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7

As with mastering any technique, you need to practice ... a lot. That said, I would also suggest you try changing the angle of the snare drum a little bit. Try a few different angles to see if you can find one that results in hitting the perfect rimshot more reliably. For instance, if you are consistently hitting only the rim, then it may help to ...


5

If you're just looking for more rudiment-type patterns to practice, the 40 standard rudiments are only the beginning. There are literally thousands of potential new licks and patterns, many of which elaborate on the original 40. These are often referred to as 'Hybrid Rudiments', to emphasize that they combine and extend the traditional 40. This list of 128 ...


4

First of all, a bit of rattling is absolutely normal and I always have the impression that my toms don't sound right if the snare remains silent. There are a few things you can do to reduce the rattling if it's too much... Try to avoid direct sound from guitar or bass amps, i.e. don't place them in the snare's direction. On professional shows you ...


4

There's the standard cheat: put one stick down on the rim with the tip on the head, and hit it hard with the other stick. For the one-stick rim shot: practice practice practice. Before long you'll be able to do it with your eyes closed. (Unfortunately you can't practice this one on the practice pad -- you just have to make lots of noise on a real ...


4

The primary reason for this difference is in the mechanics of the drums themselves. Snare drums have both top and bottom heads that are usually tuned to a relatively high tension compared with the timpani. Hence, all the notes are extremely staccato and have virtually no sustain to them at all, so it is very difficult to play a note on the drum in the 50 or ...


3

As a jazz drummer I normally do the stick on stick cheat. When doing an actual rimshot, I usually change from traditional to matched. I find it much easier to get a solid rimshot because you can push downward with the force of your wrist. One main thing I would suggest: It is much better to hit the drum than the rim, so if you're going to over shoot, make ...


1

Over-correction is good. Start by hitting the rim with the middle of the stick angled a little bit away from the head, so as to make sure the tip can't hit. Slowly decrease the angle with each hit. Fairly soon you'll develop muscle memory of where the proper angle is. A thing to note: unlike simply playing a snare, rim shots require being quite familiar ...


1

Here's one that seems to work for me but I don't know if this is a proper way to do it Hold the stick towards as far the lower end as you are comfortable with Sharply strike the rim with the part of the stick just outside your hand. Try to keep the stick roughly parallel to the drum When you get it right, the stick's center of gravity should end up ahead ...



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