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1

A Mixolydian scale is a major scale starting on the 5th step of the scale. So it's basically a major scale with a flattened 7th which makes it harmonise with a dominant 7 chord. It's got a slightly happier vibe than a Dorian scale and a slightly sadder vibe than an Ionian(Major) Scale.


7

As pointed out in a comment by Matthew Read, this is for sure a translation error. The author as well as the translator are both Spanish speakers (from Argentina and Mexico, respectively). Subtonic is of course correct, but sensitive is a mistranslation from the Spanish sensible for leading tone.


6

The C and A Altered Dorian scales you show, are simply Dorian Modes with fourth degrees raised by a Semitone. So, to work out the Altered Dorians starting on the other pitches: firstly, work out the Dorian modes starting on each of these pitches; secondly, raise the fourth degree of each of these modes by a semitone. There are two easy ways to work out the ...


0

Lets have a review about what exactly those Roman Numerals mean. They Indicate the scale degree on which the chord is build and also what sort of chord we have to do with and also the inversion. The Four Main chord types you will have to do with in your harmony work is... Major (Major Third / Perfect Fifth) minor (Minor Third / Perfect Fifth) Augmented ...


3

Chord progressions are nice, and a lot of good songs have been made using them, but to move on to more complex patterns (or make your own progressions) you really need to learn the personalities of the different chords as well as some common transitions between chords. I'll try my best to explain it, but it is really hard ... especially on a forum. I'll ...


1

That's a great question. Let me tell you what works for me. When I write a song, I usually start with a chord progression because that is easier than starting with a melody in my experience. A chord progression will provide the framework for the melody. You need to know what chords go in the key you want your song to be in. Some handy charts might ...


4

Start small. Although it's possible to change chord progressions and scales in a song, it sounds to me like doing so effectively is currently beyond your skill level. So, what you will want to do is pick a scale and then harmonize the chords to it, or vice-versa. The first thing you need to do is decide what key you're in; this will determine the scale ...


1

It's difficult to add to the excellent answers already, but another way to see the modes is in a circular fashion. Can't do it here, but if the 7 notes (Like Dom and JCPedroza, I'll be in C),are written around a circle, the modes in note names will be easily read off as you go round.Keep going clockwise, and each letter name will give the next mode, in order ...


3

You kind of have a skewed view of what modes actually are. The modes we name are set constructs, not based on if you build on any degree on any scale. The third scale degree is only Phrygian in Ionian(major). The scale built on the third of Aeolian(minor) is Ionian(major). The Phrygian mode does exist in Aeolian mode, but is built off scale degree 5 as ...


3

I am having some confusion is respects to the formal definition of what the various modes are. I know that their defined in relation to their scale, however, i've come to realise this may not be best way to define it. Modes are not defined by how they are related. Modes are defined by their interval pattern, by how they are constructed. There are ...


2

So, in technique and practice, is it actually required that you "train" to >the point where you become mentally aware that you're pressing "C D E F G A >B C - C B A G F E D C", or is it just a finger/mental exercise? You've already got lots of great answers, but just a quick note about the above. A piano method will usually recommend not just notes, ...


2

While only skimming the other answers, let me answer it simply this way: How difficult was it for you to learn how to read and write? Think of all the different combinations of letters and spaces that are required in order for this sentence to "make sense" to you. The same applies to music although much more simply. As you learn your scales, you will ...


4

In fact there are 12 major scales (one for each root note) and 12 minor scales -- and there are other scales too - chromatic scales, various pentatonic scales, blues scales... the list goes on and on. However, don't be daunted. Most people don't even learn all the major scales -- there is a smaller group that are most commonly used, because they are easier ...


4

When reciting poetry, you don't just need to learn the sounds of the 26 letters, but also the sounds of various combinations, partly even those of whole words. I mean, compare "bough", "rough", "dough", "cough", "plough", "tough". Then you need to learn where to stress each word, just compare "determinate" and "determination" where the word ending affects ...


5

Just think about what you have to memorize in order to drive a car! The accelerator opens the throttle to give more power to the engine. If you want to accelerate at the rate of two miles per hour per second, you have to push it down by a precise amount, plus or minus a certain amount if you are going uphill or downhill. At the same time you do this, you ...


3

There's no set number of notes outside a specific system — the term "microtonal" is very broad. From Wikipedia: Microtonal music can refer to all music which contains intervals smaller than the conventional contemporary Western semitone. The term usually refers to music containing very small intervals but can include any tuning that differs from ...


9

It's always counter-productive to feel horrified while you're trying to learn something! At your level, please don't feel you have to memorize your fingering or your black-white key patterns. For now, make sure each scale you work on feels comfortable and smooth. What you are mainly doing at this point is getting some fluency, practicing these figures out ...


1

Being able to play any scale, from any position within that scale, and in any combination of intervals (rather than just stepwise motion up or down) is simply the very beginning and the bare minimum required to be a competent improviser (without spending decades learning how to "do it by ear only"). Understanding basic harmony, which means understanding the ...


2

Following on from Matt's excellent answer, one thing I get my pupils to do is make up a phrase, say 6 or 7 notes, in a particular key, using, say, major, minor or blues. Then to be able to move it around the neck, and play it in any octave, starting on any string (dependent on the phrase, obviously), in maybe two different ways from a start note. The start ...


8

The most important thing is to be able to know and see on your guitar the intervals between each scale tone and the root note. If you're able to do this then you're independent of the key and you don't necessarily need to know the name of the note that you play, as long as you know its relation to the root of the scale. So when you learn scale patterns make ...



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