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9

It is so the speaker is pointed more towards your head than your feet and so you can hear yourself better. If a small combo-amp is on the ground, the sound has to bounce quite a bit to actually get to your ears and if you are at a band practice or a gig it may mean bandmates can hear you better than you can hear yourself. If your speaker is pointed at your ...


5

Usually the ohms rating is the minimum the amp is safe with (as when you reduce resistance you increase current) so you are going the safer direction here by using an 8 ohm speaker. So for a 300W amplifier through a 4ohm speaker, using Power = Current squared X Resistance, you can supply up to around 8A. Using your 8ohm speaker the same equation gives your ...


5

Generally, for low level outputs, such as headphones, the current change due to impedance is unlikely to cause an issue. If you were wanting to connect many headphones it would probably degrade badly, but for just splitting to a second pair I wouldn't bother with an active circuit - just a normal headphone splitter should do just fine.


5

I see that you noticed this happens usually with the bass amp, and I don't see an answer addressing bass in particular. I can think of some reasons: Mechanical Coupling Bass amps are isolated from the floor to avoid mechanical coupling. Depending on the venue (stage design, materials, acoustics, etc) floor vibration can cause an array of problems, like ...


4

A well as turning the monitors down, I would suggest muting the monitor channels and turning down the volume on the monitor if they are independently powered. I know turning the levels right down should remove any voltage across the output, but some mixers seem to still have a DC offset which will cause a pop when the mixer is powered down. Muting on some ...


4

The audio signal coming out of a keyboard has all the same characteristics as the signal coming out of a CD player's line-out socket. For home use you just need the same kind of speakers/amplifier as you would use for a CD player. A hi-fi system, or a pair of powered PC speakers will do the job nicely. The "keyboard equivalent" of a guitar amp -- something ...


3

In and of itself, the presence of multiple frequencies does not produce any distortion or frequency modulation. The idea of the high frequency waves "riding on" (or being "pushed by") the low frequency waves can be misleading in this context. Intermodulation effects require some non-linearity in the system, i.e. a distortion model. Most the most basic ...


3

"I see another answer explains that the positioning is to "hear yourself better", but this will be hardly the case for bass amps, since those wavelengths are not very directional. Bass amp isolation from the floor will make little to no difference; low frequencies, the ones produced by the bass, are omnidirectional (unless a special system is used, which is ...


3

I have never used the Yamaha YDPS51 before, but I have connect powered speakers to my Casio and Korg headphone jacks and it has worked fine. The simple answer to your question is yes, it is safe and worth a try. Although you might experience a loss in sound quality or even a distorted sound due to impedance mismatch. It also depends on the kind of speakers ...


3

If you're using active electronics, as silly as this sounds, verify that the battery isn't dead. I had a similar issue with my first bass, and it turned out to be the 5 dollar 9-volt battery-swap fix. After verifying that, as stated in the previous answer, see if you can pad the input somehow to make sure that you're not slamming the preamp.


3

The pickups could be clipping the input gain stage of your amplifier. I doubt it has anything to do with the knobs, since active electronics can give out a very hot signal. Can you give us more information on what you're using for an amplifier? What active electronics are you using, specifically? I doubt you'll kill the speakers if it is input clipping ...


2

A keyboard like this creates a full spectrum of sound, and you don't generally expect your amplifier and speaker to add colour to the sound. The keyboard outputs stereo (or, optionally, mono) line level, unlike the much quieter "instrument level" that comes from a guitar. As a result, you're looking for most of the same properties as a you'd be looking for ...


2

My HI-FI system (a basic compact hi-fi system) is the only output I use with my POD X3 and I'm really satisfied with it. It's connected through left/right RCA cables. I don't see why it would not work with a POD 2.0. I see few possibilities : The cables / connectors you are using are cheap (but if you use them with you TV, I guess it's not that) The ...


2

Figure out which one you like the best, get rid of the other one/trade for matched impedance/sensitivity, you'll end up happier in the future; by the way, parallel is the opposite of chaining (series). I wouldn't mongrelize to 12ohm/12ohm, you won't be able to adjust the amp (the multi-tap output transformer actually) to "see" the correct load on the output ...


2

If you parallel the two cabinets, the resulting nominal impedance will be around 5.3 ohms. This uneven load distribution not ideal; the lower ohmage Marshall cabinet will draw something like two thirds of the power. So on the grounds of power alone, it may be louder by several decibels, and if the speakers in the Marshall also happen to be more sensitive ...


1

It may well work- if you connect pure speakers from the headphone socket, the volume may not be loud, but the quality will be better. If your speakers are powered (as in computer monitors) then as long as you start with the output volume low, it will probably give a good sound. You may even have an input on your hi-fi, which could give a good sound, too. If ...


1

You're almost bound to make distorted noise. Going through a guitar amp. will give you mono, not stereo, so sound quality will not be as good. Using a decent pair of headphones is the pro. way to go anyway. Plugging into the 'aux' of a decent hi-fi set up will give a good sound, if you can attenuate the input signal. You're more likely to damage the ...


1

I would say the one that can be damaged is the Amp. The signal coming out of the Focusrite is stronger signal than the guitar normally output, so the Marshal Amp might receive a signal that is too strong. If you are careful starting with low volumes you will not have problems, still give low signal from Audio Interface and always check the volume is not ...


1

It is more like to damage the amplifier. The amplifier is designed to take instrument level signals, which are much lower in power than line level. However solid state amps are pretty hardy. If you turn the volume right down on the PC, it should work. You won't get the greatest sound quality.


1

Sounds like you are overloading the pre amp.Just as a guitarist would when turning up the pre-gain.To clean up that sound, he would turn the volume down at the guitar.At that point, the guitar volume pot. becomes a sort of distortion control. What's wrong with leaving the bass guitar volume down enough to achieve a clean sound, and turning up the amp? On ...


1

If your amp is specified for 300W @ 4 Ohm, it means that your amp was designed for a speaker with 4 Ohm. Assuming a constant load, this would be about 9A @ 35V (rounded). It's a common misunderstanding that audio amps were impedance matched to the speakers, i.e. that their internal resistance would be the same as the speaker's resistance. Instead, amps ...


1

The rule is to always turn your sound system on from "upstream" to "downstream", and to always turn off from "downstream" to "upstream". At its simplest and most basic, "amps are last on, first off". If you are following this rule, and still getting pops when you turn the amps on or off, one of two basic things is happening: You are turning everything on ...



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