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2

This is just the way all classic tube amp designs pushing 12" cones sound. Close backed cabinets are even more directional than open backed cabinets with the same drivers. I play live with a 1x12 combo and I deliberately point it right at my head and make it sound a little too bright and harsh. That way I can always hear my amp over the rest of the band and ...


1

There are several possible causes: As a general rule, the sound produced by a loudspeaker is more directionally "focused" at high frequencies. If the speaker is aimed directly at the opposite wall of a room, you are likely to get "organ pipe" resonances because of sound reflecting directly from the wall back onto the speaker. In this case, there may be ...


0

I am author of the site ,, Synesthesia interactive music visualization", which is at least good visible in Internet . Now I think that instead synesthesia music visualization must take in bearings such firmly asserted phenomena as conditional reflex, prediction,expectation, satisfaction. In a matter of fact namely these phenomena are referred to my program. ...


-3

Type of connector isn't an issue. You can certainly take the output of one mixer into a channel of another (two channels if it's a stereo output) or into a spare Aux Return. But you won't quite get "one big mixer" because the Aux busses, used for effects sends and monitor sends won't be connected. It can work well for making a submix of the drum mics. ...


0

You can certainly put the submixer on stage in order to fit more in your snake. You certainly want to avoid running a 50' RCA connection if possible. Check the outputs of the mixer you want to use as a submixer. It should have balanced main outputs on either XLR or 1/4". If there are balanced XLR outputs, connect them directly to the snake and then into XLR ...


2

The connection between sub-mixer and main mixer doesn't have to be RCA., it could be jack to jack, or XLR. With 50', you may need balanced leads, so it will depend where physically your snake is, or use a stereo or mono feed with shielded cable between sub and main. Or use a D.I. box to help the signal.


1

To add to the other answers let me share some practical ideas I have learned over the years from the days when I used to build homes and build out office space. These ideas will help you reduce considerably reduce the volume of any sound transmitted outside of your practice space, regardless of where you set it up. Sound travels through the air. It ...


-1

This is going to be EXPENSIVE! And, even in a detached house, several hundred feet away from the nearest neighbour, "loud volumes at any time day or night" are going to be classed as a nuisance. Stay where you are, play more quietly and use headphones. You need to practice your music, not continually test your PA system.


2

It really depends on what you mean by "loud volumes", what would be acceptable to your neighbors, and what the pre-existing situation of the dwelling you intend to inhabit is. Your question isn't really answerable with specifics. In my experience as a musician in apartments, townhomes, and single family homes, you can either buy the right dwelling and play ...


7

If you are serious about this, you need to spend a LOT of money. You really need to build a "room within a room", with the floor mounted on a very soft foundation such as flexible airbags, so there is no vibration transmitted through the structure of the house. Then you can think about soundproofing the walls, floor, and ceiling of the inner room to stop ...


5

Let's just say you want to play as loud as you would in a concert. A little googling turns up 110 to 120db being a pretty standard range for concert volumes. The city of Binghamton, NY, USA conveniently posts their noise ordinance as a helpful chart. I'm not sure how representative these are, but they limit levels of sound in multi-unit buildings to 45db at ...


11

While sound proofing can be very effective, sound can be very easily transmitted through air and solid like walls or floors. So in a condo you may be able to sound proof your walls to limit the sound to neighbours, but as anyone who has ever lived above a neighbour knows, your floor will transmit a lot of sound. A detached house will be much better, as ...


1

The question assumes that the waveform at stake is directly human hearable. If that would be the case, an alternative approach to the programmatic one would be to use an additive synthesizer to synthesize the waveform. For those into the computer music/DAW realm, there are a number of free VST synthesizers that perform additive synthesis, and I remember at ...



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