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5

Pulling out the pickups, and using plastic tubing to hold onto the volume/tone pots as they slide in to the guitar. For one example, see http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p29QN4ycHMU (Putting new pickups in a Gretsch Electromatic)


5

There is some confusion here between semi-acoustic guitars and electric acoustic guitars. It's compounded by the fact that the guitar linked in the question has been mislabelled by the shopping site - they are evidently not specialists in music. I think we all know what an acoustic guitar is - a guitar made of thin wooden sheets, surrounding a large hollow, ...


4

Semi acoustic guitars, while of the variety mentioned in the first post, can also being carved top electric guitars that have a solid post that anchors the middle of the acoustic chamber, which is a hollowed out area to either side of the post. Such guitars as the Gibson 335 are famous examples of semi-acoustic guitars that, while primarily played into ...


4

Semi acoustic and electric acoustic guitar are hollow (not solid) body guitars with a mic inbuilt. It can be a condenser microphone or a piezo-electric under-saddle pickup. Some have both and you can adjust where the sound comes from. The point with semi acoustic guitars/electric acoustic guitars is that they are very practical on live situations when you ...


4

I have an Epiphone 335 copy (they call it a "Sheraton") and a Warmoth-parts solid-body with "tone chambers" in it. I wouldn't describe either as having a "mellow" sound, per se. The Epiphone does have a sound I'd describe as "open" and "woody", though not as much so as my all-hollow archtop. You've heard 335's a thousand times, I'm sure, and you know how ...


4

Through the pickup cavities and the f-hole. I've used a mirror probe and long, skinny tools to install a pickup inside of a parlor guitar; it must be hard as hell to do this work without a full-sized soundhole. You'd need tools like an inspection mirror, tweezers or skinny pliers, long screwdrivers, and skinny flashlights.


3

In addition to Slim's excellent answer, I would mention that there is another kind of guitar referred to as a "semi-acoustic". This is a guitar that is designed to sound just like an acoustic guitar, but only through amplification. It is a guitar that is small and thin, proportioned like a solid body electric guitar, but which has a top that is built and ...


2

From my on the road experience, the best way to control feedback is to reduce stage volume. I understand this is not easy to do on a crowded stage (if you play small bars and whatnot), and especially if your bassist enjoys turning his amp to thunderous volume levels (been there) but from my limited experience, there's a couple of things you can do. ...


2

You don't mention the OS/computer system you are using. For windows, many sound cards have ASIO drivers bundled with them. If you are not able to find ASIO drivers, then you can use FREE software called ASIO4ALL. You will need this to be able to get low latency. If you do not, you will experience a perceptible delay between what you play and what you hear ...


2

Yes, but be aware of the difference of microphone-in and line in: line-in () takes an amplified signal, while a mic jack socket takes an unamplified signal. Plugging an amped signal into the mic jack can damage your sound card. A strongly amped signal (like the output from a guitar amp) might also damage it even if you use line in, although it should be ok ...


2

Absolutely. There are many amp simulators available---I like Amplitube, but there are plenty of others. If you're using an external audio interface to plug your guitar into your computer, you will probably want to set up your software to use the audio interface for output as well; otherwise you're likely to run into latency issues.


2

I'd get needle-nose pliers and pull the jack towards the hole, then insert the pliers into the jack and hold them open. The pressure against the inside of the jack should be enough for you to pull it through the hole.


2

I've had several Les Pauls, a handful of Strats, and an ES-335 and a ES-345. Those two ES bodies are technically semi-hollow bodies, but definitely have a softer, mellow, more acoustic sound, somewhere between a Strat and a Les Paul. The ES guitars I had have dual-humbuckers, and a solid maple block that the humbucker's mounting rings are attached to, ...


2

It is not normal for new strings. If your old strings didn't buzz, then your new strings may have lighter gauge and therefore the guitar fretboard is too flat. You may need to adjust the truss rod, replace the bridge saddle or get a new heavier gauge set of strings. By the way - do not wait for the strings to get rusty in order to change them. If at all ...


1

Assuming that it has been tuned correctly, it is not normal. The old strings were probably 11s or maybe 12s, so there should be no problems if there weren't previously.Do they buzz open, on specific frets, maybe there is another problem with the guitar that has manifested itself when the strings were changed. Were they changed for a particular reason ? Like ...


1

Feedback (technically 'positive audio feedback') is the noise you hear when an input (guitar pickup/mic) sends a signal to an output (an amp) and then picks up the amplified sound again, and sends that down to the output and outputs that. This loop continues, creating that sound. Feedback increases in volume over a short period of time because of the ...



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