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11

per the first promising looking result from google... http://library.thinkquest.org/05aug/01262/lessonsolfege.html Chromatic Scale Using sharps - Do, Di, Re, Ri, Mi, Fa, Fi, Sol, Si, La, Li, Ti, Do Using flats - Do, Ra, Re, Me, Mi, Fa, Se, Sol, Le, La, Te, Ti, Do


9

The terminology you're looking for would be Aural Training, Ear Training, or Aural Skills and there is a lot of literature on the subject. Since you seem to want to take a more academic approach to it, I can point you to this course offered online by Berklee College of Music. Also, this textbook seems to take a similar approach as you described. They begin ...


6

You say I can only solfege (moving-do) in my head up to about Allegro 16ths at best Congratulations. That's more than enough for most purposes. I am not sure you need more but adapting the note names to your language basic phonemes is a very good idea. Constructing a dodecaphonic version of note names is fun too. But good luck to evangelize it. I would ...


5

There seems to be some (depending on country, author or whatever) variants of the general idea to replace vowels by higher sounding ones for sharps and by lower sounding ones (in extreme case always "u") for flats (which are also simply formed by attaching a "b" for "bemolle" in French, so si→sib). In German wikipedia I found these replacements do→di, ...


5

Can 'do' be any pitch one wishes?, i.e. does this mean everybody chooses their own key to sing in, transposing the music while singing? A movable 'do' can indeed be any pitch, however, in a group setting, the entire group must use the same any pitch. Otherwise, you get unintended multitonality, and chaos! If needed, the group's leader could pick a pitch ...


4

Movable Do is called such because it is just that: movable. Movable Do focuses on intervallic relationships. When you change keys, "Do" becomes the new tonal center for that key and all of the other solfege syllables are transposed accordingly. For example, in the key of D, "D" would be "Do". If we changed keys to "F", "F" would now be "Do." Fixed Do ...


3

Am I correct in assuming this is a theory for non-majors course of some kind? If that is the case, you're going to have a huge variance in the amount of reading ability, from none at all to students who could have been music majors if they had chosen to. However, everyone is probably going to have some similar intrinsic knowledge about the aural aspect of ...


3

The simple answer is yes - your application will just need to use some mechanism to refer to the octave used. The solfege system just refers to the 7 notes of the octave, and once you move up to the next octave it begins again.


2

The Movable Do system is not well defined in the areas of theoretic "extremities" such as double augmented and double diminished intervals. I have, however, been made aware of a few publications that use a Helmholtz-like notation form for solfege intervals larger than an octave. These have however been publications of the "Tonic Solfa" system, which is based ...


2

"movable do" is not only octave agnostic, it's also key signature agnostic. If your key signature is D major, D4 is do. Nearly all western music tones are based on a key signature and scale. "movable do" mostly just applies to the major scale, I believe. There's also the minor scale and the 7 modes bring in an additional 5 scales (outside the major and ...


2

It does sound like you are teaching some sort of "Fundamentals of Music for Non-Majors" course (whether formalized as such or not). Put yourself in the mindset of your students for a moment, if you can. You have probably had a fair amount of training, and connecting the "written theory" concepts like IV-V-I with actual sounds and actual music probably ...


1

I have constructed my own solfege system at http://toneme.org which simultaneously handles relative and absolute solfege, including accidentals. Each utterance consists of a consonant phoneme followed by a vowel phoneme. The consonant represents the pitch class, and the vowel represents the function. Please note that the website is several years out of ...



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