scales are diatonic. If you look at the T/S pattern for the scale you list (starting on A) it's: TSTTSTT. A diatonic scale is any rotation of this pattern ...


1

Yes the G major scale is diatonic. The basic idea of something being diatonic is that you would be able to "pass though" all letter named notes in the scale. By doing this each scale degree would get an individual letter name. 'Dia' itself means though and any scale that goes through all 7 letter named notes and repeats is diatonic. So in the key of G ...



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