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18

This is called feedback. Put simply, the microphone hears some sound. It sends it to the amp. The amp sends it to the speaker. Some time has passed. The microphone hears the sound from the speaker (now louder), sends it to the amp, and round-and-round it goes, getting louder each time. After a few goes around the loop, you reach internal limits and ...


13

The noises are caused by electronics picking up wireless signals from your mobile phone and translating the interference into sound. Well-shielded circuits won't have this problem, but it's common in consumer electronics and some musical equipment, notably guitar leads. There's no damage to your equipment, and if the sound is a problem just keep the phone ...


11

Well first, the amount of power inherent in the average festival rig or even an installed club system will dwarf what you can get out of any four speakers on the planet. That chest-thumping kick drum that's a mainstay of EDM is produced by moving a lot of air very quickly, creating a shockwave you can feel. That requires a lot of big cones, in turn requiring ...


10

It is so the speaker is pointed more towards your head than your feet and so you can hear yourself better. If a small combo-amp is on the ground, the sound has to bounce quite a bit to actually get to your ears and if you are at a band practice or a gig it may mean bandmates can hear you better than you can hear yourself. If your speaker is pointed at your ...


8

A head is simply the name for an amplifier without a speaker. Your friends won't have heads on top of amps, they'll have heads on top of speakers (with the head driving the speaker). The "basic guitar amp" you have at the moment, is probably an amplifier and speaker combined in one cabinet. These are commonly called combos. There are several reasons for ...


8

It is true that a tube amp should not be operated without a load, i.e. without speakers (or a dummy load) connected. Solid state amps don't have that problem. The reason is that (almost) all tube amps use an output transformer, which can produce high voltage peaks if its secondary (output) winding is not connected, because the energy from the primary (from ...


7

Having faced this issue some times, the best reccomendation i can give you is first of all, listen to your recordings in various systems, the more, the best, because if you want the world to listen to it, you can never test every system in the world, so, try as many as you can and try to balance for the best in all the systems. Particularly, one of the best ...


6

Usually the ohms rating is the minimum the amp is safe with (as when you reduce resistance you increase current) so you are going the safer direction here by using an 8 ohm speaker. So for a 300W amplifier through a 4ohm speaker, using Power = Current squared X Resistance, you can supply up to around 8A. Using your 8ohm speaker the same equation gives your ...


6

I see that you noticed this happens usually with the bass amp, and I don't see an answer addressing bass in particular. I can think of some reasons: Mechanical Coupling Bass amps are isolated from the floor to avoid mechanical coupling. Depending on the venue (stage design, materials, acoustics, etc) floor vibration can cause an array of problems, like ...


6

Key factors (hometheatershack.com) are your woofers' combined surface area; their displacement, achievable low Hz factors and an amplifier capable of delivering the power needs of the speaker configuration. You simply cannot expect this, to do what this does, which makes it feel like this. Behind the bar at the club, you might find racks full of ...


5

The audio signal coming out of a keyboard has all the same characteristics as the signal coming out of a CD player's line-out socket. For home use you just need the same kind of speakers/amplifier as you would use for a CD player. A hi-fi system, or a pair of powered PC speakers will do the job nicely. The "keyboard equivalent" of a guitar amp -- something ...


5

Generally, for low level outputs, such as headphones, the current change due to impedance is unlikely to cause an issue. If you were wanting to connect many headphones it would probably degrade badly, but for just splitting to a second pair I wouldn't bother with an active circuit - just a normal headphone splitter should do just fine.


5

Another couple of reasons why someone would choose head/speaker over combo : a comparable combo usually weighs more than one or the other, so is harder to hump around (poor old roady).Heads go wrong more frequently than speakers, so carrying a spare head to a gig is better than taking two combos. In defence of the combo, one doesn't need to remember the ...


4

A well as turning the monitors down, I would suggest muting the monitor channels and turning down the volume on the monitor if they are independently powered. I know turning the levels right down should remove any voltage across the output, but some mixers seem to still have a DC offset which will cause a pop when the mixer is powered down. Muting on some ...


4

Just mixing with headphones as recommended in a comment, is a bit risky, since the sound differs quite a lot from what you get with a couple of speakers. Some kind of monitors are definitely recommended. A good pair of monitors is obviously preferable, but the important thing is to know your monitors well. If you have a pair of imperfect monitors, but you ...


4

Defer this decision until you know where you're going to play. I'm going to assume you have an acoustic drumkit, which you won't be mic'ing up. So the drums set a baseline volume which the other instruments and voices need to match. You actually don't need much to achieve this. The guitarist just needs a modest amp - one step up from a practice amp, ...


4

If you have access to a looper pedal, such as the Boss RC series, they have a line in. Connect the pedal to the looper, and then your MP3 player to the line in of the loop pedal.


3

The replacements would appear to be black widows, 15", 8 ohms, with more power capacity than the originals, which should also be black widows. Good speakers ! First check the drivers out of circuit, using a small battery. 9v will do. When it's connected to the speaker, the cone should move out or in. If not, it needs changing. If it moves, it should either ...


3

In and of itself, the presence of multiple frequencies does not produce any distortion or frequency modulation. The idea of the high frequency waves "riding on" (or being "pushed by") the low frequency waves can be misleading in this context. Intermodulation effects require some non-linearity in the system, i.e. a distortion model. Most the most basic ...


3

"I see another answer explains that the positioning is to "hear yourself better", but this will be hardly the case for bass amps, since those wavelengths are not very directional. Bass amp isolation from the floor will make little to no difference; low frequencies, the ones produced by the bass, are omnidirectional (unless a special system is used, which is ...


3

I have never used the Yamaha YDPS51 before, but I have connect powered speakers to my Casio and Korg headphone jacks and it has worked fine. The simple answer to your question is yes, it is safe and worth a try. Although you might experience a loss in sound quality or even a distorted sound due to impedance mismatch. It also depends on the kind of speakers ...


3

If you're using active electronics, as silly as this sounds, verify that the battery isn't dead. I had a similar issue with my first bass, and it turned out to be the 5 dollar 9-volt battery-swap fix. After verifying that, as stated in the previous answer, see if you can pad the input somehow to make sure that you're not slamming the preamp.


3

The pickups could be clipping the input gain stage of your amplifier. I doubt it has anything to do with the knobs, since active electronics can give out a very hot signal. Can you give us more information on what you're using for an amplifier? What active electronics are you using, specifically? I doubt you'll kill the speakers if it is input clipping ...


3

If you parallel the two cabinets, the resulting nominal impedance will be around 5.3 ohms. This uneven load distribution not ideal; the lower ohmage Marshall cabinet will draw something like two thirds of the power. So on the grounds of power alone, it may be louder by several decibels, and if the speakers in the Marshall also happen to be more sensitive ...


3

I'm going to play devil's advocate here. A PA is a collection of parts. That means you can start out simply and add pieces as the need arises. Here's what I would do: Look at the plastic-bodied powered speakers. They have amps, EQ and one or more inputs. You can begin with only one or two and plug mics directly into them and off you go. If money is an ...


3

I'd have thought that merely plugging the player into the input would do the job. The volume can be attenuated via the gain pot on the amp., and also by the volume control on the player. Turn it down initially, as there will be a propensity for lots of sound. The speaker extension output - it may already be switched, and cuts out the internal speakers of the ...


2

A keyboard like this creates a full spectrum of sound, and you don't generally expect your amplifier and speaker to add colour to the sound. The keyboard outputs stereo (or, optionally, mono) line level, unlike the much quieter "instrument level" that comes from a guitar. As a result, you're looking for most of the same properties as a you'd be looking for ...


2

My HI-FI system (a basic compact hi-fi system) is the only output I use with my POD X3 and I'm really satisfied with it. It's connected through left/right RCA cables. I don't see why it would not work with a POD 2.0. I see few possibilities : The cables / connectors you are using are cheap (but if you use them with you TV, I guess it's not that) The ...


2

Figure out which one you like the best, get rid of the other one/trade for matched impedance/sensitivity, you'll end up happier in the future; by the way, parallel is the opposite of chaining (series). I wouldn't mongrelize to 12ohm/12ohm, you won't be able to adjust the amp (the multi-tap output transformer actually) to "see" the correct load on the output ...


2

Recording studios used to have (not sure if they still do) a set of 'ordinary' speakers to play back final mixes through. They were the sort that Mr. Average would have in his front room.Hi-fi, but not state of the art, just a fair sound. A bit like i-pods produce now.The eq. would be set flat. If your speakers already produce lots of bass, I can't ...



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