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1

Very different systems that drive toward different understandings. Fixed do is essentially C, D, E, ... and can sometimes help develop a sense of perfect pitch (or at least vocal tension pitch.) Movable do is all about what the notes are doing and character... more of a tie in to tension/resolution and opens the door to an aural understanding of functional ...


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I've worked with both, and prefer movable do. In movable do, the solfege syllables represent something functional about the note in the context of the key: "do" is always the tonic, and "ti" is always the leading tone. I've noticed that the countries that use fixed do tend to put more of an emphasis on developing perfect pitch in their students. That ...


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In music theory from Ricci Adams you have online exercise note exercise on top the is a toggle switch which you could change from letters to solfege. I hope I was a help.


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The example, as it stands, is ambiguous. The way this passage will be perceived is going to be heavily dependent on what (if anything) precedes it, and what follows it. Pace Sandra-Émilie, syncopation is a bit broader and more complex than "tones entering where there is no pulse." The Wikipedia page gives some idea of just how broad the definition can be, ...


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According to G. Cooper and L.B. Meyer in The Rhythmic Structure of Music, a syncopation is "a tone which enters where there is no pulse" and which is followed, on the next beat, by a rest or a suppressed tone (a tied note). Therefore, this is not a syncopation, according to these authors. This is what is called "suspension" because it starts on a weak beat ...



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