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28

The first thing you need to do is: Stop writing the letter names!!! This applies to piano or any other instrument. If you keep doing this when you practice, you won't be practicing your sight reading, only your technique. In other words, this is training you to play an A when you read the letter "A", instead of the musical notation for it. If you can ...


22

Yes, unfortunately it's all about practice. But there are some things you can focus on to speed up the process: - Learn the notes on the neck by heart, and the associated intervals. That is, learn the notes on the low E-string and the relation between those notes and the notes on the higher strings so that you without thinking can fret a certain interval. ...


19

You write but I'm still quite slow, especially when there are a lot of 16th notes and syncopation. That's natural. In my experience, it is better to train separately for sight reading and for speed of execution. The primary goal must be continuity of execution and respect of relative duration of notes. The basic tool to improve this aspect of ...


14

Learn to recognize intervals between notes quickly. For example, notes that skip a line or space are a third apart. Notes that skip seven are an octave apart. When reading a chord quickly, read the root/lowest note and then the intervals above it and place them in the key. With experience you will be able to recognize common voicings by shape alone.


13

Yes. High-paid studio musicians are all expected to sight read perfectly on the first read. There are even programs to illustrate and develop the skill for younger musicians. Many movie soundtracks are recordings of first-time sight reading.


11

In piano, the staffs usually signifies what hand plays what note where the lower staff would be your left hand and the upper staff would be your right hand. While the clefs are important, you may see the same two clefs on a grand staff. In Imagine you can see there are two bass clefs because the piano part is low. It is kind of an unwritten rule of thumb in ...


9

First of all, are you trying to figure out the pitch of a note simply by seeing? As in seeing seeing a C# on the staff then being able to sing a C# exactly on pitch without an instrument? This ability is called perfect pitch, and most people, including myself, do not possess this ability. What most good musicians (including singers) have is good relative ...


9

It's a tremolo. There are two types of tremolos. One between two different notes like in your example above and a second with the bars going though the stem of the note. In your case, it is like a trill where you go back and forth pattern them in that patter as fast as you can for the duration. Here is the link I used to confirm the ...


9

This is tremolo notation. The beams indicate the speed of the tremolo. In the first bar, you should alternate between the D-F# chord and the A in 16th notes. In the second bar, you should alternate between the two sets of notes in 32nd notes technically, or "as fast as possible" if 32nds are infeasible.


8

Throw yourself into the deep end of the pool: volunteer to help beginning instrumentalists practice by playing the piano accompaniments. You'll play a lot of them and you'll have no time to practice them, but they are usually easy to read. You'll also learn the important skill of keeping the music going no matter what happens, and of faking the music ...


8

The history goes that religious music was written in 3 time, reflecting the holy trinity.So a circle would be used. When music was written in 4 time, a BROKEN circle would be used. This over time became printed as a C. So it represents 4/4, but doesn't actually stand for 'common'.As above, when split, it means split time - 4/4 but played with a 'two' feel.


7

Actually, I'm going to say, don't memorize, read. Sight reading is working up your short-term memory. So after you make a few mistakes and play it 20 times, maybe memorize it, you're good right? Wrong (Ha!). Scour the internets for sheet music. Suggestion: Search google images and start looking for music pdfs. I say go through many pieces, don't play ...


7

There is a tool ly2video announced in the Lilypond mailing list. It generates a video from the score. The home page is https://github.com/aspiers/ly2video. You can look at an impressive result at ...


7

You probably do need to commit some pieces to memory, and here's why. As a fluent reader of English, when you see the word "penguin", you don't process each individual letter in your head. You see the whole shape of the word, and immediately get a mental image of a black-and-white bird. When you were a child, learning to read, you did process each ...


6

To Rein Henrichs very good advice, I would add: When you look at a chord, try to visualize, play, hear and name its simple inversions (basically putting the lowest note one octave higher, or its highest note one octave lower, you can repeat the process several times until you come back to the original chord). It will reinforce your sight-reading of ...


6

From what I see, you are a "working backwards" personality. You are like a painter who just mix your colors to get your desired shade and then just paint. After that, you ask yourself: "What did I do just now and how did I get that color?" You get the desired sound first and then try to decipher it. So, to achieve your end, learn the below and then work ...


6

Only Write down notes as a "homework" assignment, don't practice this way: As was already said, do not write down the notes. The only exception might be to start out doing this on copies of the music, but never practice from this music. Say the note names Aloud away from your instrument: I think the best way to learn to sight read notes better is to take ...


6

The issue of learning quickly and then playing "by ear" isn't so much of a problem, since every musician, after reading and practicing from notation for a particular piece of music, will "chunk" it and no longer be reading every single note on the page. Even when sight-reading for the first time, a pianist isn't going to read "C-E-G", they're just going to ...


5

It really depends. If you want to play in big bands, then yes! Sightreading is a huge deal. If you play in a small group that plays lots of arrangements, then this would be important also. Personally, I play in 3-4-5tets and we don't really use music, we just call out tunes that everyone knows. I've had the pleasure to play in Paris as well, and there it ...


5

In my personal opinion; the simplest and most effective way to learn notes/chords on the fretboard is using patterns; in the same way that when you glance at a chord in written music you can see from its shape what type of chord it is. EG: knowing that chords are built from thirds and any deviation from that is usually 'stand out' in written music. Just to ...


5

I've been practicing my sightreading much the same way that I learned normal reading; I just keep doing it, as much as possible. When I practice sight-reading, before I start playing, I look at the music, to see if I can imagine what it sounds like and to identify tricky sections of the piece. I also play through the piece at least three times: the first ...


5

Flash cards can be an effective method. You can make up a few dozen cards with different intervals, with multiples of each interval starting on different notes and so on. On the back you can have the name of the interval or something like that. Then you'd play/name the top card, flip it and confirm, play/name the next card, flip it and confirm, and so on. ...


4

Something that's always helped me, particularly when learning specific-but-related-sets of items (such as notes and then chords), is to simply make flashcards. Writing things down (in general) seems to make a big difference in one's ability to recall that information. And, for me at least, this includes making flashcards.


4

There are several approaches you can take to learning the fretboard. You can either go by scales and sound out every note in the scale as you play them to memorize what the notes are You can go the rote memorization route and memorize notes at the significant frets (5, 10) and just go from there -- most notes you need you'll be able to reach either by ...


4

from your description of how you "work out the melody" i.e. "muttering mnemonics ... counting frets up ... picturing a piano ... figure out ... half ... whole step", your mental process for that involves 4 procedural steps IN SEQUENCE. That takes too long. What you want to do is to reduce that down to 1 step that accomplishes all the procedures required IN ...


4

The answer to Your last question would be Yes. I think You should differentiate sight-reading with so called a-vista reading. First is ability to translate notes into music on Your instrument, and second is ability to do it on the spot on performance level. I think when You wrote about pros and cons - You were talking about a-vista. Which is a huge effort ...


4

It all depends on what your goals are. Do you want to be able to play with other jazz musicians? Especially piano and horn players? They will NEVER have tab for you. NEVER. If you say "hey, do you have tab for that tune" they will either laugh at you or tell you to leave. They have standard notation that you will have to read off if you want to play a tune ...


4

One thing you could do is install MuseScore. It's free. You can input a score, and change the size of the page by going to Layout > Page Settings and changing the width and height of the page to about the size of a bar. Then you can re-size your window so only one page is displayed at a time. When you push the playback button it will scroll to each next bar ...


4

The first step in learning to sight-read is to read music, a lot. If you feel like you don't need the music anymore after a few playthroughs, test that assumption by writing out the whole piece from memory. I would encourage you to continue to look at the music while playing even if you do have it memorized though. Having a deep knowledge of theory will ...


3

Well...today,a jazz musician should have a solid basis in theory; chords, their construction, inversions, extensions... Scales and modes, the circle of fifths.. How jazz is structured and all that. However, "sight reading", the ability to "play from the sheet", likely not so much. Jazz is greatly about improvisation, after all, and lots of groups work ...



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