Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

13

No, you can't substitute quarter notes. This notation indicates that the player should continue alternating between the two pitches in a sixteenth-note rhythm. Look at the first bar: although the first two beats are written as 8 sixteenths and the second two beats are the unfilled beamed noteheads, the second half of the measure should sound identical to the ...


13

They indicate open-string notes (E,A,D,G,B,E); note that they are in the same position of the numbers that indicate which fingers to use to fret the notes.


8

The 'actual notes' marking appears in two places in the score. The first, as you've flagged, is the first entrance of the trumpet part. The same marking then appears at a section marked specifically for clarinet (where the remainder of the part is clarinet or flute). As this marking consistently appears at the first entrances of the only parts marked ...


7

This is called a turn. The 'basic' version would be written without the accidentals, and the player would play the first note, then quickly play one tone (note) above, the main note again, a tone below, the main note, and the resolve one the final note. The accidentals clarify exactly which notes to "twiddle" to. The turn can be either directly over a ...


5

Those are tremolos. The convention is that the notes that are beamed together are alternated using the value of the beam (that means that F♯ and D that start the 2nd bar in the top voice would be alternated as 16th notes, for instance), and the note heads reflect the length of time to be filled, in this case a half note for each notated tremolo group.


5

The given chord will be the underlying harmony. That does not mean that the notes at that point of time played by the piano will feature every note in A minor, nor does it mean that nothing but notes fitting an A minor chord will be present. It just means that if another accompanying instrument were to play an A minor chord, this would fit with the music. ...


4

It's the kind of instruction I would expect in "scordatura" situations where an instrument is retuned or modified or stuffed beyond pitch accuracy. In that case, "actual notes" would mean that the given notes are the sounding notes rather than what one should be fingering on the instrument if it were unmodified. Another, probably less likely, option would ...


4

The key to this section is the term "Senza tempo", which means "not in tempo", or in other words that this is completely free decoration. The rising arpeggio in the left hand can be taken leisurely, and the small notes can start when you feel like, and at the speed you feel like (usually pretty fast though). Really they are a variant form of trill, which ...


4

There is no standard way by which musicians create music to represent mathematical patterns, equations, or other entities. Whenever someone does undertake a project like the ones you found, what they do is create a custom, non-standard mapping between mathematical objects and musical objects or parameters. For example, I once wrote a very simple song to ...


4

"Upper position" and "baroque in nature" seem like somewhat contradictory requirements. At any rate, the Bach Cello Suites are not likely to be mastered and put away soon and they are pretty baroque. Bach has the advantage of writing for rather than against the instrument, so while the solo string pieces are really tough, they are also immensively ...


3

Do you have a gut-string Baroque cello and a Baroque bow, or are you playing a modern steel-string cello with a modern bow? For historically-informed, period-correct playing with a Baroque bow, check out publications by Baroque string instrument educator Martha Bishop, who lives in Atlanta, Georgia, USA. These resources may be worth checking out even if you ...


3

Music and maths are indeed closely related (there are innumerable books on this topic), but your question appears to put cart before horse. Musical notation is a product of underlying mathematical models, western musical notation just one of many. Tastes do differ, sometimes wildly. :-) Nevertheless, at a fine grain there are indeed a multitude of formulas ...


3

If the notes are A-E-A, the chord is indeed ambiguous. It could be an A or Am chord. However, the context can often tell you what the chord is supposed to be, even if the third (C# in case of A chord, C in case of Am chord) is missing. For instance, this chord will most likely be an Am chord if it appears in a C or Am key. If the sheet music describes ...


3

The biggest thing is simply practice and experience: the more you do it, the easier it gets. It doesn't help so much for the present, but it means that if you do this again next year, it will be easier. But here are a few tricks for this year. Highlight your part. That way, it stands out from the others, so it takes less concentration to find it when you ...


2

If it's on sheet music, it probably won't be describing the chord shown. More likely it will be telling you what chord can be played along with that bar/part bar of the music. There may be another part, for example, with just a G note for the bar, and the chord shown may be C. There will generally be chords shown, often for a chordal instrument like guitar ...


2

The short answer is "any way that you want to". Numbers Converting a single number to music is a relatively straightforward process. A number is a linear string of digits, while a melody can be thought of as a linear string of pitches. Therefore, all you really need is a mapping from a digit to a pitch. There are several possible ways to do this, but the ...


2

If you want to work out in the upper register in general, there are plenty of 19-th century studies (Duport, Popper and Piatti come to mind, implying use of the thumb positions), but as others have pointed out, most baroque composers who wrote cello parts or works did not go very high compared to modern cello works. If you are really interested in Baroque ...


2

In context they appear to be some variant of the quarter note The other answers are right: those are tremolos. But you're not completely off the mark, either: there is other music where, indeed, eights with open noteheads are a notation for quarter notes, and can be beamed: in Couperin's Goûts Réunis one finds for example:


2

The short answer is, yes, a skilled pianist should be able to "sightread" a piece of music at some pretty high percentage of their skill level. Nobody can sightread a concerto, but if you put a piece of piano music in front of me, the determining factor in whether I can play it is the state of my technique, not my ability to read the notes. I found that ...


1

Basically, since you cannot read both hands at the same time, I would suggest taking each measure and working it on its own. This way you can see what the right hand is playing, then what the left hand is playing (or vice versa) and then put them together. This might sound time-consuming and boring, but it's the simplest way to do it! when you want to ...


1

Proprietary/Commercial: Finale, Sibelius Free: MuseScore, Lilypond Finale can import scanned scores. MuseScore is acceptable for small projects, but for larger ones you should probably buy software. Long run, it is worth the investment because the free programs tend to have bugs and this slows down production, at least I have found it so.


1

This sort of question relies so much on context! Was the trumpet previously playing in some modified transposition? Was it previously instructed to extemporize? Fortunately, in this case we can consult the full score. http://imslp.org/wiki/The_Unanswered_Question_%28Ives,_Charles%29 In this case I think it's clear that Ives is reminding us the score is ...


1

There is plenty of software out there that will help you to learn to read score. Try some of these: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=rylee.gaddict.gfba https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.punktumsoft.android.guitarnotetrainer


1

Usually with SATB the lyrics are just under the dots.That's because the same words may not always be sung at the same time in each voice. Learning the lyrics as in a poem means there is one fewer thing to look at - then the notes can be followed more easily. If you can find recordings of the pieces, them listen to them while following the sheet ...


1

This is a badly notated 'open string', this should be a zero instead of a circle because it makes it hard to differentiate between open strings and open harmonics.


1

On guitar, there are often several places to play the same note. For example, the top E could be fretted on the 3rd string, 9th fret, 2nd string, 5th fret or open top string.The circle, as stated in the previous answer, indicates that the composer wants that E played on an open top string.The circle by the bottom E says the same thing, although I can't think ...


1

That is the octave harmonic. Half-way up the fingerboard you will find a spot on each string that if you place your finger lightly on the string without holding or pressing down will emit a slightly hollow sound that is an octave higher than the open string on which you are playing. The D would be played in this way on the D-string, and the A would be played ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible