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6

It depends on the load requirements of the amplifier and the impedances of the speakers, neither of which you have specified. If the amplifier has a 4 ohm output transformer tap, or it is solid state and well-specified into a 4 ohm load, you can put 2 x 8ohms or 4 x 16ohms in parallel. Similarly if you have 2 x 16ohm speakers you can put them in parallel ...


2

A Peavey ValveKing 20MH amp has a speaker output impedance switch which allows selection of either 16Ω or 8Ω speaker/cabinet impedances with 8Ω max on the 20MH. If you are considering wiring more than two speakers to the amplifier, you need to concern yourself with your amplifier’s ability to handle low impedance loads. If you ignore the way you wire them ...


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In a small venue such as a Hotel Lobby or restaurant you will probably not need to mic or amplify your trombone as it will be loud enough on it's own - unless you want or need to send the audio of your performance into a remote location to play through speakers such as inside the restrooms. But you will need something to play your backing tracks at a ...


1

It depends a lot on the size of the rooms, if you're going to play alone or with a band, and how much you're willing to spend. But I would start looking at small compact PA ("public address") systems like this one (this is just an example of the type of equipment, I'm not endorsing or recommending this, or any other specific brand or model) and take it from ...


1

The main criterion for choosing your cable is length. It should have sufficient of this to reach the speakers in their new location. If they don't, it's a showstopper. Apart from that, don't fuss. If you use an extra plug/socket stage, turn the plugs occasionally to make sure corrosion isn't adding resistence. Once a year should be fine.


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The reason for monitor speakers not causing feedback is the DIRECTION more than the sound level. Since the microphones used for live performance are virtually all directional, the direction the speakers are firing is critical. Monitors are always angled to send sound at the rear of the microphone's reception field, where it is least sensitive. They can often ...



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