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As jamerack says, the thickness and material of different strings does make the same note sound different. Playing harmonics will even this out quite well. You'll still get accurate notes, but they'll tend to sound more similar. Have a go at tuning using harmonics - it's been covered in other questions/answers here. Some disagree that it's accurate, all I ...


4

The gauge and material of the strings gives the same note a different timbre on different strings. If you are hearing different pitches, then it may be a product of an untrained ear. The longer you play for, the better your ear becomes and you will be able to better hear pitches and tonality.


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Positions and mappings of frets in Tar is similar to Setar. In this two images positions and mapping of frets in Setar is shown. In Tar instrument two right most strings are usually tuned as Do. Two middle strings are usually tuned as Sol. From two left most strings, the right one is usually tuned as Do like the two most right strings, and the left one (the ...


2

See this Wikipedia article on instrument classification. There are many instrument classification systems that have been used at different times and in different situations, so there is not one answer to your question. Here are probably the three most common classifications for the piano: Percussion due to the fact that the strings are struck by hammers. ...


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The piano is a string based instrument that produces sound by pressing a key that is attached to a hammer. This hammer hits the string associated with the key. From this point of view the piano is more like a percussion instrument with the capability of tuning. The predecessor of piano is the clavichord which is similar but more simple to the piano. It has ...


2

It's both, and it's neither. Use such classifications only so far as they're useful to you. For instance, a piano strikes its strings, a harpsicord plucks them. So do we classify the harpsicord as closer to a violin, the piano as closer to a drum? And both as very different to each other? Only if it's useful to do so. Is it?


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Since the strings inside a piano have to be hit by hammers, activated by pressing the keys, it is supposed to be in the percussion family. Other, earlier keyboards also had strings, but some were plucked somewhat like playing guitar, albeit the quills or equivqlent were activated by pressing the keys.So, although it has tunable strings, it's the method used ...


2

The "tuning" argument is irrelevant. Tuned drums are used in many different world musical traditions, as well as in western classical and popular music. Instrument classification is to some extent arbitrary, and many different "systems" have been used in different cultures at different periods of history. In western music, "keyboard instruments" are often ...


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Adding to Rockin's usual helpful answer, lighter strings, while being easier to press down, will also be more prone to rattle. So you'll have to be just as firm, but for a slightly different reason, although the outcome is the same. Also, in setting up, having substantially different strings will often necessitate changing the intonation - the open length of ...


2

The buzzing might because the strings are tuned too low or the guitar is not properly set up (refer to Rockin Cowboy's answer). But it might also be because your fingers don't yet have enough strength to push the string hard enough into the fret. Light strings can help with that, since they have lower tension. However, as a beginner I was quite averse to ...


2

The short answer is that lighter gauge strings will be easier to play and easier to get clear tone when you fret the notes. Most beginners and even many seasoned guitarist prefer lighter gauge strings. But going from medium gauge to extra light gauge will probably create the need for a new set up. So let's talk a little about "set up" for acoustic ...


3

The answer is that nickel wound strings (found on electric sets and John Pearse Nickle Wound Acoustic sets) of a given gauge (diameter) will have less overall mass than an equivalent gauge "Phosphor Bronze" or "80/20 Bronze" and therefore tune to a given pitch at slightly lower tension (assuming equal scale length). See comparison chart at end of this ...


3

The scale length will be a factor; for a given gauge, the longer the string, the more tension will be required to tune it to the same pitch. The difference between strings of the same gauge will be due to their weight or mass per unit length. This gauge comparison is only valid for like strings -- that is, wound vs. wound, or unwound vs. unwound. A wound ...


1

Ever considered Martin Monel acoustic strings? They are nickel plated strings for acoustics and give you a different feel and more flexible response...


4

As near as dammit. The difference will be the third (G) string. Generally on an electric set it's plain, but wound on an acoustic set. You probably wouldn't want the plain on an acoustic, although that's what my acoustics usually have - full electric sets. Slightly thinner, but that means less tension.


1

In my strat like guitar string retainers were set too low (and also too sharp). It was cutting the E and B strings every two days. I minimally raised them and problem disappeared. If you broke string it is important to check where it was cut.



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