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24

In a key where there are already some sharps (or flats) in the key sig., as here, every time one of those notes is played, it has to be sharp (or flat). In E, or C#m, the key here, every other note is natural - E, A, and B. So if a note sounding like a C needs to be played, it can't just be written as a C, because the player would automatically sharpen it, ...


12

The note is the same key as C. It is written as B# instead of "C natural" to indicate note's "role" according to rules of classical (musical) harmony. My guess is this portion of musical piece is written in Cis-moll, and the arrpegio being played is dominant chord (G# B# D# F#). Because in minor tonalities Dominant chord always has VIIth tone (B is VIIth ...


12

Yes a B# is just a C, but it is written that way because that note is function like a "B" instead of a "C". If you look at the notes you have G#, B#, and F#. Look familiar? It's a G# dominant 7th (5th is omitted, but thats not unheard of). A more focused question on this idea can be seen in this question as to why notes get alternative names.


7

If it was written as C, it would be actually C# ... because you have four sharps on left (those ####) and they basically mean that: F = F# G = G# C = C# D = D# Which is E major. Instead, they write it as B# because they want you to play actual C. It could be also written as a C with a natural sign ♮ ... the natural sign would "cancel out" the sharp # on ...


6

Yes they do because they are the key signature of a piece. The key signature tells you what key you are in and what notes to expect. Since you are in the key of E major, you will most likely use the notes E, F#, G#, A, B, C#, D# which the four sharps represent. Those are the notes you should use unless a different accidental is applied to a note.


5

There really isn't something like that. The closest thing is a simile where you could write a rhythm pattern and then put the chord changes over the similes as shown in this answer. Music notation in general is very exact to make sure the musician playing the song know exactly how to play it.


5

I would just like to clarify a couple things that I don't think have been fully articulated. First is that there is a distinction to be understood between the concepts of "note" and "pitch". A note is a symbol in a score. It represents a pitch to be sounded. Enharmonic equivalence is idea that the same pitch can be represented by different note names. ...


4

Sight-reading tabs, and by that I mean playing the tab off the paper is something one learns quite faster than learning to play a regular score from paper. That's the reason for their existence. They are basically a pre-prepared performance. Reading tabs without having an instrument in hand and figuring out what the music is in your head works worse than ...


4

Add disclaimer Some people apparently couldn't understand what I was getting at with this answer, or don't understand humour or whatever, and therefore flagged the answer. I assure you that any misspellings found here are entirely enharmonic in nature, and thus don't matter. Or do they? If you think so, you've got the point I'm making. It is knot a C. ...


4

As Dom states, each and every stave is a separate entity, and accidentals need to be put in for each changed note. This is in D minor (at least here), and what's happening is the normal melodic minor trick of that era. Melodies going downwards would use a natural minor configuration, while those rising would have a raised 6th and 7th. Thus, Bbs in the left ...


3

That looks like C# minor which gets its leading tone (B) raised by a semitone. You are correct in thinking that B# and C are played at the same place but for the purposes of music theory they are not the same notes. They are what is called enharmonic equivalents ie two notes with different names played at the same place.


3

This is called a key change. The 7 sharps simply means that it's changing key from C major to C# major. Treat everything after the key change as if you're playing in C# major. So, when the key is still in C, you'd play no sharps or flats (unless noted by an accidental), and after the key change, if you see a C in the sheet music, you'd play a C#, if you see ...


3

It's nothing whatsoever to do with imaginary problems in writing a C natural! It's about spelling a major 3rd above G# correctly, and making the interval LOOK like a 3rd, not a 4th.


3

Anytime in written music that there are multiple staffs, they are all played simultaneously. Exactly who plays/sings what part will depend on the context of the music. Typically, in vocal music with two staffs, the upper staff (with the treble clef) will contain the female parts (Soprano and Alto), while the lower staff (with the bass clef) will contain the ...


3

My bet is on the 8vb only applying to the left hand. The A1 in the left hand is supposed to be held, and if the right hand would then play another A1, this would disrupt the holding of the left hand A1. While this kind of disruption for voice-leading purposes is not rare in piano music, in this instance it would cause an imbalance in the decay of the ...


3

Being able to play one grade 4 piece does not mean you will be able to play all of them. The C minor prelude looks and sounds harder than it actually is, in my opinion (as someone who has learned to play the piece). I would say the overall difficulty level between the two is comparable, although as Dr Mayhem commented, the pieces do very different things ...


2

Think of ottava shifts as of a clef change: where 8vb starts, imagine it's actually a switch into the bass-8 clef, where it ends, the clef switches back to bass (bass-0). Clefs apply to each staff separately, so do ottava shifts. So your yellow notes are (in order in which they're marked): <a1 a0> a2 a3 c#2 f#3. I'm not sure how would I play it, the ...


2

No, accidentals are always staff independent. The reason you have a Bb in at the beginning of the bar and a B natural at the end is because the Bb is pulling down to the A and the B natural is leading up to the C.


2

In deciding whether an accidental should be printed, one should generally expect that people reading music will be blind to staffs that don't contain their part(s), and may be blind to music which they are not performing even when it shares a staff with music they are; one should add cautionary accidentals if necessary to ensure that such possible blindness ...


2

No they do not. If you wanted to represent the accidental on a different staff you would need to write it in. Each staff is independent of the other even if they are linked as in your example.


2

There are several existing forms of shorthand that have been accepted as part of standard notation, such as full-/half-/two-measure repeat symbols, sim. (for articulations and dynamics) and turns (which define note sequences by relative pitch and are probably the closest thing to what you are looking for [I'll add a pic shortly]), but those assume you've ...


1

I have seen "etc." being used in e.g. books of exercises. First there's say two bars establishing the pattern and how it progresses, then one bar with just "etc." written in it followed by the end point of the exercise. But then the type of pattern has been explained earlier e.g. by writing out one exercise fully. So it can be used in certain contexts, but ...


1

Treble clef is from Middle C upwards through the notes Bass clef is from Middle C downwards through the notes That's literally all there is to it So find the middle C note of the piano, left is bass clef, right is treble clef


1

In my experience both tabs and notation are useful. I can sight read notation faster and yet tab is more enjoyable and my brain is drawn to it. Tab wont prevent you from learning the tougher skill of reading notation. Also you can learn to sight read tablature. I have seen some people do it really fast. On the other hand, there is also extra knowledge ...


1

To answer your question: yes, of course. The point is tablatures are simpler at the beginning of your friendship with guitar, because it doesn't force you to learn traditional notation for many hours. Usually, guitarists are not patient enough to spend many hours first on learning theoretical stuff. So if you've just began playing guitar, use tablatures, and ...


1

The short answer to your question is yes - it is possible to sight read tabs. At least for folks who seem to prefer tabs over standard musical notation. I have a friend who after years of piano lessons decided to learn to play guitar. Her guitar teacher writes her lessons in tab. She has learned to sight read tab but has expressed that she wishes he ...


1

The main notes of a tonal scale comprise 7 pitches, each consistently designated by its own letter. So a piece in C major would generally use the pitches C-D-E-F-G-A-B-C. A piece in C# major would use C#-D#-E#-F#-G#-A#-B#-C#. It would be incorrect to designate these as C#-D#-F-F#-G#-A#-C-C#, as there would be two "flavors" of F and of C, but no "flavor" of E ...


1

+= sharpened. Sharpened whatever. The number that has + in front of it(or by it) is raised by one semitone so +5 is a sharpened 5th and +9 is a sharpened 9th. The sign means augmented,when used in chord names, and the usual note that's augmented (taken up by a semitone) is the 5th. Thus A = A,C#,E, whereas A+ = A,C#,E#(F). It's common in jazz to alter 5ths ...


1

No, a B marked with a single flat will only ever be a B-flat. Occasionally in written music you will see "courtesy accidentals", redundant accidentals meant to clarify or remind the player. These are are often used when a note was altered in a previous bar.


1

No, a Bb is a Bb, no matter how many times you say so! One would be required if there had previously been a B natural, in the same octave, in the same bar. If it had been in a different octave, one (maybe in brackets) would seem sensible. In a preceding bar - use your common sense.



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