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7

As naught101 says, your particular case here is a sinusoidal wave with a quiet third harmonic. To hear what this sounds like at an audible frequency, go to http://meettechniek.info/additional/additive-synthesis.html in a browser that supports the Web Audio API (like Firefox or Chrome), turn the audio on, and set it like this: H1 there represents your ...


3

You don't need any specific audio software to generate audible waveforms. Here's a simple C program that will generate the required data on standard output: #include <stdint.h> #include <stdio.h> #include <math.h> double y(double t) { return (16 * cos(t/2) - cos(t*2)) / 15; } double pitch = 440 * 2*3.14159; // so the base pitch will ...


1

The question assumes that the waveform at stake is directly human hearable. If that would be the case, an alternative approach to the programmatic one would be to use an additive synthesizer to synthesize the waveform. For those into the computer music/DAW realm, there are a number of free VST synthesizers that perform additive synthesis, and I remember at ...


1

Equations could be fed into e.g. SuperCollider. Another option is to "fencepost" the equation and convert the value of the equation at those points into a pitch (and possibly also a duration, perhaps based on the slope at that point, or whatever), though this will require some amount of fussing to appropriately scale the fenceposts (what the x values are) ...



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