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18

The "C" after the clef in place of the time signature stands for "Common Time," and it is shorthand for 4/4 time. If you see a "C" with a vertical line through it, that stands for "Cut Time," and it is shorthand for 2/2 time.


11

In piano, the staffs usually signifies what hand plays what note where the lower staff would be your left hand and the upper staff would be your right hand. While the clefs are important, you may see the same two clefs on a grand staff. In Imagine you can see there are two bass clefs because the piano part is low. It is kind of an unwritten rule of thumb in ...


11

This is tremolo notation. The beams indicate the speed of the tremolo. In the first bar, you should alternate between the D-F# chord and the A in 16th notes. In the second bar, you should alternate between the two sets of notes in 32nd notes technically, or "as fast as possible" if 32nds are infeasible.


11

It's a tremolo. There are two types of tremolos. One between two different notes like in your example above and a second with the bars going though the stem of the note. In your case, it is like a trill where you go back and forth pattern them in that patter at at a speed related to the bars connecting the two notes. So the two bars in the first measure ...


10

On the assumption that if you added up the note values in the bar concerned, and they added up correctly WITHOUT the 'little notes', they will probably be grace notes. They have no value of their own, and are played sort of crushed in just before the main note that follows. You should not blow separately, but play the little note almost like it was a ...


8

The history goes that religious music was written in 3 time, reflecting the holy trinity.So a circle would be used. When music was written in 4 time, a BROKEN circle would be used. This over time became printed as a C. So it represents 4/4, but doesn't actually stand for 'common'.As above, when split, it means split time - 4/4 but played with a 'two' feel.


7

I would say that since Music is a hobby for me and I do not plan to play in any kind of band or such learning to sight read isn't really important. It depends on you. I prefer reading normal music sheets rather than tabs or whatever, but this is just me. If you have time and energy to learn how to sight read,it most certainly won't be wasted. but ...


5

If you have a bass voice, then you can most easily sight-sing bass vocal music. However, if you want to sing music with notes in a higher range, this easiest way to do this, would be to sing everything an octave lower (or the sections that are out of your range). Although you will not be reproducing exactly the notes written, in their written octave, this ...


4

I'm sure you will find many programs that give you want you are looking for (any notation program for example). However, you need to learn to play the rhythms yourself. Using the programs will result in you learning by rote, which is essentially just copying what you're hearing without really understanding the concepts. This is akin to being a parrot. ...


3

Yes, plenty. Guitar Pro is commercial, but there are free alternatives: http://sourceforge.net/projects/tuxguitar/ I'm sure Tux has the MIDI voice for percussion available.


3

The 7/8 bars here are written so that they are timed a half beat (quaver) short of the 4/4s. Wanting to start with a 'one' count, you could count 1e&a 2e 3e&a 4e&a, giving you all the semis on a syllable each. The reason I've left out &a of 2 is that the phrasing in this case does just that - it's split the bar into 3 and 4, making 7, thus ...


3

It pretty much indeed comes down to chord recognition in this case. This includes reading in intervals. Instead of figuring out each single note in a chord [always starting from the bottom and working your way up], and let's assume the second measure you have shown here - you will, eventually, immediately recognize that it is the second inversion, because ...


3

I've tested many different things in years, from online flashcards to books to some sort of software and so one. By far one of the best options is Notable by The Noteable Software Company. It analyses your reaction time and gives you the charts and statistics of your real ability of recognizing the notes, as well as a road map to the progress. It has some ...


3

I found another one (Sheet Music Trainer). This one is for android. It appears to work with most instruments. There is a full list on there website.


3

I have answer this also in another topic. for quick reference you can find some info from the screenshots.


3

I agree with everyone else about not writing in the note names, but would like to suggest an intermediary step: write in a note only at the beginning of a line, or for large intervals. Given that, another approach is to sight-read based on the intervals between notes, as well as on their absolute value (i.e, think 'one-step-down' or 'one-third-up', as well ...


2

I'm not sure what level you're at, and so what difficulty of sight reading you want to practise, but I use this iPad/iPhone app with some of my guitar pupils (they find it great fun!): https://itunes.apple.com/gb/app/my-note-games/id470503027?mt=8 It's quite clever, as it is like a combination of a sight reading app and a tuner, as it listens to you ...


2

It depends on the time you practice and the time you need for the songs you play. Hard to say without knowing you. General rule of thumb: if you don't see progress in the songs you play or don't remember well enough what you practiced the day before, you need to spend more time for the songs you play, so probably you need to preactice less songs. if you ...


2

It is important to be able to read music to some extent. But the ability to sight read, which means to be able to pick up the music and just play it, is not all that essential. I can sight read a single vocal line, but in theory classes, we used complex scores that there was no way I could ever sight read them. In fact, sight reading was part of a different ...


2

I would actually say that the opposite is true, namely, that study of music theory is what matters, and that even if you don't practice sight reading (though you probably should), it's the study of theory that will make the biggest improvement in your sight reading compared to anything else. Sight reading is a tricky thing to do, there is quite a lot of ...


2

I'd take it further than Bob's as always good answer. Sight singing does not have to rely on being in the written key. If one has absolute or perfect pitch, it may complicate the issue in my answer, but read on. Unlike most instruments, the voice has no particular 'fingering' that's needed to sing, say, a C note. It's more of a relative note thing - C-F is a ...


1

Well, falsetto is not head voice (contrary to what the accepted answer writes) and it should certainly be not strenuous before getting quite higher than your natural range. However, it's like switching gears so you cannot really usefully employ it musically since it breaks character. Head voice or mixed voice is a manner of putting falsetto character into ...


1

You'll probably find it easiest to move away from counting every semiquaver (16th) in each bar, and just count quavers (8th). This still helps you count semiquavers, though, as every semiquaver note is either on or off a quaver beat. But, you should feel that your counting and playing both flow better, and feel less rushed, as you are counting half as many ...


1

Sight reading is an extremely rare skill which is mostly used by high level performers auditioning a piece they have never seen for a part in a musical or band. For nearly all other players, it is unrealistic to attempt to play a piece you cannot easily sing or with which you are unfamiliar. The main value of reading music is NOT to play it the first time ...


1

I feel that I may be missing something if I skip sight reading I think so. Understanding (and being confortable with) traditional music notation is very useful, and specially in combination with the understanding of the theory (scales, chords, etc). For example, you can detect at first sight the tonality of a piece, and spot quickly the chromatic notes, ...


1

Whilst agreeing with most of Shev's answer, I feel that sight reading is a lot more straightforward on a keyboard type instrument.For each note on the stave, there is only one place to play it. Thus it makes more sense, and the 'geography' of a melody is simpler to translate onto the keys. With a guitar, there are sevceral different places to play the same ...


1

Some songs are very easy to learn and remember, other songs take longer. I usually learn a song's intro for example, just the intro, until I have the intro in fluent memory. If the intro is simple, that doesn't take long, it can be memorised in minutes, but if it's not, it can sometimes take days to master. Then I go back to adding the next phase of the ...


1

From another answer at this SE I got notion of the book The Musicians Way by Gerald Klickstein. While its main audience are university level musicians, there's a lot of stuff that is useful for those of us not playing for a living. He talks about how to practice, methods for remembering songs, how to approach new material etc. I think there will always be a ...


1

The answer is simple: you need to get the sounds in your ear before you can externalize (sing) them. Try the following as an exercise: Sing a major scale with correct solfege (up and down) Begin singing a minor scale with appropriate solfege Before you get to the third scale degree, stop, and alter the next pitch in your head (bringing it down a half-step ...


1

If one wants to use staff association as a strong hand indication while retaining rhythmically helpful grouping, one can use notation like the following:



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