New answers tagged

3

Because the strings on a steel-string are closer, you will have to curl (claw) your left hand fingers more to place them accurately. In the long run I found this aids playing (classical) on a nylon string guitar where you are exhorted to curl your left hand fingers. So, playing on a steel-string now and then helps to develop this practice.


3

Fret buzz is not only not necessarily bad, but actually a part of the guitar tone. The guitar is partially a percussive instrument, and one percussive aspect of that (in addition to knocking or tapping on the body of an acoustic guitar or hollow-body electric) is the snap produced by string-on-fret action. Slap guitar technique in particular exploits this ...


4

Fret buzz isn't necessarily a sign of a poor setup, because some players want low action and can accept some fret buzz. A guitar tech should discuss this with a player before doing a setup. Having strings fret out when bending is more serious and I would expect a tech to make sure this isn't happening, unless a player said they don't do string bending and ...


10

The lower the fret action, the more buzz you will get. Your ideal height will be based on what you need. Unamplified, many of the really fast guitarists have fret buzz all over the neck. Personally, I use a reasonably high action on most of my guitars (about 3mm at 12th fret) because I dislike buzz and have quite a hard picking action. I do have two guitars ...


2

The strings buzz quite consistently but not enough to be heard through an amp Strings buzzing not only puts you off playing but it will prevent the string from resonating for as long and lower your tone quality. In my opinion nobody should create fret buzz when you ask them to lower your action. One thing you could try is a higher gauge string, but that ...


-1

D'addarrio custom lights are amazing strings, but as my childhood teacher used to say... your sound will only be as good as your weakest link. it must all be meant for each other. IMHO, dreadnoughts and the kind of feel your looking for are not meant for each other. This is how we learn though, we go for it and if it doesn't work it doesn't work. The other ...


2

Please tell me you didn't end up repurposing the instrument! I'm sad nobody on the thread previously mentioned buying a true violin C string. They do exist. I own a wonderful 5 string violin and have a Thomastik vision violin C. Not the cheapest, but sounds gorgeous! Daddario also makes Helicore violin C strings, which are used widely and less expensive. You ...


1

I find that flatwounds can, in most circumstances, help you deliver a more solid low-mids tone that works in a band environment. The flipside is that for home practice you miss the 'zing' of roundwounds for a while. I play in a band with two electric 12 string guitarists, so I never really needed good biting high frequencies: your experience may be different....


1

Whatever you do, leave as many strings on the instrument as possible. Taking too many off can cause your post to collapse, and then you have to pay to have someone reach in there and give a post adjustment. That really stinks. I think it should be ok as long as you are careful not to joggle it too much and are quick in getting the next string. As to why ...


0

Don't forget that you can mix and match different brands on the same instrument - often people go for a high-end E and/or A and then have a less expensive D and G. A couple of Danish options (they seem to be good at making strings, along with pastries and bacon): Jargar are great steel core strings, durable and decent tone. They last quite a long time ...


1

I had the same problem with my classical guitar: it buzzed whenever a G was played (open G-string or A and E-string when playing G as well). Turned out that this was caused by the end of the three metal strings (D, A, E) touched the back of the bridge! I pulled these ends away from the back of the bridge and the buzz disappeared. See photo:


0

As a certain footwear company would say, "Just do it". The vast majority of basses will have roundwound strings on when you buy them, so play them for a while. When you're beginning bass, the important aspect is locking in with a drummer, and although there is a sound difference between roundwound and flatwound strings, you'll never hear it in a band ...


4

Most beginner basses come with round-wounds because these strings are more common (and therefore cheaper, supply and demand or something like that, the kids all want to play rock and roll with twangy sounds). For jazz/musical theatre I will usually use flat wounds and for anything wanting a little more bite then steel round-wounds. Obviously, as with ...


8

Flat wound strings tend to sound less bright than roundwound. If you're concerned about finger wear, then I suppose flatwounds are a little kinder, although I use roundwound on most of my basses, and still have all my fingers - and no callouses!! I have a couple of fretless, and to me, they are made for flatwounds. The other slight problem is that flatwounds ...


0

You can try getting flat wound strings, which are much smoother than round wound strings. You should also try different gauges of string to see if you find one easier to play than another. Light gauge strings can be easier on your fingers since you don't have to press as hard.


-1

Using higher tuning is not smart...how can the child then learn to play any tunes? Even if they can they won't then be able to reproduce them on a correctly tuned guitar. There are no special strings for a shorter scale guitar. If you're going out of tune, first be sure that the strings are not slipping on the tuning posts, this often happens with nylon ...



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