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Have you tried Just Play, by Pentagrom? Its simple but solves exactly your problem, because it turns your smartphone into an instrument in the shape of written music, so that to read the notes of any score you just press the dots on the lines. I use it to practice for my choir, to know if Im singing the notes right (I dont worry about the rhythmn because I ...


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A good idea is to start with the note that is the shortest and make that one beat and count the other notes in relation to the smallest notes. So for instance if you are in 4/4 time and the shortest notes in the piece is quavers you make the quavers one beat, the crotchets 2, minims 4 and semi breves 8. It is not a perfect method. You run the risk of ...


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Could you read from the grand staff before you took the 10-year break? if the answer is yes, it's just possible you have developed a problem with your vision that is restricting your field of view, but isn't severe enough to limit other visual activities. Getting an eye test might help. If you have never been able to read the grand staff, I would guess the ...


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I would recommend getting a copy of Hindemith's book: Elementary Training for Musicians In the early chapters he has masses of exercises in sight-reading rhythmic patterns, both as single-line rhythms, and also more complex ones where you have to tap one rhythm while playing another rhythm (very useful for pianists). The book is also extremely useful for ...


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It will depend a little on the instrument. For example, rhythm guitar with lots of strumming will be slightly different from picking out a melody on, say, a clarinet. Yes, the rhythmic pattern will be the same, but its execution is different, as is reading chord symbols as opposed to dots. Tapping a foot is always good, as is internalizing the basic beat ...


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It's certainly how we recognise words,we look at shapes rather than sound each bit. That's for kids learning to read their first words.A lot of what we see is perceived in that same sort of way. When we speak, we don't necessarily plan each and every word and phrase. As far as KNOWING each note - If you stopped a brilliant player in mid flow and asked what ...


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For jazz guitar there is a standard book by William G. Leavitt called Melodic Rhythms for Guitar. It has lots of examples of so-called "rhythm groups" of increasing complexity. Playing through this book greatly improves sight-reading of rhythms. And this is also the clue: there's no shortcut. You have to sight-read in order to learn it. In my opinion you ...


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Sounds like a natural and good thing which should not be worked against. Similar to recognizing words instead of putting them together letter by letter (like one does when learning to read), it's good to recognize phrases instead of individual notes.


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I am in a very similar situation, having played classical guitar for many years and started learning piano properly after I retired. I found a piano teacher who was prepared to teach me using Bartok as much as possible - sounds odd, I know, but I love Bartok's music, and have found his approach to teaching piano fascinating. In addition to Mikrokosmos books ...



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