Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

8

the numbers are indeed fingerings. The circle indicates that the hand position is changing. The long curved lines are not sostenuto pedal markings, they're "legato" markings. Legato means that you play the marked phrase smoothly note into note, without spaces or rests between the notes. You're correct that the numbered measures near the repeat sign are ...


6

Can't think why some numbers are in circles - they refer to fingerings - 1= thumb, r.h. in the treble clef. Yes, it's a phrase rather than a slur, so no pedal as the harmony changes. It is a repeat sign. Play the first part again, and second time around, don't play 'bar 1'. Poco moto is a way to say push it along a bit, rather than just keep a tempo going. ...


5

To answer the parts of your question specific to the piano, it's entirely acceptable to allow the sound to die away. Silence is a part of music too, or we wouldn't have rests. One way to get more sustain, though, is to use a concert grand piano. (I'm being a bit facetious, of course--I don't have $50,000+ kicking around and you probably don't either--but ...


5

Fermatas do not have a specific length. You would just hold the note longer than the value for effect typically at the discretion of the performer or conductor based on what kind of effect you want. For this specific piece, the tempo is pretty fast so any piano should be able to sustain it easily and the piece is well known enough that you can listen to ...


4

In principle you could use the Italian marking "M.S. solo" meaning literally "Left hand only". But "Solo" might be read with a different meaning (i.e. "this piece is for one player"), even though that would seem to make little sense in your context. I think you would be better using a full sentence in your native language, either in the title or at the start ...


4

You hold a fermata until it stops crying. Or rather, until you have the attention of the audience and before you lose it again. In a room with reverbation, you stop until the onset of a p will overcome the remaining reverb of an ff. There is a fresh start after a fermata, and you should make it appear like that. With a sustaining instrument like an ...


3

First thing to do is to listen to a recording - or several different ones - of the particular piece. This will give you a more accurate idea of how it goes. Or at least how others think it should go. Chords, dots and particularly tab on various sites on the internet are sometimes the product of amateurs, with little grounding in what they're doing. Thus ...


3

Like you - I have come across sheet music and tabs that I did not find sounded like the song they were supposed to represent. What I have learned is that in many cases, the sheet music you buy or find on-line, is nothing more than someones interpretation of a particular song or their own personal translation. Often they contain some inaccuracies. I ...


3

Ok, given the example, the upper phrase you highlight is a whole-note ascending minor third with the lower note doubled in the bass (the first note is a b flat due to there being a b flat at the start of the bar), the second phrase is a chromatically ascending minor third with the lower note doubled in the bass logically leading to the next bass note. So ...


3

It is very typical for musicians to have a folder or binder for whatever sheet music they are using. It is also not uncommon nowadays to see musicians using and iPad or a tablet to store digital copies of their sheet music and using it in place of a binder or folder.


2

First of all, it should be noted that the edition you have picked is no paragon of typesetting. All of the notes are there, but... The time signature has been changed from 3/8 to 3/4, with all note values doubled. This is probably to avoid scaring beginners with intimidating-looking notes that look short or fast. The eighth notes are beamed in pairs, ...


1

Just one thing to keep in mind: when you find something sounds utterly wrong, it may just be that you're reading the notation wrong. I find that a particular trap are keyboard fugues from Bach where there is modulation back and forth in a measure and an accidental that occured at the start of the measure is not repeated close to its end even though it is a ...


1

Play it how you think it should be played. Just because it's in a book doesn't mean it's correct and you can't change it. It could also be good ear training. If you are self learning, there isn't anything preventing you from totally skipping the song, if you still aren't motivated.


1

Basically, I think my question is, how do I get that much sustain? Well, you don't really. It depends on the piano, but since it is not a sustained instrument, such as winds or strings, the sound will die away. The only thing you can act on is the timing, which brings me to a point which seems greatly overlooked in the other answers, that is of the ...


1

In the big band, a flight case holds all of the orchs, which get set up by the band leader or one of his minions, on the music stands on the bandstand/stage. That way, no-one ever forgets their music, or brings the wrong folder, and the dots never get lost. For personal use, there is a special sort of leather case, which has a metal bar to close it over. ...


1

Theres that big curved line, I think its a slur, right on top from bar 1-4... does that mean I hold the sustain pedal down for that whole bit? That is called a legato phrasing mark. In bar 9 and 10 there is a "1 block" and a "2 block", I googled it and (correct me if I am wrong) but that means when it repeats play the "1" the first time and ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible