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A few caveats to buying sheet music: Music for "piano/guitar/voice" often does not have the complete guitar version. If you are a guitarist, look for TABs to lend a possible greater authenticity. If the music is labeled EASY or something similar, then it is unlikely to be anywhere near authentic. Some sheet music will leave out the melody, some will not. ...


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You need an "internal metronome" - to feel the pulse of the measure in your head as you play. Some people tap their feet to keep that going. But it sounds as if your teacher doesn't appreciate the role that a real metronome can take in developing your internal metronome. One really useful exercise is this (it works best with an electronic metronome, as by ...


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Right after the time signature change you see a natural sign, which would not be necessary for the assumed implicit key signature reset. Key signatures are very important and therefore very explicit. For a change of the key signature typically all existing accidentals are first neutralized and then the new ones added.


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Bach Prelude BWV 938 I googled Bach e minor and looked at images. ...


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To expand my previous comment into an answer: you refer to some sheet music as the sheet music, which is quite recommendable for pieces of most composers (to a degree - there are lots of pieces of which there are earlier versions, transcriptions, simplifications, etc.). But, in case of Chopin (and lots of his contemporaries) this is not the right way to ...


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Your teacher may well be right. HOWEVER, if, at the stage you're at, you can't feel the pulse, or mark it with some part of your body - tapping foot, twitching shoulder, head nodding, counting in your head - then the humble metronome can come to the rescue. You'll still need to count, and on flute it'll have to be in your head (mouth is busy!), but on your ...


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I think you need to take a step back and focus on rhythm. You can find a simple rhythmic solfege that starts with the basics of the rhythms and study that. It will help you understand the different values of the notes and then you'll be able to feel them. If people haven't done a study similar to this and jump right into playing songs, they might have a ...


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If you're playing in a local band, memorizing everything might be an option. My experience in bands was that the volume of music precluded memorization. If your show is 15-20 minutes, sure, but an hour of music is a lot, especially on keyboards. Playing from music on mallets in an ensemble is harder than any other instrument I've tried. This is because the ...


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This depends on the arrangement. Often you will see music which has scores for piano and one singer, with chords over the score. In which case you can expect the piano part to sound fine on its own. If there are notes in place for all parts, you can probably expect there to have been more thought put in to how the parts play together and interact. Removing ...



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