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0

When I showed a music teacher of mine the Alto-Tenor clef as originally used in conjunction with Treble clef symbol, the moment he saw it, in an instant, he said to remove the Treble Clef symbol, and use the two staves as a Contra Basso/Alto-Tenor grand staff for use by bass players playing five and six string basses.


3

Right after the time signature change you see a natural sign, which would not be necessary for the assumed implicit key signature reset. Key signatures are very important and therefore very explicit. For a change of the key signature typically all existing accidentals are first neutralized and then the new ones added.


1

The only time a key signature changes is when the composer labels it as such. Using the image you provided as an example, the piece would remain in E major, until at some point in the song, the composer states that the piece is to be played in let's say G major. I have taken piano lessons for ten years, and on occasion dabble in composition.


-3

They have nothing in common. Well, that is not enterily true. If you record it and change the speed on the playback not the input source, then you'd be raising a bit the key collaterally :)


1

The link you cited is for the liner notes of a 2000 album of Granados' Escenas Romanticas on the Naxos label. The pianist in the recording is Douglas Riva. Here is the Wikipedia article on Douglas Riva. The article says that Douglas Riva is an authority on the music of Granados. Here is a link to Douglas Riva's website and his email address along with a ...


0

It really depends on your specific personal goals. It's only a bad habit if you have a compelling need to be able to sight read and play a piece note by note. If you were going to be in a position where you would be expected to instantly play any piece that was put in front of you without rehearsal, then you would want to overcome that tendency and learn ...


1

A common misconception is that accidentals affect future notes in the same measure across octaves. This is simply not true. Accidentals only affect the note in the octave in which they occur. So, if A4 has a sharp accidental and there is an A3 later in the same measure, the sharp doesn't carry over. This happens often in jazz music, as well as in ...


0

Imagine a single sharp written before the F#: it wouldn't have any effect (unless it cancels a natural sign in the same bar). So the double sharp raises the F# by a semi-tone, which is enharmonically equivalent to a G.


0

Accidentals are always just what they say, and not affected in any way by the key signature. (Other than the key signature being the reason to put them there!) So yes, in this case, it is an F double sharp - or G natural.


2

The are two basic types of editions; performing editions where the editor tells you how he/she thinks the piece should go, and urtext editions which tell you what the composer wrote, or show you all the alternatives if that is not known exactly. Longo is unashamedly a performing edition in the style of piano-playing 100 years ago, and almost every note of ...



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