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5

It's certainly how we recognise words,we look at shapes rather than sound each bit. That's for kids learning to read their first words.A lot of what we see is perceived in that same sort of way. When we speak, we don't necessarily plan each and every word and phrase. As far as KNOWING each note - If you stopped a brilliant player in mid flow and asked what ...


5

There are no tricks. Just a lot of practice with songs at a level that you find easy. Strive to stay in time and just read as well as you can. This is a separate practice in addition to learning new songs/keeping repertoire fresh/improv exercises/etc etc etc. In a year with lots of practice it'll get noticeably easier. Past 2 years (again, with lots ...


5

You need an "internal metronome" - to feel the pulse of the measure in your head as you play. Some people tap their feet to keep that going. But it sounds as if your teacher doesn't appreciate the role that a real metronome can take in developing your internal metronome. One really useful exercise is this (it works best with an electronic metronome, as by ...


4

I would recommend getting a copy of Hindemith's book: Elementary Training for Musicians In the early chapters he has masses of exercises in sight-reading rhythmic patterns, both as single-line rhythms, and also more complex ones where you have to tap one rhythm while playing another rhythm (very useful for pianists). The book is also extremely useful for ...


4

I don't know if you mean Alfred's piano books, but those are the ones that I use with my students. If you're not using Alfred's you might have a look. There are some sample PDF pages. Mikrokosmos is a great series, if you like Bartok. Getting students to play the pieces if they don't like Bartok is more trouble than it's worth. Fingering is a flexible ...


4

Sight Reading / Singing and Aural skills really are things your teacher should be doing with you. I know sometimes teachers don't have the time or the patience to these things themselves but I still think it is poor for a teacher not to be doing these things with you. You don't consider your pupils like the mince going through a sausage stuffer. You need to ...


3

You should start by making sure what your range is ie the notes you can comfortably sing. Baritones also have 'deep' voices make sure you are certain of what type of singer you are exactly. When you have done this the fun part begins. You can start of by just singing along with the piano. No words just try to match the sound the piano makes (Be certain the ...


3

We don't know the program--you'll need to talk to someone there to find out what exactly the prerequisites are. Usually this is the kind of question that the teacher for the course you're going to take would be happy to answer. In general for introductory theory courses they won't care at all about the quality of your voice, only that you can produce ...


3

For jazz guitar there is a standard book by William G. Leavitt called Melodic Rhythms for Guitar. It has lots of examples of so-called "rhythm groups" of increasing complexity. Playing through this book greatly improves sight-reading of rhythms. And this is also the clue: there's no shortcut. You have to sight-read in order to learn it. In my opinion you ...


3

Could you read from the grand staff before you took the 10-year break? if the answer is yes, it's just possible you have developed a problem with your vision that is restricting your field of view, but isn't severe enough to limit other visual activities. Getting an eye test might help. If you have never been able to read the grand staff, I would guess the ...


3

Sounds like a natural and good thing which should not be worked against. Similar to recognizing words instead of putting them together letter by letter (like one does when learning to read), it's good to recognize phrases instead of individual notes.


3

Yes, this is normal. Like any other ability, aptitude varies wildly no matter your skill in other areas. Learning to read music is similar to reading language for the first time and should be approached the same way — start small, with simple things, and work up via lots and lots of practice. While you might pick up the odd tip or trick here and ...


2

I use my mobile phone with Solfa. Mobile device allows me to learn on way to and from work (train, bus) and also somehow feels more convenient and "ready" than a desktop computer or laptop. You cannot take your piano on a bus. This program allows to configure the level of difficulty (which clefs, should notes above/below the clef be included, should sharps ...


2

Recognizing the intervals between notes is very vital in understanding and being able to identify chords, but there is a lot more to it then that especially since you may play the chord in any voicing where the notes of the chord are not in an order you recognize and you may also only be playing part of the chord. To be able to identify chords efficiently, ...


2

By doing scales in the lower positions. What I also find useful is to not stymie your creativity by only knowing a scale two octaves in one position. Learn an octave of a scale on one two and three strings. For instance two string scale and you go the the next string after the fourth note of the scale and learn to go after the fifth as well. When you have ...


2

I'd be inclined to use the same studies, but use position 1 of the C scale, which spans between 7th and 10th frets.The root C is on bottom string, 8th fret. On the lower strings, you'll play exactly the same notes as starting on 5th st, 3rd fret. As much as possible, try to keep your playing within a four finger/ four fret span. Using open strings in some ...


2

One way is to use the scales you already know, but shift the fretted notes down one string and up to the 5th fret but use the same open strings as always. C Major Scale (C:V) $6.8 $4.0 $5.7 8 $3.0 $4.7 $2.0 $3.5 You can see from this example that the fifth fret itself is only needed for one note, the upper C. So, the same technique can be applied to ...


2

Your teacher may well be right. HOWEVER, if, at the stage you're at, you can't feel the pulse, or mark it with some part of your body - tapping foot, twitching shoulder, head nodding, counting in your head - then the humble metronome can come to the rescue. You'll still need to count, and on flute it'll have to be in your head (mouth is busy!), but on your ...


2

A technique advocated by Steve Vai on this one is to pick up some sheet music books for other instruments, especially violin. Being a hardy Scot I'd recommend some fiddle tunes, but that's up to you ;) A book specific to guitar that I've found great for sight-reading practice is Harmony for Guitar. Sight reading isn't the direct focus of the book, but all ...


2

As a string player, I found playing in small and large ensembles very helpful for getting more solid with sightreading. Playing with others forces you to keep going even if you missed a little something along the way. And it helps you get in the habit of looking slightly ahead so you aren't too surprised by a sudden key change or whatever. Pianists are at ...


2

It is too normal. Generally speaking, if one can hear something and play it back, then the sight reading tends to take a back seat. Conversely, if one happens to be naturally good at sight reading - it happens - why should they do anything different? The dots say what to do, good enough! Joking apart, I have played with only a handful of musos who were ...


1

As someone once told me in school, the only way to learn how to sight read is to sight read. Start with stuff that you can learn easily, and mix things up with greater and lesser challenges. As you get better, learn how to fake difficult passages by leaving out and changing some of the notes. As you get still better, then you will find that you have to do ...


1

I would start by first focusing on audiating specific intervals. Pick one to start with - say a perfect fifth. Since you are comfortable with intervals and can audiate individual notes, start by audiating a tone and then audiating, separately, a perfect fifth above it, just as if you were auditing 2 notes in a melody. Then, try audiating the first note, ...


1

I think you need to take a step back and focus on rhythm. You can find a simple rhythmic solfege that starts with the basics of the rhythms and study that. It will help you understand the different values of the notes and then you'll be able to feel them. If people haven't done a study similar to this and jump right into playing songs, they might have a ...


1

AB has recently included sight singing in the piano grades too, so your teacher should be looking at that aspect to prepare for exams along with everything else. Often, as Neil suggests, the aural bit of exam stuff is left till the rest is good - it is a small percentage - but it still needs to be part of each lesson. My pupils can't escape it !


1

It will depend a little on the instrument. For example, rhythm guitar with lots of strumming will be slightly different from picking out a melody on, say, a clarinet. Yes, the rhythmic pattern will be the same, but its execution is different, as is reading chord symbols as opposed to dots. Tapping a foot is always good, as is internalizing the basic beat ...


1

It isn't really that useful to think of the sightreading tests for a graded music exam in comparison to the performance pieces for graded music exams. This is because: the sightreading tests are much shorter, more like exercises than actual pieces. the sightreading tests are designed simply to test your ability to read notation and perform it at sight; ...


1

As others have said: most sight-singing classes don't care if your voice sounds well. It's all about reading, keeping rythm and holding pitch. It's not a voice lesson. You're not becoming an opera singer, you're developing a more intimate relation to written music. For holding pitch, which I suspect is your main concern, a lot of it is about building ...


1

Unless you are going to be a singer, don't worry too much about vocal quality. Obviously, there are books you can read on vocal pedagogy to help with healthy singing technique, but probably not necessary in your case; ask your singer friends for some pointers and I'm sure they'll be happy to help you out. One of the ways I learned to sight-sing that was ...


1

Just a different sort of flashcard. Get some blank postcards and a black marker pen and in your best musical handwriting, notate a rhythmic pattern lasting one crotchet on each card. Each single card could contain for instance (a non-exhaustive list): crotchet quaver quaver crotchet rest dotted quaver semiquaver semiquaver semiquaver quaver rest Triplet ...



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