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2

If I understand your wording in the question, there's confusion over terminology. D Dorian is the Dorian mode centered around and rooted on D. It contains all of the notes from its parent scale of C major. The Dorian of C is another, less common, way of naming it. Subtle difference in name, but using different notes! D Dorian - D E F G A B C, Dorian OF D - ...


1

Although perhaps not the easiest version, but one which will give you the most theoretical background, is the Circle of Fifths; this is especially useful for determining the number of flats or sharps in a scale, or given a number of sharps or flats, determining in which key you are playing. You start at C, which in major does not have any sharps or flats. ...


7

Every scale will have ONE of each letter name - for a full major or full minor. Starting with C major, with no # or b. The circle of fourths (or fifths, depending which way you go) will give a formula. Go up in fourths, and it will add one extra flat each time. thus - F - has Bb (the fourth note of itself). Up another fourth takes it to Bb - with 2 b, the ...


7

The key thing to remember is that for diatonic scales (major, minor and the modes) each note has a different letter name. In your example F G A A C D E F (ignoring the flats/sharps) has a duplicated letter; thus the 4th note must be a B. One way to lay out a scale is to put the notes in order, e.g. B C D E F G A, and then figure out where the flats/sharps ...


5

What you are looking for are key signatures. A key signature determines which flats/sharps to use on a scale. The flats/sharps that appear, do so in a certain order, not random. So, if you see 1 flat, you have to play B♭, if you see 2 flats, you have to play B♭ and E♭ etc. So, if you begin to read a sheet music and you see 2 flats, then ...


4

A look over the Blue Note article on Wikipedia that Shevliaskovic linked talks a bit about the tuning theory behind Blue Notes, so I'd like to expand on that, as you mentioned wanting a "Mathematical" definition of these notes. The article states that in order to overcome tuning hardships in keyboard creation in the 18th century, Equal Temperament was ...


7

The archetypal bluesy sound comes from bending and inflecting the notes within certain ranges. When soloing, I personally play the blues scale on guitar as a pseudo-pentatonic something like this (C tonic): C a 'window' around Eb, covering the range down to D and up to E. F, bending up a little (maybe not as far as Gb) G Bb, with scope to bend up a little ...


10

That blues note is nebulous. It can be, and is, anywhere between a minor 3 and a major 3. Listen to blues players, and you'll hear it bent fully from min. to maj., or just hinted at with a tiny flick from minor upwards. The listener probably completes the bend in his mind's ear. It sometimes gets played as a straight major that gets wobbled down to minor and ...


5

The so called 'blue note' has it's roots in the African immigrants in the States. Back in Africa, they didn't have the piano to tune their voices to, so they sung what they liked best. When they came to the Western World, they found out the piano (and other instruments of course) and they learned to play it. When they begun to sing the blues, songs based ...


1

You are right, in that the major scale uses notes from its relative minor scale - PROVIDED we're talking about the Aeolian mode or natural minor. Be aware that a relative minor set of notes will vary with the other two minor scales. In the MELODIC minor, (classical), the 6th and 7th notes are raised by a semitone, usually on the way up, and it reverts to ...


3

Yes, they are derived from each other. In particular, they are modes of each other. If you don't know about modes, here is a good starting point from the site. Basically, you're getting a different scale by using the same set of notes and treating a different note as the root. If we're in C major, our set of notes is the naturals (C D E F G A B) and your ...


4

Yes, the are related exactly as you say - offset by two. In fact, every major key has a relative minor and each minor key has its corresponding relative major. For example, if you play only the white keys on a piano starting from C and going up to the next C, that is the C major scale. If you want to play in the relative minor to C major, start from A and ...


-2

how To use dorian mode??? for example You are in the key of (C) use ionian mode or C MAJOR SCALE D DORIAN MODE FOR (Dm) ETC. Now if you want to emphasize d dorian mode Use Dm as ur tonic or 1st chord followed by G major and use mixolydian mode or Am and play aeolian mode or natural minor scale. If u dont know mixolydian and aeolian just play dorian mode ...


0

I noticed that Dorian works well in Oye Como Va by Santana. I wish I understood why it works so well in some minor arrangements but not so well in others. Oye Como Va seems to be Am while the Dorian mode would be playing G Major i believe


0

Scales are just a starting point. Play with the scales major or minor pent. Are you playing over dominant 7 or 9 chords, you can try Mixolydian modes. I started by using just the minor pent of the I chord, then I started adding the major pent, then messed with Mixo mode. However, thinking about switching scales seemed needlessly complicated to me so I just ...


2

The problem with answering the question "what notes are in the blues scale" is that the archetypal bluesy sound comes from bending and inflecting the notes within certain ranges, so any attempt at defining a blues scale in terms of the 12-note scale is only going to be an approximation. When soloing, I personally play the blues scale on the guitar as a ...


2

What people usually mean by "blues scale" is the scale that you already knew, i.e. a minor pentatonic scale with an added b5 ("blue note"). What the author of that book refers to as blues scale is actually more like a collection of notes, all of which can be used over a blues progression. The difference with the standard blues scale is that not all of those ...


2

Two blues scales exist generally. Minor blues as in C, Eb, F, Gb, G, Bb. Major blues as in C, D, Eb, E, G, A. Often players will mix the sets of notes in their playing. The minor blues is probably used more in guitar playing, due to the pattern of notes easily found because of the way guitars are tuned. The whole solo in Stevie Wonder's Sir Duke is major ...


5

Dom's answer correctly explains what the modes of the pentatonic scale are and how they are (not) used. Since this might give the impression that the pentatonic scale is almost exclusively useful if used as either major or minor pentatonic scale, I would like to add one important application of the pentatonic scale where it is used over a chord whose tonic ...


9

Theoretically, yes there are five modes that can be derived from the major pentatonic scale and they would be named the same way the other modes contained in the major scale. Let's look at the relative modes instead of parallel as it is slightly easier to see the patter. The C major pentatonic scale consists of the following notes: C, D, E, G, A ...


3

Some music stays in a key. It really only uses the 7 notes diatonic to that key. Some music stays in a key for a while, but then modulates to another key. Then it might modulate to another one (that would be literally multiple key changes). Some music has a clear root note (tonic), but uses notes and chords outside of a seven-note scale built on the tonic ...


1

You asked: A major scale is made up of 8 notes right? Really it's just seven notes, unless you add the repeat of the tonic (first pitch) at the end, at an octave higher. And its obvious to me playing sharps/flats over a song in the key of C major doesn't sound very pleasant. You'll soon learn that playing outside of the key can sound quite ...


2

First of all, it's not changing key, it's just using chords not strictly in the key. You're allowed to deviate from the 7 notes that are strictly in key, only extremely boring music doesn't. Second, your chords are a little off. The first one is B minor, not D major. The second is A minor, not C major. It's a little noisy so it's hard to hear, but ...


2

Ah, yes! This tip from Joe is one of my all time favorite things to meditate on. I especially like to pick voicings from the Joe Pass chord book, and apply this concept to them. I think that the main idea here is associating different sounds with chord voicings, and developing your ear to hear different harmonic possibilities over chords. Also, developing ...


1

Here is a link to Jamey Aebersold Jazz http://www.jazzbooks.com/ There is a great pdf that has a book relating to what you may need. http://www.jazzbooks.com/mm5/download/FQBK-handbook.pdf



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