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11

A few ways: By counting the measures! It really is that simple. You start on measure 28, so measure 29 is your first measure of rest, then measure 30, then measure 31, etc. By the time measures 38 and 39 come up, you should be mentally and physically preparing to play again in measure 40. I always tried to interact physically in some way; typically I would ...


6

Basically, it's a shortcoming of traditional notation to be able to write down blues chords and such. I assume the notation is E major (4 sharps?) Watching the video, a couple things are fairly clear. In the introduction, Jimi's exploiting the tritone, based on E, the tritone interval for which is B-flat. So there's one accidental for ya ... the bass ...


5

As Tim said, this is definitely instrument dependent, but I'll try to give you some specifics. In general, though, here are some things that I really advise against marking down: What the key signature means Similarly, going through a piece to write in every accidental that is already given in the key signature Note names Instrument-specific guidance on ...


5

What I mean by that is that, I can always play this bar faster by adding a notation like pianissimo or a fortissimo above the bar. Almost. Pianissimo and fortissimo are dynamics. They relate to the loudness (also called "intensity") of the music. But there are other words to use for speed. You could simply write "faster" or "slower." There are all kinds of ...


4

My understanding so far has been that 4/8 is faster because it is probably assumed that a crotchet is conventionally always at 80 tempo (unless mentioned) and hence a semi-crotchet is played at 40 tempo as convention and hence the bar is played much faster. Your conclusion is faulty. It is a widely held misconception in music. There is no inherent ...


4

Richard's answer is correct and very useful, however misses points which are essential - to me at least. I'm going to fill in some important intermediate steps to reach the goals already outlined - which seems highly called for in the case of someone who is asking a question like this. (Note your question is not clear: Richard has assumed you're asking how ...


4

Richard's answer is great, and you can use all that stuff, but another thing is if you know the number of measures of rest then you can use it in your count like so: if there are 20 measures of rest in 4/4 then you count 1-2-3-4, 2-2-3-4, 3-2-3-4, ...... 19-2-3-4, 20-2-3-4. This way you easily keep count of the measures.


3

Since the root, or tonic of Locrian of C is B, it could be written with the key sig. of 5# for B maj., or 2# for B min., more likely the latter, as Locrian is more minor than major. That would mean putting naturals on F and C, which would probably encourage a reader to think it's modal, and Locrian. Don't know why you suggest B#, as it's enharmonically C, ...


3

Depending on how the audio file was recorded it may have time deviations from the 100 bpm steady beat you'd need. If it was recorded without a click track, electronic drum, or some other fixed tempo reference, there will surely be jitters that may make it very difficult (or at least demand a lot of work) to perfectly align with a new steady time reference. ...


3

If you want to avoid the whole ruler thing, you can actually find tab sheets; like for instance in this site, where there are PDFs with empty guitar tabs for you to print for free: There are many different layouts for you available just on that site: But also, you can buy these kind of sheet at some music stores. I have seen in guitar shops, but I'm ...


3

Yes, you can use the multi-voice feature. On each track, you can use up to 4 independent voices : the notes can have different duration and independent stem direction. Each number represent a voice (when selected, the notes on that voice are in black, the others in gray) and the last button displays all voices in black. When you edit / enter notes, it ...


2

In summary, is it right to say that If I set the tempo of crotchet = 80 for my first bar semi-crotchet = 80 for my second bar. Is it equivalent to saying 2 4/4 bars instead of 4/4 and 4/8 right? In general, if two time signatures have the same denominator (the bottom number), that means that the "beats" corresponding to the bottom number are at ...


1

Actually, the standard key signature for any mode comprises the sharps or flats (or combination of both - see some of Bartók's pieces) that define the mode. In the case of B Locrian, that means an empty key signature, as B Locrian uses the same heptatonic collection as C major/A minor. Key signatures don't really exist to specify the key (despite the name),...


1

When the composer of a given piece of music is not the one to write up the sheet music, the key/time signature/etc. are up to the discretion of the transcriber. In some cases, they do a terrible job, leaving anyone looking at it confused or annoyed trying to read it as they chose to transcribe it. I suspect that some companies that publish this material ...


1

Wow, this is interesting! The image you provided is from the original Paris print from Maurice Schlesinger. This notation is also found in a Breitkopf und Härtel version from 1878; an 1881 version co-issued by Schirmer and a lesser-known Berlin company; another Schirmer print from 1894 edited by Mikuli; and a 1915 print from Schirmer, now edited by Rasael ...


1

There are two interesting levels: What is this sort of music? (Try to hear the melody, the rhythm, where are the notes one should emphasize, ...) Where are problematic notation parts? (Unexpected key changes, modulations, accidentals, clef changes, what are the notes with many ledger lines) When looking at the sheet, try to imagine how to finger / pluck /...


1

I looked up "bass clef quiz" and found a number of good hits. No doubt some of these links will be broken before long, but hopefully that query will find new ones by then :) http://www.studybass.com/tools/bass-clef-notes/ http://notationtraining.com/bass-clef-practice Edit: I just created one of my own. http://bassclef.info/


1

NO! NO! NO! NO! IT IS NOTTTTT!!! a roll. The dots indicate a four note subdivision in the time of the note they are over: a half note with a single slash indicates play eighth notes (four of them). A quarter note with a double slash and four dots means to play sixteenth notes.



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