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2

The 'grt', sometimes designated 'I', is the manual closest to the player on a two manual organ. It's called the great manual. The other is called the swell, or 'II'. Hence 'sw'. Different sounds can be made using the stops for each manual, and sometimes they are coupled, so playing one manual operates both, giving more sound options.


6

Just to add to @MattL's answer... Great and Swell are usually assigned to different manuals. (Although they can be linked by couplers.) The Great manual will usually be assigned to principal stops, or as this page describes it, the Great manual usually: contains the meat and potatoes of the organ: the principal chorus. The Swell manual will be linked ...


11

They refer to divisions (manuals) of the organ: Grt. for Great (French 'Grand Choeur', German 'Hauptwerk') and Sw. for Swell (French 'Grand Orgue', German 'Schwellwerk'). For English, American and German organs, in a two-manual configuration, the lower manual is the Great, and the top manual is the Swell. French organs usually have the Swell at the bottom. ...


5

My sense (after writing parsers for ABC, MusicXML, Cappella, Noteworthy, and about 6 other formats; and output to Lilypond, etc.) is the limitations of ABC, the format, cannot be completely separated from the limitations of ABC parsers. As both Kevin and Chris noted above, the ABC format has the capacity to encode much of the complexity of MusicXML and ...


4

There are a number of features planned for abc notation - major updates for v2.2 and v2.3, as well as a number of minor proposals. abc v2.2 is mainly concerned with "sort[ing] out ambiguities and incompatibilities in multi-voice music", relating to the 'control voice'. As far as I can see, both Lilypond and MusicXML have fully-fledged multiple voice ...


14

I believe the symbol is an Italian notation, referred to as 'Mordente' - although not always the mordent as we know it! It was commonly used 1710-1760, which fits the time period you specified. How to play it seems to vary according to who wrote it, but one of the most 'defined' examples was from Germiniani's 1748/51 ornament tables, where it was specified ...


-2

I might have it: in Finale music notation software, they include this symbol. According to the manual its a caesura. Don't know if it fits with the context, but that's the closest I could find.


0

Having looked through all my resources, and failed to find it, I'd hazard a guess that it's a tremolo sign, with the note being bowed rapidly back and forth.Although that's not easy on a flute ! It actually shows up in a similar manner, but with the marks on the stem, as tremolo, for violin. Could also be a 'ceasura' - a brief silent pause, where timing ...


1

ABC Notation is a wonderful notation language that a number of people prefer to Lilypond. Many of the limitations of ABC Notation are not in the notation but in the implementation of tools. Before ABC Notation 2.1 the main limitation was in the writing of multiple voice music, but this has been addressed in ABC Notation 2.1 and will be finalized in ABC ...


2

Even though this question has already long been answered, I thought I would show a picture of the note durations in case it helps someone. The time of a single quarter note can be filled many ways: |___________| : One quarter note |_____|_____| : Two eighth notes |___|___|___| : Three triplets |__|__|__|__| : Four sixteenth notes So the rhythm ...


0

The first 13 notes are the following: DD DBG F# ECC BGA G. (Your score begins with the last two lines of the birthday song). If you've never worked with scores before, then google "piano scores" or watch youtube (instructive) videos like this one.


3

The chart you have is useful, but the way they put the staff is slightly confusing. The lower octaves (lower frequency pitches) have the lower numbers and on this chart the lower octaves are on top which is odd. Here is a slightly better chart that tells you where all the C's lie on the grand staff and what octave they are in: From your score, you can ...


1

The D after the "start here" arrow is "D4" (MIDI note 62). Higher notes in the sheet music (which will have larger numbers) are confusingly located lower on the chart (which is why the staffs are upside down). You'll also need to know that the "F#" (pronounced F-sharp) is located on a black key, between F and G. The MIDI numbers for the white notes vs. ...


0

It's funny I saw the notation and recognized the piece right away. I can't play it very fast, but I recognized it! Yes, it means to play both at the same time, but that's not all you want to do with this passage. If you notice there's a phrase in there that resides on the top notes. You want to balance the right hand so the top and bottom notes sound a bit ...


12

Yes, that's a "play both notes". See http://musescore.org/node/14449 for a note on the standard from the US Music Publisher's Association.


2

I tried pasting your code into http://www.drawthedots.com/abcjs, and I saw the problem you're talking about. But I also saw, from the score, why it's doing that. In ABC notation, accidentals last for the entire bar, and barlines are not automatically added. So in the first chord, you have a ^c. This affects all other c's in the measure, so that the c in ...


0

LilyPond comes with documentation. lilypond-book in particular is documented in the Usage Reference. In particular, the option quote does not do what you think it does. lilypond-book should likely output information on the terminal and complain when it has difficulties figuring out margins and similar. Without that information, diagnosing what goes wrong ...


0

I'd try to find a way to change the paper variables in the lilypond file, basically to set the page width to be something appropriate for a figure in a document. I'm not sure whether you can do this via MuseScore, but if you go in and edit the .ly file by hand, you should be able to make it narrower.



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