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9

Stage monitors are designed to do something quite different from what normal stereo speakers are designed to do. That means if you get great stage monitors, they won't sound so great as stereo speakers and vice/versa. But you could use one for the other. Getting effective stage monitors is more important, to me, because you want to be able to hear yourself ...


8

I haven't found any comments on this question online from someone who actually knows a lot about amplifier design. I also have not been able to find any horror stories such as "I did this once and destroyed my amp/speaker", which I would expect to find if it were actually an issue. I have found many mentions of professional bass players using guitar amps and ...


5

You shouldn't connect any unpowered speakers directly into that mixer. It produces line-level output, which is designed to be fed into an amplifier, then to the speakers. In order to repurpose those speakers, you'll need to purchase an amplifier that can appropriately drive them. If you connect those speakers directly to the mixer (the only way I could ...


4

The 'phones out sends a very small electrical amount of power, to make the headphones work. Ordinary speakers, hi-fi and especially those used on stage, will require an awful lot more power to make them work. You could use the 'phones socket to plug into an amplifier, which would then produce enough to make the speakers work. In the same sort of way, you'd ...


4

I agree that looking at the future configuration you want is a good idea becuase that way you're not spending money on something now and then spending more to replace it later. From that point of view, one piece of advice is to imagine your ideal, complete PA system that you hope to have in the future. Then, when you want to add or change what you currently ...


4

Who told you you can't use you home PA? Sure enough, if you just plug the guitar right in a PA, it'll sound somewhat boring, but there's no reason you could not do it anyway. In fact, such a “super-clean” sound can IMO sometimes be a pleasant alternative. The thing is, guitar amps aren't designed to sound “good” in a HiFi sense, at ...


4

Guitar cabinets are designed to give a completely different response from HiFi speakers. In particular, they cut away / smear out a lot of the high frequencies and transients. This is really important for distortion sounds (without something like a guitar cabinet response, these sound just extremely harsh, but not really powerful – rather ...


4

As long as the speaker's power rating is > 15W (which is the amp's maximum power) you don't need to worry too much. The main question is if it's really worth to replace the built-in speaker, which - I heard - is actually not bad at all. The only problem is its relatively small size, but due to the combo's size it will be hard to replace it with a much bigger ...


3

A decent PA would do it, and give you the possibility of plugging in microphones also, or other sound sources. If you are trying to go cheap and compact, then a keyboard amp or electronic drum amp would also work, but those are normally designed for a single sound source. You'll want a lot more watts in your PA or keyboard/drum amp than your guitar amp, ...


3

As far as I know, it's not a case of being able to tolerate it, it's more if the speakers can't reproduce the sound well. That's why you generally have 15" speakers in a bass cab and 12" speakers in a guitar cab. At the end of the day, an amplifier does just that - amplifies the sound it receives. I imagine you plug an active bass with very hot pickups into ...


3

If we first simplify things to consider that the speakers are in an infinite space with no walls, floors or reflective surfaces, many of the things you mention have to do with, as you say, the amount of time the sound takes to get to the ear from each driver. Let's also pretend for a moment that people have just one ear! If you were to place two speakers ...


2

A tube power amplifier (like the final stage in your Mark V) has to have an output transformer to lower the output impedance (the "Ohms") to a level appropriate to drive a speaker. What does that mean? Well if you know what voltage and current and power are, then one way to look at impedance is how much of the power you are putting out is in voltage and how ...


2

Though Todd Wilcox is right that this will be a compromise, I'd say it's not necessarily that bad. True is: classical HiFi speakers are almost completely unusable for any live application, and heavy-duty wedge monitors are quite ridiculous as home speakers. But there is a decent middle ground nowadays: compact active full-range PA speakers. These are ...


1

It is likely that the output from your keyboard is too loud which is overdriving the input of your monitor's amplifier and causing clipping/distortion. Try turning your keyboard's volume down and then turn the volume of your monitors up to compensate for the keyboard's volume decrease.


1

THINGS TO CONSIDER are as follows: What is the size of your audience or venue. The bigger the room, the more powerful your amplification system will need to be. Sound reinforcement outdoors can present even greater demand on your amplification needs. Outdoors you have more ambient noise (traffic going by, planes flying over, wind blowing, etc.) and no ...


1

Bare minimum requirements: Microphones and/or DI boxes Mixer Power amp(s) Speaker(s) All the necessary cables Note that the mixer and power amp can be purchased in combination called a "powered mixer", or the power amps and speakers can be bought in combination called a "powered speaker". Very desirable extras (but not 100% required): Snake Feedback ...


1

As a bassist of 40 years, having played through many hundreds of different amps, bass amps, guitar amps, keyboard amps, PA systems, up and down the line from a Pignose amp up to a 50,000 watt outdoor festival sound system, that no, categorically no, is it going to damage a guitar amp or guitar speaker to play bass through it, as long as you do not overreach ...


1

Be wary of the headphone output levels in the pedal and the actual volume on the system in order to: 1) get a clean sound. 2) reduce the risk of blowing a speaker when using a heavy distortion or high gain effect. It is common sense even when connecting to an amp but extra care is needed when using systems the way they are not intended to. The Zoom G3 ...


1

If your stereo has an "aux" input, of the kind you'd plug a separate CD player into, then yes, you can connect the output of most multi-effects pedals to this. It's likely, in fact, that the output is labeled "headphone/line out". But any headphone output can be used as a "poor man's line out".


1

It does depend on how loud you mean by loud. For the purpose of practice, anything that makes your ears ring after playing might seem cool now, but take it from someone who can't hear that well anymore and has constant ringing in their ears because of loud music (I think it was a Pantera, or possibly dream theater concert that did it in the mid 90s) I would ...


1

One test is to attach a small battery - 1.5v is fine - to each speaker. The cone should jump either in or out on contact. This is mainly for checking the polarity of each speaker, so that they can be connected in series or parallel properly. Connect each individually, not while in circuit. It will tell whether a speaker is still responding, although if ...


1

The guitar amps you have most likely have some "effects" on them already. Most guitar amps allow you to select either a clean signal or a distorted overdrive signal (at living room levels). Also, many have built in reverb or delays or other effects that can be selected. But eventually, most guitar players end up wanting a sound they just can't get out ...


1

You can use a stereo and speakers. The reasons people tend to use instrument amps for practice is because they are (hopefully) built to cope with an uncompressed/unEQ'd instrument signal, which will have more big level spikes at particular frequencies, in contrast to recorded music which tends to be more smoothed out (making it more obvious when you're ...



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