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This isn't a great answer if you just want to make music, but if you want to use music making as a vehicle to teach the kids how to program then I'd take a look at Sonic Pi. The founder of that effort is Sam Aaron the guy behind Overtone, a Clojure dialect that overlays SuperCollider and turns it into an elegant live coding environment. The people working on ...


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I figured it out! While using Groove Agent SE, you can just drag the audio parts or slices you want onto the pad you want them on; then you can just "Create Drum Map From Instrument" and then edit the drum part in the drum editor thing like normal.


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It refers to the batch of tracking software that would have been out at the time. It considers itself a second generation tracker probably because it's now quite old. Think of it as similar to generations of consoles. If the N64 and Playstation were second generation consoles, then the GameCube and PS2 would be third generation consoles, while the sega ...


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I am not sure if they include all of the features you require. But the java jmusic library is quite extensive, I think that would be your best shot. Otherwise other options would be JFugue, music21 (python) or the visual programming language CSound, from ircam, also very extensive.


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I think Overtone has what you're looking for and more. It's a Clojure library that acts as a powerful front-end to SuperCollider. It may take a while to learn how to use it (especially if you're new to Clojure), but once you do, it's quite powerful and flexible. You can do things like define a melody as a sequence of scale intervals, and then combine that ...


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Getting into tracker software might another approach. You could consider the tracker score notation the programming language, and the tracker player the complier/interpreter. There are plenty of music modules (songs) you can load and play with. These are shared all the time. You can use tracker software out of the box to edit your 'input music' (E.g. ...


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One can consider Lilypond to fit in this mold: although it is more focused on typesetting music, it can output a MIDI representation of the score. However, I find that, in terms of basic usage, it is not easy to achieve expressive effects in the midi output. In addition, it has no real-time capabilities. I mention it primarily since it may provide ideas ...


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Édouard mentions OpenMusic, somewhat similar, and descendant of PatchWork is PWGL (http://www2.siba.fi/PWGL/). Looking at what you need from a language it might be useful especially 'constrains' part of PWGL. Learning curve is steep (LISP) but well worth your time. Some great external libraries for rhythm manipulation too. good luck


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Besides Haskore which is already mentioned in the paper you refer to and the ones mentioned by other, there is "supercollider" and "pure data". I absolutely understand you question. I've been looking for such a high-level thing myself. Here are my personal thoughts on this: I haven't found anything good and came to the conclusion, that there are no ...


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You may be interested in the CHucK programming language. https://www.coursera.org/course/chuck101


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Give a try to OpenMusic, a visual programming language for symbolic music. It’s a bit frightening at first, but the tutorial should get you going pretty quick.


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See this SO question. I'm not sure if this is exactly what you need, but it might help. Because I'm just linking another question, I'd normally put this as a comment. However I don't have commenting permissions on this site (yet).


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Googling it quickly gave http://linuxband.org/. Other tips are given in e.g. http://www.jazzguitar.be/forum/recording-music-software/19914-band-box-alternative.html.


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Vowels are formed using formants: the basic characteristic particularly of chest voice is a "pulse train" which has lots of harmonics. Those harmonics are then amplified or dampened depending on the shape of the mouth. The strongest surviving harmonics are called "formants". Basically, one hears the mouth shape under the "lighting" of the voice box, and ...



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