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6

As @Jacques said, the link for the full sheet music is not working, so we can't tell for certain what is intended in context, but here's my educated guess: The person that wrote your sheet music should have separated the pitches into two different voices to show that the lower note holds through for the full measure while the upper voice adds some ...


4

B# and C are basically the same note. They are called enharmonic tones. In modern musical notation and tuning, an enharmonic equivalent is a note, interval, or key signature that is equivalent to some other note, interval, or key signature but "spelled", or named differently. The one note differs from the other depending on the harmony of the song. ...


4

I do not believe, except maybe in rare instances, that staffs that large were used. You may be thinking of Lute tabs. All early music scores were written by hand. It's very time consuming to do this and they were after the most efficient use of space. This is why the 4 line staff with clefs and ligatures were used. I would start, of course, start with ...


3

Depending on how the audio file was recorded it may have time deviations from the 100 bpm steady beat you'd need. If it was recorded without a click track, electronic drum, or some other fixed tempo reference, there will surely be jitters that may make it very difficult (or at least demand a lot of work) to perfectly align with a new steady time reference. ...


2

As Tim said, this is definitely instrument dependent, but I'll try to give you some specifics. In general, though, here are some things that I really advise against marking down: What the key signature means Similarly, going through a piece to write in every accidental that is already given in the key signature Note names Instrument-specific guidance on ...


2

I can barely understand what you're talking about, honestly. Whatever it is, I think you need to forget the word "bind". In both exercises, there are two separate lines. In the first, there's a top line that goes: (rest) | E E E | (rest) | (rest) E and a bottom line that goes: A A A | (rest) | A E E | A The second example ...


1

I looked up "bass clef quiz" and found a number of good hits. No doubt some of these links will be broken before long, but hopefully that query will find new ones by then :) http://www.studybass.com/tools/bass-clef-notes/ http://notationtraining.com/bass-clef-practice Edit: I just created one of my own. http://bassclef.info/


1

Your enthusiasm and ambition are admirable, and these traits will be invaluable, and even necessary, as you progress. Great and unimaginable things are accomplished this way. However, this isn't one of those times. It may seem contradictory to you now, but the best and fastest way to "learn to play" this piece is to not play it at all at this point in your ...


1

I read through the comments that you are a mid-beginner, getting to intermediate level. I would not discourage you to learn this (hard) piece. This is the part of craziness that I have encountered too when I started. Go on and take pleasure. Now to answer the questions, you'll certainly find very logical that, this piece being intended for advanced level ...


1

There are often mistakes and discrepancies in different editions. The best way to determine if there are errors is often (unfortunately) just to listen to recordings and use a pencil to correct notes in your score. If there is repetition or transposition of phrases you can compare those and it can make your life easier finding the right notes (e.g. are ...



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