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My advice, as a player with decades of experience, with respect to visualization of one's instrument is this: Don't! Music is an aural art not a visual art. So auralize your instrument don't visualize it. Learn to associate hand and finger position with the relative pitch. If you take the visualization path on music you will, as countless have before you, ...


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I have written or drawn a set of key diagrams to suit standard (Spanish) guitars. They will apply to any style guitar with the same tuning . The idea came from wanting to combine (or fuse together) the image of a fretboard with the image of the classical music stave. There are separate diagrams for each Major Key and in practice they cope with any Minor ...


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Because it's 'in key' (no accidentals) when rooted on the dominant of the key..... ie. In the key of C (all white notes) G7 uses all white notes..... C7 and F7 both have the seventh as an accidental (black note in C). So to stay in key you have major sevenths built on the first and fouth chords (root and ...


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I have a similar background, and in my experience, there simply isn't a good transition or analog from piano to guitar. Whereas a child can learn to identify every B-flat on the piano in an afternoon, it takes weeks or months of practice to know the notes on the fretboard. It's an entirely different system. I would like to suggest a few approaches / ideas I ...


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The are scale shapes. The help to memorize notes on fretboard. The every scale has multiple positions. The most popular are vertical patterns but there are others This is very popular minor pentatonic scale shape diagram It will be never so easy to play them as it was on keyboard but you will get used to it. The most beneficial thing you can do on guitar ...


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You could put black and white stickers on each fret under each string, but it would ruin the guitar's aesthetics a bit. I would suggest memorising the notes on the low E and A strings up to the 12th fret and their relation to the dot markers. By knowing the notes on the E string, you can know the notes on the D string, the note two frets further along the ...


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Welcome to the wonderful world of guitar. The guitar is a very versatile and portable instrument that you can enjoy anywhere you like. As you have discovered, fretted (or non fretted) stringed instruments such as guitar, ukulele. mandolin, or even violin, are very different from a keyboard instrument. With a piano, there is only one specific key per ...


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There aren't any in the major scales. For instance, Ab Major has Bb, Eb, Ab and Db. Meanwhile, A Major has F#, C# and G#. So every note in C major that isn't flatted in Ab major is sharped in A major. There is also the extreme example of C# major, where every note is sharped.


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#2 is a minor triad in first inversion (it has the 3rd as the lowest note). #3 is a major triad in second inversion (the 5th is lowest). Doing them in this order forms a simple chord progression: I vi IV vii°/V V.


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Just a side note (too long for a comment), in Jazz there are the so called Symmetrical Diminished scales. These are octatonic scales that play well over diminished chords, and that are built from two groups of 4 notes, each group with a similar shape. There are two of these scales: half-whole mode -- 1st group = [1 b2 #2 3] - 2nd group = [#4 5 6 ...


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beautiful flute song using this scale greetings Erik


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There is a jazz scale theory, coming mainly from the modal period, with contributions from the jazz theorist George Russell, that approaches improvisation by viewing "every chord as having one or more scales that can be played over it" (www.jazzstandards.com/theory/modal-jazz.htm). Here's a possible chords-scales correspondence (this chart is my attempt at ...


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The octave is a rainbow that repeats. Just as the rainbow has a pattern, if you choose any reference pitch and go up an octave or down an octave, this "pattern" repeats again and again. Of course 400Hz does not sound exactly the same as 800Hz, but they have the same "color" (Like an Ab and the Ab higher one octave) and thus something that shows this ...


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No. To determine any scale/mode requires two sets of data, only one of which you have provided. 1) The notes of the scale. That is clear. So far, so good. 2) The "key center," meaning the pitch upon which a resolution is made at the end of the phrase. That second element is unclear. @Dom has assumed that the B is that note, because you placed it first in ...


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The notes that seem to have 2 different names are actually 2 different notes. If you are only looking for note names then you should be fine - follow the advise of these commentators and you will automatically get the correct sharps or flats for your key signature. But if you are coding music to be played in precise harmony (for example on Supercollider) ...


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The analogy of colour is actually really apt. Chromatic notes along with other non chordal notes are indeed used to give melodies colour. Non chordal notes or notes that do not belong to the scale often are used to make music interesting by bridging between chordal notes in a manner that makes musical sense. Melodies when made effectively have a strong, ...


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Source: http://etymonline.com/index.php?term=chroma&allowed_in_frame=0 (emphasis mine) chroma (n.) "quality or intensity of color," 1889, from Latinized form of Greek khroma "surface of the body, skin, color of the skin," also used generically for "color" and, in plural, "ornaments, embellishments," related to khros "surface of the body, skin," ...


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It is usual to be told that learning guitar initially involves learning lots of chord and scale shapes. You can buy books called "1500 chords you must learn", and so on. This can be a distraction, and for me, it makes the guitar seem more complicated than it really is. I prefer to just remember two basic, fundamental shapes - I'll call them "north-east", ...


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That is an interesting question. And Dom's answer gives the simple explanation that most plausibly explains how the term "chromatic" which originally referred to color and not sound or pitch (from the Greek word chrôma, meaning color) was adopted to describe the full set of 12 musical pitches in Western Music. I would like to add to Dom's answer and ...


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It is impossible to say for sure, since the term chromatic has had a musical meaning since at least ancient Greek times (hence the use of a Greek word). More on that in a moment, but first, its worth noting that "color" has idiomatic meanings as well, such as these definitions for "colorful" in the Merriam-Webster Learner's Dictionary: 2. interesting or ...


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The chroma in chromatic does mean color. In chromatic scale, we have full access to all the notes available in the twelve tone equal temperament system. We don't typically use all 12 notes when composing or playing and we'll mostly stick with a smaller set of typically seven notes from a heptatonic (seven note) scale. We'll also most likely be in some kind ...


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First of all, a question like this can be easily answered with a simple google search. If you search for A-Major scale on line, one of the results will be: Basic Music Theory dot com A Major Scale The following two images from that site show the entire A-Major Scale. The first shows the notes on the piano keyboard and the second shows the notes on the ...


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Scale degree seven in A major is G sharp.


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G Dorian is G Dorian, not minor. That said: G Dorian has one flat (Bb) and no sharps, although the seventh F is occasionally sharped as an accidental.


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The mode that starts on scale degree three of a major scale is the Phrygian mode. It differs from the minor mode in that the second scale step is only a half tone above the tonic, rather than a whole tone. In a way, it's more minor than minor. Here's an example of music in the Phrygian mode: O Virtus Sapientiae, by Hildegard of Bingen: ...


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There are more, except that when you reach the octave copy higher up the neck, it becomes the same as those lower. The clue's in 'pentatonic'. With five notes to play with, so to speak, by the time we get to the sixth, we're back at the beginning again. There are really only two SCALES here. The minor pent., starting for the sake of argument on the open ...


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The D#/Eb note is used in much the same way a flat fifth/sharp fourth is used in blues or jazz. Simple passing tone that builds tension. Somewhat dissonant so as to make the resolve to the so called "right" notes sound better. Blues and jazz musicians regularly disregard the technical concept of the right notes and use the wrong ones to make the right sound ...


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The first shape of the (minor) pentatonic scale always starts on the root note of the scale on the low E string. So if you are improvising in E minor pentatonic, then the first shape would start on the open E string (As you probably know). The intervals of the pentatonic scale are different between every note: m3, M2, M2, m3, M2. The intervals in each ...


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It's because you can start/continue the the pattern on any of the notes of the pentatonic scale. The collection of notes you have will always be the same, but the exact pattern of the scale will be different. Let's look at the E minor pentatonic scale to start with. In the E minor penatonic scale you have the following notes with the following intervals: ...


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You give us neither the G7 > C or E7 > Am cadences that would answer your question conclusively. Which way will you choose to end the piece of which this is an excerpt? Neither you or you friend is wrong, or right!


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http://www.shivkumar.org/music/basics/ramesh/gentle-intro-ramesh-mahadevan-I.pdf A gentle introduction to Carnatic music - the music of south India. South Indian music shares many similarities with the north Indian Hindustani music, but considered more conventional and complex. Internationally famous Carnatic musicians: brothers L Subramaniam and L ...


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The other answers cover all the important points. I'd just like to add that there's no "logic" behind the Melodic Minor scale, but merely musical taste, which is of course not set in stone. For instance: sharpening the seventh step when it goes up, and flattening when it goes down, is not universal. O quam mirabilis est by Hildegard of Bingen has ...


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Just adding to the previous two answers, there are three types of minor scales: Natural Minor - all notes are the same going up and coming down Harmonic Minor - The 7th note is sharp going up and going down Melodic Minor - The 6th & 7th notes are sharp going up but natural coming down. In the example you've given, they're using the Melodic Minor ...


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The way that the Melodic Minor scale is presented to students (Melodic Minor when ascending, Natural Minor when descending, see ex. 1) is merely a teaching tradition. This tradition is an incomplete definition of how the great composers employed the Melodic Minor Scale in their melodies. The apparent purpose is to allow the student to demonstrate mastery of ...


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The reason for the difference in ascending and descending comes down to how people composed in minor keys during the common practice period of music. To fully grasp the concept, you have to not only look at the melodic minor scale, but all three flavors of the minor scale which are the natural, the harmonic, and the melodic. Obviously the natural minor is ...


3

In the Common Practice Period (technical name for composers doing what I'm describing), the keys were (and still are) divided into two modes, major and minor. Each of the 12 (not counting enharmonic things like C#=Db) major keys consist of the usual 7-note major scale pattern: SSHSSSH (from C, DEFGABC). The minor modes have a flat third (Eb in the case of C) ...


3

The two accidental signs after the high A are natural signs. You play G-natural and F-natural when descending in the A Melodic-Minor Scale. The A will never be altered in any kind of A-scale. More generally, the 6th and 7th scale degrees in a Melodic-Minor Scale are considered movable and may change through the course of a piece to suit the melody. The ...


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pentatonic scales 1 pentatonic scales 2 Also common, for jazz: Play them as arpeggios. Youtube example for playing them as arpeggios.



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