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18

The "C" after the clef in place of the time signature stands for "Common Time," and it is shorthand for 4/4 time. If you see a "C" with a vertical line through it, that stands for "Cut Time," and it is shorthand for 2/2 time.


11

In piano, the staffs usually signifies what hand plays what note where the lower staff would be your left hand and the upper staff would be your right hand. While the clefs are important, you may see the same two clefs on a grand staff. In Imagine you can see there are two bass clefs because the piano part is low. It is kind of an unwritten rule of thumb in ...


10

On the assumption that if you added up the note values in the bar concerned, and they added up correctly WITHOUT the 'little notes', they will probably be grace notes. They have no value of their own, and are played sort of crushed in just before the main note that follows. You should not blow separately, but play the little note almost like it was a ...


9

This is tremolo notation. The beams indicate the speed of the tremolo. In the first bar, you should alternate between the D-F# chord and the A in 16th notes. In the second bar, you should alternate between the two sets of notes in 32nd notes technically, or "as fast as possible" if 32nds are infeasible.


9

It's a tremolo. There are two types of tremolos. One between two different notes like in your example above and a second with the bars going though the stem of the note. In your case, it is like a trill where you go back and forth pattern them in that patter as fast as you can for the duration. Here is the link I used to confirm the ...


8

The history goes that religious music was written in 3 time, reflecting the holy trinity.So a circle would be used. When music was written in 4 time, a BROKEN circle would be used. This over time became printed as a C. So it represents 4/4, but doesn't actually stand for 'common'.As above, when split, it means split time - 4/4 but played with a 'two' feel.


3

It pretty much indeed comes down to chord recognition in this case. This includes reading in intervals. Instead of figuring out each single note in a chord [always starting from the bottom and working your way up], and let's assume the second measure you have shown here - you will, eventually, immediately recognize that it is the second inversion, because ...


3

I agree with everyone else about not writing in the note names, but would like to suggest an intermediary step: write in a note only at the beginning of a line, or for large intervals. Given that, another approach is to sight-read based on the intervals between notes, as well as on their absolute value (i.e, think 'one-step-down' or 'one-third-up', as well ...


2

I have answer this also in another topic. for quick reference you can find some info from the screenshots.


2

It depends on the time you practice and the time you need for the songs you play. Hard to say without knowing you. General rule of thumb: if you don't see progress in the songs you play or don't remember well enough what you practiced the day before, you need to spend more time for the songs you play, so probably you need to preactice less songs. if you ...


1

Some songs are very easy to learn and remember, other songs take longer. I usually learn a song's intro for example, just the intro, until I have the intro in fluent memory. If the intro is simple, that doesn't take long, it can be memorised in minutes, but if it's not, it can sometimes take days to master. Then I go back to adding the next phase of the ...


1

From another answer at this SE I got notion of the book The Musicians Way by Gerald Klickstein. While its main audience are university level musicians, there's a lot of stuff that is useful for those of us not playing for a living. He talks about how to practice, methods for remembering songs, how to approach new material etc. I think there will always be a ...


1

The answer is simple: you need to get the sounds in your ear before you can externalize (sing) them. Try the following as an exercise: Sing a major scale with correct solfege (up and down) Begin singing a minor scale with appropriate solfege Before you get to the third scale degree, stop, and alter the next pitch in your head (bringing it down a half-step ...


1

If one wants to use staff association as a strong hand indication while retaining rhythmically helpful grouping, one can use notation like the following:


1

I've tested many different things in years, from online flashcards to books to some sort of software and so one. By far one of the best options is Notable by The Noteable Software Company. It analyses your reaction time and gives you the charts and statistics of your real ability of recognizing the notes, as well as a road map to the progress. It has some ...


1

I learned my notes by learning all (as many as I can find) moveable barre chords and what each note is across the strings. As I move the barre up and down the neck I would note how each note changed on each string. Example: The venerable Gmajor barre chord is 3 5 5 4 3 3 or G D G B D G By sliding that up a fret(1/2step) ...



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