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2

In 'guitarist' rather than 'physics' terms & assuming the same guitar/string type/tuning in each case... A set of 11s is easier to play than a set of 12s, but not by much. The extremes of 8s up to 14s would really show you the difference in playability & how easy it is to bend a note. By the time you're up to 14s, you are really in 'Do I have the ...


8

Strings gauged at 0.011 and 0.012 differ in diameter by 0.001 inches. Strings for guitar are usually sold in sets and named after the lightest string in the set, so the implication is that, in a set of "elevens", all the strings will be thinner than the corresponding strings in a set of "twelves". Different manufacturers have different combinations with ...


1

I can only guess that you mean .011 and .012 gauge strings, as often found as the top E on guitars.The numbers refer to the diameter in thousandths of an inch - 11 thou and 12 thou. For the same speaking length, and same material, .012 string will be tighter, making it slightly harder to press down or bend. The sound will be a little richer, as it's moving ...


1

This usually happens with lower end or cheaper guitars. If it comes with friction pegs (old flamenco guitars) or when the machine head is of low quality or is worn out/broken. When this happens, the string will lose tension as you play it, as you store it, or even as you tune it (in order of severity). Although it should not change pitch by a magnitude of ...


4

I have seen and experienced similar things. This is typically indicative of a tuning machine head being broken or worn out. A lot of times the gears will wear out and slip as the tension gets too high, causing the pitch/tension to drop considerably, usually to a place that the tuning gear is capable of holding, though not a couple octaves in my experience. ...


0

The Nashville tuning, there are strings for this, you can read all about it here http://www.wikihow.com/Tune-Your-Guitar-to-Nashville-Tuning


1

I play seven string guitar, and in the seven string community there are those guitarists who prefer a high A over a low B. One such fellow got tired of the lack of options and started making custom very-thin strings. His website is Octave4plus.com


5

Given that the bottom E and A are two octaves higher,a .010 and .007 will tune to that. The middle two, one octave higher, will need .014 and .008, and the top two, as standard can be .012 and .010. All I've done is calculate each string as a close approximation to a standard open guitar string, given its open pitch. These can be changed by about 10% either ...


5

There are Nashville strings intended for similar usage. Other manufacturers than D'Addario likely has similar strings. You want two octaves higher on the E and A though, so it seems making your own set like Tim suggests is the way to go in this specific case.


0

Get Caig De-Oxit 5% (which you should have anyway if you like your electronics to work properly), squirt a little spot on a cloth, grip the string firmly and slide the rag back and forth until the string stops squeaking. May take a minute or two per string, depending on how dirty they are. String may get hot from friction. I've not noticed any problems on ...


2

To the best of my knowledge, Finale and its sound libraries do not support anything other than 12-tone equal-temperament at A=440 Hz. However, you can purchase the full version of the stand-alone Garritan Personal Orchestra program and use it with Finale in place of the built-in Finale sounds. Garritan Personal Orchestra's ARIA playback engine can be used ...


6

Hmmm, no I don't think I've noticed a particular break-in period myself, but maybe I just haven't noticed. If you've changed brands or makes at all, you might just have to get used to a new feel. I have however, had days when it's very hard to shift smoothly, often due to weather. One thing that has helped a great deal is to take an almond and break it in ...


0

There's a key difference in string gauges. Under the same tension, a thinner gauge has less mass and it can move more easily when it receives an impulse, as opposite to a thicker gauge. In thinner strings, more harmonics are generated because, aside from the fundamental vibration, smaller harmonic vibrations occur on the string more easily. That makes for a ...


2

Some additional details. There is a very small change in pitch due to the change in tension that occurs when the string is fretted. This change in tension varies along the neck, generally larger changes further up (away from the nut) the neck. This change is small enough that it is usually imperceptible in single note playing; however this difference does ...


5

All else being equal, a thicker string will damp out transverse vibrations more rapidly because it experiences more drag (inter-molecular deformation) per unit length. (See section 4.6 of [not my work] http://www.people.fas.harvard.edu/~djmorin/waves/transverse.pdf.) (If we consider strings made of different materials or under different tensions, this rule ...


2

The other two answers are true however it seems your question is about sounding a unison as opposed to replicating one sound on a different string, even though you pointed out string thickness as a possible reason for the sound you are noticing. What happens when a string vibrates is that it actually stretches from side to side or up and down depending on ...


13

Technically speaking two notes with the same pitch have the same frequency as the fundamental. However this does not explain why two notes of the same frequency also called unisons, sound different on strings of different diameters or lengths or both. The guitar and the entire orchestra string family as you may know have numerous unisons (unlike the piano). ...


1

So the difference between the quality of two notes that are the same pitch (two different strings, or even with two different instruments) is not in the frequency necessarily (though my guitar is always a bit out of tune...) but rather the overtones each string produces. I don't know exactly how to mimic that but read into the overtone series - maybe bassier ...


0

Just go with a standard set. You will not be able to hear the difference with too much distortion I believe. Just pick a standard set of .009 to .042 since that is easy to handle... It's all about personal preferences. Don't pick strings because they should sound better. Pick them because you personally think they sound better and most importantly, they feel ...


1

DR strings are hands down the best strings for metal. Several different types of DR's, but they are all great. Strings actually do make a fairly big difference in sound, and playability.



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