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Rather than deciding between "bright" and "mellow," I suggest searching for a good sound in general and a long sustain. A good piano, one that's properly tuned, voiced, and regulated, will allow you the full spectrum of colors, from bright and brilliant to dark and lush, and the sound should last forever. Even if you prefer one of those two sounds now ...


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It seems to me what you are asking about is best exemplified by Klangfarbenmelodie. A striking example would be Frank Zappa's Amnerika on Civilization phaze III. Hocket, where a melodic line is split between two voices, can be seen as a precursor. Conceivably there could be a conceptual piece that does just what you describe. The idea of displaying a ...


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Not exactly "notes", but some percussionists develop entire pieces based solely on percussion instruments (e.g. orchestral percussion sets, or drum kits complemented with additional instruments or implements). An example is Glenn Kotche (of Wilco fame) who has a number of pieces for percussion only, either solo or for ensembles, like this one. ...


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This example isn't quite as strict as you're thinking, but check out Webern's arrangement of a Bach ricercare. This particular video clearly shows how often Webern switches between instruments. This is a famous example of what Arnold Schoenberg called Klangfarbenmelodie (often translated as "tone-color melody"). The idea is that the different timbres (i.e., ...


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Handbells Also, depending on the precise definitions, marimba and xylophone might qualify.


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Here are some things that have helped me understand sound design: Learn a musical instrument. Study acoustics. Start recording things. Listen carefully to all of the audio elements of every movie and TV show you see. Think about what the purpose is behind every sound and effect. Make note of which are the loudest elements and where elements are panned. ...


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I agree with Todd's answer; it's mostly a matter of personal preference. However, it should be noted that a lot of the sound depends both on the style of the piano and the tuning. The style may not be an adjustable factor depending on your circumstances. An new upright piano will generally be more mellow than a grand, for example. And like Todd says, ...


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Your third question is a matter of opinion and can't be answered here. Pretty much the same with your second question. I'm pretty sure everyone would agree that the answer to the first question is "Yes". You should pay attention to the brightness, but how bright it should be is a matter of personal taste. Important note: Pretty much all pianos get brighter ...



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