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A quick-and-dirty method might be to use a noise gate. Reverb is often much quiter tha the voice itself so you could apply a noise gate to the track and set the threshold to be as low as possible such that it captures only the voice. If you're not familiar with a noise gate, it's a device (software or physical) which silences output if the signal is less ...


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You can try with de-reverberation programs. There has been a lot of progress in the area, so these programs can achieve pretty good results. Some options are: Zynaptiq Unveil Izotope RX3 Acon Digital DeVerberate Vocal Dereverberation


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One old technique for this is to copy the track or tracks, invert the phase on each and apply a high ratio compressor to the inverted track. When you mix the treated tracks with the originals, the parts that were left by the compressor will cancel out. See De-Verb for Free: Removing Reverb using Free Plugins for a fairly good explanation of this technique. ...


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I've practiced with a metronone for long enough to develope that internal pulse. After hearing a very good lesson by Troy Stetina I've realized it's time to go to a drum machine because he talks about the importance of being able to listen to everything the drums are doing including the fills. I also now remember Malcolm Young saying in an interview that ...


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The difference is - they sound different. Neither method aims for "accuracy" in the way a purist stereo recording of acoustic instruments in a beautiful-sounding room does! The idea is to grunge up the guitar sound. Don't worry about how closely one method copies the other, just about whether you like the result.


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They sound 'bad' because they are not naturally created sounds. They are not the sounds of acoustic instruments, which have a much wider array of characteristics as compared to just some particular frequencies sounding for a particular time.


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I am the developer of Chordastic, I think this is the software you are looking for. It can produce really nice lyrics and chord sheets with minimum effort and with very easy UI.


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If I understand correctly, you have a midi file with N different tracks, and you want to create N sound files out of that where for each sound file, one of the tracks is proportionately louder than all the other tracks. If that's the case, you can do this with python and the fantastic music21 library: from music21 import * ##Load in a MIDI file st = ...


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GarageBand is a bit limited compared to Logic Pro X, but there's a hack that you can use. It's sort of cumbersome though, but it should work. Essentially, you're going to create 2 software instruments and add the AUPitch plugin to one of them detuning it by a quarter tone (up or down, doesn't matter). Create 2 tracks (of the same instrument) Move to one of ...


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Adding my answer from software recommendations to this thread: Check out 'Pitch' on the apple app store: https://itunes.apple.com/gb/app/id989140910?mt=8&ign-mpt=uo=6 It shows random notes and listens for the note you play. You get a point for each right note. Here is the website: http://www.practicemakesperfect.education You can change clef and key ...


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Go to the MIDI/Audio menu -> Quantization Settings... -> More Settings -> check "Minimize Number of Rests" and check "Allow Dotted Rests in Simple Meters" Then highlight the measures you want to affect and run MIDI/Audio -> Retranscribe.



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