Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

37

http://www.lancastersymphony.org/Portals/1/docs/pdfs/music%20notation/Rests_8_lowres.pdf http://www.openguitar.com/theory/tw02_preparing_score.html To draw the quarter rest, draw the right side of a letter “R”, omitting the vertical, or start with a number “2”, but pull the horizontal line down on the right. Put the hook on the bottom and ...


28

In general I find that I am slowed by grabbing the page, not by the actual turning. You could bend the corners of the pages forward so that it's easier to grab quickly, or use those sticky flags on the pages, or something like that. As for turning pages where there's no break for one hand, you need to memorize the music. You can memorize all of it and ...


26

One of the tricks you can use is one I have learned watching Gustav Leonhardt in concert. For difficult page turns, he uses a little copy of the start of the next page that he pastes on the side of the preceding right page as a flip. Not only is it easier on his memory but it allows to grab the page quickly and turn it efficiently. Now that scanners and ...


22

This type of notation is used to indicate tremolos. A single figure is made up of two noteheads of identical value (in this case, half notes) that are beamed together in a way that indicates the speed of the tremolo. The rhythmic length to be played is that of one of the beamed half notes. You would alternate between the two noteheads at a speed of 32nd ...


22

Yes, unfortunately it's all about practice. But there are some things you can focus on to speed up the process: - Learn the notes on the neck by heart, and the associated intervals. That is, learn the notes on the low E-string and the relation between those notes and the notes on the higher strings so that you without thinking can fret a certain interval. ...


18

In cases like this you should play the second D, cutting the first one slightly short to accommodate it. It's not a typo, just a choice by the arranger to take the least complicated & most readable approach to notating the music. Think of the printed music as communicating the intended sound, rather than exact movements of your fingers, and it should ...


15

It is just for emphasis. It is usually just an instance where, in a recent measure in the piece, the F note had a natural attached to it. The F-Sharp would be included in the following measure as a reminder that F is no longer natural, that it is back to the F-Sharp that it is in the key signature. If there is an X next to a note, it is just a double ...


14

It's not a slur; it's a tie. The marking is obviously easy to confuse, but in this case you'll note that there is a slur arching over top of the phrase as well, so this must be something different since there can't be a "double-slur" :) When two notes of the same pitch are tied together they are played as one whose duration is the sum of the duration of ...


13

A pianist I used to work with would never actually grab the pages she was turning. She would just rely on the friction of her fingers between the front face of the page and swipe the page across. It was a very fast, efficient, and somewhat violent movement. I would not recommend this on any score with a weak binding or easily torn pages. Disclaimer: I've ...


13

In addition to indicating the end of a distinct section of the piece, a change in key signature, time signature or major tempo change, the double bar is also used to mark the location of a Da Capo or Dal Segno (a notation system that marks the repeating of a certain section of music without requiring additional measures to be written/printed.) It is also ...


12

I'm pretty sure LilyPond can do what you want. It's not the easiest thing to use but since you've already used a text-based system it might not be too bad. Here are some examples and this is also relevant in this case. MuseScore is another free option, which is easier to use and might also be able to do this. EDIT: Here's a lilypond version: And code: ...


12

Without the key signature is looks confusing and wrong to musicians who are used to reading music in context, instead of just treating sheet music as a "play by numbers" game. It looks like C major, but the notes are mostly confined to the GABCD range, and the theme ends on G. Indeed, an F note will indeed occur in harmonizations of the theme. For instance ...


11

You can try to soften the spine by opening it in various locations and flexing the book gently. (Here's a nice version of the procedure, with diagrams, even; and here's another, similar graphic, this one from a bookbinder.) If that doesn't work, you can get a piece of clear plastic and leave it over the pages; not an ideal solution, but it will let you use ...


11

Simply put, no. If you limit a song to single pure tones, it's pretty easy to write software to recgonize them and transcribe it. But once you get to a real instrument things get much harder. Even single notes can be difficult to recognize due to overtones -- the dominant frequency doesn't even need to be the fundamental frequency, which makes it very ...


11

Tags are idiomatic to barbershop music (which is typically four a cappella voices), and refer to the ending chords of a song, usually coincident with the last line of lyrics. Sometimes singers will get together for the sole purpose of singing tags, since they are easier to learn than an entire piece of music and usually consist of harmonic cadences that are ...


11

An arranger specifically changes the music away from what was originally written. This is different from an editor who might clean up notation, clarify the meaning of markings, translate outdated terms, give instructions for proper interpretation, etc. Both technically alter the original but the editor tries to "bring out" the original as much as possible, ...


11

An arrangement is about which instruments play what, when and how for a specific tune. The core of a tune, or composition, is the melody/-ies1. Using this core an arranger - i.e. the person attributed by "arranged by" - when creating an arrangement may Decide what instruments, including singing voices, to use Select key (or keys) for the arrangement (i.e. ...


11

Just to elaborate and clarify, there are a few different types of pizzicato: There is the standard "pizz." which is done with the flesh of the finger on the bowing hand; A pizz with fingernail, which gives a more crisp attack; A "Bartok" or "snap" pizz where the performer pulls the string away from the fingerboard and releases to produce a harsh snapping ...


11

Use \once \set chordChanges = ##f at the location where you want to force the chord symbol. \score { << \new ChordNames { \set chordChanges = ##t \chordmode { \repeat volta 2 {g1} \alternative { {c} {\once \set chordChanges = ##f c4 g c c} } } } \new Voice = "one" { \relative c'' { ...


11

The X's are sharp signs, which means this piece is in D. Note, an X can also mean a double sharp, but in this context (throughout the whole piece), it clearly refers to a sharp. The t.'s mean trill (this is confirmed by many recordings that I've listened to). The W's at the end of the line tell where the first note on the next line is. For example, the ...


11

The double-octave transposition notation is indeed used in many kinds of classical and contemporary music. (The piano is only as big as it is to begin with because composers kept pushing the boundaries.) Your idea is very close, but incorrect. The notation is actually 15ma or 15mb, because the number in question refers to the size of the interval. | 1 2 ...


11

In piano, the staffs usually signifies what hand plays what note where the lower staff would be your left hand and the upper staff would be your right hand. While the clefs are important, you may see the same two clefs on a grand staff. In Imagine you can see there are two bass clefs because the piano part is low. It is kind of an unwritten rule of thumb in ...


10

It certainly won't replace the time you need to practice with the piano, but it will definitely help. In addition it gives you create chances to build a theoretical background knowledge by analyzing the structure of the piece, the chords used and relationship of the notes. Reading the notes and chords and even clapping or just "thinking" the rhythm is a ...


10

from my bookmarks: http://www.sheetmusictrade.com/ http://imslp.org/wiki http://icking-music-archive.org/index.php http://www1.cpdl.org/wiki/ http://www.mfiles.co.uk/sheet-music.htm http://www.bh2000.net/score/ http://www.rowy.net/sheet_music.html http://www.free-scores.com/index_uk.php3 plus in French: http://www.lespartitions.info/gratuites/index.php ...


10

Here is a quick example of triplets similar to your description of what you saw: There are four beats in each measure, but in the first measure, the second beat is divided into three equal sub-beats notated as eighth-note triplets. Three eighth-note triplets fit into the space normally allotted to two eighth notes. In the second measure, the second beat is ...


10

Smaller notes are a different issue, and could be relevant to a second line of lyrics, but you will typically see them only sporadically appear within the top voice. Anyway, what you're asking about is referred to as multiple voices on a staff. Notes in harmony will generally only be grouped together with a stem if the rhythm is the same, and all of the ...


10

Yes, this can be done. I have no direct experience here, but there are several projects underway to translate musical pieces that are in the open-source MusicXML data format (which can be exported from music notation software such as Finale and Sibelius) into Braille sheet music. There is a great deal of public-domain classical music available in ...


10

Yes, both piano music and recorder music are written with the same kind of music notation, using the same kinds of symbols. The pitch "A" on the piano and the same pitch "A" on the recorder are written with the same musical note in sheet music. I do not know, but I suspect that the problem your daughter is encountering is of a different nature: On the ...


9

Little Post-It notes as tabs sticking out from the edge of the page. Line them up from top to bottom and it's easy to grab the top one and turn the page. Another trick with a bad page-turn is to take a pair of scissors and cut horizontally across the middle of the page, like a Dutch door. Then you can turn the top half first and the bottom half later.


9

Every pianist I know photocopies and hole punches the sheet music to go into a 1" black binder. This also allows them the luxury of unfolding taped pages so they can play until a break before needing a page turn, but the use of a binder alone should make it easier to grasp and cleanly turn a page compared to a bound paperback or folded free sheet music. Of ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible