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10

On the assumption that if you added up the note values in the bar concerned, and they added up correctly WITHOUT the 'little notes', they will probably be grace notes. They have no value of their own, and are played sort of crushed in just before the main note that follows. You should not blow separately, but play the little note almost like it was a ...


7

I would say that since Music is a hobby for me and I do not plan to play in any kind of band or such learning to sight read isn't really important. It depends on you. I prefer reading normal music sheets rather than tabs or whatever, but this is just me. If you have time and energy to learn how to sight read,it most certainly won't be wasted. but ...


6

I don't think this has anything to do with his age. Everyone except savants start out taking a long time to recognize notes on the staff, in the same way that toddlers might take a long time to recognize letters in a book. The only answer is to have him practice. Simple practice is best to start. Something like flashcards is ideal, and what my teacher ...


5

If you have a bass voice, then you can most easily sight-sing bass vocal music. However, if you want to sing music with notes in a higher range, this easiest way to do this, would be to sing everything an octave lower (or the sections that are out of your range). Although you will not be reproducing exactly the notes written, in their written octave, this ...


4

I'm sure you will find many programs that give you want you are looking for (any notation program for example). However, you need to learn to play the rhythms yourself. Using the programs will result in you learning by rote, which is essentially just copying what you're hearing without really understanding the concepts. This is akin to being a parrot. ...


4

I don't know if you mean Alfred's piano books, but those are the ones that I use with my students. If you're not using Alfred's you might have a look. There are some sample PDF pages. Mikrokosmos is a great series, if you like Bartok. Getting students to play the pieces if they don't like Bartok is more trouble than it's worth. Fingering is a flexible ...


4

Learning the notes on any staff is a lot of memorization at first. There are a lot of little tricks to remember what each line and space is on the staff, but it can be a lot to learn at once. I've taught a few younger kids how to read the treble and bass clef (not any teenagers though) and while FACE and Every Good Boy Does Fine helps some it confuses ...


3

The short answer is, yes, a skilled pianist should be able to "sightread" a piece of music at some pretty high percentage of their skill level. Nobody can sightread a concerto, but if you put a piece of piano music in front of me, the determining factor in whether I can play it is the state of my technique, not my ability to read the notes. I found that ...


3

Could you read from the grand staff before you took the 10-year break? if the answer is yes, it's just possible you have developed a problem with your vision that is restricting your field of view, but isn't severe enough to limit other visual activities. Getting an eye test might help. If you have never been able to read the grand staff, I would guess the ...


3

It's certainly how we recognise words,we look at shapes rather than sound each bit. That's for kids learning to read their first words.A lot of what we see is perceived in that same sort of way. When we speak, we don't necessarily plan each and every word and phrase. As far as KNOWING each note - If you stopped a brilliant player in mid flow and asked what ...


3

Sounds like a natural and good thing which should not be worked against. Similar to recognizing words instead of putting them together letter by letter (like one does when learning to read), it's good to recognize phrases instead of individual notes.


3

I assume that this person already understands the stave and can, slowly and methodically, translate between a stave position, a note name, and its position on an instrument (that is, which key to play, which fret to hold, etc. depending on the instrument). I assume this because they're simple concepts. What he needs is practice; and to encourage him to ...


3

Yes, plenty. Guitar Pro is commercial, but there are free alternatives: http://sourceforge.net/projects/tuxguitar/ I'm sure Tux has the MIDI voice for percussion available.


3

The 7/8 bars here are written so that they are timed a half beat (quaver) short of the 4/4s. Wanting to start with a 'one' count, you could count 1e&a 2e 3e&a 4e&a, giving you all the semis on a syllable each. The reason I've left out &a of 2 is that the phrasing in this case does just that - it's split the bar into 3 and 4, making 7, thus ...


3

It pretty much indeed comes down to chord recognition in this case. This includes reading in intervals. Instead of figuring out each single note in a chord [always starting from the bottom and working your way up], and let's assume the second measure you have shown here - you will, eventually, immediately recognize that it is the second inversion, because ...


3

I found another one (Sheet Music Trainer). This one is for android. It appears to work with most instruments. There is a full list on there website.


2

I would actually say that the opposite is true, namely, that study of music theory is what matters, and that even if you don't practice sight reading (though you probably should), it's the study of theory that will make the biggest improvement in your sight reading compared to anything else. Sight reading is a tricky thing to do, there is quite a lot of ...


2

Sight reading is an extremely rare skill which is mostly used by high level performers auditioning a piece they have never seen for a part in a musical or band. For nearly all other players, it is unrealistic to attempt to play a piece you cannot easily sing or with which you are unfamiliar. The main value of reading music is NOT to play it the first time ...


2

It is important to be able to read music to some extent. But the ability to sight read, which means to be able to pick up the music and just play it, is not all that essential. I can sight read a single vocal line, but in theory classes, we used complex scores that there was no way I could ever sight read them. In fact, sight reading was part of a different ...


2

I'm not sure what level you're at, and so what difficulty of sight reading you want to practise, but I use this iPad/iPhone app with some of my guitar pupils (they find it great fun!): https://itunes.apple.com/gb/app/my-note-games/id470503027?mt=8 It's quite clever, as it is like a combination of a sight reading app and a tuner, as it listens to you ...


2

I'd take it further than Bob's as always good answer. Sight singing does not have to rely on being in the written key. If one has absolute or perfect pitch, it may complicate the issue in my answer, but read on. Unlike most instruments, the voice has no particular 'fingering' that's needed to sing, say, a C note. It's more of a relative note thing - C-F is a ...


2

Developing good sight reading skills involves: a high level of coordination a lot of time and patience reading lots of music the metronome 1. Coordination You mentioned that you have trouble reading both hands at the same time. This is a skill that anybody would struggle in if you do not gradually progress through songs with increasing difficulty. You ...


2

For jazz guitar there is a standard book by William G. Leavitt called Melodic Rhythms for Guitar. It has lots of examples of so-called "rhythm groups" of increasing complexity. Playing through this book greatly improves sight-reading of rhythms. And this is also the clue: there's no shortcut. You have to sight-read in order to learn it. In my opinion you ...


2

I would recommend getting a copy of Hindemith's book: Elementary Training for Musicians In the early chapters he has masses of exercises in sight-reading rhythmic patterns, both as single-line rhythms, and also more complex ones where you have to tap one rhythm while playing another rhythm (very useful for pianists). The book is also extremely useful for ...


1

I am in a very similar situation, having played classical guitar for many years and started learning piano properly after I retired. I found a piano teacher who was prepared to teach me using Bartok as much as possible - sounds odd, I know, but I love Bartok's music, and have found his approach to teaching piano fascinating. In addition to Mikrokosmos books ...


1

Basically, since you cannot read both hands at the same time, I would suggest taking each measure and working it on its own. This way you can see what the right hand is playing, then what the left hand is playing (or vice versa) and then put them together. This might sound time-consuming and boring, but it's the simplest way to do it! when you want to ...


1

It should not be a issue of age. I myself have taught 8 year olds how to read music. Get yourself a good theory book and start counting notes. You learn this by doing. Write the numbers A B C D E F G out. Mention it to your student that when you go up on the staff you count forwards and when you go down you count backwards. It is tricky at first because ...


1

You'll probably find it easiest to move away from counting every semiquaver (16th) in each bar, and just count quavers (8th). This still helps you count semiquavers, though, as every semiquaver note is either on or off a quaver beat. But, you should feel that your counting and playing both flow better, and feel less rushed, as you are counting half as many ...


1

Well, falsetto is not head voice (contrary to what the accepted answer writes) and it should certainly be not strenuous before getting quite higher than your natural range. However, it's like switching gears so you cannot really usefully employ it musically since it breaks character. Head voice or mixed voice is a manner of putting falsetto character into ...


1

I feel that I may be missing something if I skip sight reading I think so. Understanding (and being confortable with) traditional music notation is very useful, and specially in combination with the understanding of the theory (scales, chords, etc). For example, you can detect at first sight the tonality of a piece, and spot quickly the chromatic notes, ...



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