Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

In the British Brass Band tradition, all instruments (except bass trombone, and please don't expect me to explain why :-) are written in transposed treble clef. This allows any player to pick up any instrument and at least know the fingerings! In the orchestral tradition, Trumpets and Horns are written transposed. This can be explained by their ...


0

When I was learning grade piano, some pieces required analytical practice, some I sight-read. But pieces don't define a grade, performances do. The way you play a scale for Grade 4 won't do for Grade 8 - and it's little to do with adding a further octave or two.


0

I agree with all of what Mr. (Ms.?) Reilingh says except I would suggest that you don't practice "a measure at a time", rather practice in phrases (a musical sentence) by breaking the phrases into small manageable parts then combine these parts until you have the complete phrase. Granted this may result in "a measure at a time" but I believe this way of ...


1

To an extent, it's down to personal choice. The more experienced you become, the more naturally your fingers (and thumb) will play certain strings. The rules are more general guidelines, and you may even find that using your pinky is better than another finger. A good move for repeated notes on one string is to alternate, but there are times when using ...


4

Being able to play one grade 4 piece does not mean you will be able to play all of them. The C minor prelude looks and sounds harder than it actually is, in my opinion (as someone who has learned to play the piece). I would say the overall difficulty level between the two is comparable, although as Dr Mayhem commented, the pieces do very different things ...


1

The #### circled in red in your answer are the key signature. YOu can read this as "four sharps", that stand for E Major (or C# minor). Basically all F C G D in the score are sharp, no matter in which octave. The simplest case is No Sharps/No flats (C Major / A Minor), in that case all notes are natural.


6

Yes they do because they are the key signature of a piece. The key signature tells you what key you are in and what notes to expect. Since you are in the key of E major, you will most likely use the notes E, F#, G#, A, B, C#, D# which the four sharps represent. Those are the notes you should use unless a different accidental is applied to a note.


1

Finding the key when there are sharps: In all cases, look at the last sharp. Find your key at the half tone above it. That is usually very uncomplicated. For the key signature with one sharp, for instance, it is f# you are looking at. Move up a half tone, and you find the tonic note of g. You are in the key of G. However, with your example, the last sharp ...


1

It has indeed got a key change , from C to C#. It could have been written in Db instead, with 5 flats!. But keeping to a 'C-ness' means that the dots stay in the same places, lines,spaces, as they were, assuming the tune stays the same. It's a trick used in a few songs to add some excitement or stop some tedium. If you are struggling with playing in that ...


3

This is called a key change. The 7 sharps simply means that it's changing key from C major to C# major. Treat everything after the key change as if you're playing in C# major. So, when the key is still in C, you'd play no sharps or flats (unless noted by an accidental), and after the key change, if you see a C in the sheet music, you'd play a C#, if you see ...


0

Miškinis’s Pater Noster, which begins with various repeating short motifs by each voice. The motifs do not start together either. My edition, to express this, writes the motif once, then the first few notes of the next repetition of the motif (to ensure the next motif enters where expected), then use a “percent” sign followed by a black line around in the ...


2

There are several existing forms of shorthand that have been accepted as part of standard notation, such as full-/half-/two-measure repeat symbols, sim. (for articulations and dynamics) and turns (which define note sequences by relative pitch and are probably the closest thing to what you are looking for [I'll add a pic shortly]), but those assume you've ...


1

No, a B marked with a single flat will only ever be a B-flat. Occasionally in written music you will see "courtesy accidentals", redundant accidentals meant to clarify or remind the player. These are are often used when a note was altered in a previous bar.


1

There are two separate "layers" of music occurring on the second staff. As you can see, the notes with downward stems already fill the bar, making 3 beats. The rest is part of the upper layer of notes, which begins with one beat of rest and continues with 2 beats on the D.


1

No, a Bb is a Bb, no matter how many times you say so! One would be required if there had previously been a B natural, in the same octave, in the same bar. If it had been in a different octave, one (maybe in brackets) would seem sensible. In a preceding bar - use your common sense.


-2

"Etc." is fine, if it's clear. The more musical term is "sim.". Just make sure it IS clear :-) If in doubt, write it out.


2

No, accidentals are always staff independent. The reason you have a Bb in at the beginning of the bar and a B natural at the end is because the Bb is pulling down to the A and the B natural is leading up to the C.


1

Correct. There is a subjective component to this decision, but you generally want to keep the placement of the beat as clear as possible. The rule of thumb is that when a note doesn't begin on a beat, it should not cross into another beat without a tie, unless the notation is simple enough (e.g. quarter, half, quarter) that there is no ambiguity in how the ...


1

I have seen "etc." being used in e.g. books of exercises. First there's say two bars establishing the pattern and how it progresses, then one bar with just "etc." written in it followed by the end point of the exercise. But then the type of pattern has been explained earlier e.g. by writing out one exercise fully. So it can be used in certain contexts, but ...


2

In deciding whether an accidental should be printed, one should generally expect that people reading music will be blind to staffs that don't contain their part(s), and may be blind to music which they are not performing even when it shares a staff with music they are; one should add cautionary accidentals if necessary to ensure that such possible blindness ...


5

There really isn't something like that. The closest thing is a simile where you could write a rhythm pattern and then put the chord changes over the similes as shown in this answer. Music notation in general is very exact to make sure the musician playing the song know exactly how to play it.


4

As Dom states, each and every stave is a separate entity, and accidentals need to be put in for each changed note. This is in D minor (at least here), and what's happening is the normal melodic minor trick of that era. Melodies going downwards would use a natural minor configuration, while those rising would have a raised 6th and 7th. Thus, Bbs in the left ...


2

No they do not. If you wanted to represent the accidental on a different staff you would need to write it in. Each staff is independent of the other even if they are linked as in your example.


1

I use my mobile phone with Solfa. Mobile device allows me to learn on way to and from work (train, bus) and also somehow feels more convenient and "ready" than a desktop computer or laptop. You cannot take your piano on a bus. This program allows to configure the level of difficulty (which clefs, should notes above/below the clef be included, should sharps ...


1

Treble clef is from Middle C upwards through the notes Bass clef is from Middle C downwards through the notes That's literally all there is to it So find the middle C note of the piano, left is bass clef, right is treble clef


3

Anytime in written music that there are multiple staffs, they are all played simultaneously. Exactly who plays/sings what part will depend on the context of the music. Typically, in vocal music with two staffs, the upper staff (with the treble clef) will contain the female parts (Soprano and Alto), while the lower staff (with the bass clef) will contain the ...


0

The top section with the treble clef is for the right hand of the piano and the bass clef staff is for the left hand. Keyboard, organ or piano follows both lines. If there are two staff lines with treble clef with the words between two treble clef lines with a bass clef line below the 2nd treble clef line, the top line is just the melody that you would ...


0

To further confuse things, the notes may only be enharmonic (same pitch) in equal temperament. In some other temperament, they may be slightly different pitches.


1

In my experience both tabs and notation are useful. I can sight read notation faster and yet tab is more enjoyable and my brain is drawn to it. Tab wont prevent you from learning the tougher skill of reading notation. Also you can learn to sight read tablature. I have seen some people do it really fast. On the other hand, there is also extra knowledge ...


1

To answer your question: yes, of course. The point is tablatures are simpler at the beginning of your friendship with guitar, because it doesn't force you to learn traditional notation for many hours. Usually, guitarists are not patient enough to spend many hours first on learning theoretical stuff. So if you've just began playing guitar, use tablatures, and ...


0

This piece is in the key of either E major or C# minor. The melody line goes G# - B# - F#, spelling out a G#7, a dominant chord of the III (mediant) of the scale, a secondary dominant to the submediant (VIm or C#m in this case). This harmony would be normally a G# minor having B instead of B#, but due to its secondary dominant nature it will have its third ...


4

Sight-reading tabs, and by that I mean playing the tab off the paper is something one learns quite faster than learning to play a regular score from paper. That's the reason for their existence. They are basically a pre-prepared performance. Reading tabs without having an instrument in hand and figuring out what the music is in your head works worse than ...


1

The short answer to your question is yes - it is possible to sight read tabs. At least for folks who seem to prefer tabs over standard musical notation. I have a friend who after years of piano lessons decided to learn to play guitar. Her guitar teacher writes her lessons in tab. She has learned to sight read tab but has expressed that she wishes he ...


2

Think of ottava shifts as of a clef change: where 8vb starts, imagine it's actually a switch into the bass-8 clef, where it ends, the clef switches back to bass (bass-0). Clefs apply to each staff separately, so do ottava shifts. So your yellow notes are (in order in which they're marked): <a1 a0> a2 a3 c#2 f#3. I'm not sure how would I play it, the ...


3

That looks like C# minor which gets its leading tone (B) raised by a semitone. You are correct in thinking that B# and C are played at the same place but for the purposes of music theory they are not the same notes. They are what is called enharmonic equivalents ie two notes with different names played at the same place.


5

I would just like to clarify a couple things that I don't think have been fully articulated. First is that there is a distinction to be understood between the concepts of "note" and "pitch". A note is a symbol in a score. It represents a pitch to be sounded. Enharmonic equivalence is idea that the same pitch can be represented by different note names. ...



Top 50 recent answers are included