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19

This answer has been copied, pasted, and updated based on a related question that I answered. I will answer your question related to hanging your guitars on the wall after I give some basic context on how to properly store a guitar in general. I think it's worthwhile to provide some context in which to answer your question. In essence, when it comes to ...


14

Call the airline beforehand and explain your situation. Policies vary. See if the aircraft(s) has a suit closet up front which can stow your guitar. It will not fit in the overhead unless you are very lucky, especially with a hardcase (forget it), and it unfairly denies other people their luggage space. (Others have said they got theirs in, hardcase and ...


13

It won't warp the neck. The force of gravity on the neck is much less than the force asserted on the neck by those strings under tension. I would still not advise long term storage of guitars by hanging them on the wall. The safest place for your guitar is in its hard shell case. While hanging on the wall your guitar is far more susceptible to changes in ...


10

I doubt it. Every single music store I have ever been in hangs instruments from the headstock. If it caused damage I don't think use of them would be so widespread.


9

You put a lot more stress on that neck joint playing the guitar and bending strings than gravity does when it's hanging there by the neck. I've certainly never seen any evidence produced that holds up the tale that a guitar hanging from its neck is a guitar neck in the process of warping. I'll always say: the safest place for a guitar is in it's case. But ...


6

Loosening the strings is a must if your guitar is likely to fly. I took a flight to Germany in 2001 without loosening the strings of a Strat I had at that time, the guitar was in a hard-case; when I got there the springs had somehow slipped of the back of the tremolo causing the tension of the strings to pull the tremolo up to an obscene angle. I put this ...


4

Many folks keep some of their collectible guitars in display cases or guitar cabinets that may have a glass front to allow viewing of the instrument. However these cases should have a built in humidity control system as it is vitally important to maintain the proper level of relative humidity for your guitars. When storing guitars, one of the most ...


4

I'm pretty certain we have a very similar question here, but I can't find it... Anyway - consensus seems to be that your best bet is to store it on its side if laying it horizontally, or better yet: store it on a guitar stand, vertically. Either of these positions minimise the stress on the neck, frets and strings.


4

Bow tension The most important thing you could do for your bow is to keep it loosened when it is not in use. This is something that every string player must do when putting their bow back in the case after playing. Storage Placement-wise, it is best to leave the bow in the case and occasionally take it out into the sun. If you have a long plastic bag ...


3

I had a bow that I stored in a cello case for months, with the tension off. When I went back to try to use it, I discovered that 2/3 of the horsehairs had been eaten through. My teacher then told me about "bow mites" (microscopic critters that are also called dust mites or carpet mites). She said that a bow needs to be stored with mothballs (napthaline or ...


3

Storing a guitar strings-down probably isn't the best idea, since putting weight on the strings will grind them against the frets, putting a tiny amount of wear on the strings and frets. It may also be putting the weight of not only the guitar but the case on the guitar's neck, depending on how your case is constructed. I suggest storing the guitar in the ...


3

I've flown with my guitars a handful of times... The first time around 2003[?], for an important audition, I purchased a seat for it, no problems there... If you have an expensive instrument, crummy case, or are otherwise afraid something might happen, this is the safest way to go. All it takes is a short drop onto the concrete by a baggage handler and your ...


3

After 9-11 I took an acoustic thru TSA and onboard. They made me unzip the case so they could search. Of course, it is much more intrusive now under the present administration, so I would check with the airline or look on TSA website for more info.


3

I took my acoustic guitar with me on a flight once and leaving the UK, the checking counter insisted I check the guitar in with the rest of my heavy luggage. Conversely on the way out, leaving Turkey, the checking counter insisted I take it on as hand luggage, even though I didn't purchase an extra seat for it. There was no room in the overhead compartment ...


3

Whether it's good for them or not, I've been hanging a few of my guitars on the wall for a few years now, and I haven't noticed any difference in their condition vs. the ones I keep in a case in the closet, other than the normal wear & tear. Of course, YMMV, but I've also made sure that the room they hang in stays a reasonable temperature, and that the ...


2

If you tend to walk in the dark near your guitars, then hanging them is much better than leaving them on a stand and kicking them accidentally in the dark. I prefer to hang mine, but as you mention you are renting an apartment, your landlord will almost certainly disapprove of what needs to be done to hang them from the walls. I'm fortunate in that my ...


2

I have 22 guitars hanging on my wall, ranging from low end Korean to Fender Custom Shop Strats and Teles and Ibanez Prestige and Universes. Except when I am playing them, they have hung, the oldest since 2006 the newest since January 2011. Not one of them has had a problem. I am full-blown AR when it comes to my babies and I would case them immediately if ...


2

From practical experience, the bow would be loosened each time after playing, but the strings would remain in tune. So for long term storage, the bow would naturally be left loose.The strings on my violin - a French made from late 19th Century, left under the stairs in a centally heated house for approx. 10 yrs (yes, I thought I'd lost it in a move!), were ...


2

I am no luthier, so I'm not going to claim that whan I say is absolute truth. But I found this site after searching for a bit, and it seems quite correct to me. And yes, it is normal that the distance between the finger board and the strings grow larger the closer to the brigde you get, and it will thusly be harder on the fingers to play closer to the ...


2

For a complete beginner, it is normal for the strings to be uncomfortable to press down, especially the E string. Try minimizing your playing time at first, and build it up slowly. Take frequent breaks when your fingertips start hurting. If your strings are too high, it will hurt more, and for longer. Standard height for strings at the end of the ...


1

Let's take some perspective, and suppose your violin is not new. As the saying goes, your mileage may vary and you might have been lucky in the past, but do not count too much on it. Stretched hair on your bow render it less usable and less springy. It can also induce some warping of the stick. If the hair is too long (usually because it has been left ...


1

Unless you are building a sealed case like a humidor, the construction material matters very little. All you should concern yourself with is whether the structure can support the weight of your guitars (and then some). Environmental considerations are addressed in this answer.


1

In addition to the points already noted, the Musician's Union in the UK recommend: Don't carry anything else in the case other than the instrument - this makes it much easier to screen and saves difficulties Carry your Musician's Union membership card - again, in the hope of reducing difficulties with authorities Check with airports at either end of your ...



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