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12

Well first, the amount of power inherent in the average festival rig or even an installed club system will dwarf what you can get out of any four speakers on the planet. That chest-thumping kick drum that's a mainstay of EDM is produced by moving a lot of air very quickly, creating a shockwave you can feel. That requires a lot of big cones, in turn requiring ...


8

It is true that a tube amp should not be operated without a load, i.e. without speakers (or a dummy load) connected. Solid state amps don't have that problem. The reason is that (almost) all tube amps use an output transformer, which can produce high voltage peaks if its secondary (output) winding is not connected, because the energy from the primary (from ...


7

Key factors (hometheatershack.com) are your woofers' combined surface area; their displacement, achievable low Hz factors and an amplifier capable of delivering the power needs of the speaker configuration. You simply cannot expect this, to do what this does, which makes it feel like this. Behind the bar at the club, you might find racks full of ...


3

A decent PA would do it, and give you the possibility of plugging in microphones also, or other sound sources. If you are trying to go cheap and compact, then a keyboard amp or electronic drum amp would also work, but those are normally designed for a single sound source. You'll want a lot more watts in your PA or keyboard/drum amp than your guitar amp, ...


3

If we first simplify things to consider that the speakers are in an infinite space with no walls, floors or reflective surfaces, many of the things you mention have to do with, as you say, the amount of time the sound takes to get to the ear from each driver. Let's also pretend for a moment that people have just one ear! If you were to place two speakers ...


3

First of all, if you have a choice (and why wouldn't you?), avoid an impedance mismatch. So my advice would be to get one more speaker, either 4 or 8 Ohms to get an impedance which you can match. Then you don't need to worry, and if your amp ever dies on you, you won't have that nagging feeling that you should have known better ... Having said that, and if ...


2

If they're 2x8 Ohm in series, then yes that would give 16 - but guessing is no good. 3 ways to find out, check the maker's plate on the back, get a multimeter & test it, or take the back off & look. For an annoyingly under-technical explanation, read on... The reason 16 is 'safe' is that amps have a tolerance; 8 - 16 is pretty standard. Some can ...


2

A tube power amplifier (like the final stage in your Mark V) has to have an output transformer to lower the output impedance (the "Ohms") to a level appropriate to drive a speaker. What does that mean? Well if you know what voltage and current and power are, then one way to look at impedance is how much of the power you are putting out is in voltage and how ...


2

Who told you you can't use you home PA? Sure enough, if you just plug the guitar right in a PA, it'll sound somewhat boring, but there's no reason you could not do it anyway. In fact, such a “super-clean” sound can IMO sometimes be a pleasant alternative. The thing is, guitar amps aren't designed to sound “good” in a HiFi sense, at ...


2

Don't. "Impedance" means that for any sinoid voltage applied to the terminals, the effective current will not exceed the one derived by Ohm's law. But it does not make any claim that the impedance will be constant over frequency, or that the phase of the current will be the same as that of the voltage. Amplifier standardize on the output voltage: how much ...


1

Be wary of the headphone output levels in the pedal and the actual volume on the system in order to: 1) get a clean sound. 2) reduce the risk of blowing a speaker when using a heavy distortion or high gain effect. It is common sense even when connecting to an amp but extra care is needed when using systems the way they are not intended to. The Zoom G3 ...


1

If your stereo has an "aux" input, of the kind you'd plug a separate CD player into, then yes, you can connect the output of most multi-effects pedals to this. It's likely, in fact, that the output is labeled "headphone/line out". But any headphone output can be used as a "poor man's line out".


1

It does depend on how loud you mean by loud. For the purpose of practice, anything that makes your ears ring after playing might seem cool now, but take it from someone who can't hear that well anymore and has constant ringing in their ears because of loud music (I think it was a Pantera, or possibly dream theater concert that did it in the mid 90s) I would ...


1

One test is to attach a small battery - 1.5v is fine - to each speaker. The cone should jump either in or out on contact. This is mainly for checking the polarity of each speaker, so that they can be connected in series or parallel properly. Connect each individually, not while in circuit. It will tell whether a speaker is still responding, although if ...


1

You can use a stereo and speakers. The reasons people tend to use instrument amps for practice is because they are (hopefully) built to cope with an uncompressed/unEQ'd instrument signal, which will have more big level spikes at particular frequencies, in contrast to recorded music which tends to be more smoothed out (making it more obvious when you're ...


1

It's all about headroom 2x12 will get you a lot more headroom, 4x12 even more. It's not about volume, if you have a 1x12 that is 100W and a 2x12 that totals 100W, for the same settings in the amp, you will have the same volume, but in reality the 2x12 will seem louder and the sound will be a lot less muddy with way less tweaking of the EQ. That's what we ...


1

16 ohm speakers are unlikely to be a problem. The term "safe mismatch" is really a misnomer. Amplifiers are not "matched" to the speakers. The amplifier output impedance is normally very low. But the amplifier has voltage, current and power limits that should not be exceeded. Additionally, valve amplifiers don't like very high impedance loads as stray ...


1

One thing worth mentioning is that loudspeaker impedances are minimum values over the frequency range and vary over frequency. The frequency response is for a given voltage. A consequency of this is that two loudspeakers of different build put in series may not divide the voltage up evenly between themselves. So whatever arrangement you end up forming, ...



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