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4

There is a notation form I have come across called Sagittal notation. It seems pretty comprehensive for microtonic notation. The Sagittal notation system is a comprehensive system for notating musical pitch in all possible scales and tunings - a universal set of microtonal accidentals, equally suited to extended just intonation, equal divisions of the ...


1

You have to understand why playing dynamics make you fail both hands. My guess is that it makes you anticipate the next notes and because you are probably too shaky in both hands, you fail in putting them together. Try combinations of the following: continue practicing hands separately with dynamics play slowly both hands without dynamics, and with ...


1

Before you do ANY dynamics, you must be able to play the piece with both hands almost flawlessly. Dynamics are there to be added after the technique has gotten perfected. Play like a robot a few times, then once you've mastered that, you must accent the left hand melody more than the right. Again, no dynamics other than that. Once you've gotten that down, ...


1

Play the two hands separately slowly, noticing whether you're playing the melody or the accompaniment.


2

Partial answer : The circled numbers are the string numbers and the uncircled numbers are the finger numbers. For example, the first chord annotation asks you to play the F-sharp by placing your 4'th finger (at the 7'th fret) of the 2'nd string (i.e., the B string), and to play the D-natural by placing your 3'rd finger (at the 7'th fret) of the 3'rd string ...


2

It probably is trying to indicate that the following two bars is played in the second position. (fret 2 to 5)


0

It is just a small chromatic motif in the melody. It starts with the dominant chord (E Maj) chord and then moves back to the a minor chord where there is several variations in the picking from the a minor chord. It is used somewhat similar to an upbeat.


1

Slow down until you can play it (even if it means playing extremely slowly). Then gradually increase your speed.


3

Most pieces have the melody played by R.H. and accompaniment by L.H. So we piano players get used to this concept. This is the other way round, and the L.H. is playing the tune. Our left hand is not au fait with this, so it's tricky. You could try, for a bit of fun, swapping hands (and either octaves, or crossing) so it's more of a 'normal' situation. ...


-4

I see numbers 1,2,4 there. Maybe this is written for four singers, where 1 and 2 sing and 4 sings I don't know what happend to singer 3. Maybe she is silent here. Or maybe her part is on the other staff that we don't see in the OP.


0

If you really need the playback to be like you ask, you could use repetition and alternate endings. It will work "playback-wise" but I doubt this is a proper use of that in music notation. But I think this does what you want :


9

Dave is right, but there's a little more to it. You can break the part up into two different lines. One that looks like this: And another that looks like this: When you put them together, you get the two part represented by different stems. It's pretty much telling you to hold the first note for the length of a quarter note, but play the set of notes ...


5

There are two voices in this music: the lower plays f, then e as quarter notes; Note that the downward pointing stem's don't have flags/beams -- thus they are quarter notes. the upper plays f <a d> e <g c#> as eighth notes This is the way to write music where more than one voice happen to execute the same note at the same time. If you ...


1

By what you explain, it sounds like you want to repeat a section 3 times. You don't need to use a Coda and Segno because a closing repet can be used more than twice as seen in the Guitar Pro manual: Repeat close This symbol replaces a closing bar-line, and sends you back to the last Repeat open sign. A dialog window will open up for you to ...


4

To build on NReilingh's great answer, anything* is transcribable. Transcription is just making music so that it can be communicated visually to another musician. Most conventional music makes a trade off between detail and legibility, with things like tempo, phrasing, and articulation rendered by general, fairly ambiguous symbols. Transcription focuses on ...


9

All transcribed notation is an approximation. The classic dots and stems are simply not adequate for many types of music. But before we even talk about transcription, consider that many composers have conceived of sounds that are far beyond the status quo -- often called the avant garde, but not necessarily so. Many of these composers have then invented ...


2

One possibility that is seen in Hebrew occasionally is to print a mirrored score (including all symbols) apart from the lyrics. Most of the time, however, you just get the score straight, and the lyrics left-to-right, syllable by right-to-left syllable. I would imagine that it takes some practice singing that.


1

You are correct, a 7 inch Android tablet limits your choices somewhat. I have both a 7 and a 10 inch (hi res) tablet and the bigger size really helps a lot. And iPad has a lot of great apps. That being said, you should give the Fakebook app a try. While the Orpheus app recommended above is good, the Fakebook is much more suitable for gigging: - it loads ...


1

I'd just play the A2 and G3 notes with the left and the C4 and E4 with the right hand here. It's already where you need it and mostly idle. You just have to make sure to match the articulation and volume of the left hand. While you could also play everything but the bass note with the right hand regarding reach, that would require the right hand to split ...


1

The problem with using your left hand will be that the first note of the bar won't be sustained. If your piano has a sostenuto (middle) pedal, one way you could avoid this is to catch the first note of the bar in the sostenuto pedal and then play the rest of the bass clef notes in the left hand.



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