Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

10

Short answer: the fingering can be the problem, but there are other possibilities, one of which is finger placement. Congratulation for your study of the soprano recorder. Hope you are having fun. -> The fingering you show in your question is a typical fingering for a baroque soprano recorder. I presume you have a baroque/english-model recorder because ...


8

Read what Quantz has to say about the matter. Syllables like te-ke and duh-gah were not considered beautiful. He recommended did'll or dood'll, made using the sides of the tongue. Playing all the notes in a passage evenly was not the goal either. Play them in pairs, or one vs. 3, etc. Varying the tonguing helps keep the tongue from getting tired. Francis ...


8

EXCELLENT question! The answer actually rather like "Why does stopped french horn sound up a half step when closing the bell lowers my tuning?" Horn players routinely adjust their hand position to close or open the bell of the instrument, thereby changing the tuning. When they need to adjust themselves down, they close the bell, and when they need to ...


7

Since the recorder is a type of flute that doesn't have an embouchure which affects pitch, all you have control over is the speed of the airstream. As a result, recorder vibrato is executed by adding pulses to the airstream at a regular interval. Since the airstream should be driven by the diaphragm, we call this diaphragmatic vibrato. Locate your ...


5

Did'll is clearly the way to go. Count on it taking LOTS of hours to get you there. I used to practice in the car on long driving trips.... did-ll--di-dll... etc. For HOURS. Eventually this becomes LIGHTNING fast. I can do running 16ths on a g scale at a metronome count of over 200 beats/minute (800 notes a minute). Quantz "On Playing the Flute" is ...


5

Get a teacher if you possibly can, just for the start if necessary. They will really, really help you progress. Whether you have a teacher or not, once you have some ability to sight-read pieces, if there's a group of recorder players near you then you can get some invaluable experience by going along and playing with them. You'll be stretched, challenged, ...


5

While the characteristics of the trumpet (or other brass instruments) will cover any inconsistencies in your double-tonguing technique, the recorder will not. You'll need to very carefully work on evening out the syllables. Simply thinking of an even, uninterrupted airflow will help, but you'll likely need some additional work. Visualize a continuous ...


5

It's not a bell, it's a bell key. The bell is just another word for the end of the recorder (where most of the air comes out), and a bell key is a small construction that can partly cover the bell up. The recorder can be made to play higher by carefully covering the bell -- sometimes people do this with their upper leg, but from my own experience I can ...


4

If you enjoy classical, ethnic or folk music, go for the recorder. However, as you say you like rock, I'd say the harmonica is more common for this genre. Also, since you're playing at parties, I'd also choose the harmonica because it is louder than the recorder. Harmonica It's simple, but like any instrument it gets more complicated as your learn more, ...


3

I've done considerable research into this and I have found some good websites and books: Recorder-Fingerings.com: This site has fingerings for about thirty recorder makers and most of their recorders. It includes over five hundred detailed charts of piano, forte, and trill fingerings. 8notes.com: This site has about thirty pieces of free beginner-level ...


2

You should have a look at JoyTunes: music games controlled by real instruments. They currently have 2 games for learning to play the recorder: Recorder Master (also available for iPad) Recorder Express


2

I began learning the recorder about 2 years ago and I found the 8notes site to be a good source of simple songs for me to practice. I learned by practicing the easiest songs first until I was comfortable with the fingerings and reading the music and then working my way up to harder songs. I didn't know how to read music when I started but learned the ...


2

Here is the link to the best method books I've ever seen and used. Recorder from Zero I wrote the first review on that page. I used these books to teach my daughter how to play and they did their job well. However, since you say you are a complete beginner, I cannot recommend it for you, although once you get some reading skills you can certainly use it ...


2

Some plastic recorders have separate blocks but most of those are glued in so removing them is not really possible. Warm/hot dishwater in the sink will do the trick. Later, a piece of card stock cut appropriately can be used to dislodge particles of food or lint that get caught in windway afterwards, or just wash it again. A clean pipe cleaner will work ...


2

The decibel level you can reach and still maintain pitch does increase as the recorders get shorter, but I agree that your main problem may be technique. That being said, playing a soprano "quietly" is not easy, esp. up above G6. Altos are mellower, tenors even more so. There are tenors being made with keys (Mollenhauer) that are playable by children so ...


2

Small hands don't matter. It's true that high-pitched sounds tend to be more annoying than midrange. But to get to the root of the problem: it sounds like you have breath control difficulties, and those can only be corrected by taking some lessons. You shouldn't have to "overblow" to reach the higher octave(s), and while some of that depends on just how ...


1

The bell key described by Lee White was invented by Dr. Carl Dolmetsch (special keys )to help the fingering for the very difficult high C#/F# (soprano/alto) note, one half-step below the the high D/G (2 octaves+1 whole step) that all baroque or modern-design recorders should be able to play easily. Without the key one must indeed stop the bell (close the ...


1

After playing the violin for 15 years, I didn't have enough time to practice anymore. So, I switched to a woodwind instrument. I've been learning the Irish flute and Irish tin whistle on my own. It's very easy to start playing, especially if you're used to playing by ear. The technique is really simple at the beginning and you can play a decent tune very ...


1

Though Quantz's did'll is a good and working option, it isn't the only one. It seems to be used most when an especially fluid effect is wanted, and other tonguings may be employed when seeking for more separation between the notes. For a contemporary author's take on double tonguing on recorder (rather than on transverse flute), see van Hauwe's Modern ...


1

I approach cleaning my recorders the same way a flutist cleans their instrument because both have a stopped head joint. My recorders all came with a cleaning rod. I use a small piece of fabric, usually silk, and run this through the instrument after each time I play. You should be careful when cleaning the windway because any nicks to the ramp (the angled ...


1

I would try a pipe-cleaner, or perhaps a cheap brass mouthpiece brush. Some mouthpiece brushes have a plastic cap on the wire though; those won't work. A pipe cleaner would probably be your best bet.


1

I use "Recorder Karate." Ignore the silly belts, just grab the book. It's an easy introduction, and teaches you how to read music at the same time. Once you pick up some basic reading skills and know the C-major scale, you can grab any sheet music with a limited range that's in the key of C! ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible