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Generally, teaching the major minor distinction in solfege has two sides to it; one is to sing scales and understand it theoretically like you and jjmusicnotes. The other is to have repertoire that you know the melodies of instinctively, that contain the solfege difficulty. I can't tell from your post what music you prefer, but standards are often a good ...


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The answer is simple: you need to get the sounds in your ear before you can externalize (sing) them. Try the following as an exercise: Sing a major scale with correct solfege (up and down) Begin singing a minor scale with appropriate solfege Before you get to the third scale degree, stop, and alter the next pitch in your head (bringing it down a half-step ...


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It depends on the time you practice and the time you need for the songs you play. Hard to say without knowing you. General rule of thumb: if you don't see progress in the songs you play or don't remember well enough what you practiced the day before, you need to spend more time for the songs you play, so probably you need to preactice less songs. if you ...


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Some songs are very easy to learn and remember, other songs take longer. I usually learn a song's intro for example, just the intro, until I have the intro in fluent memory. If the intro is simple, that doesn't take long, it can be memorised in minutes, but if it's not, it can sometimes take days to master. Then I go back to adding the next phase of the ...


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From another answer at this SE I got notion of the book The Musicians Way by Gerald Klickstein. While its main audience are university level musicians, there's a lot of stuff that is useful for those of us not playing for a living. He talks about how to practice, methods for remembering songs, how to approach new material etc. I think there will always be a ...



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