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53

Jalmus provides what you are looking for and it has a MIDI interface. It is also free open source, is cross platform (written in Java, it works on Windows, Linux, and Mac), and is available in English, French, Spanish, Italian, Danish and German. From the website: Jalmus is a free, open source music education software helping the musicians, ...


30

Are you sure you want a software solution at all? An alternative is a large supply of small pieces, like Bartok's Mikrocosmos. Just keep playing different ones. One level of that will keep you entertained for quite a while. I particularly like the song about the foxes and the chickens. Sight-reading is not just about connecting your eyes and your fingers. ...


29

A free alternative to Transcribe, which allows you to do tons of other things too like removing vocals, is Audacity.


25

Since you're looking for software to input a score that is still under construction, MuseScore (found at musescore.org) would be my go-to application. It's a GNU-licensed graphical score editor that has playback and range-checking abilities. In case you later want to engrave a finished score with LaTeX-like typographic quality, LilyPond is considered to be ...


24

One option is to use (and abuse) Impro-Visor. Impro-Visor is a jazz improvisation trainer, but it has built into it a "lick generator", which builds melodies over existing chord changes using grammar rules. (The program is of course also capable of generating chords.) By putting in various grammar rules you should be able to adapt the program to also work ...


23

There is LilyPond which does what you are looking for. It was first released on 1996, but it still gets updates. LilyPond is a computer program and file format for music engraving. One of LilyPond's major goals is to produce scores that are engraved with traditional layout rules, reflecting the era when scores were engraved by hand. LilyPond ...


18

Transcribe helps you slow down the tempo whilst retaining the pitch. It also has other useful features for transcribing, such as placing bookmarks for sections, measures, and beats, and an equalizer for isolating instruments. It can also show which tones are being played, which works OK with some tweaking of the filters. Another important feature is that ...


15

Simply put, no. If you limit a song to single pure tones, it's pretty easy to write software to recognize them and transcribe it. But once you get to a real instrument things get much harder. Even single notes can be difficult to recognize due to overtones -- the dominant frequency doesn't even need to be the fundamental frequency, which makes it very ...


15

I'm pretty sure LilyPond can do what you want. It's not the easiest thing to use but since you've already used a text-based system it might not be too bad. Here are some examples and this is also relevant in this case. MuseScore is another free option, which is easier to use and might also be able to do this. EDIT: Here's a lilypond version: And code: ...


15

No doubt both are used, depending on circumstances. Having done some recording in both styles (sequenced/synthesized and live-performance) even with my mediocre performance skills and low-quality hardware, I've still often found performing to be less-labor-intensive than sequencing (to my surprise). If you can find any random half-decent instrumentalist it ...


14

I was looking for something like this once too. One I've used and liked because first I can put the note names to be Do, Re, Mi, Fa... or A, B, C, D... and it's free if you used it on the website is this one: http://www.emusictheory.com/practice.html They drill you with note after note and you need to say which it is. It also has the average time it takes ...


14

Capo (only for Mac) is visually appealing and wonderfully easy to use. In addition to slowing music down without affecting pitch, it also uses frequency analysis to make educated guesses at the notes being played, which can speed up the transcription process tremendously.


14

It depends on the source of the music, but I can think of two ways to do this. If I remember correctly, they can both be accomplished with Finale and Sibelius. If the source is Sheet Music: You are going to need to scan the music and use OCR software meant for music. Sibelius has a program called Photoscore that will do this. If the music is available ...


14

Drums have pitches, but by the time they are in the track, then unless it is for very specific purposes, to complement a melodic line etc, then those actual pitches should not be truly apparent to the end-listener. Let the listener just get the 'vibe' of what you intend. They shouldn't really be hearing a 'tune' from the drum pitches, only the apparent ...


14

There are 3 separate voices. Voice 1 is the high D-F#-A-G, voice 2 is the middle [eighth rest]-D-A-E-A, and voice 3 is the half notes.


13

You should definitely check out the open source notation software http://musescore.org/. It has many features related to transposing.


13

There's also TuxGuitar. It's not as good as Guitar Pro, but should be enough for your needs.


13

Use \once \set chordChanges = ##f at the location where you want to force the chord symbol. \score { << \new ChordNames { \set chordChanges = ##t \chordmode { \repeat volta 2 {g1} \alternative { {c} {\once \set chordChanges = ##f c4 g c c} } } } \new Voice = "one" { \relative c'' { ...


13

What you are trying to achieve is not a trivial task. If you want a good master it'll take more than some tips. I'll try to do some quick observations on some possibilities. There's nothing specific to Ableton Live, because there's nothing exclusive to Ableton Live in this subject. You want more loudness in your track. As you might know we can't just turn ...


12

My response will be in part influenced by the information I gathered from reading your profile. My first suggestion to you is to strongly encourage you to learn an instrument. If you're serious about writing music and about having it played by live performers, having a working knowledge of the instruments is important. It is paramount to be technically ...


12

Yes it is possible to have a note that is part of a triplet and dotted for example: In this we're using quarter note triplets. Instead of having them all be 3 even quarter note triplets the first one is dotted and the second one is shortened giving us a triplet consisting of a dotted quarter note followed by an eigth note followed by a quarter note to ...


11

The best one I've found so far is Noteable. It drills you on different notes, allowing you to choose which notes and/or key signature(s) you want to practice, and even learns which notes you're suffering on and drills you on those ones more. It supports MIDI interface. As far as I'm aware, though, there's no support for practicing chords, and it's not ...


11

Well, there are a few options, but there are considerable limitations. First, copyright. The instrumental backing tracks for popular music are usually the property of the producer or record label, so finding these on the internet for free is of questionable legality. Some labels do provide licensed CDs for exactly the purposes you require (or karaoke, ...


11

It's actually pretty easy to remove just vocals from a track with something as simple as audacity. Most modern songs have just the vocals panned hard center (everything else is slightly to the left or the right. import into audacity. to the left of the window, there's the name of the track you just imported, just above where it tells you the info for it ...


11

When using an amp with microphone, it means that you play the guitar through a physical amp, and using a microphone to direct this sound into your recording system. An amp simulator is software that literally simulates an amp; you plug your guitar into your computer (through an interface for better quality), and this sound is modified by the software that ...


11

Making everything audible in the mix is not always possible. Elements that share frequencies will mask each other. The most crucial part of the mix is not actually in the mixing phase itself, but in the composition, instrumentation, and arrangement phase. Experienced composers will give each element its space in the frequency spectrum, so there is little to ...



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