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Treble and bass clefs each have a few variations. An 8 or 15 above the clef means 8va or 15ma respectively (one or two octaves higher). In bass clef, the 8 or 15 can be below the staff, telling the player to play one or two octaves lower. Other clefs include soprano, mezzo-soprano, alto, tenor, and baritone. Finally, there is also a percussion clef. There ...


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There are three clefs in general use, the G clef, the F clef and the C clef. The G clef is normally positioned on the second line up, indicating that this line is G. This is commonly called the "Treble clef". A common variation is the sub-octave treble clef, shown either with a small figure 8 below or as a repeated G clef symbol. This is used for tenor ...


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Yes there are two other less often used clefs that every musician should also know of. The alto clef. With middle C being on the middle line on the staff And the tenor clef. With middle C being on the second line from top on the staff.


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There are orchestral/wind ensemble instruments that regularly use the C clefs, in everyday situations. Some of the C clefs have conventional names for themselves, and certain instruments use them: Alto Clef When the C clef is centered on the 3rd line of the staff it's called an alto clef, or viola clef. Instruments that generally use this clef include: ...


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They are the ones used on pianos and guitars, but some instruments have their range awkwardly situated for inclusion in one or the other - treble or bass. Thus, there is a C clef, which locates middle C on any line needed. As in the third line up, for example, where B in the treble lives normally. That then means the notes playable by the instrument mostly ...


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It's worth following up Menuhin's promotion of Robby Lakatos as preserving the Romani roots which inspired Liszt, as an idea for freeing the music from the dots - don't forget that the score is only a working memorandum and not a life-preserving program to be diverted from at your peril. You must be able to justify your action on the basis of historical ...


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'a2' also shows up in percussion parts. even when there is only one written part (snare drum, for ex.) a composer occasionally wants a second player to 'double' what is being played, either for volume or added color/texture. bolero is a good example. toward the end, a 2nd snare drummer is supposed to join in. (this is not always done, but it is in the ...


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It might be useful to think of it this way. The second violins, for instance, are a section; they normally play together as a section. Many scores don't specify how many second violins are in the orchestra; they just expect there to be as many as the orchestra has. When the composer needs this second violin section to change its behavior and split into two ...


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It's certainly how we recognise words,we look at shapes rather than sound each bit. That's for kids learning to read their first words.A lot of what we see is perceived in that same sort of way. When we speak, we don't necessarily plan each and every word and phrase. As far as KNOWING each note - If you stopped a brilliant player in mid flow and asked what ...


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Sounds like a natural and good thing which should not be worked against. Similar to recognizing words instead of putting them together letter by letter (like one does when learning to read), it's good to recognize phrases instead of individual notes.


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In the British Brass Band tradition, all instruments (except bass trombone, and please don't expect me to explain why :-) are written in transposed treble clef. This allows any player to pick up any instrument and at least know the fingerings! In the orchestral tradition, Trumpets and Horns are written transposed. This can be explained by their ...


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When I was learning grade piano, some pieces required analytical practice, some I sight-read. But pieces don't define a grade, performances do. The way you play a scale for Grade 4 won't do for Grade 8 - and it's little to do with adding a further octave or two.


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I agree with all of what Mr. (Ms.?) Reilingh says except I would suggest that you don't practice "a measure at a time", rather practice in phrases (a musical sentence) by breaking the phrases into small manageable parts then combine these parts until you have the complete phrase. Granted this may result in "a measure at a time" but I believe this way of ...


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To an extent, it's down to personal choice. The more experienced you become, the more naturally your fingers (and thumb) will play certain strings. The rules are more general guidelines, and you may even find that using your pinky is better than another finger. A good move for repeated notes on one string is to alternate, but there are times when using ...



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