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Adding to other answers - there are some good physical reasons. The most consonant interval, apart from octave, is the perfect fifth. Sounds that are perfect fifth apart blend really well, because the lengths of their waves have proportions of 3 to 2, so the basic sound pattern repeats every 6 "basic units" (two vibrations of the lower string take exactly ...


1

There is confusion with the term diatonic. Most sources I've checked refer to the notes in major and minor scales. This is reflected within the key signatures. Thus any note from G major, including F# but not F, will be diatonic. So a tune which uses only those notes, in that key, at that point in the piece, will be diatonic. The minors have a bit of ...


11

This system is the result of the specific historical evolution of Western music notation. The five-line staff was not the first try at writing down the pitches being used in European music. The first systems were just mnemonic, consisting of neumes (squiggles, basically) drawn above the words of a religious text, much like the cantillation symbols that ...


4

In the history of western music, the 7 notes came first. The twelve arise from adding the necessary notes to play the 7-note scale starting on any note of the 7-note scale. In the key of C major, no sharps or flats are needed. C D E F G A B C When you modulate a fourth to F, you need to add the soft B or B♭. F G A B♭ C D E F And for each ...


-2

I don't think there is really a very good reason why it should be those 7 notes rather than the other 5 as well, except for the fact that writing notes in both the lines and the spaces makes the music much easier to read (if you're playing quickly, the notes can blur into each other as it is, with only 5 lines for them to be on!) I suppose also it works ...


1

You are correct. The pattern of tones and semitones that make up a diatonic scale can be transposed to any starting pitch without altering the "diatonic-ness" of the scale. All major and natural minor scales are diatonic. If you look at the T/S pattern for the scale you list (starting on A) it's: TSTTSTT. A diatonic scale is any rotation of this pattern ...


1

Yes the G major scale is diatonic. The basic idea of something being diatonic is that you would be able to "pass though" all letter named notes in the scale. By doing this each scale degree would get an individual letter name. 'Dia' itself means though and any scale that goes through all 7 letter named notes and repeats is diatonic. So in the key of G ...


1

It depends entirely on the genre, and that is actually one of the defining characteristics of genre. most pop: probably, and mostly. Sometimes augmented by the occasional secondary dominant. Part of why they are so "easy to hear". But if it's torch-songy pop, probably not because they borrow a lot from the style of standards musical theatre or standards or ...


3

This is described somewhat in the answers here: Scale degree naming Basically, scale degrees are typically numbered according to the (parallel) major key, even if you're actually playing in a minor key, or some other mode. Thus in your case, A major would have a G# and an F#, so the bVII and bVI tells us that they have to be lowered (the sharps removed). ...


0

if you want a general method you can apply behind all the theory this chart works for you.Just choose any chords you want and use them accordingly.


1

In addition to jadarnel27's excellent answer, I think it's worth discussing diatonic intervals. A diatonic internal is one that is composed entirely of notes in a scale. For example, in the key of C, a C major chord is made of the notes C E G. The interval between C and E is a major this. A d minor chord is spelled D F A and has a minor third between the D ...


0

The chords you are talking about are called "diatonic" chords: chords whose tones are taken from the scale. If your scale has 7 tones, then you can make at least 7 diatonic chords (depending on how many tones you stack on each chord, or whether you use thirds or fourths to create your chords). The two kinds of scales that "diatonic" is most often used with ...


0

A lot of jazz and blues is based around variants of major and minor, the Mixolydian and Dorian modes respectively. But there remains the same dichotomy. Mixolydian is just like Major but with a flatted seventh scale degree, called the dominant-seventh. Dorian is just like Minor but with a sharp sixth scale degree.


0

Your first lesson sounds good - people need to know their way around a chord. Chords-wise : A lot of popular songs are in C/F /G etc but on guitar they're a bit of a finger-full on guitar. Maybe it's easier to teach E A and D which allows for loads of tunes and are probably easier to play. You could even start with 2-string power chords and build the rest ...


0

I would agree that working on repertoire from a very early stage is a good idea. Just make sure the songs you begin with are not too difficult as that may lead to frustration. Also basic strumming rhythms should be taught early on as well. Start with the simple first position chords C - A - E - G and D Major. Do Simple time signatures 3/4 and 4/4 are a good ...



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