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If they're 2x8 Ohm in series, then yes that would give 16 - but guessing is no good. 3 ways to find out, check the maker's plate on the back, get a multimeter & test it, or take the back off & look. For an annoyingly under-technical explanation, read on... The reason 16 is 'safe' is that amps have a tolerance; 8 - 16 is pretty standard. Some can ...


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It's all about headroom 2x12 will get you a lot more headroom, 4x12 even more. It's not about volume, if you have a 1x12 that is 100W and a 2x12 that totals 100W, for the same settings in the amp, you will have the same volume, but in reality the 2x12 will seem louder and the sound will be a lot less muddy with way less tweaking of the EQ. That's what we ...


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16 ohm speakers are unlikely to be a problem. The term "safe mismatch" is really a misnomer. Amplifiers are not "matched" to the speakers. The amplifier output impedance is normally very low. But the amplifier has voltage, current and power limits that should not be exceeded. Additionally, valve amplifiers don't like very high impedance loads as stray ...


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Personally, I would never trust a "Safe Mismatch"... Obviously, systems are protected against those who don't care and don't understand impedances, but even though they say it is safe, it will reduce the life span of the amplifier. Tube amplifiers are more fragile to these changes mostly because the tubes heat a lot already when working like they're ...


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One thing worth mentioning is that loudspeaker impedances are minimum values over the frequency range and vary over frequency. The frequency response is for a given voltage. A consequency of this is that two loudspeakers of different build put in series may not divide the voltage up evenly between themselves. So whatever arrangement you end up forming, ...



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