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Your question is a good one, but I think you can go about it in a slightly different way and end up with much more meaningful results. If we acontextually (that is, away from the music itself) try to compile a list of various musical traits, it will never be complete and it will never be specific enough. So instead of trying to list musical traits and then ...


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This is a very wide topic, but think about how you would approach recordings of two of your favourite jazz pianists. Do they have some favourite runs or chord sequences that crop up again and again? How do they handle the beat? Tight, or loose? Always ahead of the 3rd beat in a bar? How about volume, and sustain? Do they generally approach runs in a smooth ...


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C and Dm are both diatonic chords in C major. That is not dissonant. That consists of the notes C D E F G and A. That is what you might call a cluster. What you are experiencing is not some kind of auditory illusion; It is a physical phenomena. Beat frequencies are real things. They occur when two tones (or harmonics of tones) interact. If they are ...


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Stereo recording was invented to enable a recording engineer to produce a reproduction of the original performance that emulated what the listener might hear at a live performance. If you attend a performance of the symphony orchestra - from where you are seated in the audience the brass may be on your right and the strings on your left. So a producer ...


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Stereo is kind of two separate sound sources. Separation is part of it. Panning hard left or right will be an option, just as keeping the sound source exactly mid centre is. With speakers left/right ( or in this scenario, north/south, the best place to be to hear stereo is in the centre, facing west/east. When there are speakers on all four sides, the stereo ...


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ATTENUATION. This is the technical term for a reduction in signal strength (i.e. a reduction in the volume). Isolation or cancellation? The other responders seem to miss that many solutions for noise reduction are using active inverse wave cancellation rather than passive isolation--which is what I recommend for maximum hearing protection and listening ...


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I've noted this myself, actually. As an anecdotal example: when I was younger I was lucky enough to get an antique German violin, heavily discounted due to damage, but it looked a lot worse than it was and my teacher knew someone who could restore it. After restoration, it was gorgeous, but it still sounded "stiff", for lack of a better word - no depth to ...


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If you use a heavy mute for a practise session on a good violin, the full sound of the violin will not recover right away afterwards but will take some playing without mute to do so. What causes this difference? The most obvious candidate of course is the bridge itself possibly needing recovery from the pressure of the mute, but it might also be the bridge ...


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This is a heavily-researched, and (sadly) highly inflammatory topic. There are some people who swear it takes 50 years for the varnish to reach a stable structure & stability; there are others who say it's due to the wood itself aging and "settling" in at the cellular level. I'm not aware of anyone who's had the time and the cash to put a couple ...


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I don't know of any published studies on this, but the basic cause is well known, and it is a fundamental limitation on the quality of sound reproduction. When you pan the two chords hard left and right, your two loudspeakers (or earphones) are acting as two independent (monophonic) sound sources. Human hearing is very good at locating the position of ...


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First of all congrats to the OP for an intriguing and innovative idea. I don't know of any specific studies about this subject either, but I think that the reason why the two chords don't sound dissonant when separated left and right is the same as when they are separated by an octave, and the reason why (traditionally) we have 9th, 11th chords and not 2nd,...



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