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9

Stage monitors are designed to do something quite different from what normal stereo speakers are designed to do. That means if you get great stage monitors, they won't sound so great as stereo speakers and vice/versa. But you could use one for the other. Getting effective stage monitors is more important, to me, because you want to be able to hear yourself ...


8

I haven't found any comments on this question online from someone who actually knows a lot about amplifier design. I also have not been able to find any horror stories such as "I did this once and destroyed my amp/speaker", which I would expect to find if it were actually an issue. I have found many mentions of professional bass players using guitar amps and ...


7

Hi fidelity reproduction of high frequencies is undesirable in electric guitar amplification. If you look at what actually comes out of a guitar amp, things get really messy around 5 - 6 kHz and then drop off rapidly after that. This is a good thing. If you ever use any kind of amp or pedal distortion designed for guitar and then run it directly into a ...


6

It depends on the load requirements of the amplifier and the impedances of the speakers, neither of which you have specified. If the amplifier has a 4 ohm output transformer tap, or it is solid state and well-specified into a 4 ohm load, you can put 2 x 8ohms or 4 x 16ohms in parallel. Similarly if you have 2 x 16ohm speakers you can put them in parallel ...


5

You shouldn't connect any unpowered speakers directly into that mixer. It produces line-level output, which is designed to be fed into an amplifier, then to the speakers. In order to repurpose those speakers, you'll need to purchase an amplifier that can appropriately drive them. If you connect those speakers directly to the mixer (the only way I could ...


5

It's really quite simple. Your Hi-Fi stereo speakers are designed to produce the full range audio spectrum that might be found in recordings that you would play through your system. This will include the lowest notes of a bass and a kick drum to the high frequency of a cymbal or highest notes of an 88 key keyboard. The frequency bandwidth that an ...


4

The 'phones out sends a very small electrical amount of power, to make the headphones work. Ordinary speakers, hi-fi and especially those used on stage, will require an awful lot more power to make them work. You could use the 'phones socket to plug into an amplifier, which would then produce enough to make the speakers work. In the same sort of way, you'd ...


4

I agree that looking at the future configuration you want is a good idea becuase that way you're not spending money on something now and then spending more to replace it later. From that point of view, one piece of advice is to imagine your ideal, complete PA system that you hope to have in the future. Then, when you want to add or change what you currently ...


4

Guitar cabinets are designed to give a completely different response from HiFi speakers. In particular, they cut away / smear out a lot of the high frequencies and transients. This is really important for distortion sounds (without something like a guitar cabinet response, these sound just extremely harsh, but not really powerful – rather thin†),...


4

As long as the speaker's power rating is > 15W (which is the amp's maximum power) you don't need to worry too much. The main question is if it's really worth to replace the built-in speaker, which - I heard - is actually not bad at all. The only problem is its relatively small size, but due to the combo's size it will be hard to replace it with a much bigger ...


4

ATTENUATION. This is the technical term for a reduction in signal strength (i.e. a reduction in the volume). Isolation or cancellation? The other responders seem to miss that many solutions for noise reduction are using active inverse wave cancellation rather than passive isolation--which is what I recommend for maximum hearing protection and listening ...


3

The TRS jack connectors on your speakers are electrically identical to the XLR ones. What matters is that the connection is balanced, not what type of connector is used. And, to be honest, on a Line level connection to a powered speaker, it doesn't matter THAT much whether it's balanced. If you haven't got a TRS jack to TRS jack cable handy (that's what ...


3

As far as I know, it's not a case of being able to tolerate it, it's more if the speakers can't reproduce the sound well. That's why you generally have 15" speakers in a bass cab and 12" speakers in a guitar cab. At the end of the day, an amplifier does just that - amplifies the sound it receives. I imagine you plug an active bass with very hot pickups into ...


2

It is likely that the output from your keyboard is too loud which is overdriving the input of your monitor's amplifier and causing clipping/distortion. Try turning your keyboard's volume down and then turn the volume of your monitors up to compensate for the keyboard's volume decrease.


2

Though Todd Wilcox is right that this will be a compromise, I'd say it's not necessarily that bad. True is: classical HiFi speakers are almost completely unusable for any live application, and heavy-duty wedge monitors are quite ridiculous as home speakers. But there is a decent middle ground nowadays: compact active full-range PA speakers. These are ...


2

"Electric guitars don't go far into bass territory": Uh, we are talking about E2 here. Which is absolute bottom of the range for bass-baritone singers. Top is something like B5 (19th fret). Which is top range for choir sopranos but does not require a violin player to stray from first position. So we are not talking about particularly high material for ...


2

Ok, I think here's what happened: I'm 99% sure the "Parallel" and "Serial" jacks are actually outputs, and they are mutually exclusive options one would use to chain an additional speaker cabinet. Chaining a second cabinet in parallel would lower the total impedance of the system, and chaining one using the serial output would raise the impedance. As ...


2

The main criterion for choosing your cable is length. It should have sufficient of this to reach the speakers in their new location. If they don't, it's a showstopper. Apart from that, don't fuss. If you use an extra plug/socket stage, turn the plugs occasionally to make sure corrosion isn't adding resistence. Once a year should be fine.


2

A Peavey ValveKing 20MH amp has a speaker output impedance switch which allows selection of either 16Ω or 8Ω speaker/cabinet impedances with 8Ω max on the 20MH. If you are considering wiring more than two speakers to the amplifier, you need to concern yourself with your amplifier’s ability to handle low impedance loads. If you ignore the way you wire them ...


2

It depends a lot on what your interface supports, but the key point is that the headphone output on your phone is 1/8" stereo line level; for the most part what you'll need is a cable that has one end of that format, and the other end(s) of a format compatible with your interface. Most likely you are looking for a 1/8" stereo to two 1/4" mono cable: then ...


2

In a small venue such as a Hotel Lobby or restaurant you will probably not need to mic or amplify your trombone as it will be loud enough on it's own - unless you want or need to send the audio of your performance into a remote location to play through speakers such as inside the restrooms. But you will need something to play your backing tracks at a ...


1

It depends a lot on the size of the rooms, if you're going to play alone or with a band, and how much you're willing to spend. But I would start looking at small compact PA ("public address") systems like this one (this is just an example of the type of equipment, I'm not endorsing or recommending this, or any other specific brand or model) and take it from ...


1

I think the problem is that the expected input for the 1/4 inch line-level is expected to be +4dBu. The manual for the sound card uses different units, but quotes +6dBV (a capital V) @ 0 dbfs (pages 18-19). I think this means that at maximum sound level in the digital domain, the output is going to be +6dBV and I think this loosely translates to about +...


1

The linked manuals show the speakers are 10 kOhm input impedance, while the analog output from your sound card is 33 Ohm output impedance. I can pretty much guarantee that that'll never work. Your sound card expects to be driving cheap headphones; you need a high-impedance "line out" signal for those speakers.


1

Apparently both the inputs on the Logitech speakers are 3.5mm stereo, so you need a RCA (Phono) to 3.5mm stereo adapter. If you got one like this (male on the 3.5mm end), you could plug into the front socket on the Z-200: Alternatively you could get an adapter with a female 3.5mm stereo socket that allowed you to connect the male integrated 3.5mm stereo ...


1

THINGS TO CONSIDER are as follows: What is the size of your audience or venue. The bigger the room, the more powerful your amplification system will need to be. Sound reinforcement outdoors can present even greater demand on your amplification needs. Outdoors you have more ambient noise (traffic going by, planes flying over, wind blowing, etc.) and no ...


1

Bare minimum requirements: Microphones and/or DI boxes Mixer Power amp(s) Speaker(s) All the necessary cables Note that the mixer and power amp can be purchased in combination called a "powered mixer", or the power amps and speakers can be bought in combination called a "powered speaker". Very desirable extras (but not 100% required): Snake Feedback ...


1

As a bassist of 40 years, having played through many hundreds of different amps, bass amps, guitar amps, keyboard amps, PA systems, up and down the line from a Pignose amp up to a 50,000 watt outdoor festival sound system, that no, categorically no, is it going to damage a guitar amp or guitar speaker to play bass through it, as long as you do not overreach ...


1

The reason for monitor speakers not causing feedback is the DIRECTION more than the sound level. Since the microphones used for live performance are virtually all directional, the direction the speakers are firing is critical. Monitors are always angled to send sound at the rear of the microphone's reception field, where it is least sensitive. They can often ...



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