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5

To answer the parts of your question specific to the piano, it's entirely acceptable to allow the sound to die away. Silence is a part of music too, or we wouldn't have rests. One way to get more sustain, though, is to use a concert grand piano. (I'm being a bit facetious, of course--I don't have $50,000+ kicking around and you probably don't either--but ...


5

Fermatas do not have a specific length. You would just hold the note longer than the value for effect typically at the discretion of the performer or conductor based on what kind of effect you want. For this specific piece, the tempo is pretty fast so any piano should be able to sustain it easily and the piece is well known enough that you can listen to ...


4

You hold a fermata until it stops crying. Or rather, until you have the attention of the audience and before you lose it again. In a room with reverbation, you stop until the onset of a p will overcome the remaining reverb of an ff. There is a fresh start after a fermata, and you should make it appear like that. With a sustaining instrument like an ...


3

First thing to do is to listen to a recording - or several different ones - of the particular piece. This will give you a more accurate idea of how it goes. Or at least how others think it should go. Chords, dots and particularly tab on various sites on the internet are sometimes the product of amateurs, with little grounding in what they're doing. Thus ...


3

Like you - I have come across sheet music and tabs that I did not find sounded like the song they were supposed to represent. What I have learned is that in many cases, the sheet music you buy or find on-line, is nothing more than someones interpretation of a particular song or their own personal translation. Often they contain some inaccuracies. I ...


1

Just one thing to keep in mind: when you find something sounds utterly wrong, it may just be that you're reading the notation wrong. I find that a particular trap are keyboard fugues from Bach where there is modulation back and forth in a measure and an accidental that occured at the start of the measure is not repeated close to its end even though it is a ...


1

Play it how you think it should be played. Just because it's in a book doesn't mean it's correct and you can't change it. It could also be good ear training. If you are self learning, there isn't anything preventing you from totally skipping the song, if you still aren't motivated.


1

Basically, I think my question is, how do I get that much sustain? Well, you don't really. It depends on the piano, but since it is not a sustained instrument, such as winds or strings, the sound will die away. The only thing you can act on is the timing, which brings me to a point which seems greatly overlooked in the other answers, that is of the ...



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