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0

Try to get hold of some easy piano tutors, even very simple ones for children, perhaps. There are also some very easy pieces by serious composers you might look at. When I started, as a mature learner, one of the things I used at the start was book 1 of Bartok's Mikrokosmos. The first pieces are very simple with both hands playing in parallel one or two ...


4

I do not believe, except maybe in rare instances, that staffs that large were used. You may be thinking of Lute tabs. All early music scores were written by hand. It's very time consuming to do this and they were after the most efficient use of space. This is why the 4 line staff with clefs and ligatures were used. I would start, of course, start with ...


2

I can barely understand what you're talking about, honestly. Whatever it is, I think you need to forget the word "bind". In both exercises, there are two separate lines. In the first, there's a top line that goes: (rest) | E E E | (rest) | (rest) E and a bottom line that goes: A A A | (rest) | A E E | A The second example ...


4

B# and C are basically the same note. They are called enharmonic tones. In modern musical notation and tuning, an enharmonic equivalent is a note, interval, or key signature that is equivalent to some other note, interval, or key signature but "spelled", or named differently. The one note differs from the other depending on the harmony of the song. ...


0

Just to add some working example to the thread, here goes Prokofiev op. 97, no. 10. An adagio from the Cinderella suite for piano. The complete score for this adagio is available here, page 29. In the first two bars, there are specifications for both staves (forte), and for the upper (piano) and lower (mezzoforte) staves only.


6

As @Jacques said, the link for the full sheet music is not working, so we can't tell for certain what is intended in context, but here's my educated guess: The person that wrote your sheet music should have separated the pitches into two different voices to show that the lower note holds through for the full measure while the upper voice adds some ...


0

You can find a list of Major Scales in any basic music theory book . Also look on the web for a list of scales .Each scale has a note name.That is the keynote of the scale. A short trick to help you with sharp keys is to look at the last sharp symbol .In the diagram above the four sharps are shown in a red circle. The last sharp is on the D. So go up one ...


1

There are often mistakes and discrepancies in different editions. The best way to determine if there are errors is often (unfortunately) just to listen to recordings and use a pencil to correct notes in your score. If there is repetition or transposition of phrases you can compare those and it can make your life easier finding the right notes (e.g. are ...


1

Your enthusiasm and ambition are admirable, and these traits will be invaluable, and even necessary, as you progress. Great and unimaginable things are accomplished this way. However, this isn't one of those times. It may seem contradictory to you now, but the best and fastest way to "learn to play" this piece is to not play it at all at this point in your ...


1

I read through the comments that you are a mid-beginner, getting to intermediate level. I would not discourage you to learn this (hard) piece. This is the part of craziness that I have encountered too when I started. Go on and take pleasure. Now to answer the questions, you'll certainly find very logical that, this piece being intended for advanced level ...


3

Can I ask what your intentions are with doing this exercise? Based on the picture you present, I'm not sure it's worth the time it takes, and here's why: essentially, all you've done is labeled every pitch name. In doing so, you just 'translated' one written system (the musical score) into another written system with which you're more familiar (solf├ęge). If ...


1

The fact that you are a beginner--at music reading--is obvious, or you wouldn't be attempting this. By all means, give it a go; for all I know you have the technique of an Art Tatum, who couldn't read music either. (Blindness kind of gets in the way of that.) However, if you were only able to read words at the level of an older child, you could more ...


6

I have to agree with @alephzero here. You need to have a very good technique to be able to play this piece. If you want to attempt it regardlessly, you should definitely do it together with your teacher (who I am pretty sure is going to try to talk you out of this idea). Otherwise you might end up "teaching" yourself the wrong technique of playing which ...


9

Your theory is correct: these notes are written offset from one another to be legible. They are to be played simultaneously.


-2

Since hemidemisemiquavers are written as such, then the dots on a single stem should be played simultaneously. Otherwise it'll be a fast arpeggio, which is sort of what the hemidemisemis are. Also why put an arpeggio sign when that's about the only way to play hemidemisemis.



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