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When to change your Guitar Strings? When the strings sound dull and lifeless; they may even look dull. When the strings no longer play in tune, exhibiting evidence that they've lost their flexibility. Note: As through repeated contact with hands and fingers, guitar strings lose their tone and won't play in tune; they also wear out and eventually may ...


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The only time I would not tune up from below is if the string had been tuned way too high already for whatever reason. In that case, after you tune the string down, it will tend to creep up a bit afterwards because of material memory. Tuning it from above will help counteract this effect. That said, this is only really applicable to certain materials- ...


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Firstly - you haven't said if you are strumming an acoustic or rocking a shred-tastic electric; if it is the latter I agree with the previous comments to get the action set correctly - 6mm is high! if you play bass you could try round wound ground down or nylon wound - also check out super slinky strings - Finally there is a super product out there called ...


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Only fret the string with enough pressure to make the chord. I have had students with this problem and I tell them to lighten up a bit on the strings when making a chord. If you push too hard on the strings, your fingers will hurt, no matter how long you have been playing. Once you get use to the new pressure of your fingers Your fingers will feel a lot over ...


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While a light gauge requires less pressure, it is also more cutting, especially if the action is too high. I'm thinking, for example of the difference between a thin versus a thicker, blunter blade--the former will slice more easily. Definitely see about getting a better guitar, as the action sounds high. A better made guitar will have a flatter neck that ...


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1) Switch to nylon ("classical guitar") strings. The tension required to tune nylon is less, and the material is softer than steel strings. Won't work for electric, but if you like or were playing acoustic, ... 2) Switch to a ukulele: super low-tension strings. 3) Switch to bass. Big fat strings. 4) Acoustic bass strings are stupid thick and soft; ...


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The three things that are likely to cause you pain at this stage are: string gauge: thick strings will require more pressure to fret them pressing too hard: a common problem when learning is putting far too much pressure on the strings. You only need to touch them to the fret (see people like Ritchie Blackmore using scalloped neck guitars, where the string ...


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Not knowing what the action is like on your guitar, it's difficult. You need to make the action - the distance between the strings and the fretboard - as low as possible, so the strings don't need pressing far.But not so close that they buzz. Also, you may well be pressing TOO hard, it shouldn't be necessary to squeeze too much, just enough to stop fret ...


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Yes such instrument is possible it sounds like a player activated variation of an aeolian harp. Looking at Aeolian harp designs help me to develop some ideas what such instrument and it might look like and how I could prototype my design ideas. Below is quick image of quick prototype design trying to show major design elements are: mouthpiece tube bridges ...


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As you have observed, most of the string brands differentiate their offerings by varying the way they make the wound strings. But regardless of how creative and different they get with the wound strings, the unwound strings are all the same. Plain steel. The wound strings for electric guitars can be wound with pure nickel (for a warmer tone and softer ...


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For electric guitar, there are also nickel strings that have a warmer tone. Pure nickel will have the warmest tone, but even the 8% nickel wound string will be less bright than the steel strings. There are also a variety of ways for strings to be wound/wrapped. The way the wrap string is wound around the core string also affects tone: The profile of ...


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Honestly, the only solution is to continue to play. Your fingers will develop calluses and stop hurting after a few weeks (for some people it may be a couple months, it varies). Just make sure that after you have developed your calluses, you continue to play, because after a few days of not playing they will deteriorate and go away, leaving you at square one ...


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As jamerack says, the thickness and material of different strings does make the same note sound different. Playing harmonics will even this out quite well. You'll still get accurate notes, but they'll tend to sound more similar. Have a go at tuning using harmonics - it's been covered in other questions/answers here. Some disagree that it's accurate, all I ...


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The gauge and material of the strings gives the same note a different timbre on different strings. If you are hearing different pitches, then it may be a product of an untrained ear. The longer you play for, the better your ear becomes and you will be able to better hear pitches and tonality.



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