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6

Make or buy yourself some flash cards for bass clef notes. Begin with a very small subset of cards -- choose several that you can identify reliably, such as middle C. If you have, say, 3 easy cards and 2 slightly harder cards, that's a good combination. On the back of the card, write the name of the note. Now shuffle and quiz yourself. Say the names of ...


4

There are orchestral/wind ensemble instruments that regularly use the C clefs, in everyday situations. Some of the C clefs have conventional names for themselves, and certain instruments use them: Alto Clef When the C clef is centered on the 3rd line of the staff it's called an alto clef, or viola clef. Instruments that generally use this clef include: ...


3

I've played both piano and bass guitar, and what helps me is a bit of transposition. Find a tune that you can play on your right hand, in treble clef, well. Make sure it's something you could stand to listen to like 100 more times. Using a blank staff (lines on a piece of notebook paper work fine), transpose that line into bass clef. A G in treble clef ...


3

It's certainly how we recognise words,we look at shapes rather than sound each bit. That's for kids learning to read their first words.A lot of what we see is perceived in that same sort of way. When we speak, we don't necessarily plan each and every word and phrase. As far as KNOWING each note - If you stopped a brilliant player in mid flow and asked what ...


3

Sounds like a natural and good thing which should not be worked against. Similar to recognizing words instead of putting them together letter by letter (like one does when learning to read), it's good to recognize phrases instead of individual notes.


2

There are three clefs in general use, the G clef, the F clef and the C clef. The G clef is normally positioned on the second line up, indicating that this line is G. This is commonly called the "Treble clef". A common variation is the sub-octave treble clef, shown either with a small figure 8 below or as a repeated G clef symbol. This is used for tenor ...


2

This is something that will improve with time, but you should practice regularly if you want to improve it faster. Even a few minutes a day only spent reading bass clef (not playing the piano) should be enough. If you’re taking public transportation, this is a great place to practice. The restroom is a good place as well.


2

Here are the standard clefs available in the Sibelius music notation program. There are 22 of them, not counting guitar tablature. A few of the clef symbols are alternate ways of notating the same thing ("Treble down 8"), but as you can see, most are distinct. The other thing to note is that there are only three basic symbols for pitched instruments ("G", ...


2

The following image shows the alto "C", bass "F", and treble "G" clefs alongside each other in the most common position. These are the most common clefs for pitched instruments. "Non-pitched percussion", (e.g., a drum set, but not xylophones or chimes), will often use the percussion clef (see Nick B.'s answer). (Images courtesy of Wikipedia.) ...


2

There simply is no easy way about it. You begin at your entry points (as I like to call them) F being on the second line from top and G being on the bottom line on the staff. You may also find it useful to write the letters A-B-C-D-E-F-G out on your answer book. You have notes on lines and in spaces and when you go down on the staff you count backwards and ...


2

Shift your perception down by one whole line/space. C below the treble clef is one line below the clef; C below the bass clef is two. High F is the top line of the treble clef; the top F of the bass clef is the second-from-top line. C on the treble clef is the space above the middle line; C on the bass clef is the space below the middle line... and so forth. ...


1

When I was in college, I helped a few people with learning to read new clefs. One tuba especially really needed help with treble clef. Know that whatever method works for you to learn it, eventually you become fluent and the method disappears, much like it did with treble clef. As you guessed, what you need is exposure to more bass clef and you'll be able ...


1

I'm a guitar player, so naturally I learned the treble clef first, and only much later did I need to learn the bass clef. I remember what helped me a lot then. It is maybe trivial and all too obvious, but as a pure visual help I imagined that the notes stay where they are (with respect to the treble clef) and that the lines shift up by one. I.e., I tried to ...


1

Treble and bass clefs each have a few variations. An 8 or 15 above the clef means 8va or 15ma respectively (one or two octaves higher). In bass clef, the 8 or 15 can be below the staff, telling the player to play one or two octaves lower. Other clefs include soprano, mezzo-soprano, alto, tenor, and baritone. Finally, there is also a percussion clef. There ...


1

Yes there are two other less often used clefs that every musician should also know of. The alto clef. With middle C being on the middle line on the staff And the tenor clef. With middle C being on the second line from top on the staff.


1

They are the ones used on pianos and guitars, but some instruments have their range awkwardly situated for inclusion in one or the other - treble or bass. Thus, there is a C clef, which locates middle C on any line needed. As in the third line up, for example, where B in the treble lives normally. That then means the notes playable by the instrument mostly ...


1

'a2' also shows up in percussion parts. even when there is only one written part (snare drum, for ex.) a composer occasionally wants a second player to 'double' what is being played, either for volume or added color/texture. bolero is a good example. toward the end, a 2nd snare drummer is supposed to join in. (this is not always done, but it is in the ...


1

It might be useful to think of it this way. The second violins, for instance, are a section; they normally play together as a section. Many scores don't specify how many second violins are in the orchestra; they just expect there to be as many as the orchestra has. When the composer needs this second violin section to change its behavior and split into two ...



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