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1

As suspected by alephzero, the word "tono" (in Spanish) or "tom" (in Portuguese) refers in this context to the "church modes", i.e. the Gregorian modes of the plainchant tradition. In The Evolution of Organ Music in the 17th Century: A Study of European Styles, John R. Shannon describes Musical Flowers for keyboard instrument and harp, the chef d'ouvre of ...


2

Something that's related to your question is the mode theory. Here's a nice article on that! It boils down to: > If you play your scale (e.g. C major [C D E F G A B]) on a set of chords with a tonal centre of C major, and you focus on the relative position of the notes towards the C in the scale, it will sound happy (Ionian) > If you play your scale ...


1

A major scale is a diatonic scale. The sequence of intervals between the notes of a major scale is: whole, whole, half, whole, whole, whole, half.where "whole" stands for a whole tone (a red u-shaped curve in the figure), and "half" stands for a semitone (a red broken line in the figure). A major scale may be seen as two identical tetrachords separated by a ...


2

C# major's relative minor key is A# Minor. These two keys both contain the same notes but a different tonic (in this case the tonic being C# and A#, accordingly) C♯(i) D♯ E♯ F♯(iv) G♯(v) A♯ B♯ A♯(i) B♯ C♯ D♯(iv) E♯(v) F♯ G♯ This doesn't really have any bearing on how you write a song in a major key, but it does help us to understand the relationship ...


2

In rock music it is not uncommon for the root notes of chords to follow a scale, while the chords all are major chords (or distorted fifths, i.e. power chords which have an overtone series much like a major triad). Therefore it can be more meaningful to analyze the harmony of a rock song by considering what scale/mode the root motion implicates. Many of the ...


0

What's to "approach"? Those are the chords. They don't fit any neat system of all being in one scale. It would be ridiculous to invent constant modulations. Lots of music does this. If your system of theory doesn't "allow" it, find a better system!


2

The current configuration is historically based. Early singing was based on what are now the "white keys" on the piano. Also, in early time, a Bb was added so that the F-B interval (which was considered difficult to sing in tune, compared to other intervals) could be avoided a bit. The early organization (which contemporary music theorists called modes or ...


2

Anything can inspire creation of mathematical systems expressed in music. However, whether the connection is actually less tenuous than any kind of voodoo is a different question. In the manner you pose the question, I don't think that it can be answered positively with an approach reasonably called justifiable. One obvious problem here is that Fourier ...


3

William Sethares, creator of "xenotality" and "exotonality," wrote a book called Tuning, Timbre, Spectrum, Scale. According to Dave Benson in Music: A Mathematical Offering p. 490: The basic thesis of this book is the idea, first put forward by John Pierce, that the harmonic spectrum or timbre of an instrument determines the most appropriate scales ...


0

I have been in a guitar rut for a long time, so much so that my playing has actually suffered. I bought my first best beginner guitar at that time & I regret this and know that if I ever stop playing guitar my life will not be the same. I love music but being able to create amazing music on the guitar is something I have been working towards since I was ...


1

Using all of the notes, but starting and finishing on Eb makes it Eb Mixolydian, and the Gb added gives it that blues feel.


1

If I hear that scale, I hear the Abb as the perfect fifth G, and the Gb as a blue note. Since this scale is none of the commonly used scales, I think it is best described as "blues scale with an added b2". If you hear it differently, it may help to add the melody to your question to clarify the essence of that scale. EDIT: Judging from the chord progression ...


0

My advice, as a player with decades of experience, with respect to visualization of one's instrument is this: Don't! Music is an aural art not a visual art. So auralize your instrument don't visualize it. Learn to associate hand and finger position with the relative pitch. If you take the visualization path on music you will, as countless have before you, ...


0

I have written or drawn a set of key diagrams to suit standard (Spanish) guitars. They will apply to any style guitar with the same tuning . The idea came from wanting to combine (or fuse together) the image of a fretboard with the image of the classical music stave. There are separate diagrams for each Major Key and in practice they cope with any Minor ...


-1

Because it's 'in key' (no accidentals) when rooted on the dominant of the key..... ie. In the key of C (all white notes) G7 uses all white notes..... C7 and F7 both have the seventh as an accidental (black note in C). So to stay in key you have major sevenths built on the first and fouth chords (root and ...


4

I have a similar background, and in my experience, there simply isn't a good transition or analog from piano to guitar. Whereas a child can learn to identify every B-flat on the piano in an afternoon, it takes weeks or months of practice to know the notes on the fretboard. It's an entirely different system. I would like to suggest a few approaches / ideas I ...


3

The are scale shapes. The help to memorize notes on fretboard. The every scale has multiple positions. The most popular are vertical patterns but there are others This is very popular minor pentatonic scale shape diagram It will be never so easy to play them as it was on keyboard but you will get used to it. The most beneficial thing you can do on guitar ...


0

You could put black and white stickers on each fret under each string, but it would ruin the guitar's aesthetics a bit. I would suggest memorising the notes on the low E and A strings up to the 12th fret and their relation to the dot markers. By knowing the notes on the E string, you can know the notes on the D string, the note two frets further along the ...


9

Welcome to the wonderful world of guitar. The guitar is a very versatile and portable instrument that you can enjoy anywhere you like. As you have discovered, fretted (or non fretted) stringed instruments such as guitar, ukulele. mandolin, or even violin, are very different from a keyboard instrument. With a piano, there is only one specific key per ...


0

There aren't any in the major scales. For instance, Ab Major has Bb, Eb, Ab and Db. Meanwhile, A Major has F#, C# and G#. So every note in C major that isn't flatted in Ab major is sharped in A major. There is also the extreme example of C# major, where every note is sharped.



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