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42

Jalmus provides what you are looking for and it has a MIDI interface. It is also free open source, is cross platform (written in Java, it works on Windows, Linux, and Mac), and is available in English, French, Spanish, Italian, Danish and German. From the website: Jalmus is a free, open source music education software helping the musicians, ...


30

The first thing you need to do is: Stop writing the letter names!!! This applies to piano or any other instrument. If you keep doing this when you practice, you won't be practicing your sight reading, only your technique. In other words, this is training you to play an A when you read the letter "A", instead of the musical notation for it. If you can ...


23

Are you sure you want a software solution at all? An alternative is a large supply of small pieces, like Bartok's Mikrocosmos. Just keep playing different ones. One level of that will keep you entertained for quite a while. I particularly like the song about the foxes and the chickens. Sight-reading is not just about connecting your eyes and your fingers. ...


23

Yes, unfortunately it's all about practice. But there are some things you can focus on to speed up the process: - Learn the notes on the neck by heart, and the associated intervals. That is, learn the notes on the low E-string and the relation between those notes and the notes on the higher strings so that you without thinking can fret a certain interval. ...


19

You write but I'm still quite slow, especially when there are a lot of 16th notes and syncopation. That's natural. In my experience, it is better to train separately for sight reading and for speed of execution. The primary goal must be continuity of execution and respect of relative duration of notes. The basic tool to improve this aspect of ...


19

One option is to use (and abuse) Impro-Visor. Impro-Visor is a jazz improvisation trainer, but it has built into it a "lick generator", which builds melodies over existing chord changes using grammar rules. (The program is of course also capable of generating chords.) By putting in various grammar rules you should be able to adapt the program to also work ...


18

The "C" after the clef in place of the time signature stands for "Common Time," and it is shorthand for 4/4 time. If you see a "C" with a vertical line through it, that stands for "Cut Time," and it is shorthand for 2/2 time.


14

Learn to recognize intervals between notes quickly. For example, notes that skip a line or space are a third apart. Notes that skip seven are an octave apart. When reading a chord quickly, read the root/lowest note and then the intervals above it and place them in the key. With experience you will be able to recognize common voicings by shape alone.


14

Yes. High-paid studio musicians are all expected to sight read perfectly on the first read. There are even programs to illustrate and develop the skill for younger musicians. Many movie soundtracks are recordings of first-time sight reading.


11

The issue of learning quickly and then playing "by ear" isn't so much of a problem, since every musician, after reading and practicing from notation for a particular piece of music, will "chunk" it and no longer be reading every single note on the page. Even when sight-reading for the first time, a pianist isn't going to read "C-E-G", they're just going to ...


11

In piano, the staffs usually signifies what hand plays what note where the lower staff would be your left hand and the upper staff would be your right hand. While the clefs are important, you may see the same two clefs on a grand staff. In Imagine you can see there are two bass clefs because the piano part is low. It is kind of an unwritten rule of thumb in ...


10

First of all, are you trying to figure out the pitch of a note simply by seeing? As in seeing seeing a C# on the staff then being able to sing a C# exactly on pitch without an instrument? This ability is called perfect pitch, and most people, including myself, do not possess this ability. What most good musicians (including singers) have is good relative ...


10

On the assumption that if you added up the note values in the bar concerned, and they added up correctly WITHOUT the 'little notes', they will probably be grace notes. They have no value of their own, and are played sort of crushed in just before the main note that follows. You should not blow separately, but play the little note almost like it was a ...


9

Throw yourself into the deep end of the pool: volunteer to help beginning instrumentalists practice by playing the piano accompaniments. You'll play a lot of them and you'll have no time to practice them, but they are usually easy to read. You'll also learn the important skill of keeping the music going no matter what happens, and of faking the music ...


9

It's a tremolo. There are two types of tremolos. One between two different notes like in your example above and a second with the bars going though the stem of the note. In your case, it is like a trill where you go back and forth pattern them in that patter as fast as you can for the duration. Here is the link I used to confirm the ...


9

This is tremolo notation. The beams indicate the speed of the tremolo. In the first bar, you should alternate between the D-F# chord and the A in 16th notes. In the second bar, you should alternate between the two sets of notes in 32nd notes technically, or "as fast as possible" if 32nds are infeasible.


8

The best one I've found so far is Noteable. It drills you on different notes, allowing you to choose which notes and/or key signature(s) you want to practice, and even learns which notes you're suffering on and drills you on those ones more. It supports MIDI interface. As far as I'm aware, though, there's no support for practicing chords, and it's not ...


8

I was looking for something like this once too. One I've used and liked because first I can put the note names to be Do, Re, Mi, Fa... or A, B, C, D... and it's free if you used it on the website is this one: http://www.emusictheory.com/practice.html They drill you with note after note and you need to say which it is. It also has the average time it takes ...


8

Pick a piece you have played, erase all those pencil marks, and play it without looking at your hands, concentrating on the music in front of you. As slowly and as badly as necessary. This, in my experience, helps build the feedback loop from notes to fingers to ears.


8

I think you're looking for something like PianoBooster. It displays parts on a scrolling stave in-time with your playing, using standard MIDI files. It can wait for you to hit the correct note, can play the left-hand or right-hand part for you, and lets you adjust the speed to suit you. You can also transpose a part up or down. PianoBooster is free and open ...


8

There is a tool ly2video announced in the Lilypond mailing list. It generates a video from the score. The home page is https://github.com/aspiers/ly2video. You can look at an impressive result at ...


8

The history goes that religious music was written in 3 time, reflecting the holy trinity.So a circle would be used. When music was written in 4 time, a BROKEN circle would be used. This over time became printed as a C. So it represents 4/4, but doesn't actually stand for 'common'.As above, when split, it means split time - 4/4 but played with a 'two' feel.


7

Actually, I'm going to say, don't memorize, read. Sight reading is working up your short-term memory. So after you make a few mistakes and play it 20 times, maybe memorize it, you're good right? Wrong (Ha!). Scour the internets for sheet music. Suggestion: Search google images and start looking for music pdfs. I say go through many pieces, don't play ...


7

You probably do need to commit some pieces to memory, and here's why. As a fluent reader of English, when you see the word "penguin", you don't process each individual letter in your head. You see the whole shape of the word, and immediately get a mental image of a black-and-white bird. When you were a child, learning to read, you did process each ...


6

I've been practicing my sightreading much the same way that I learned normal reading; I just keep doing it, as much as possible. When I practice sight-reading, before I start playing, I look at the music, to see if I can imagine what it sounds like and to identify tricky sections of the piece. I also play through the piece at least three times: the first ...


6

Only Write down notes as a "homework" assignment, don't practice this way: As was already said, do not write down the notes. The only exception might be to start out doing this on copies of the music, but never practice from this music. Say the note names Aloud away from your instrument: I think the best way to learn to sight read notes better is to take ...


6

Do flash cards! This is much easier, and a lot more fun, if you have a good software program (and a MIDI-enabled keyboard/computer) to help you out :)


6

To Rein Henrichs very good advice, I would add: When you look at a chord, try to visualize, play, hear and name its simple inversions (basically putting the lowest note one octave higher, or its highest note one octave lower, you can repeat the process several times until you come back to the original chord). It will reinforce your sight-reading of ...


6

From what I see, you are a "working backwards" personality. You are like a painter who just mix your colors to get your desired shade and then just paint. After that, you ask yourself: "What did I do just now and how did I get that color?" You get the desired sound first and then try to decipher it. So, to achieve your end, learn the below and then work ...


6

Is there any good software for learning how to sight-read? I've spent the last year working on a software product called SightReadingMastery to help people with sight reading. A few things about it to note: It's web-based, so you don't have to download or install anything It's not free, but there's a 7-day free trial, so you can try it out and see how ...



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