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54

NReilingh gave a good general-case answer. I'll give you a specific case just to demonstrate that the concept is useful. First consider a C major chord. C-E-G, right? Then you make it into a minor chord by flattening the third, to get C-E♭-G. So far, so good. Now, consider an A♭ major chord: it's spelled A♭-C-E♭. But what happens when ...


25

Since you're looking for software to input a score that is still under construction, MuseScore (found at musescore.org) would be my go-to application. It's a GNU-licensed graphical score editor that has playback and range-checking abilities. In case you later want to engrave a finished score with LaTeX-like typographic quality, LilyPond is considered to be ...


23

B and Cb are different notes. One is a kind of B and the other is a kind of C. Information about harmony is contained both in the note name and any accidental alterations to it — C to any kind of E is a third, and C to any kind of F is a fourth, and those intervals have different meanings, even if they sound "the same". And these pitches are only the same ...


14

It's a simile. There are a few different types of similes and this one means "play the last notated measure again". So in this piece you will end up playing the measure before the simile marks 3 times, then play the next notated measure. It's pretty much a very shorthand way of saying "Play what you just played again".


14

It's an 11-tuplet. Like a triplet, but with 11 notes where there would otherwise be 8 (or some other power of 2).


12

Use a music clip. There are two kinds. When I first started playing piano, I was using one of these: You put the clip around the top of the book, which holds it flat. Problem is, it doesn't work well for large books which are too thick to fit the clip, and when you're playing something at the beginning or end of the book the two sides become unbalanced. ...


11

Dave is right, but there's a little more to it. You can break the part up into two different lines. One that looks like this: And another that looks like this: When you put them together, you get the two part represented by different stems. It's pretty much telling you to hold the first note for the length of a quarter note, but play the set of notes ...


10

I don't know if this fits all the criteria you are looking for, but there is NotateMe which is available on Google Play and App Store. It allows you to write music sheets with your finger (or a pen) and is 'translated' into sheet music. Here is a video demonstration: There is also Ensemble Composer. ...


10

It does mean 'short'. In medieval mensural notation, it was a short note, either one third or half as long as a LONGA. It appears there were only two note lengths, breve and longa from 13th up to the 17th Century, reflecting the syllable sung. The longa is obviously a longer note length... Music may have been much slower then!


10

They are usually items that are either optional or merely reminders. In many cases, they may represent editorial alternatives (for instance, the editor may not see the parenthetical item as definitive, but some historical sources include it, so the editor presents it as an alternative). In your first example, the low G is presented as a feasible ...


9

All transcribed notation is an approximation. The classic dots and stems are simply not adequate for many types of music. But before we even talk about transcription, consider that many composers have conceived of sounds that are far beyond the status quo -- often called the avant garde, but not necessarily so. Many of these composers have then invented ...


8

the numbers are indeed fingerings. The circle indicates that the hand position is changing. The long curved lines are not sostenuto pedal markings, they're "legato" markings. Legato means that you play the marked phrase smoothly note into note, without spaces or rests between the notes. You're correct that the numbered measures near the repeat sign are ...


8

"Optional Snare Drum" What you're seeing is a cue for an optional instrument. The Star-Spangled Banner may begin with or without snare drum.


8

there's the .abc format and lilypond format. Those are about the only widely used text only score formats. But geared for making graphical notation, not analyzing scores. There's musicxml, too. But it's not very standardized and is also more geared for notation than analysis. I kinda suspect you don't know what you're getting into :) music is not ...


8

When looking at Jazz Standards as sheet music, do you play them as is or are you supposed to improvise off of them (or just add some flavor)? TL;DR: You never play something as it is in Jazz, unless it is specified to for some reason. That's Jazz. If you listen to two takes of the same song by the same group, it (most likely) will sound totally ...


8

What are "too many ledger lines"? Looks perfectly feasible to me. If you want to move them to the upper staff, don't let them share stems with the notes to be played by the right hand. Instead, the stems for right hand point up, and those for left hand down. Once you do that, your "too many ledger lines" solution takes not significantly more space. In ...


8

This is a custos (from latin, plural custodes), see lilypond documentation. No match in English Wikipedia, however. The German Wikipedia has it and adds the following translations (as its usage mostly dating from the 18th century): Guidon (French) Direct (English) Mostra (Italian) and Kustos, Weiser (German). A German Encyclopedia of Church Composition ...


8

Part of the problem is that beginners are trying to learn at least three different things at the same time: How to read sheet music How to play their instrument How to play the specific piece that is in front of them. If you concentrate mostly on #3, then learning #1 and #2 will be slower, and (relatively) unstructured and disorganized. You need to work ...


7

My favorite method is to use clothespins to clip the edges of the book to a music stand. If the dimensions of either the book or the stand don't allow that, I use the clothespins to clip a ruler or a similarly sized piece of wood to the front of the book to keep it open. If the book is stapled together and not too thick, bending it backwards a few times ...


6

There are two voices in this music: the lower plays f, then e as quarter notes; Note that the downward pointing stem's don't have flags/beams -- thus they are quarter notes. the upper plays f <a d> e <g c#> as eighth notes This is the way to write music where more than one voice happen to execute the same note at the same time. If you ...


6

Can't think why some numbers are in circles - they refer to fingerings - 1= thumb, r.h. in the treble clef. Yes, it's a phrase rather than a slur, so no pedal as the harmony changes. It is a repeat sign. Play the first part again, and second time around, don't play 'bar 1'. Poco moto is a way to say push it along a bit, rather than just keep a tempo going. ...


6

What you have are two arrangements of the same piece in two different keys. The second version is a semitone higher than the first - meaning every note is shifted down one piano-key (if you also use the black notes.) Try playing both exactly as written, and you'll see you have the same tune, just slightly lower in the first instance. So, the first four ...


6

The octave the notes are written in is irrelevant in most transcribed pop vocals as there are many different types of vocalist. Remember we typically generalize vocals into 4 different groups Soprano, Alto, Tenor, and Bass and we also typically like to perceive the melody as well within the upper section of the treble staff so typically pop lead vocal parts ...


6

When I wrote lead sheets by hand (this is a quarter-century ago, mind you), I used a felt-tip calligraphy pen. I held the pen so that the nib essentially was up-and-down on the page (that is, parallel to the bar lines). This gave me fairly easy-to-draw note heads, thinner stems, and thicker beams. With practice, it was not difficult to achieve results ...


6

Composers may use a dashed/dotted/broken slur or phrase mark when it's optional (for example, when lyrics are irregular, as user25358 attests). It may also be used to indicate a hemiola, for example where a 3/4 bar should be treated as 6/8. That could be the case in bars 2-3 of your excerpt. Editors may use a dashed/dotted/broken slur to indicate editorial ...


6

I've had books re-bound with a spiral binding through a local print shop. The binding is less durable in that it's easier for pages to rip out with this binding, but it allows the pages to stay flat. If you have a lot of books, this may be prohibitively expensive.


6

Marking the score 3/4 for 3 measures and then 4/4 for one, seems to fit nicely. Another thing you could try, is to mark the 4th measure as 12/8 (which works with 4 groups of 3 eighths each). Personally, I think I would choose the first option, 4/4.


6

I think this is an error in the score. If I say that, it's because Thcaikovsky, in a letter to Jugensern (the editor of the score you are working on), say that few mistakes are still present in the score. I found this on the internet: Tchaikovsky gave a detailed account of his reworking of his First Symphony, and publication of the full score, in a ...


6

You can (theoretically) read a score without bar lines, and indeed bars (or measures) and bar lines, in the sense that we use today, are a relatively new invention, from the mid of 17th century. Before that, "bar" lines were not used at all, or were used only to visually divide a piece into sections or phrases. In fact if we go all the way back to Gregorian ...



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