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To get started I'll offer a short answer to these two questions almost - but not entirely Yes - by providing real world examples which are accessible to everyone Index Just some short basics so that everyone is one the same page A little aside to honor pentatonic scales Modality and potential confusion when it gets 'jazzy'... The ...


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The reason a mode sounds different is simple: which note is targeted as the base. which means which note is emphasized more than others. really it's a combination of the base note and the fifth above it. emphasizing these two notes more than the others give a different sort of tonality than a home base of "C and G".


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All relative scales work the same no matter the scale. For example in the case of major and minor pentatonic scales in your example the C major pentatonic scales and the A minor pentatonic scales contain the sames notes as you can see here: C Major pentatonic: C D E G A A Minor pentatonic: A C D E G The differences is what the tonic (or root) ...


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I have a similar approach like @Dom but there is one thing I do feel very differently. If it were a major scale in F - the pattern of the 5th, 6th, 7th, 8th that has way more the taste of a minor scale wouldn't be so molesting to my western ears. In german this is also called 'harmonic major' because it resembles both - the major scale and the harmonic ...


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The typical way the CAGED method is in reference to the to the different shapes of major barre chords and how the major scale corresponds to the chord shapes at those positions. While you can also use this to think in a modal way using the same chords and position based on the patters, it will not work for harmonic minor and melodic minor because they ...


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This is a great little exercise:


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To the A minor pentatonic scale, while soloing, if you also add in the 2 and the 6 (B and F), it will give you another tool to making some cool sounding music. I did this while soloing over a C major backing track and was pleasantly surprised. I liked the effect even better than the b5 or "blues note". Even adding the major 3rd (C#) as a quick passing note ...


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A fifth is the smallest non-octave consonant interval, with a frequency ratio of 3:2. If you start stacking pure fifths, the first result reasonably close to stacked octaves (2:1) is 12 fifths, which turns out to be 531441:4096 as opposed to 128:1 for 7 octaves. That's as close as you can get for a reasonable number of notes per octave. So if you are ...


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Sounds like the notes belong to A pent. min. There should probably be an open key sig. as the key refers to C major. With chords of A7, D7 and E7, as you state, it's firmly in A blues. No other key has I, IV and V as those. If there are no Fs or F#s, then they won't get played anyway. The writer may as well have put Fb in the key sig! A lot of tab writers ...


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Certain interval patterns do turn up in scale repositories more often than others; easy ones are perfect fifths, though as others have pointed out, this may be due to cultural training on what is appropriate, not instinct. A full analysis might start with the scale archive at: http://www.huygens-fokker.org/scala/ (though note some of those are constructed ...


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Back in the early days of Church canon, the third was a decidedly "outside" note. It occurred here and there, but it was by no means afforded the status we give it today. It didn't sound "instinctive." The only sounds/tones that are "instinctive" are the species danger sounds: those sounds that alert us that something higher than us on the food chain is ...


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Nurture/nature. I feel that because in the Western world, most of what we listen to is major or minor, over time we've accepted this - it's become 'instinctive'. It would be different if one had listened to, say, Indian music for a long time. Then that would seem 'instinctive'. It's far more nurture than nature, if a loose definition of 'instinctive' is ...


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If you wish to incorporate their flavours into your playing and this is how you learned the natural modes then definitely yes. I would use the natural caged patterns you have already learned and just sharpen the one note for the harmonic minor scale - then you only have to learn where this particular note is to know the entire scale. The melodic minor I ...


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It's worth re-learning the majors, but use the 6th note as a start note, or root. As in, the E major, but from C#. This will reveal the natural minor scale pattern. The only difference between that and the harmonic minor is the raised 7th note. So that can easily be adapted from the natural minor. Melodic minor is a bit confusing - the classical one rises ...


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If you want greater fluency in melodic playing, the answer is likely yes because you'll develop a familiarity with common positions for conveniently moving within chords. I recommend that when you practice them you try to be aware of what part of the scale you're playing -- especially whether you're on the root, fifth, third, and seventh. It's not ...


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I'm going to put another finger on the scale (though there may be something fishy about these ideas): 1) Nothing requires a scale to repeat within only one octave. 2) While there are theoretically notes too close to each other to be distinguished by (normal) listening, once you add the possibility of multiple notes and beat frequencies you can achieve ...


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I'm going to take a slightly different approach from Dom, defining a "different" scale differently. I'm positing that the pitch of the tonic is irrelevant to the scale's designation. For example, a "Major" scale is a single class, so Cmajor, Dmajor, etc are the same so far as the interval sequence goes. Following that rule (which you may or may not choose ...


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There are a few things that can drastically change how you look at this so let's first look at the definition of a scale is defined as: A scale is any set of musical notes ordered by fundamental frequency or pitch. So at heart, a scale is just a set of notes so to carry out the basic calculations, we'll talk about this in more set theory terms. ...


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As already mentioned in Dom's answer, everything you wrote is correct. I'd just like to add a few things concerning the term diatonic. As you said, one meaning of "diatonic scale" is a scale with five whole tones and two half tones where the two half tones are maximally separated, i.e. at least by two whole tones. This includes the major scale and all its ...


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Yes you are correct, I'll just put it in simpler terms. The major scale is both diatonic and heptatonic. Heptatonic just means that there are 7 notes per octave in the scale. The diatonic scales just a name for the specific name for scales that contain a specific whole step, half step pattern TTSTTTS in some why, shape, or form. All the 7 natural ...


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Probably more than you want to know: Johnson, Timothy (2003), Foundations of Diatonic Theory: A Mathematically Based Approach to Music Fundamentals, Key College Publishing. ISBN 1-930190-80-8. :)


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All of them. Here's the simple reason why. We use different systems to name, describe, and label scales. Let's just look at the C major scale to start. The C major scale can also be referred to as the C Ionian mode when thinking in modal contexts, but there are more ways to describe the scale then just that. You can describe a scale by pattern i.e. the C ...


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As pointed out by Dom, it is indeed the second mode of the (F) harmonic major scale. I would just like to add that this scale is often referred to as Dorian b5. Viewing this scale as a Dorian scale with one altered note makes it easy to remember its structure and to come up with appropriate fingerings.


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You could consider as a scale derived from the F harmonic major scale as the F harmonic major scale contains the notes: F G A Bb C Db E F You can view this scales as just a major scale with a lowered 6th and this type of scale comes up in the Lydian Chromatic Concept.


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At the end of the day they are all the same scales just the application to learn them is different. Every system has it's own uses and reasons. The CAGED system gets you to focus on how the different barre chords you play and the pentatonic scales they are related to line up. The sweeping patterns is thinking of the scales in terms of the sweeping lead ...



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