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1

Guitars designed for steel strings are made completely different from guitar's designed for nylon strings. Putting steel strings on a guitar made for nylon strings could ruin the guitar. Putting nylon strings on a guitar made for steel strings is not a good idea either. A picture of the guitar might help me determine which type of guitar you have. But ...


2

Hold on here. If this particular make and model of guitar was indeed originally designed for steel strings, but your friend put nylon strings on it, then it would indeed be okay to put steel strings on it instead. However, we need more information. What is the exact make and model of the guitar? What modifications have been made to the guitar to accommodate ...


-3

NO! Steel string guitars are specifically designed to be able to handle the higher tensions that is part and parcel of wound steel strings. Nylon string guitar are simply not design to handle that amount of strain on the bridge and using steel strings on them will likely leave long lasting warpage to the bridge. USE THE STRINGS THE GUITAR WAS DESIGNED ...


0

There's really no need for that. For intonation fine tuning, the little screw can be adjusted while the string is under tension, otherwise, the string will need re-tuning each time. As far as action goes, again, there's no need. In fact, it gets in the way to de-tension. A Tune-o-matic bridge has two screws, which will turn while the guitar is in tune. A ...


1

With a Fender style bridge you just need to loosen one string a little and adjust height and intonation, then retension. To adjust intonation on a one piece (Les Paul style?) bridge you need to loosen a string quite a lot more to allow access to its intonation adjustment at the rear of the bridge. For height adjustment on a one piece bridge you'll need to ...


1

Why do you want to take the strings off to do that? Slacken the one specific string you are working on slightly if you are raising the action or adjusting the intonation rearwards; keep compensating for pitch as you adjust. Otherwise it's just repetetive guesswork as to what it will be like once you reassemble it.


0

The first question is what type of guitar you have! If it's a classical guitar (Spanish style), then it's nylon strings all the way. Never, under any circumstances, put anything other than nylon strings on a classical guitar. It can't handle the tension, and you'll destroy it. Otherwise, just get very light strings. String sets are described by the ...


0

Have you changed strings in those 3-4 months? If not, the simple answer is that your strings are dead. Average working life for guitar strings is maybe 2 months if you're not playing hard. The most common reason for strings to break is that they're old and fatigued. Don't ever, ever, ever, change a single string in isolation and leave all the old crappy ...


0

You say "sounds fine". Do you have a digital tuner? If not, download a guitar tuner app on your phone. If you're relatively new to the guitar, my first bet would be that you don't have good enough ears yet to tune by ear. Keep working on it, you'll get there - but in the meantime, a digital tuner will see you right. My next bet would be that you haven't ...


1

Look around for a guitar that fits your fingers better. Neck width and length varies among manufacturers and even among models for a single manufacturer. If you have the ability to visit multiple stores trying stuff out, you should be able to find one that works for you. Or, if you have plenty of cash, find a builder and have one made to your own specs! ...


5

The short answer is - DO NOT give up on playing guitar just because your fingers aren't optimally configured. You can adapt and learn to play quite well - if you really want to! Unfortunately not all of us who aspire to learn to play guitar are blessed with long slender fingers. But if you have a strong desire to play, you can overcome whatever ...


3

Could be a few things to look at, with the best/most likely at the top Finger and hand positions, experiment with different techniques until you find a perfect hand position/shape for EVERY chord you are getting bum notes with that reduces the chances of a bad sound, trying alternate places and or missing out notes to get a chord that sounds best Have ...


6

Most players probably don't play full chords above 12th fret; however, you could try using fewer fingers, as in for an E shaped chord, using one finger on 5th and 4th strings, similarly on A shaped chords, play with 2 or 3 fingers - a barre over all 6, and a mini barre over 4,3 and 2. Just playing 3 or 4 notes out of particular chords works well, too, as ...


0

I have found that using 10- 47 sets lights and tthen detuning to D instead E sounds good and reduces the string tension on the neck. Just my .02 works for me. Also ifyo ur guitar is strong you can try the medium top and heavy bottom 1/2. It does increase the bass if you are looking for more bass especially in a mahogany back/sides guitar. This is what I ...


0

An old question with many answers... but the one thing no-one seems to have mentioned is that the care & attention applied in the actual stringing process can considerably reduce the amount of stretching required. Method 1 - the sloppy way... Tuck the end of the string through the slot, then wrap as much of the rest as you can round the post before ...


0

Kaz brings up an interesting point: Not returning to the original pitch indicates that the material has been extended beyond its elastic limit This is mostly true, which is why you'll notice that stretching the top strings doesn't do all that much. However the wound strings (typically the bottom 3 or 4) absolutely need to be stretched, because the ...


0

A few possibilities come to mind If the string is new or never been tuned up to pitch before then it might not have bedded in yet - nylon strings can take a good few days to settle down. The string might not be tied on properly and be slipping against the tuning peg. The string is faulty The tuning peg is faulty (or badly adjusted as per Celeb Hines ...


1

I can't speak to your particular model of ukulele, but I'm going to hazard a guess that your problem is similar to one that I've had in the past. On my ukulele (a Fluke), there are small screws in the ends of the tuning pins that control the tension of the tuning pin. If this screw is too loose, then the tension of the string will eventually unroll the pin, ...


1

The string might be sticking in the nut slot. I've found a bit of chapstick in the nut slot can free things up. Or maybe the slot needs to be widened a bit.


1

I can't find your model, so don't know how relevant this is. I have had various ukes of varying price, and an inability to be tuned correctly across all strings seems to be a common factor of the cheap ones; or at least a highly variable ability; I presume because they don't bother checking machine head quality or intonation but just knock them out at speed. ...


1

The temperament on some ukuleles is not perfectly equal. I don't know if it depends on strings or on the instrument itself, but it means that in some cases (at some frequencies) the distance between two neighbor frets differs from semitone. Moreover, these distances can also somehow depend on the current frequency of open string - that is, the different ...


0

Guitarists of all stripes and abilities mix and match strings all the time. Sometimes it's intentional and deliberate, sometimes it's just because (as in your case) that's all they had laying around at the time. Many pro guitarists buy an inventory of individual strings instead of buying prepackaged sets...they prefer a slightly lighter gauge this string ...


0

I've heard that non-wound steel and electric strings all use the exact same wire regardless of manufacturer. Whether that is true or not, it certainly seems to be the case that it is virtually impossible to tell the difference between two new non-wound strings of the same gauge. For wound strings this is not the case. It's quite possible for two wound ...


2

I often, though not always, find a difference in the quality of sound between new and old strings because of the age of the strings. I usually change them all when one single string breaks, for this reason. Some brands have a different quality of metal, or nylon, but for the most part the quality is consistent across brands. I have a negative opinion of ...


0

If the replaced string is a different gauge from the string that you broke it might sound different and it also might sound odd if the gauge is not similar to the string gauge that is already on your guitar. And for the changing brand of string if it is different material it might sound different, and all different string brands and types have a different ...


2

For a complete beginner, it is normal for the strings to be uncomfortable to press down, especially the E string. Try minimizing your playing time at first, and build it up slowly. Take frequent breaks when your fingertips start hurting. If your strings are too high, it will hurt more, and for longer. Standard height for strings at the end of the ...


2

I am no luthier, so I'm not going to claim that whan I say is absolute truth. But I found this site after searching for a bit, and it seems quite correct to me. And yes, it is normal that the distance between the finger board and the strings grow larger the closer to the brigde you get, and it will thusly be harder on the fingers to play closer to the ...


5

The main reasons have already been mentioned, but to elaborate with a few practical tips: Truss rod tension The tension of the strings is counterbalancing tension of the truss rod, and when string tension is removed the truss rod is "free" to bend the neck. While it's extremely unlikely that a guitar that was correctly set up would break from removal of ...


2

I fully agree with Todd Wilcox, but I'll try to open the subject a bit more. The main argument why different sources tell you not to remove all strings at once is because the neck is adjusted to be straight by matching the tension between your strings and the truss rod. If you remove all strings at once your neck adjustment is off because you just removed ...


10

I think the main reason why people dissuade from taking off all strings is historical: on violin-family instruments as well as many archtop guitars, the bridge is not fixed on the instrument at all. It just stands freely on the top surface – normally held in place by the strings. But if you take the strings off, the bridge will fall, and you need to be ...


12

While I've read several different sources recommending not removing all the strings at once, I've never read a good reason why not, and I've always restrung by removing all the strings first. The main reason is exactly as you say: to be able to clean and condition everything under the strings. I clean the fretboard and body area, oil the fretboard, and even ...


1

There are C strings and there are C strings. I have set up small violins to be "violas" for children who were starting Suzuki viola at a very young age. Most C strings sounded the way you describe, but I was able to minimize this effect with a particular choice of string. It's been a while, so I'm not sure -- maybe it was a Dominant. Also make sure you ...



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