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15

There's got to be a name to the discipline, some kind of resource, some formalized, real thing around that particular science of music... right? You are looking for sound synthesis and sound design. I'll present you some popular resources. Synth Secrets One of the most popular resources (if not the most popular) is Gordon Reid's Synth Secrets series. ...


10

Without a picture, we can just guess, and my guess is that it is referring to a triplet. Something like this for instance: Τhe eighth triplets (second group,second bar) are 3 eighth notes that are being played in one beat; the quarter triplets (first group,second bar) are 3 quarter notes that are being played on two beats etc.


7

If you are playing an organ sound, you might want a keyboard that can feel and respond like an organ, rather than a piano It's possible to make a very shallow non-weighted action, which is helpful for some techniques (I like it better for triggering percussive sounds, for example) It's cheaper to make, so instruments are cheaper. The instrument is ...


6

MIDI is not sound. The MIDI specification does not dictate what any instrument sounds like, it's up to the synthesizer to generate the sound. Free synths sound like crap, but good ones can sound as good as the creators can make them. For example, the Pirates of the Caribbean soundtrack is entirely synthesized, yet most people don't even realize it.


5

Automation is a feature available in most digital audio workstations and many types of similar audio production software. Automation allows a parameter like volume, pan, or mute to be changed automatically during playback of a song by the software. In the early years of multi-track mixing, engineers had to manually move faders, and turn knobs while ...


5

MIDI is just a stream of instructions, like: "Tell channel 1 to turn on note 60" "Tell channel 2 to turn off note 72" "Tell channel 3 to set parameter 1 to value 231" There is a set of conventions such as: Channel 1 is piano, 34 is electric bass, etc. Parameter 1 is modulation, 7 is volume, 64 is sustain, etc. This is called General MIDI (Wikipedia). ...


5

What I've found is that the acoustic piano is the most expressive when played softly. We all like loud, but anything can be loud and the ear will tune loud OUT after a while. But it pays attention when things get quiet. And that's where weighted keys really help - on a digital too. If you don't have that weight, you'll get a more frequent oops-BANG ...


4

Having just done an acid test, for me, trills using a proper piano action are easier to execute than doing them on an 'organ' type 'board. This may be because I play a lot more on pianos than keyboards, though. The bounce back seems to help the control. Having said that, there are lots of trill type bits in Bach's organ works, so it is quite possible to do ...


4

MIDI is only a specification for what instrument (patch) to use, what notes to play, how long and loud to play a note and other things like tempo, time signature and text lyrics. The concept is very similar to how an old player piano works. The midi data is like the piano roll, the sound you hear is from the physical sound produced when the hammers strike ...


4

With little experience and without clear vision of requirements, this probably will not be the last synthesizer you ever buy. In other words, you are buying the exploration device. For such a device, I would suggest to set the budget limit and select the synthesizer that has as many various features available as possible. Then you will be able to try all of ...


3

Yes, there's the rightfully famous Synth Secrets series by Sound on Sound magazine: http://www.soundonsound.com/sos/allsynthsecrets.htm And the classic Synthesizer Cookbook: http://www.amazon.com/Welshs-Synthesizer-Cookbook-Programming-Universal/dp/B000ERHA4S


3

Should the performer then care to tune all 16 boxes identically or I am just missing some piece of knowledge? Yes! A big PITA and hence a darn good reason why polyphonic, microprocessor controlled synths like the Prophet 5 (oooh 5 voices!) in the late 70's were developed. For instance, if I press C and E on MIDI keybord connected to the synthesizer ...


2

Vocaloid has already been mentioned and it's the most popular solution to date, although it's still quite far from a real voice. There are other apps like VocalWriter, quite old but interesting, or Text to Sing. Lately Realitone released Blue, not a full vocal synthesizer per se, but it includes a word builder and sounds pretty great. You may also want to ...


2

Hammer action is noisier. Of course it is dwarfed by the sounds you hear, but when you have excellent reason for playing through headphones, that reason might also make light action desirable. Also if your main instrument is not a grand piano but a harmonium or accordion or organ, there is no point in an percussive attack, and it may detract from the fine ...


2

The free sound fonts typically installed with Timidity are of very mixed quality. Routing playback through some vintage Midi expander of good quality will greatly improve results, routing it through some reasonably current good quality offering will give some more improvements at much more portable hardware size. Naturally, the analog paths involved here ...


2

Novation Bass station II user manual contains a few pages of very well written introduction. I do not say you should buy exactly this synthesizer: the knowledge is clearly transferable. User manuals of some other synthesizers may potentially also have some generic sections, and they are often freely available for download.


2

There are lots of MIDI controllers that are just buttons, sliders, and knobs. See here for a pretty wide selection. The usual way to connect these if you're looking to augment an existing keyboard is to plug the new controller into the keyboard's MIDI IN, so that from the computer's perspective it looks like everything is coming from the keyboard.


2

It seems like converting MIDI into sound should be simple enough record all possible notes, and then just superimpose the individual sounds according to the MIDI data (offsets, duration and volume), and compress the > result into MP3 or send it to the sound card. And this kind of thinking (the wrong kind, that is) gives you exactly the results you ...


2

there are 2 possible problems here. 1) The midi file is created straight from sheet music. every note starts at exactly the right time and lasts the exact duration and all the note velocities are 100. That makes for a song with absolutely no feel. If you have a musician play the song with expressive velocities, tempo variations, arrangement improvements ...


2

MIDI-based music will be as good as its designer. It's not that MIDI-based music sound quality is inherently bad; the final results depend on whoever designed the MIDI, and whoever is using it. In other words, if it sounds bad it is because of the people involved with it. Even if you didn't design it and you are just using it you are responsible of its ...


2

No, with keyboards like the psr s550b this is not possible. Those devices are usually "closed", in terms that they do not offer any effects channels or similar. However, you are free to use effects after your psr s550, by connecting the output to any effects device (e.g. a reverb or delay effect) and send this to speakers/mixer/etc. The only usual way to ...


1

You can do this with any cheap Soundmodule or Soundcard. Just go to the wind section of the GM module select a Panflute sound, put a low-cut filter on it to filter out the low end and EQ the high end to make it more aggressive. A compressor will give the sound an additional kick. If you are lucky your sound module does have a bottleblow sound as variation ...


1

From the Yamaha page with technical specs for the s550b it looks like you won't be able to upload your own sounds. For this a device needs flash memory that is fast enough (=expensive) so when you press the key (or even multiple keys) the sounds feels like it is played instantly. This is usually only available in high class models and only some middle class ...


1

I've played both types. The non-weighted GOOD keyboards are significantly easier for a non-pianist to play. The hammer-weighted actions are better if you want a touch-response (velocity) that emulates a real piano. Some people say the non-weighted or non-hammer-action are toys; they aren't. Some of them are very good (thinking of the Kawai K5000 keyboard ...


1

Pianos are constructed to performed highly nuanced music where everything depends on the proficiency of a performer that can apply a whole range of touche. Synthesisers are made to preform music that doesn't need nuances or any proficiency from the player – everything can be controlled by the envelopes of each synth or external controllers. The advantages ...


1

Camel Audio Alchemy does this very well. NI Absynth will also. Those are good to start with as well.


1

Where documented, it is often written that the lowest note will be played but this may be model dependent and in some synthesizers even switcheable. If you have arpeggiator and turned it on, the synthesizer will play all notes of the chord in a sequence.


1

Most analog VCOs generate almost perfect mathematical waveforms (almost because of minor instabilities/noise but its usually below -60db). But you don't sample VCO, there are many elements in the signal path.. Like high pass filters used to kill DC, usually after VCO, mixer, filter. What you see is just a high-pass filtered "perfect sawtooth". You can try ...


1

Look for a second-hand electric piano with some other sounds. A laptop is nothing but a nuisance on a gig.


1

Kevin provided advice for making the most of the limitation. I'll offer a couple ideas related to escaping the limitation, in case that's also part of what you're after. If the unwanted aspects occur only on two notes, they're not inherent to the waveform, so if you have the means to sample one note, you can then reproduce it with the sound you prefer on ...



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