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1

Since I see a guitar in your profile, I'm guessing that's what you play. In which case we have 2 basic types of Arpeggios: Chord Form Based- Notes are played in the order determined by the voicing of the chord you are playing, and whatever patterns you apply to them. Think Babe I'm Gonna Leave you, Hotel California etc. Scale Based- The notes are played ...


0

If you're looking at printed music, a chord with an arpeggio line beside it or the intruction "arp", the composer is telling you to play from the bottom note upwards. There is also a notation for a downward arpeggio. Chords can, of course, be played in other ways. If you're not following notation, it's completely up to you. We're not interested in ...


0

If you're being asked to play an arpeggio in an exam, then yes, the examiner will probably expect you to play the notes in order. If you're not in an exam, then of course you play anything you fancy, so the question then is just what the definition of the word arpeggio is so you know if you're playing an arpeggio or not! The etymology of the word means ...


3

Sliding as Tim suggests is definitely a possibility, but my teachers always discouraged it. As you noted in the comments it can be difficult to move while pedalling, and it is generally a somewhat awkward and inaccurate movement regardless (especially if the bench is leather or something and you must lift off it to slide down). I think a combination of ...


1

The simplest is to slide along the seat so that there isn't a great reach any more. With scales, unless they're contrary, make sure your body is central to the central part of whichever scale you play. You may need to start an octave lower, or higher, to compensate. Most people will be able to play to 5 octaves apart, but not very often will the need to ...


2

I would take this as a means to interpret what the author intended when writing the rest of the book. For example, if you play in a rock band and the band leader says a new piece you'll be learning is in D minor, there's no reason to assume that the piece is strictly functional harmony with no modal content. It could be in Dorian or Phrygian for all your ...


1

It is quite true and understandably very confusing wording at first. The first thing you have to understand is how classic music theory defines tonality. It's very specific in that tonality is defined by the tonic - dominant relationship (V(7) - I or V(7) - i) which heavily depends on what is known as the leading tone. The leading tone is the note that is a ...


0

I think what the author may want to tell you is that the natural minor form is specific to a melodic minor scale descending. It is not a scale in the strict sense of the word but rather what happens to the melodic minor scale when it descends. (The Sub Mediant and Leading Tone are lowered.)


3

A nice addendum to Caleb Hines' answer is that if you take all the most common intervals, you get M2, m3, P4, P5, M6, and m7, which is the Dorian mode. What's significant about this is that the Dorian mode is a point of symmetry in our diatonic scale. If you use D as a center point and move both up and down in perfect 5ths, you end up getting the diatonic ...


5

This selection of five pitches could be a constituent part of a number of scales, although it is not a part of any diatonic scale. As a set of notes itself, it could be referred to by its PC Set name (Forte Number), which in this case is 5-19. This has a prime form of [01367]. (You can find this using a PC Set Calculator, such as this one.) According to this ...


9

To answer this, we can arrange the modes in order from those that have the highest-pitched notes (largest intervals relative to tonic), to those that have the lowest-pitched notes (smallest intervals relative to tonic), then compare the resulting intervals. Note how, in this order, each following mode is identical to the previous one, except for one scale ...


0

Generally speaking, a tune is played in one key. To learn that tune, one has to find each and every note by randomly looking for it, then on to the next, etc.Some of the notes played while trying to find the right ones won't ever be in that tune, as they don't feature in that key. Basically, in, say, a major key, there will be 7 notes that will probably ...


0

It's not important to learn scales, if you can think of a better way to... choose which notes to play when you're improvising remember which notes to play in the songs you're playing understand what people are talking about when they are talking about scales with commonly-used terminology. So, can you? Well, for the first two, it's certainly possible ...


3

Scales are absolutely vital, but only for their usefulness and their applicability. If you hate learning them, maybe your approach to learning them needs to be more musical. If you are just trying to learn the scale patterns all up and down the fretboard, you're missing the point. Granted, knowing your fretboard geometry is important too. However, if you ...


4

Scales teach your fingers where to find notes on the neck, and your brain how to think about intervals. Without scales you will find it much harder to move around the fretboard, both on a single string, up and down the neck, but also across the neck. This will impact speed, clarity, and also your own composition processes. I would say it is essential to ...


0

Great question! I also wondered about this for a while. Each note in a scale should have a different letter name. For example, the D major scale doesn't have the same letter twice: D E F# G A B C# D If the scale had flats instead of sharps, G and D would be used twice and F and C would not be used at all: D E Gb G A B Db D Double flats/sharps were ...


2

If I understand your wording in the question, there's confusion over terminology. D Dorian is the Dorian mode centered around and rooted on D. It contains all of the notes from its parent scale of C major. The Dorian of C is another, less common, way of naming it. Subtle difference in name, but using different notes! D Dorian - D E F G A B C, Dorian OF D - ...


1

Although perhaps not the easiest version, but one which will give you the most theoretical background, is the Circle of Fifths; this is especially useful for determining the number of flats or sharps in a scale, or given a number of sharps or flats, determining in which key you are playing. You start at C, which in major does not have any sharps or flats. ...


7

Every scale will have ONE of each letter name - for a full major or full minor. Starting with C major, with no # or b. The circle of fourths (or fifths, depending which way you go) will give a formula. Go up in fourths, and it will add one extra flat each time. thus - F - has Bb (the fourth note of itself). Up another fourth takes it to Bb - with 2 b, the ...


8

The key thing to remember is that for diatonic scales (major, minor and the modes) each note has a different letter name. In your example F G A A C D E F (ignoring the flats/sharps) has a duplicated letter; thus the 4th note must be a B. One way to lay out a scale is to put the notes in order, e.g. B C D E F G A, and then figure out where the flats/sharps ...


6

What you are looking for are key signatures. A key signature determines which flats/sharps to use on a scale. The flats/sharps that appear, do so in a certain order, not random. So, if you see 1 flat, you have to play B♭, if you see 2 flats, you have to play B♭ and E♭ etc. So, if you begin to read a sheet music and you see 2 flats, then ...


5

A look over the Blue Note article on Wikipedia that Shevliaskovic linked talks a bit about the tuning theory behind Blue Notes, so I'd like to expand on that, as you mentioned wanting a "Mathematical" definition of these notes. The article states that in order to overcome tuning hardships in keyboard creation in the 18th century, Equal Temperament was ...


7

The archetypal bluesy sound comes from bending and inflecting the notes within certain ranges. When soloing, I personally play the blues scale on guitar as a pseudo-pentatonic something like this (C tonic): C a 'window' around Eb, covering the range down to D and up to E. F, bending up a little (maybe not as far as Gb) G Bb, with scope to bend up a little ...


10

That blues note is nebulous. It can be, and is, anywhere between a minor 3 and a major 3. Listen to blues players, and you'll hear it bent fully from min. to maj., or just hinted at with a tiny flick from minor upwards. The listener probably completes the bend in his mind's ear. It sometimes gets played as a straight major that gets wobbled down to minor and ...


5

The so called 'blue note' has it's roots in the African immigrants in the States. Back in Africa, they didn't have the piano to tune their voices to, so they sung what they liked best. When they came to the Western World, they found out the piano (and other instruments of course) and they learned to play it. When they begun to sing the blues, songs based ...



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