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34

Wave is an uncompressed or lossless format, whereas MP3 is compressed or lossy. Technically .wav is just a container format and can hold various types of compressed or uncompressed audio, but typically you'll see it containing LPCM uncompressed audio (the same as on audio CDs). With .wav files, you are essentially getting a raw bitstream representation of ...


15

"Worth the money" is very subjective. Let's instead talk about the various factors you have to consider. Fitting A into B Good quality microphones usually have XLR connectors. These have three wires arranged so that any interference picked up in the cable is cancelled out. Many USB audio interfaces have XLR sockets (but check that the one you choose ...


13

I know exactly what you mean and I've thought about it quite hard myself. Not everyone can do this, but as you attune to music more and get used to what a drum kit or guitar playing in a room sounds like, it's easier to pick out the characteristics of live vs. recorded. I think it's a mixture of things: The mix- sometimes live music isn't mixed as well ...


10

This is an extremely broad topic, so I'm going to try to distill it down to just a handful of points: There are (basically) two ways of generating sounds electronically: sampling and synthesis. Confusingly, we tend to call all of this sound generation "synthesis", as you are generally working with a "synthesizer". You will want to read Wikipedia - ...


10

Consonants are primarily just noise—largely high, semi-random frequencies. Vowels are generally the only part of speech that have harmonic content as opposed to the inharmonic content of consonants. Bright, forward vowels like EEEEEE have way more overtones than dark, back vowels like AHHHHHH. Most consonants other than the nasals are so brief that I'd ...


10

You can't. Even if you get the sound guy to feed the FOH sound through the stage monitors (or your IEM) it won't give an accurate representation of the FOH sound, there are simply too many variables. If you want to check FOH sound you need to walk off the stage during sound check to hear it. A long lead or a wireless pack will allow this. Be aware the ...


8

Obviously, headphones are the very first thing to recommend if you aren't already using them. A good pair of noise-cancelling headphones works both ways; you can be thumpin' it at 95dB and nobody but you will hear it. The sound produced by you hitting a rubber pad with a drumstick is a dull thunk, typically quieter than an ordinary conversation. If you have ...


8

As others have mentioned, those strings do not have dampers (the felt things that mute a note when you release the key). The reasoning is several-fold. First, the higher notes have much less sustain than lower notes. The dampers wouldn't really have much effect since those notes die out so quickly. Second, undamped strings are free to vibrate ...


8

Yes. All tenor and bass trombones are pitched the same. The difference between student instruments and professional ones is actually more in the bore size than whether or not the instrument has a trigger (which is typically called an "F attachment"). The F attachment's primary use is to extend the low range of the instrument, and enable technical facility ...


7

There's seven billion people on this planet: pick one you trust and ask them to go to the back of the house for a sound check. Fans are great for this; they're just so honored to be asked, and they have some idea of what your music is supposed to sound like. Or if there's more than one act going on, you can often ask the musicians in another band to help ...


7

Having faced this issue some times, the best reccomendation i can give you is first of all, listen to your recordings in various systems, the more, the best, because if you want the world to listen to it, you can never test every system in the world, so, try as many as you can and try to balance for the best in all the systems. Particularly, one of the best ...


6

Sounds to me like exactly the same principle. The first rhythm gets faster and faster until it becomes a blur of noise and is removed from the sound, but over the top of that is superimposed the same rhythm at half speed. While you're listening to the first rhythm get faster, the second does the same, and eventually becomes the main focus of attention. By ...


6

You need to reproduce the full spectrum for each note and model the way the amplitude (and harmonic mix) varies over time. See Analysis and Parametric Synthesis of the Piano Sound For accurate reproduction you also need to take into account complex effects such as induced vibrations in other undamped strings.


6

There are many different types of synesthesia, and it is only recently that it has been taken seriously as psychological phenomena. For anyone who is unfamiliar (or too bored to click the links in the OP's question,) synesthesia is essentially where a person's brain is hard-wired to experience sensory stimulation in multiple, simultaneous ways. For ...


6

I have absolute pitch and associate colors with specific keys. I have had this ability for as long as I can remember and only discovered in adolescence that others did not have it; the two are very much intertwined in terms of how I think about music. FWIW, absolute pitch runs in my family on both sides, with my mother possessing it and my paternal ...


6

The executive summary of Charles' very detailed answer is: Use WAV for recording and editing. Use your audio editor's native file format with references to the WAV files to keep disk space under control use MP3 for distribution. 44.1 and 160kbps is lots, unless your audience has a home stereo that is worth more than their car and ears to match.


6

The difference is in the number of channels (signals) used. Mono uses one, stereo uses more than one. In monaural sound one single channel is used. It can be reproduced through several speakers, but all speakers are still reproducing the same copy of the signal. In stereophonic sound more channels are used (typically two). You can use two different ...


5

Mesh should certainly be quieter, but to help save the sanity of your neighbours below, you will need to look at an isolated drum riser. Tennis balls could work, but more commonly you see neoprene pads as these do a very good job reducing transmission of vibrations. Underneath that you could also use a square of carpet cut to the size of the riser as this ...


5

Sand. The Grateful Dead lined their space in sand, Moby encased his NY apartment in sand. If you are on the second floor, put your set on a sandbox. Line the walls with sand bags. It's cheap, portable, labor intensive, works great. You'd probably get a kick out of this article, sums up the plight of the modern drummer well: ...


5

I'm not 100% sure this is the reason, but it is something I noticed about the guts of a piano. I no longer have a piano available to check, but I'll stick my observations in here anyway. :) At some point around the 2/3 point of the range of the piano, strings go from (mostly) wound to (mostly) plain. Plain strings tend to ring more, like you describe. ...


4

This sounds like a standard organ patch with a distortion effect applied to it.


4

If one strikes a note (say C3--an octave below middle C) on an acoustic piano without the damper pedal and then with it, one will likely notice that the second note sounds slightly different--probably brighter. This is because the struck string will vibrate with energy not only at the frequency of C3, but also some other frequencies including C4, G4, C5, ...


4

Look inside the piano: there are no dampers for the highest notes. I don't really know why; maybe it's for some extra resonance (both for the high notes and in general).


4

Just mixing with headphones as recommended in a comment, is a bit risky, since the sound differs quite a lot from what you get with a couple of speakers. Some kind of monitors are definitely recommended. A good pair of monitors is obviously preferable, but the important thing is to know your monitors well. If you have a pair of imperfect monitors, but you ...


3

This is a complicated topic. Julius Smith has a book about physical audio synthesis. The section on piano hammers has some decently heavy math. In order to make the chords sound like they are being played on a piano, you have some options: Correctly model all aspects of a piano (hammer, string, other strings, soundboard, etc.). This is hard. Record what ...


3

I'm pretty sure the key is the same thing as the root note. Anyway, I think that the key of that riff is A. A is the first note of the riff, it occurs a lot in the riff, and the notes are all on the A Minor scale. I'm going a little bit based on intuition, but that's my thought process.


3

There are many ways you could approach this, but the best way is to find a qualified teacher. For something like this, even one lesson a month, (or even less frequently) would do much to help your tone along. Since embouchure and tone are such individual characteristics, both of you and your equipment, I can only offer a few sweeping generalizations. In my ...


3

There are two distinctive sonorities on the beginning of "Seven Devil" by Florence + The Machine as found on this music video: On the right and center fields is a very good imitation ...


3

This is quite a lot like this thread, which was quite comprehensive : Electronic Drums in apartment A few points : The problem isn't so much sound travelling through the air and through the wall so much as making its way to hard surfaces and travelling through that. If you have a wooden flor, the wood will resonate nicely as you hit the kit (especially ...


3

There is no such thing as "natural voice" in singing, like there is no "natural movement" in sports or "natural look" in makeup. In all of that cases, "natural" is a particularly hard to pull off artificial creation that has to become a second nature to pull off convincingly. Now if you write stuff like Then I try to shape up my voice consciously to sound ...



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