New answers tagged

1

In regards to any person, be it author or any other, pertaining to the exact history or meaning behind the modes is technically and historically impossible. This is due to the fact the original modes developed by the ancient Greeks goes as far back as 300 or 400 B.C.!!! or the Hellenistic period. Greece was then subsequently through the proceeding ages ...


0

Without knowing more than a little bit about the history of Western harmony and its scales, I am comfortable saying you should not look to this author for history lessons. The reason I write that is because he wrote the words "white" and "Aryan" as synonyms in 1913 which highly suggests his history is racist. There are other aspects of the history he wrote ...


0

again, some simple rules and observations for working with modes in this case;(1) your song in "C minor" is already in a mode known as C-Aeolian (the natural minor 6th mode of the C-maj. scale)(2)Ionian and Aeolian are the exception to the rule and the only 2 modes of the C-Maj., scale that can have a tonal center/key- depending on how they are used (3)If ...


0

I've seen this quote from Charlie Parker in many places... "I was working over 'Cherokee' and, as l did, I found that by using the higher intervals of a chord as a melody line and backing them with the appropriately related changes, I could play the thing I'd been hearing. I came alive." The part "higher intervals of a chord as a melody line" catches my ...


1

Key signature and note collection notwithstanding, a musical composition that is written in F Lydian is NOT a mode of the key of C major - even though the key signature would be the same as for C major and all of the notes in F Lydian are also in C major. In fact, the so called “key signature” does not always tell you what key a musical work is written ...


0

let's simplify this and first answer a couple of basic questions about modes and modal music; (1) All music is modal (2) A true mode (other than Maj./Ionian or natural minor/Aeolian ) are limited to 5 tones and only to 1 octave range, from the tonic to the dominant. In other words, 5 tones are not enough to establish either major nor minor ...


1

F lydian has the same key signature as C major (in other words it has the same notes, the same number of sharps and flats, in this case zero.) It also has the same key signature as A minor. However all three are different keys, because they have different tonal centres. A key is named after the note it tends to gravitate to. A passage in A minor clearly ...


4

No. My college music theory professor always explained it this way: Key only means tonal center. If you say it's in the key of C, then you have to specify whether the mode is C major, C minor, or some other mode. He would insist that there is no such thing as the "key of C major". The correct way to say that is this: the key is C, and the mode is major. So ...


12

No. A key* is not just a set of notes, it tells you the tonal center** of a piece and the expected harmony and melody of the piece. If that was the case we wouldn't even distinguish between major and minor as they have the same set of notes as do all 7 modes of the diatonic scale. How you use your harmony and melody will define the key and tonal center by ...


2

To me, "mode" is just a word we use instead of "scale" for certain scales. From that point of view, you might as well be asking me if "A minor actually belongs to the key of C major". To me a key is both a scale and a tonal center. A different tonal center means a different key. When you start a piece in A minor and modulate up to C major, you are now ...


0

you can look at the "G# Maj." key in a couple of different ways, (1) as a disregarded, feared and denounced part of music and music theory, very much like the dreaded locrian and diminished modes - to be avoided at all cost. It's a theoretical problem much like arguing if there is such a key as B#/Cb Maj., E#/Fb Maj., in comparison to G# which is not at the ...


0

There are loads of tunes that do just this. The B7 either goes straight to a C, or goes 'round the houses' up in 4ths via E, to A, to dominant D, back home to G. Music tends to gravitate a semitone so going to C does just that. Or, it'll move in 4ths, as in the oft quoted ii-V-I in jazz. That B7 as suggested in another answer, will move to the relative ...


1

You are just using the dominat chord of E minor which is the relative minor or V/vi if you were looking at it in Roman numeral analysis. When improvising you would most likely use a variant of the E harmonic minor scale. One you could use is B Phygian Dominant which is the 5th mode of the harmonic minor scale. These scales are very related to the G major ...


0

For example we use for C major scale C-major, D-minor, E-minor, F-major, G-major, A-minor, B-diminished. When we play chromatic scale we can use "susspended4" chourd immdetly after the major chourds.I mean after C-major, F-major and G-major and for those chourds wich comes immdetly after mainor chourds I mean D-minor, E-minor&A-minor we can use ...


0

Indeed the standard positions do not really allow finger patterns for diatonic scales like you have on guitar, but require a position shift once every three or so notes, unless you use empty strings to fill some gaps. While this may seem, in a practical sense, a bit annoying, cellists tend to make a virtue of it by using the shifts as an expressive feature ...


1

I don't really understand the connection between the chart picture and the sound file, but the sequence... C, C#, D, D#, E, F, F#, G, G#, A, A#, B ... is the chromatic scale. The numbers next to the letters look to me to be "scientific pitch notation" https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scientific_pitch_notation


3

It's just 3 octaves of the chromatic scale. Based on what you say it sounds like it is not the scale, but the range given to compose in. The game is just giving you the range from C1 to B3 to play with to create / make music.


1

Are you planning on strumming your cello? If not, i.e. you want to learn the bowed playing patterns, I can assure you there are a number of patterns, depending on the actual progression of notes and the tone/timbre desired. The simplest scales go: open, 1,2or3,4, then open on the next string, etc. Obviously once you get above certain pitches, you ...


4

To establish a modal final (which is what we call a mode's melodic keynote) as a tonic, you've really got three things that you will use: a hierarchy of root relationships within the mode that confirms the tonic; conjunct melodic motion, notably by semitone, that pushes into the tonic; and the stability of the most important harmonies within the mode. ...


1

The key is not only the the harmony as Matt suggests, but also the melody and what notes sound at rest and what notes don't . To demonstrate this, play any Locrian scale. How it will sound is unfinished as in the ascending scale you will want to go up another half step and decending you will want to go back up a half step. You melody will never sound at rest ...


3

The stability of a scale or a mode is directly related to the stability of its tonic chord. Locrian is considered unstable because it contains an unstable tonic chord with a flat 5 (m7b5) instead of a perfect fifth. This chord wants to move one, it does not sound resolved. A m7b5 chord is usually perceived as a II chord in minor, not as a I (tonic) chord. ...


4

This is impossible to answer, up-transpose is as legitimate as down-transpose. It completely depends on the purpose of the transposition. For a singer the adjustment may be necessary to match his or her vocal range. It then depends, whether the high notes were the problematic ones or the low ones. The only simple cases are adjusting a given score for a ...


1

Is it common practice to use scales (modes) for jazz improvisation? TL;DR: Yes, of course it is. For the start of the song, you have a melody and some chords to accompany it. After the melody has been played, the musicians start improvising solos. In order to see what are they going improvise on, they study the chords and the melody. These two belong ...


14

Both C# minor and E major keys have the same key signature, so there is no difference there. This relationship is called 'relative key'. Each major key has a relative minor one, with the same key signature (to find it, descend a minor 3rd or ascend a major 6th from your tonic). Similarly for the minor key. To sum up the difference: These two keys have the ...



Top 50 recent answers are included