New answers tagged

1

As a player who gigs quite frequently (atleast once a weekend), I choose to play coated simply on the means of longevity. I personally play D'addario medium bronze phosphorus. I can typically get about 2-3 gigs out of a set of coated strings compared to pretty much one gig out of uncoated. I personally am a pretty rough player too, so my strings do tend to ...


-1

from experience the best way is to just keep playing on top of the blisters, don't pop them, they eventually become callouses. When I started playing steel string At school I didn't have a pick so I just kept playing and I had to learn to strum with my nails So I didn't get the dreaded blister on the tip of my thumb. My first guitar was a nylon string so I ...


0

It also actually could be the string. You did not mention if the string was a nylon or a wound string, but you probably mean a plain steel string (it seems like it's a solid electric). You also did not say if the replacement strings are the same type and gauge. Anyway, a string can be defective by having inconsistencies at various points along its length. ...


1

There are many causes to poor intonation A bent neck. A twisted neck. The guitar saddle can be on a bad angle or height for the specific string. The most common type of guitar for this is a Stratocaster since the there is a mini saddle for each individual string. Dints between each frett from old age. Concaves on the fretboard is a common cause for old ...


0

The only thing I can imagine that would cause this is neck bend, or that the fret at 12 is unusually high or low.


1

Wow. Answers all over the map. I would say "If it ain't broke, don't fix it" FWIW, I have a modest Fender Strat that I hack around on maybe 30 minutes a day four days a week and I have had the same strings for at least a couple of years and they are fine for me. I did notice in years past that strings degraded and when I was first learning to play for ...


1

You don't mention whether you have a steel string acoustic, a nylon string acoustic or an electric guitar. I'm a semi-pro playing several times a month. I have high acidity in my skin oil so guitar strings corrode quickly under use. I change my entire set of strings on a steel string acoustic or on an electric when I either break a string or when the ...


3

Generally speaking, yes, you should change those strings. One of the big reasons to change your strings somewhat frequently is tone. The tone, or sonic quality, of your instrument depends on several factors, including your strings. Newer strings have a brighter tone and tend to have more clarity. Part of the change in tone as strings age has to do with ...


4

I too haven't changed the strings on any of my guitars for years. They may not sound as good as newer strings would, but they're still perfectly playable - I'm not doing any paid-for recording or gigging work so I don't see a problem. On bass, many people even prefer the sounds of older, deader strings - some bassists simply never change them, and it wouldn'...


2

Whilst endorsing what Todd says, if yours is a nylon strung guitar, then it's not so important. At least for the top 3, which should be a simple nylon filament, that a good rub over (and under!) with a lint free cloth will keep clean. The wound ones could do with a change, though, as dirt, grease and acid from your sweat will have infiltrated, dulling the ...


13

How often you should change guitar strings depends on how often you play, the chemistry of the oils in your fingers, and your personal preferences for budget, comfort, and tone. I like to put new strings on a guitar after about a month of play, assuming about two hours of playing time a day. I have a personal preference for newer strings that sound new and ...


3

Because the strings on a steel-string are closer, you will have to curl (claw) your left hand fingers more to place them accurately. In the long run I found this aids playing (classical) on a nylon string guitar where you are exhorted to curl your left hand fingers. So, playing on a steel-string now and then helps to develop this practice.


4

Fret buzz is not only not necessarily bad, but actually a part of the guitar tone. The guitar is partially a percussive instrument, and one percussive aspect of that (in addition to knocking or tapping on the body of an acoustic guitar or hollow-body electric) is the snap produced by string-on-fret action. Slap guitar technique in particular exploits this ...


5

Fret buzz isn't necessarily a sign of a poor setup, because some players want low action and can accept some fret buzz. A guitar tech should discuss this with a player before doing a setup. Having strings fret out when bending is more serious and I would expect a tech to make sure this isn't happening, unless a player said they don't do string bending and ...


11

The lower the fret action, the more buzz you will get. Your ideal height will be based on what you need. Unamplified, many of the really fast guitarists have fret buzz all over the neck. Personally, I use a reasonably high action on most of my guitars (about 3mm at 12th fret) because I dislike buzz and have quite a hard picking action. I do have two guitars ...


3

The strings buzz quite consistently but not enough to be heard through an amp Strings buzzing not only puts you off playing but it will prevent the string from resonating for as long and lower your tone quality. In my opinion nobody should create fret buzz when you ask them to lower your action. One thing you could try is a higher gauge string, but that ...


-1

D'addarrio custom lights are amazing strings, but as my childhood teacher used to say... your sound will only be as good as your weakest link. it must all be meant for each other. IMHO, dreadnoughts and the kind of feel your looking for are not meant for each other. This is how we learn though, we go for it and if it doesn't work it doesn't work. The other ...



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