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6

As @Jacques said, the link for the full sheet music is not working, so we can't tell for certain what is intended in context, but here's my educated guess: The person that wrote your sheet music should have separated the pitches into two different voices to show that the lower note holds through for the full measure while the upper voice adds some ...


6

There are no tricks. Just a lot of practice with songs at a level that you find easy. Strive to stay in time and just read as well as you can. This is a separate practice in addition to learning new songs/keeping repertoire fresh/improv exercises/etc etc etc. In a year with lots of practice it'll get noticeably easier. Past 2 years (again, with lots ...


6

I find it hard to recognize notes This means that, at this point, you should probably not be sight-reading actual pieces. Instead you should get flash cards or something similar with single notes, and work on identifying them quickly. Once you are doing it correctly and quickly, work on playing the note instead of just identifying. Once you can do that ...


3

Without more information, I would guess that at least four things could be going on: Rubato: An intentional fluctuation of tempo, with an expressive goal, used in music since Romanticism. This would feel most as 'ebbs and flows' to me. Because rubato is supposed to be only a temporary deviation of the original tempo. Changing meter: The number of beats in ...


3

Yes, this is normal. Like any other ability, aptitude varies wildly no matter your skill in other areas. Learning to read music is similar to reading language for the first time and should be approached the same way — start small, with simple things, and work up via lots and lots of practice. While you might pick up the odd tip or trick here and ...


2

It is too normal. Generally speaking, if one can hear something and play it back, then the sight reading tends to take a back seat. Conversely, if one happens to be naturally good at sight reading - it happens - why should they do anything different? The dots say what to do, good enough! Joking apart, I have played with only a handful of musos who were ...


2

Recognizing the intervals between notes is very vital in understanding and being able to identify chords, but there is a lot more to it then that especially since you may play the chord in any voicing where the notes of the chord are not in an order you recognize and you may also only be playing part of the chord. To be able to identify chords efficiently, ...


2

As a string player, I found playing in small and large ensembles very helpful for getting more solid with sightreading. Playing with others forces you to keep going even if you missed a little something along the way. And it helps you get in the habit of looking slightly ahead so you aren't too surprised by a sudden key change or whatever. Pianists are at ...


2

A technique advocated by Steve Vai on this one is to pick up some sheet music books for other instruments, especially violin. Being a hardy Scot I'd recommend some fiddle tunes, but that's up to you ;) A book specific to guitar that I've found great for sight-reading practice is Harmony for Guitar. Sight reading isn't the direct focus of the book, but all ...


2

To want to learn to sightread is laudable. Sightreading is an incredibly important skill. BUT - there are two facets to it. Correct notes and timing. Think about it. If you played Frere Jaques in time, but with several wrong notes, it would still probably be recognisable. If you played all the correct notes (in the right order!) but changed the timing, it ...


2

There are a few schools of thought. Things I personally think are important: let's be making the connection from sight to sound, as well as from sight to fingers moving. These are not necessarily the same. I would strongly encourage you to do sighsinging and learn solfege as well. Ultimately, you want to have a very good "inner ear" and this is a part of ...


2

The most important when counting is to get the basic beat right. In 4/4 like you havehere, you normally count the quarters: When you have a punctuated quarter, the next beat comes before it is finished. See the first measure here: Note that you have a small eigth note (the first G♯ in the last measure) that is put in between the other notes. It is ...


2

The treble clef for the first 2 bars can be counted like 1 e & a 2 e & a 3 e & a 4 e & a b d f# b a a g# g# 1 e & a 2 e & a 3 e & a 4 e & a f# d d (hold note) I'll leave the rest ...


2

If it helps, keep in mind that in music typography helps a lot with counting too. If the music is reasonably well set, notes in the two clefs that sound together are vertically aligned. For example, in the first bar of the second passage, you can see that the first of the two semiquavers in the treble clef aligns with the fourth quaver in the bass clef so ...


2

The question is quite broad, however here are some tips: Familiarize yourself entirely with scales and arpeggios. As boring as it sounds, it is incredibly important to know your way around a piano. Don't just familiarize yourself with major scales, work with natural, harmonic, and melodic minor, and even the blues scales! It is also a good idea to work ...


1

Different music skills are pretty much interelated, namely writing and reading music notation are two skills that mutually reinforce and it's hard to be very good at one, without the other. So learning to sight read "in your head", as you say, is a skill better learned as part of an overal music theory program, and usually takes a few years to acquire. But ...


1

There are two interesting levels: What is this sort of music? (Try to hear the melody, the rhythm, where are the notes one should emphasize, ...) Where are problematic notation parts? (Unexpected key changes, modulations, accidentals, clef changes, what are the notes with many ledger lines) When looking at the sheet, try to imagine how to finger / pluck /...


1

The only way to get better at sight reading is to play as many new and different pieces as you can get. Have around 3-4 pieces on the go at once - spend a week or less playing the easier pieces until you're happy with them, and spend as long as you need on the harder pieces. Exercises can be good, but you only start being able to read pieces fluently when ...


1

In general a (classical) 4/4 signature emphasises the first and third beat, with the first beat being emphasised slightly (but noticeable) more than the third beat. In a 2/4 signature, the first beat is emphasised in each bar to give it a march feel. Think 1 2 1 2. If one was to rewrite a 2/4 as a 4/4 then one would lose the equal emphasis on every first ...


1

I think that memorizing fingerings is very important in playing guitar. However, for strictly sight-reading music in standard notation, memorizing fingerings can only get you so far. Obviously if you recognize an open E major voicing written in sheet music, you will know exactly how to play that without looking at every individual note. However, in the ...


1

Playing chords on a guitar is different that playing chords on piano because of the way the notes are laid out on the fret board. Every chord can be played in multiple ways (called voicings) in multiple positions. But most beginning guitar students start by learning the simple open position or first position chords. Also, on guitar you can't just move a ...


1

It really sounds like you need to take the time and work on your sight reading. In many ways learning to read notes is the same as learning to read letters. When young children come to elementary school the teacher may hold up a sign that shows the letter 'A' together they may say the sounds of the letter A. They may practice writing the letter 'A' together ...


1

Sightreading Mozart and Beethoven is more or less a matter of vertical pattern recognition, and you already have the patterns in your hands, just no connection to the visuals. That makes it frustrating. There are two approaches: start with simple patterns and stuff that is more spread out horizontally. Scott Joplin might be reasonably nice to work with ...


1

In general, playing in ensembles, large and small, is helpful. You're forced to keep going. If you miss some notes, it's okay -- as long as you know where you should be. Sightreading in orchestra is different from sightreading in chamber music, where each participant is a soloist. It's helpful to give yourself lots of opportunities of both types. To get ...


1

I played guitar for 45 years. I first learned everything by ear. My playing stagnated over time, because I had developed a lack of discipline or rather didn't have enough new ideas or tools in my tool box to grow as I wanted. It wasn't for lack of trying either as many times I would average 10 to 14 hours of practice a week for many years. Along came my ...


1

As someone once told me in school, the only way to learn how to sight read is to sight read. Start with stuff that you can learn easily, and mix things up with greater and lesser challenges. As you get better, learn how to fake difficult passages by leaving out and changing some of the notes. As you get still better, then you will find that you have to do ...


1

About a year ago I decided to start working on sight-reading. I'm a professional jazz musician and that I have two degrees in music composition already. I have been hired a lot to read music because I'm fairly proficient at it. But I always wanted to get to a different level. One thing I have found, is that it's important to read different styles of music. I ...



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