Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

12

Without the key signature is looks confusing and wrong to musicians who are used to reading music in context, instead of just treating sheet music as a "play by numbers" game. It looks like C major, but the notes are mostly confined to the GABCD range, and the theme ends on G. Indeed, an F note will indeed occur in harmonizations of the theme. For instance ...


11

Use \once \set chordChanges = ##f at the location where you want to force the chord symbol. \score { << \new ChordNames { \set chordChanges = ##t \chordmode { \repeat volta 2 {g1} \alternative { {c} {\once \set chordChanges = ##f c4 g c c} } } } \new Voice = "one" { \relative c'' { ...


11

The X's are sharp signs, which means this piece is in D. Note, an X can also mean a double sharp, but in this context (throughout the whole piece), it clearly refers to a sharp. The t.'s mean trill (this is confirmed by many recordings that I've listened to). The W's at the end of the line tell where the first note on the next line is. For example, the ...


11

The double-octave transposition notation is indeed used in many kinds of classical and contemporary music. (The piano is only as big as it is to begin with because composers kept pushing the boundaries.) Your idea is very close, but incorrect. The notation is actually 15ma or 15mb, because the number in question refers to the size of the interval. | 1 2 ...


11

In piano, the staffs usually signifies what hand plays what note where the lower staff would be your left hand and the upper staff would be your right hand. While the clefs are important, you may see the same two clefs on a grand staff. In Imagine you can see there are two bass clefs because the piano part is low. It is kind of an unwritten rule of thumb in ...


10

Yes, this can be done. I have no direct experience here, but there are several projects underway to translate musical pieces that are in the open-source MusicXML data format (which can be exported from music notation software such as Finale and Sibelius) into Braille sheet music. There is a great deal of public-domain classical music available in ...


10

Smaller notes are a different issue, and could be relevant to a second line of lyrics, but you will typically see them only sporadically appear within the top voice. Anyway, what you're asking about is referred to as multiple voices on a staff. Notes in harmony will generally only be grouped together with a stem if the rhythm is the same, and all of the ...


10

Yes, both piano music and recorder music are written with the same kind of music notation, using the same kinds of symbols. The pitch "A" on the piano and the same pitch "A" on the recorder are written with the same musical note in sheet music. I do not know, but I suspect that the problem your daughter is encountering is of a different nature: On the ...


9

It's a tremolo. There are two types of tremolos. One between two different notes like in your example above and a second with the bars going though the stem of the note. In your case, it is like a trill where you go back and forth pattern them in that patter as fast as you can for the duration. Here is the link I used to confirm the ...


9

This is tremolo notation. The beams indicate the speed of the tremolo. In the first bar, you should alternate between the D-F# chord and the A in 16th notes. In the second bar, you should alternate between the two sets of notes in 32nd notes technically, or "as fast as possible" if 32nds are infeasible.


9

'Fine' pretty much means the end of a piece. In piece you used for your example the end is pretty obvious, but some pieces of music will end in the middle after a D.S. al Fine. In this example you can see the end of the piece is not where it would usually be. D.S. al Fine itself means go the Segno (the weird s with a line and two dots) and play to the ...


9

First off 2 octaves above or below is a 15th because an octave is 7 letter named notes above a unison (P1) so to get the first octave you have 1 + 7 = 8. 7 more notes above that is the next octave so 8 + 7 = 15. However it is very rare because as you inferred, it is rare that a pianist will play that high up and also it is much easier to understand just the ...


8

As Chochos and Kaz said, it lets you know that the key is G. Kaz described some things that knowing the key will let you do. Here are some more: Since the song is in the key of G, the note G will sound more consonant than any other note, followed by a D (the fifth of the scale). These notes will sound more peaceful than any other note, and most phrases ...


8

The song "Wonderful Dream" was written by Melanie Thornton (1967-2001). She was an American singer who had commercial success in Europe while remaining unknown in the USA; most published information about her seems to be from Germany. I found a vocal solo and piano arrangement published by Hal Leonard. It appears to be out of print from Hal Leonard, but if ...


8

Usually this is notated with the comment "let ring" above or below the staff; optionally you can include a dashed line (similar to an 8va line) that indicates the span of music where it should be played this way. Here's a good example


8

It's easy to think that a short sound just needs a blob on the music, but it's easier to count through the bars if each one has the prescribed number of beats. Imagine a snare on 2 and 4. If the rests on 1 and 3 weren't marked, you may well think that the first snare hit was on 1. Who knows? Whilst most drum sounds are short, cymbals can ring for a whole ...


7

To follow up Wheat's definition answer, here's how I would play this: When playing glisses on wind instruments, especially in a contemporary or jazz context, the change in pitch should be as continuous as possible. In contrast, a piano is only capable of playing absolutely defined pitches, so glisses all sound like a fast scale (chromatic or otherwise). ...


7

The top staff is the (vocal) melody. In principle this could be given to the vocal performer by itself for him/her to sing from in a vocalist+pianist type of situation; as the pianist, you do not play these. The lower two staves comprise the grand staff common to piano music. As indicated in other answers this is organized so as to show the right vs. left ...


6

Musescore is free as opposed to many other programs such as Sibelius or Finale. However, it is still very good and can do almost everything that paid programs can do. One of the input files accepted in Musescore is MIDI and it can output PDF among other formats. However, as guidot said, it takes a human to do it right because a MIDI file does not contain ...


6

There is an active Yahoo Group called Braille Music Chat: http://launch.groups.yahoo.com/group/braille-music-chat/ When I was writing my Masters project (on braille music for blind musicians) I found this group very helpful and friendly, and there are lots of braille-reading musicians who contribute regularly to the discussions there. The team at Steinberg ...


6

Grab a fake book and start digesting them! "Fake books" were historically completely illegal compilations of lead sheets (containing chord changes and melody lines) used by musicians as a quick reference for any one of the hundreds of charts they'd never seen before. These were completely illegal because no one was paying to license these songs from the ...


6

Age: Here's the download page. This pdf is the first one (#20529), and there it says it's from ~1733. Locatelli was still alive then so it could very well be the first print. With the red, green, and blue markings I agree with the others; we have sharps, trills, and continuation indicators (showing the first note of the next line) The purple markings also ...


6

I think in this context, "Piano Score" is a mistranslation. That would usually indicate an arrangement that has been condensed from an original instrumentation down to piano plus solo instrument or voice. Carl Witthoft's link contains the following image: The instrumentation is drums, guitars, and voice (and I would call this a "Band Score"). If the ...


6

There are no pedal markings, so the low G should be held with the left hand. That makes this note possibly more convenient to strike with a sforzando with the right hand depending on the reach of your fingers. The edition of the score that you've quoted indicates this (clearly, IMO). As nonpop observes, the original manuscript is different on this point, ...


5

I'm not a Drummer, but I would highly recommend investing in a copy of Guitar Pro. Most of the songs I've downloaded for guitar pro have the transcribers really putting a ton of effort into transcriptions of songs. It allows you to follow along, speed up, slow down, loop etc, and the Real Sound Engine means that the drums actually sound realistic. A ...


5

The letters Above mean the Implied/intended harmony. There are 2 possibilities I see here as to why an F and C7 are listed. If you are playing solo There are certain common chord progressions in music. The go-to example always seems to be I-V-I, and what this means is that the chords move from the first/tonic chord of the scale(in this case F, to the ...


4

The Primer of Braille Music Notation, which is available through the National Library Services for the Blind and Physically Handicapped in the United States, is still a great way to begin learning braille music. Although Traditional in its approach, the practice and skill-building exercises are very reinforcing in developing knowledge of braille music ...


4

The first example is a glissando. Wikipedia defines this as "A continuous, unbroken glide from one note to the next that includes the pitches between." The second example is a fall-off, meaning to glissando downward in pitch to an unspecified point (you choose how far to go), possibly with a rapid decrescendo to silence.


4

This is not quite a "conversion", since the midi file is on a much lower level than a score. So while you will surely get some output, it is more than questionable, whether somebody can play from it without considerable editing. As an example midi contains nothing about a key and so has to make wild guesses concerning accidentals, same for time signature, ...


4

The most extensive site is http://www.cpdl.org . There are also many chorale arrangements on IMSLP (http://www.imslp.org/) but that site also has orchestral, solo, opera, pieces, etc. CPDL is specifically focused on choral music. What you will not find on either site is most music published in the past 50 years (or since 1923 for American users) since that ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible