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2

If you look at standard SATB arrangements of hymns, you will notice that the bass often moves in contrary motion to the melody, and often in rhythmic intervals in the middle of phrases when no one else is moving. This really makes the bass part pop in a way that does not distract from the song itself. Also pick up and study some of Bach's chorales, and you ...


3

It seems that culture may come in here. In some countries, the solfege system is thought of as quite important. In France, for example, it's a fixed doh at C, and all the notes are named from this. So there, it would be useful. In England, there's not so much emphasis, so learning dots makes more sense. No doubt, other countries will have their own views, ...


2

Use a well spaced writing technique. Especially between Bass and Tenor. Remember that in a modern SATB choir, Soprano and Tenor are the brighter voices and Alto and Bass the darker. So you have not a timbral continuum from Bass to Soprano. This is very important when you want to write a transparent texture.


1

Write higher. People commonly write the tenor part too low, which then forces the bass even lower, into a quieter part of their range (it doesn't help that usually most of the members of the bass section are not true basses, but rather baritones without good control of their upper range).


2

In scores for greater ensembles as well as for instrument groups (say 2 bassoons and contrabassoon notated in the same score) the dynamic is typically written below the voice it belongs to.


6

On piano music, with treble and bass clefs, if the dynamics mark is between them, it refers to both parts (hands). If it's for the treble, it's found above the treble, and if for bass alone, it's found under the bass.


1

I believe this is what you're referring to. This is known as "multiple voices", where music consists of two or more melodic lines. In this case, this would be a vocal piece, but if you had to play it on piano, you'd have 4 independent melodic lines to play. Take a look at bar 4. The notes that have the stems facing upwards are one "voice" and the notes with ...


0

The 5 is for fingering on the piano. It's telling the player to use their pinky on the note. You can disregard it if you are not playing piano.


5

Okay, after quite a bit of thought I think I have worked this out. However, before answering, two things: firstly, I have to say, I haven't seen this notation before and it doesn't seem very helpful; secondly, the other answer and comments helped me work this out. Also, it is worth pointing out for other readers, that this passage of music has the ...


2

I'll add a bit more explanation to the notation. Usually, in each bar of a sheet, you have a fixed number of voices, which makes it easy to follow the music. In bar 54, there is 1 voice, in bar 55, there are two: One contains f8 g8 a8 b8 a4 b4 (the start of the solo), the other one contains d'2 r4 r2 (the end of the previous motif and just rests afterwards, ...


3

Well, if the solo for violin 2 starts there, there is some other solo or a tutti before it, and the D is obviously the last note of that other solo or tutti. If it is a tutti that the solo violin is supposed to share, then the solo violin will fade out of the preceding phrase decently so that the D does not sound out of character or sequence. While it is ...


0

From the picture, it looks like the top number indicates how many strings are part of the barre, and the lower number indicates the un-barred strings. But if there's really a 2/2 in there, then this can't be the answer.


8

The numbers tell you which left hand finger to use (index being 1, pinky being 4 - thumb not included on guitar of course). The Roman numerals tell you which position to play in. This is similar to which fret, as you suggest, but indicates the fret position of the left hand, not the actual note. This is done by putting a Roman numeral for the fret which ...


7

Some of it appears to be a variation of shape notes (5,8,9,10,11,12), others seem based on larger note values that are quite rare in modern music and clef like (6,14). Some (mainly the Xs and triangles) seem based on percussion notation (2,7,8) and some just seem to be decorations (1,3,4,13). As these notes heads come from different places and are used in ...


7

Here are some of example of where alternate note heads are useful. There are probably more that I can't think of, or am unaware of. The "ladder" shape is one form of the double-whole note (aka breve). As you might expect, it has twice the duration of a regular whole note. Notation for percussion instruments oftens use various shapes to indicate different ...


0

initial hit with the first fingering. (pre arc) hold with the second fingering. (post arc) so your hand can be in a better position to hit the coming set of notes. you don't always get those fancy arcs or even fingering at all in most sheet music.


4

I think you have the order of transition wrong. So in the first image (L.H.), you'd play the high F (assuming bass clef) with your thumb (1), then the D with the index finger (2). You'd then continue holding down the D with your thumb (2), which allows you to reach down to the C (with your pinkie). So you're transitioning from finger 2 to 1 (not from 1 to 2 ...


0

On the assumption that the second example is R.H., then yes,the fingers will keep the A and C (?) down and swap to allow the thumb to play low C (?) - an arc for each change.


1

When notated like this, it generally means that you will hold down the note with one finger while the other fingers play the 8th notes. Play the E with your little finger and hold it down, then use your index finger and thumb to play the B, high E, and B. Repeat for the F and so on. I don't see any pedal markings, so no pedal should be used.


4

Having just dug out the flute book in question from my archives (!), it seems like not a bad idea. The first few tunes can be played using open strings and not moving too far up the neck. On guitars, once one learns that there are two octaves available without moving up or down more than 4 or 5 frets, one can play most, if not all of a particular tune in ...


9

In playing string instruments, the term "Position" refers to the placement of the left hand along the fretboard/fingerboard. Different instruments might number them differently, but with guitar, I think its the number of the fret that your index finger is would be stopping. So when your fingers are in the "usual" place, at 1st, 2nd, 3rd, and 4th frets, you ...


0

If you want to exchange scores with friends who use different score-editing programs, so that they can continue working on it, your only real choice is to exchange MusicXML files. But the only way you'll send them EXACTLY what you design is if you both use the same program and use its native file format. If they don't need to continue editing the score, ...


0

If you know what you want the score to look like, the score-writing programs already mentioned will help you do the job. If the MIDI is configured as one string=one channel and you want guitar tab rather than staff notation, you might even get some way towards automatic conversion!


0

It is a long but worthwhile struggle to learn to read on the guitar. Lots of practice of simple melodies, and many different ones, will be a great start. Many different sheets of music will help you avoid memorizing (which won't really be of much use as you're learning to sightread). So just grab as many method books as you can from the web and/or ...


0

What you need, if you're not looking for methods addressing specific technique exercises one by one, are some reference composers and works (as in those used in music schools). As with any instrument, there are tons of classical études written for students of all levels. For example, just searching "guitar etudes" in the public domain (IMSLP indeed) gets ...


2

Try IMSLP. I just entered a search on their site for "guitar method", and got several pages of links. The first one, Stahl's New Guitar Method (from 1903!) goes into considerable detail on notation right from the start - it may or may not suit your other needs, but I'm sure that you'll find something there that does.


2

Developing good sight reading skills involves: a high level of coordination a lot of time and patience reading lots of music the metronome 1. Coordination You mentioned that you have trouble reading both hands at the same time. This is a skill that anybody would struggle in if you do not gradually progress through songs with increasing difficulty. You ...



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