New answers tagged

1

The best thing you could do for yourself is to try and learn to tune by ear. It's really not that hard: Use an electronic tuner to get your A, then play A and D together. Listen to the beats, the rapid pulsations in the sound that get faster as you move away from the correct pitch, and get slower and disappear when your D hits the right pitch... Then, play ...


3

I actually see not much more than the name string they have in common. While I have only superficial knowledge of guitar strings they seem to have simple homogeneous structure like nickel-plated steel, which is easily mass-produced. If you choose the same material for violin, prices don't seem to be significantly different. But nearly no one uses them. ...


9

You must have a vintage Martin 1T because the newer ones have a tie bar bridge and don't use bridge pins at all. From your question: I tried seeing if it actually was small enough to even fit into space between the side of the hole and the side of the pin. It couldn't - it seemed to hang up on the bottom edge of the hole. That is what it is supposed ...


3

The pin itself is held in the bridge by friction, but the pin holds the string by obstruction. The groove in the pin should be wide enough for the string and any knot which secures the string to its ball-end. Once installed, the ball-end is pulled right up to the underside of the body and cannot move further because the pin is in the way.


0

You shorten the guitar strings with your fingers. :D physics for the win! But seriously frequency always depends on length and tension.


1

One point has been left out so far. The design of a guitar leaves us no option but to have equal-length strings with different thickness (with the frets used to control the length for all notes except E-A-D-G-B-E for a conventionally tuned guitar). A piano changes both length and thickness: that seems overkill until you realize that there is the issue of ...


2

Several points. If you are sure the friction tuning pin is not slipping then what is happening could be one of the following things. 1) The knot at the bridge may be loose. Be sure the knot has enough turns around itself to prevent slipping. 2) Sounds like you have the correct amount of turns around the tuning peg. Failure to have enough wraps will ...


0

First to clarify some misconceptions. All strings on a guitar are actually a different length but they look the same. The bridge on the body is angled slightly so technically the strings all have a different length: The main reason why the strings can be around the same length but have different pitches has to do with the thickness of the string. On a ...


24

The best-written summary I could find of this was on Wikipedia. Technical preliminaries (you can skip this if you don't care) All chordophones (musical instruments based on vibrating strings) can be analyzed using the same physics model of a string under tension that is fixed on both ends. The model is slightly simplified and differs from reality in two ...


1

Both length and tension factor into the frequency of a vibrating string, along with the mass of the string. The reasons for the differences arise from how one plays the instruments, and physics. In the case of the guitar, chords are played by using the fingers to push the strings down onto the frets, decreasing the length of the string. This shows that ...


2

The formula is frequency = sqrt(tension/mass per unit length)/(2*length) The factor of 2 comes from the fact that an in-tune fundamental vibration has to travel all the way down the string and back up again in order to be in phase. You can play around with all the parameters. A guitar has 6 strings of about the same tension, but differing thickness. This ...


8

The pitch that a string produces is determined by the frequency of the vibration of the string. In other words how fast is it vibrating. The rate of vibration of a string when it is plucked or struck is dependant on several factors. The tension of the string is only one of the things that will affect the frequency. A string placed under higher tension ...


-1

All strings in the guitar (or other necked string instruments) are different: they have partially different materials (the lower strings tend to be wound with wire) and they certainly have different thickness. They sound best at a particular tension. You usually buy them in sets even though they age differently. Piano strings are very durable and rarely ...


15

String diameter and scale length and tension are all factors, but you are overlooking an entirely different dimension to your question. Frets. A guitar string has a fixed length, but have you noticed the frets? When you stop a string against a fret, you are then temporarily creating a shorter speaking string length. So one string on a guitar can be stopped ...


4

Both length and tension work together to create pitch. Note that the strings on a guitar are all approximately the same length and tension,but the bottom is about 4/5 times the diameter of the top string. On any string instrument, it's important that each string is about the same tension as the others, so that becomes static to a degree. So the two variables ...


-1

It a literal sense, yes they do. The second law of thermodynamics states that all things, left to themselves, move from a state of order to disorder. In the case of unused guitar strings, the atomic structure of the string will interact with its environment. Particulate matter in the air will come to rest on them. The energy from the local environment ...


2

Apparently nylon Lyre strings are not readily available but I was able to locate one on-line seller offering the equivalent of nylon Lyre strings. From the site: These modern Fluorocarbon strings are a better alternative to plain nylon and are very popular with harp and ukulele as they produce a clear and strong sound, On lyres this is very effective ...


3

Every string on every guitar will deviate at the nut. Downwards. There needs to be an angle, be it laterally or downwards, so that the string has a 'node', rather like if the string is fretted, there is a downwards angle formed by the fretting finger, otherwise the note doesn't ring clearly. The nut isn't there to clamp the string tightly, although some of ...


0

I teach high school guitar ensemble classes and the coated strings last much longer, are easier on beginners' fingers and have a great timbre. Elixirs are the way to go if you can afford the price, you will get much longer life out of them. If you like a brighter sound, use the ones with the nano web coating, if you like a little darker sound, use the ...



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