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0

If you're running Windows then I would suggest RandomABC (SightRead.zip) which generates random ABCNotation tunes within a a given range. Then you could just print out random scores to test your sightreading. You could also manipulate the ABC files for any interval range you were interested. So spend a couple of hours generating the tunes you want, print ...


-1

I use MidiIlustrator. Very good app. You can compose or re-write any music sheet. Once you learn how to use it. This one is the best. It change page for you, too. Music note is good too but it doesn't change page.


4

I'm sure you will find many programs that give you want you are looking for (any notation program for example). However, you need to learn to play the rhythms yourself. Using the programs will result in you learning by rote, which is essentially just copying what you're hearing without really understanding the concepts. This is akin to being a parrot. ...


3

Yes, plenty. Guitar Pro is commercial, but there are free alternatives: http://sourceforge.net/projects/tuxguitar/ I'm sure Tux has the MIDI voice for percussion available.


3

The 7/8 bars here are written so that they are timed a half beat (quaver) short of the 4/4s. Wanting to start with a 'one' count, you could count 1e&a 2e 3e&a 4e&a, giving you all the semis on a syllable each. The reason I've left out &a of 2 is that the phrasing in this case does just that - it's split the bar into 3 and 4, making 7, thus ...


1

You'll probably find it easiest to move away from counting every semiquaver (16th) in each bar, and just count quavers (8th). This still helps you count semiquavers, though, as every semiquaver note is either on or off a quaver beat. But, you should feel that your counting and playing both flow better, and feel less rushed, as you are counting half as many ...


2

I'd take it further than Bob's as always good answer. Sight singing does not have to rely on being in the written key. If one has absolute or perfect pitch, it may complicate the issue in my answer, but read on. Unlike most instruments, the voice has no particular 'fingering' that's needed to sing, say, a C note. It's more of a relative note thing - C-F is a ...


1

Well, falsetto is not head voice (contrary to what the accepted answer writes) and it should certainly be not strenuous before getting quite higher than your natural range. However, it's like switching gears so you cannot really usefully employ it musically since it breaks character. Head voice or mixed voice is a manner of putting falsetto character into ...


5

If you have a bass voice, then you can most easily sight-sing bass vocal music. However, if you want to sing music with notes in a higher range, this easiest way to do this, would be to sing everything an octave lower (or the sections that are out of your range). Although you will not be reproducing exactly the notes written, in their written octave, this ...



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