Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

18

This is called feedback. Put simply, the microphone hears some sound. It sends it to the amp. The amp sends it to the speaker. Some time has passed. The microphone hears the sound from the speaker (now louder), sends it to the amp, and round-and-round it goes, getting louder each time. After a few goes around the loop, you reach internal limits and ...


12

No, it will not damage the speaker. The high tones of a guitar are simply not capable of damaging your bass amp. Even if the amp isn't really suitable for these high tones (and in many cases, they can actually play them just fine), the amp will perfectly survive them. No harm there. The other way around is a much worse idea, because deep bass tones tend to ...


12

Well first, the amount of power inherent in the average festival rig or even an installed club system will dwarf what you can get out of any four speakers on the planet. That chest-thumping kick drum that's a mainstay of EDM is produced by moving a lot of air very quickly, creating a shockwave you can feel. That requires a lot of big cones, in turn requiring ...


8

A head is simply the name for an amplifier without a speaker. Your friends won't have heads on top of amps, they'll have heads on top of speakers (with the head driving the speaker). The "basic guitar amp" you have at the moment, is probably an amplifier and speaker combined in one cabinet. These are commonly called combos. There are several reasons for ...


8

It is true that a tube amp should not be operated without a load, i.e. without speakers (or a dummy load) connected. Solid state amps don't have that problem. The reason is that (almost) all tube amps use an output transformer, which can produce high voltage peaks if its secondary (output) winding is not connected, because the energy from the primary (from ...


7

Having faced this issue some times, the best reccomendation i can give you is first of all, listen to your recordings in various systems, the more, the best, because if you want the world to listen to it, you can never test every system in the world, so, try as many as you can and try to balance for the best in all the systems. Particularly, one of the best ...


7

Key factors (hometheatershack.com) are your woofers' combined surface area; their displacement, achievable low Hz factors and an amplifier capable of delivering the power needs of the speaker configuration. You simply cannot expect this, to do what this does, which makes it feel like this. Behind the bar at the club, you might find racks full of ...


5

Another couple of reasons why someone would choose head/speaker over combo : a comparable combo usually weighs more than one or the other, so is harder to hump around (poor old roady).Heads go wrong more frequently than speakers, so carrying a spare head to a gig is better than taking two combos. In defence of the combo, one doesn't need to remember the ...


4

Defer this decision until you know where you're going to play. I'm going to assume you have an acoustic drumkit, which you won't be mic'ing up. So the drums set a baseline volume which the other instruments and voices need to match. You actually don't need much to achieve this. The guitarist just needs a modest amp - one step up from a practice amp, ...


4

Just mixing with headphones as recommended in a comment, is a bit risky, since the sound differs quite a lot from what you get with a couple of speakers. Some kind of monitors are definitely recommended. A good pair of monitors is obviously preferable, but the important thing is to know your monitors well. If you have a pair of imperfect monitors, but you ...


4

If you have access to a looper pedal, such as the Boss RC series, they have a line in. Connect the pedal to the looper, and then your MP3 player to the line in of the loop pedal.


3

First of all, if you have a choice (and why wouldn't you?), avoid an impedance mismatch. So my advice would be to get one more speaker, either 4 or 8 Ohms to get an impedance which you can match. Then you don't need to worry, and if your amp ever dies on you, you won't have that nagging feeling that you should have known better ... Having said that, and if ...


3

Speaker damage is caused by either the cone moving too much, or the voice coil overheating from distortion. Most sounds from modern amps will not cause either, regardless of the instrument you connect. There is nothing that says you cannot plug a synth or a guitar into a bass amp, or a bass or synth into a guitar amp. If it sounds good, you can use it. ...


3

I'd have thought that merely plugging the player into the input would do the job. The volume can be attenuated via the gain pot on the amp., and also by the volume control on the player. Turn it down initially, as there will be a propensity for lots of sound. The speaker extension output - it may already be switched, and cuts out the internal speakers of the ...


3

I'm going to play devil's advocate here. A PA is a collection of parts. That means you can start out simply and add pieces as the need arises. Here's what I would do: Look at the plastic-bodied powered speakers. They have amps, EQ and one or more inputs. You can begin with only one or two and plug mics directly into them and off you go. If money is an ...


3

If we first simplify things to consider that the speakers are in an infinite space with no walls, floors or reflective surfaces, many of the things you mention have to do with, as you say, the amount of time the sound takes to get to the ear from each driver. Let's also pretend for a moment that people have just one ear! If you were to place two speakers ...


3

A decent PA would do it, and give you the possibility of plugging in microphones also, or other sound sources. If you are trying to go cheap and compact, then a keyboard amp or electronic drum amp would also work, but those are normally designed for a single sound source. You'll want a lot more watts in your PA or keyboard/drum amp than your guitar amp, ...


2

Recording studios used to have (not sure if they still do) a set of 'ordinary' speakers to play back final mixes through. They were the sort that Mr. Average would have in his front room.Hi-fi, but not state of the art, just a fair sound. A bit like i-pods produce now.The eq. would be set flat. If your speakers already produce lots of bass, I can't ...


2

Mainly, you should consider the number of inputs, as well as the wattage. You mentioned that you have a pianist, electric guitarist, bassist, and drummer, who all share vocals. So first and foremost, you're going to need at least 4 mic inputs, as well as 3 quarter inch inputs, if your guitar players and pianists are going to be plugged directly into the PA ...


2

An effective way to have noise-isolating headphones is to use earphones under industrial muffs. You don't specify whether they are to stop others hearing what you're listening to, or to stop extraneous noise getting to your ears, but this will work either way.Obviously, full size headphones won't do it, but smaller, good quality in-ear phones will. The ...


2

This is what the impedance spec refers to: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electrical_impedance It's nothing to do with sound isolation. I doubt there is any spec that can accurately represent the level of sound isolation. This is because the level of isolation is almost entirely dependent on the fit; How well they fit to your particular head shape and the ...


2

Hold on for now - things may change, you may decide that actually two mics will suffice, since you could share, no need to mic up drums/gtr/bass, etc. Use two or three rehearsal studios, and try out their gear. Talk to the guys there to get some more ideas.I'm going to disagree with slim and state that you shouldn't need monitors. Place a p.a. right, use ...


2

If they're 2x8 Ohm in series, then yes that would give 16 - but guessing is no good. 3 ways to find out, check the maker's plate on the back, get a multimeter & test it, or take the back off & look. For an annoyingly under-technical explanation, read on... The reason 16 is 'safe' is that amps have a tolerance; 8 - 16 is pretty standard. Some can ...


2

A tube power amplifier (like the final stage in your Mark V) has to have an output transformer to lower the output impedance (the "Ohms") to a level appropriate to drive a speaker. What does that mean? Well if you know what voltage and current and power are, then one way to look at impedance is how much of the power you are putting out is in voltage and how ...


2

Don't. "Impedance" means that for any sinoid voltage applied to the terminals, the effective current will not exceed the one derived by Ohm's law. But it does not make any claim that the impedance will be constant over frequency, or that the phase of the current will be the same as that of the voltage. Amplifier standardize on the output voltage: how much ...


2

Who told you you can't use you home PA? Sure enough, if you just plug the guitar right in a PA, it'll sound somewhat boring, but there's no reason you could not do it anyway. In fact, such a “super-clean” sound can IMO sometimes be a pleasant alternative. The thing is, guitar amps aren't designed to sound “good” in a HiFi sense, at ...


1

It's all about headroom 2x12 will get you a lot more headroom, 4x12 even more. It's not about volume, if you have a 1x12 that is 100W and a 2x12 that totals 100W, for the same settings in the amp, you will have the same volume, but in reality the 2x12 will seem louder and the sound will be a lot less muddy with way less tweaking of the EQ. That's what we ...


1

16 ohm speakers are unlikely to be a problem. The term "safe mismatch" is really a misnomer. Amplifiers are not "matched" to the speakers. The amplifier output impedance is normally very low. But the amplifier has voltage, current and power limits that should not be exceeded. Additionally, valve amplifiers don't like very high impedance loads as stray ...


1

One thing worth mentioning is that loudspeaker impedances are minimum values over the frequency range and vary over frequency. The frequency response is for a given voltage. A consequency of this is that two loudspeakers of different build put in series may not divide the voltage up evenly between themselves. So whatever arrangement you end up forming, ...


1

The outputs of the DDJ-SB are RCA, and the inputs of the BX5 D2 are XLR and TRS (you can use either). You can use a cable with a pair of RCA males and a pair of XLR or 1/4" TS (you use TS instead of TRS because the DDJ-SB's output is unbalanced). Like this one or a pair of this one. You can also use a dual RCA male - dual RCA male cable and use a pair of ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible