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1

Just one thing to keep in mind: when you find something sounds utterly wrong, it may just be that you're reading the notation wrong. I find that a particular trap are keyboard fugues from Bach where there is modulation back and forth in a measure and an accidental that occured at the start of the measure is not repeated close to its end even though it is a ...


3

First thing to do is to listen to a recording - or several different ones - of the particular piece. This will give you a more accurate idea of how it goes. Or at least how others think it should go. Chords, dots and particularly tab on various sites on the internet are sometimes the product of amateurs, with little grounding in what they're doing. Thus ...


3

Like you - I have come across sheet music and tabs that I did not find sounded like the song they were supposed to represent. What I have learned is that in many cases, the sheet music you buy or find on-line, is nothing more than someones interpretation of a particular song or their own personal translation. Often they contain some inaccuracies. I ...


1

Play it how you think it should be played. Just because it's in a book doesn't mean it's correct and you can't change it. It could also be good ear training. If you are self learning, there isn't anything preventing you from totally skipping the song, if you still aren't motivated.


-2

One has to add that the left hand tremolo notation in bar 8 of the OP is sub-optimal and rather confusing. A better way is already demonstrated in the melody of the same bar. A half-note + a double dotted quarter-note would be the perfect notation for the tremolos as well. Conformity in every line of the score is key! Just imagine a full-score with a ...


1

Basically, I think my question is, how do I get that much sustain? Well, you don't really. It depends on the piano, but since it is not a sustained instrument, such as winds or strings, the sound will die away. The only thing you can act on is the timing, which brings me to a point which seems greatly overlooked in the other answers, that is of the ...


0

It may be a hammer-on to the 24th fret.


4

You hold a fermata until it stops crying. Or rather, until you have the attention of the audience and before you lose it again. In a room with reverbation, you stop until the onset of a p will overcome the remaining reverb of an ff. There is a fresh start after a fermata, and you should make it appear like that. With a sustaining instrument like an ...


5

To answer the parts of your question specific to the piano, it's entirely acceptable to allow the sound to die away. Silence is a part of music too, or we wouldn't have rests. One way to get more sustain, though, is to use a concert grand piano. (I'm being a bit facetious, of course--I don't have $50,000+ kicking around and you probably don't either--but ...


5

Fermatas do not have a specific length. You would just hold the note longer than the value for effect typically at the discretion of the performer or conductor based on what kind of effect you want. For this specific piece, the tempo is pretty fast so any piano should be able to sustain it easily and the piece is well known enough that you can listen to ...


0

Ah it seems to be just a short tie. Simply being a hammer-on from 0 to 2 and a quick 4 ie: --0h2-4--


0

May this not be counted as a complete answer for I unfortunately do not have enough reputation to comment. A few possibilities: the top staff is for another instrument or vocals (in which case I think it would possibly be smaller); I think the piece might be written for an organ as well.(see Bach's Toccata and Fugue example); as others have stated, the ...


0

If you are just beginning guitar, start learning to read standard notation in conjunction with guitar immediately. If you're not going to start with it, don't expect to pick it up quickly after you've been having success without reading. I can attest that learning to read music for guitar is harder when you already have habits and methods for getting ...


0

Do you intend to learn Classical guitar? In any case, reading music on the guitar from the treble clef is not specialized because the guitar does not transpose. You can learn to read music on the Treble Clef in any standard theory book (which usually follows the piano convention). If you move up only one fret on your 5th string from the bottom (assuming ...


4

In principle you could use the Italian marking "M.S. solo" meaning literally "Left hand only". But "Solo" might be read with a different meaning (i.e. "this piece is for one player"), even though that would seem to make little sense in your context. I think you would be better using a full sentence in your native language, either in the title or at the start ...


0

bottom staff defaults to left hand unless otherwise notated. as does top to RH.


2

First of all, it should be noted that the edition you have picked is no paragon of typesetting. All of the notes are there, but... The time signature has been changed from 3/8 to 3/4, with all note values doubled. This is probably to avoid scaring beginners with intimidating-looking notes that look short or fast. The eighth notes are beamed in pairs, ...


1

Theres that big curved line, I think its a slur, right on top from bar 1-4... does that mean I hold the sustain pedal down for that whole bit? That is called a legato phrasing mark. In bar 9 and 10 there is a "1 block" and a "2 block", I googled it and (correct me if I am wrong) but that means when it repeats play the "1" the first time and ...


8

the numbers are indeed fingerings. The circle indicates that the hand position is changing. The long curved lines are not sostenuto pedal markings, they're "legato" markings. Legato means that you play the marked phrase smoothly note into note, without spaces or rests between the notes. You're correct that the numbered measures near the repeat sign are ...


6

Can't think why some numbers are in circles - they refer to fingerings - 1= thumb, r.h. in the treble clef. Yes, it's a phrase rather than a slur, so no pedal as the harmony changes. It is a repeat sign. Play the first part again, and second time around, don't play 'bar 1'. Poco moto is a way to say push it along a bit, rather than just keep a tempo going. ...


-1

Storage Like any book, sheet music should be stored and filed usually in a cabinet. I would recommend putting all sheet music in an organized fashion vertically unless you are going to use the music. In that case, stack it up on a piano or a table. Warning Be careful when leaving sheet music out on tables. Things get spilled, cats/dogs scratch and ...


0

I like to keep the proper bound volumes upright on a bookshelf: this makes finding things really easy. But for various bits of flimsy and/or ancient, disintegrating copies, not to mention more and more stuff downloaded from IMSLP, laying flat is the only way. As part of my most recent attempt to organise things, I bought a floor-standing 10-drawer B4-size ...


0

I had a teacher in college who collected most of his music library in a lateral filing cabinet similar to this one, and this seemed to work pretty well. He was able to organize the music and it allowed for the use of bound music and folders for loose-leaf music. My current method involves stacking music flat on lots of wide shelving. Unfortunately, I'm ...


0

Your best bet may be to organize your music using tools that make it comparably easy to produce different forms of output from the same input. When using, say, LilyPond, the same input used for producing guitar tablature will equally well produce standard staff notation, and expanding lead sheet information to piano chords is also straightforward. When ...


0

For most rock players, what is known as the "lead sheet" format is probably the most recognizable. It generally has a key signature, the melody written out in standard music notation, chord symbols, sometimes with inversions/neck positions/tabulature blocks for guitarists, maybe any distinctive bass part notated, and lyrics. It's a "road map" format.


1

In the big band, a flight case holds all of the orchs, which get set up by the band leader or one of his minions, on the music stands on the bandstand/stage. That way, no-one ever forgets their music, or brings the wrong folder, and the dots never get lost. For personal use, there is a special sort of leather case, which has a metal bar to close it over. ...


3

It is very typical for musicians to have a folder or binder for whatever sheet music they are using. It is also not uncommon nowadays to see musicians using and iPad or a tablet to store digital copies of their sheet music and using it in place of a binder or folder.


5

The two things required to understand this piece are: tie and slur symbols look the same but have different meanings. in piano music, especially polyphonic, you can have many melodies (think - virtual staves) squeezed into a single staff. The slur / tie problem: If you tie two notes (they need to have the same pitch), it is always played as a single ...


3

This score writes three voices. The lowest voice is in the lower staff, stem down. The middle voice is in the upper staff, stem down, its rests close to the bottom staff line. The top voice is in the upper staff, stem up, its rests close to the top staff line. As the piece progresses, the middle line (if I remember correctly) will likely venture into the ...


2

Generally, notes with up tails are deemed to be 'the melody'. Notes with down tails, as here, are ' the accompaniment'. Thus, the tune starts with two notes that are not the melody. There are three lines to this tune, and since the top line doesn't start immediately, it needs a rest shown. Similarly, so does the middle line of notes. That 'eighth note' is a ...


2

This is what this score is saying: 1st 16th note, play and hold middle C with your left hand. 2nd 16th note, play and hold the E above middle C with your right thumb. 3rd - 5th 16th notes, keep holding the E with your right thumb while other fingers of your right hand complete the arpeggio. 6th - 8th 16th notes, keep holding the E with your right thumb (do ...


0

The main way I've seen this done is to use multiple voices to show the durations. Here is a short excerpt from a piece I was copying into my notation program:



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