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1

Heads are the amplifiers, the actual part of the signal chain that increases the power of a signal. Speakers convert that power to moving some physical apparatus (e.g. sheet of paper) that vibrates the air, making sound. So like Bob said, people don't put heads on top of amps, but rather speakers. The amp itself doesn't make sound. In fact, if you're using ...


1

The outputs of the DDJ-SB are RCA, and the inputs of the BX5 D2 are XLR and TRS (you can use either). You can use a cable with a pair of RCA males and a pair of XLR or 1/4" TS (you use TS instead of TRS because the DDJ-SB's output is unbalanced). Like this one or a pair of this one. You can also use a dual RCA male - dual RCA male cable and use a pair of ...


5

Another couple of reasons why someone would choose head/speaker over combo : a comparable combo usually weighs more than one or the other, so is harder to hump around (poor old roady).Heads go wrong more frequently than speakers, so carrying a spare head to a gig is better than taking two combos. In defence of the combo, one doesn't need to remember the ...


8

A head is simply the name for an amplifier without a speaker. Your friends won't have heads on top of amps, they'll have heads on top of speakers (with the head driving the speaker). The "basic guitar amp" you have at the moment, is probably an amplifier and speaker combined in one cabinet. These are commonly called combos. There are several reasons for ...


1

The effects loop on a guitar amplifier is between the preamp (where the gain and EQ controls sit to modify the tone) and the power amplifier (which pretty much just makes everything louder). Your specific amplifier has a multi-channel tube preamp with a solid state power amp. As your amplifier has an effects loop, you can feed a non-guitar input in through ...


18

This is called feedback. Put simply, the microphone hears some sound. It sends it to the amp. The amp sends it to the speaker. Some time has passed. The microphone hears the sound from the speaker (now louder), sends it to the amp, and round-and-round it goes, getting louder each time. After a few goes around the loop, you reach internal limits and ...



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