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6

All simile marks basically say the same thing which is play what you just played. The only thing that typically changes from simile to simile is how much you play. With a single simile you would only play one note/chord, but the others take groups of notes or measures. The breakdown of all the similes in your post are as follows: Single - play last notated ...


5

I found the below footnote in a transcription on IMSLP: It translates: I think that one could play the + sign, as a 'pinched' lower mordent. Where this is first notated, it applies to the sign above a single note in the right hand, however, there are further places where the same notation is used on chords, and below the notes, without further ...


4

This kind of beaming often indicates that that very passage in Violin II has a displaced accent when compared to the other instruments: while they follow the time signature changes, from 2/4 to 3/4 and back to 3/4, the second violin keeps a metric accent likewise to 3/4 throughout all the selected excerpt. The beaming serves to guide the player through the ...


4

Check this out. Thumbing is the act of playing with one or both thumbs on the keyboard below the keyboard on which the rest of fingers are playing. This technique was developed in the late 19th century, and fell out of use after 1930. While at first an organist not used to this technique will only be able to use it to play isolated sustained ...


4

I suggest you take a look at LilyPond, a music typesetting program. It does not have a graphical interface but rather takes a simple text description which it turns into suitable output. You will get proper beaming according to normal typesetting rules, accidentals, reminder accidentals and naturals according to normal typesetting rules, beam directions ...


2

Sometimes, beaming is used to indicate logical groupings of notes. See fore example, the motivic analysis of the piece asked about in this question: Why is the bass clef indicated twice on the same line in this Bartok piece?


2

The puzzle connected with the legato slur is "fingering": use different fingers for each pairs of notes so that you could play them slightly overlapping. Theoretically, the notes should be tied seamlessly. But for many keyboard instruments it's more feasible to "hide" the key release action in the attack of the next note. For a piano, the timing is not ...


1

This page is useful http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_musical_symbols#Articulation_marks It says: Left-hand pizzicato or Stopped note A note on a stringed instrument where the string is plucked with the left hand (the hand that usually stops the strings) rather than bowed. On the horn, this accent indicates a "stopped note" (a note played ...



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