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16

This is a difficult question to answer, because you say you already understand synthesis, and that you're good at it - so it seems you should already know what synthesisers are capable of, and how to make them do it. So you'll know there are many different kinds of synthesiser, and they can be combined - there's nothing to stop you from controlling an FM ...


13

The synth patches that you want will exist if you build them yourself. :) You might consider studying some of the older musicians such as Keith Emerson and Rick Wakeman. At that time, people usually rolled their own sounds, building them from the basic four waveforms. Also, you might read up on "additive synthesis" which has to do with the theory behind ...


8

What you need to be looking for are VST - Virtual Studio Technology - instruments. The good DAW's all let you use VST plugins to synthesise instrument sounds, using various parameters, including different breath pressure, volume etc. Many libraries are available for free online, you tend to get free ones with Digital audio magazines (often a DVD full of ...


7

Vocoders were originally invented as a way to transmit speech over low-capacity transmission media. To encode: Start with speech as an electronic signal (e.g. from a microphone) Put the signal through a multi-band filter, getting some number of new signals, each covering a different frequency range. Pass each of these frequency bands through an envelope ...


5

The full huge range of sounds available from synthesisers means that the subject is enormously broad. Typical keyboards behave differently depending on the virtual instrument you are playing. For example, a piano patch isn't likely to respond to aftertouch, and might not respond to pitch bend; a strings patch will respond to pitch bend, and might swell if ...


5

I think subtle expression possibilities is the key. Piano, electric piano and organs have a large and very finely controllable dynamic sound range1 (either by true continuous 𝆑𝆓𝆏 spectrum right "at the fingertips", or lots of of possible organ stop/drawbar combinations), so you can always counteract where it might get tiresome, without however necessarily ...


4

You need to learn about sample playback software and virtual instruments for computers. There are hundreds of commercial products on the market that provide what you are asking about. The technology has been around for thirty years, although in the early days sample playback and virtual instruments required dedicated hardware keyboard instruments. These days ...


4

The composer Gershon Kingsley is still alive in the U.S.A. where he composed this song. If you manage to have him die within this year, the copyright will lapse in 2104 according to current rules if I am not mistaken. However, the lobbying of Disney Corp. has been effective in keeping Walt Disney's work out of the Public Domain by retroactive copyright ...


4

There are analogue and digital synthesizers. The digital ones you'll likely be able to emulate faithfully through a computer, but opinions differ when it comes to analogue. There are both digital synthesizers and programs that try to emulate them, but many feel that it is not like the "real deal". There is also a big difference manipulating real keys and ...


3

I think a good analogy is with creating images. There are lots of ways to create an image: with a pencil, with a fibre-tip pen, with oil paints, with chalk, with oil paint, with watercolours, with photography, and so on. Of course, you can photograph an oil painting, but that doesn't help you modify it in an oil painterly manner. You can't accurately ...


3

Not sure what kind of sound the module should produce, but Ketron produces some fairly portable ones. Actually, have a look at this question, has many more examples.


3

Things you definitely need : P.A. system - which should incorporate the mixer, eq. and probably reverb. Drum machine. Synthesiser/ keyboard. Mic. Looper with maybe 4 or 5 pedals, to produce differing mixes. This gives the things you maybe don't need : Compressors. Exciters. Pitch shifter, etc. With a decent looper, you can create your own loops and save ...


3

Devices like the SH-101 were designed to work with external controlled voltage for synchronization with external devices, which is called "CV Gate". It is one method that people used before MIDI and the MIDI-clock specification (or SMPTE time code, for that matter). I do not believe there are any metronomes, per se, that provide CV Gate, but back in the day ...


3

Firstly, big appreciation for making your own sounds from scratch. It will lead into a personal style of music and a better understanding of the anatomy of sound. The fact that layering makes the song "a big mess of sounds" tells me that you're not aware of mixing and equalizing the synths. I'd see the layer of sounds as a scale: if you add a sound, in ...


3

It depends! "Lead synth" typically connotes a single note sound ("mono", short for monophonic) but you'll also find lead synths sounds that are "poly", short for polyphonic, depending on the (sub)genre, the artist's style, what the artist had for breakfast that morning, etc. The most common lead synth in trance is probably a mono synth constructed from two ...


3

If I am focusing on the part you are referring to, this sounds a lot like a "talk box" (along with some distortion and perhaps an additional flange. A quick search brings up the term "Formant Filter" and also a video for a random product which shows the use of a formant filter as driven by a guitar: ( ...


3

According to Wikipedia: In 1961, the IBM 7094 became the first computer to sing, singing the song Daisy Bell. Vocals were programmed by John Kelly and Carol Lochbaum and the accompaniment was programmed by Max Mathews. This performance was the inspiration for the famous scene in the 1968 film 2001: A Space Odyssey in which the HAL 9000 computer sings the ...


3

It is not a matter of quality. You can get great sounds from a computer and many albums have been made on nothing but a laptop or even an iPad or GameBoy. Quality is not the concern. There are good reasons for wanting hardware synths, though, even digital ones. They start up instantly and generally never crash. They have many knobs and controllers for ...


3

You're probably right. Even the most wonderful non-piano/organ synth patch would be too much if used for an entire concert (as would panpipes though). Many advanced synth performers will often tweak the patch as they play, equipment permitting. Sound wise, most synth sounds are going to emulate instruments that are either struck, plucked, bowed or blown, ...


2

I know this is an old question but I think I can clear up the confusion here: Two Entities: Keyboard and Sound Engine You have to distinguish between two things: 1) The capability of a (here: Miniak's) keyboard to react to key velocity and pressure (aka Aftertouch) and generate internal modulation sources and MIDI messages from these. 2) The capability ...


2

The rythmic effect can be achieved by filtering some signal through a lowpass VCF (12 dB/8ve, little resonance) heavily modulated (~ 800 Hz down to 20 Hz) by a sawtooth LFO. That gives the basic "choppy" thing. Then you can try all kinds of stuff to get the actual sound; perhaps start with a PWM-square or sawtooth VCO and ring-modulate it with a triangle ...


2

I refer you to my answer on Using keyboard/MIDI controller to learn piano Both of your instruments contain a "MIDI controller". Both of your instruments contain a "MIDI sound module". Any MIDI controller can control any MIDI sound module.


2

You use a MIDI cable, just like you would use to connect any piece of MIDI gear to any other piece of MIDI gear. Skippy, you are asking the exact same question you already asked here just a couple of days ago. MIDI Here's an extensive explanation for German speakers: Was ist MIDI? Grundlegendes zum Thema MIDI und Audio Google "What is MIDI?" in English, ...


2

The UltraNovation can be set up to trigger on the MIDI input as well as, or instead of the keyboard so you can assign any patches you like to the G10 as a trigger. The G10 is designed this way, so any MIDI synth can provide the sound - the advantage is that you can do all the usual things you would do on a guitar - whammy, string bends etc


2

Piano and synth (organ) keyboards are really not very different at all. Even across acoustic pianos the feel is QUITE different from one to the next (even moreso than between organ/synth keyboards). The reason to learn on a fully weighted digital piano is so your playing can easily be moved to a real acoustic. (Which is the king of all instruments, ...


2

Without going into a great, detailed oration, I'm going to suggest just two fundamental things that I think would help you in your pursuit. In his comment, Basstickler touched upon a great point - music experience. If you understand music theory and basic principles of orchestration, you can apply those concepts to synthetic sounds and learn how to voice ...


2

Timbre - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Timbre Best way to recreate a timbre in the real world is to consider two things: 1) The ADSR Envelope This is the different between a short, sharp sound like a drum hit versus a more gradually fading in sound such as a bowed violin. Adjust the ADSR / Amplitude Envelope of your synth sound. 2) The type of waveform ...


2

There are really two questions here. First, can a given synthesis algorithm represent all possible audio signals? Second, more related to what you are asking, how would you try to mimic a specific sound using a specific synthesizer? To answer the first question, there are synthesis models (such as additive synthesis) that can represent any signal, but there ...


2

I believe that you are looking for a software synthesizer, aka soft synth software that receives MIDI data and outputs audio data. You may also need to consider the midi usb software driver software the software that allows one to send/recieve MIDI data across the USB interface and allow it to get to the synthesizers. In hardware this type of thing may be ...


1

if you want to record and do professional stuffs you go for : DAW (digital audio workstation) , music sequencer or midi sequencer. if you want just play your instrument easily without recording and good sound quality you need to go for : standalone VST (or VSTi) , for example "standalone piano vst". also you can use these VSTs as a plugin in your DAW or ...



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