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7

As naught101 says, your particular case here is a sinusoidal wave with a quiet third harmonic. To hear what this sounds like at an audible frequency, go to http://meettechniek.info/additional/additive-synthesis.html in a browser that supports the Web Audio API (like Firefox or Chrome), turn the audio on, and set it like this: H1 there represents your ...


7

MIDI is not sound. The MIDI specification does not dictate what any instrument sounds like, it's up to the synthesizer to generate the sound. Free synths sound like crap, but good ones can sound as good as the creators can make them. For example, the Pirates of the Caribbean soundtrack is entirely synthesized, yet most people don't even realize it.


6

MIDI is just a stream of instructions, like: "Tell channel 1 to turn on note 60" "Tell channel 2 to turn off note 72" "Tell channel 3 to set parameter 1 to value 231" There is a set of conventions such as: Channel 1 is piano, 34 is electric bass, etc. Parameter 1 is modulation, 7 is volume, 64 is sustain, etc. This is called General MIDI (Wikipedia). ...


5

MIDI is only a specification for what instrument (patch) to use, what notes to play, how long and loud to play a note and other things like tempo, time signature and text lyrics. The concept is very similar to how an old player piano works. The midi data is like the piano roll, the sound you hear is from the physical sound produced when the hammers strike ...


5

Automation is a feature available in most digital audio workstations and many types of similar audio production software. Automation allows a parameter like volume, pan, or mute to be changed automatically during playback of a song by the software. In the early years of multi-track mixing, engineers had to manually move faders, and turn knobs while ...


4

With little experience and without clear vision of requirements, this probably will not be the last synthesizer you ever buy. In other words, you are buying the exploration device. For such a device, I would suggest to set the budget limit and select the synthesizer that has as many various features available as possible. Then you will be able to try all of ...


4

You could have a look at Csound, Pure Data, SuperCollider, or ChucK to name but a few. These are audio programming environments with full flexibility to do whatever you could think of, including additive synthesis, but be prepared for an intense learning period.


3

You don't need any specific audio software to generate audible waveforms. Here's a simple C program that will generate the required data on standard output: #include <stdint.h> #include <stdio.h> #include <math.h> double y(double t) { return (16 * cos(t/2) - cos(t*2)) / 15; } double pitch = 440 * 2*3.14159; // so the base pitch will ...


3

Yes, there's the rightfully famous Synth Secrets series by Sound on Sound magazine: http://www.soundonsound.com/sos/allsynthsecrets.htm And the classic Synthesizer Cookbook: http://www.amazon.com/Welshs-Synthesizer-Cookbook-Programming-Universal/dp/B000ERHA4S


3

It seems like converting MIDI into sound should be simple enough record all possible notes, and then just superimpose the individual sounds according to the MIDI data (offsets, duration and volume), and compress the > result into MP3 or send it to the sound card. And this kind of thinking (the wrong kind, that is) gives you exactly the results you ...


2

there are 2 possible problems here. 1) The midi file is created straight from sheet music. every note starts at exactly the right time and lasts the exact duration and all the note velocities are 100. That makes for a song with absolutely no feel. If you have a musician play the song with expressive velocities, tempo variations, arrangement improvements ...


2

MIDI-based music will be as good as its designer. It's not that MIDI-based music sound quality is inherently bad; the final results depend on whoever designed the MIDI, and whoever is using it. In other words, if it sounds bad it is because of the people involved with it. Even if you didn't design it and you are just using it you are responsible of its ...


2

The free sound fonts typically installed with Timidity are of very mixed quality. Routing playback through some vintage Midi expander of good quality will greatly improve results, routing it through some reasonably current good quality offering will give some more improvements at much more portable hardware size. Naturally, the analog paths involved here ...


2

Vocaloid has already been mentioned and it's the most popular solution to date, although it's still quite far from a real voice. There are other apps like VocalWriter, quite old but interesting, or Text to Sing. Lately Realitone released Blue, not a full vocal synthesizer per se, but it includes a word builder and sounds pretty great. You may also want to ...


2

No, with keyboards like the psr s550b this is not possible. Those devices are usually "closed", in terms that they do not offer any effects channels or similar. However, you are free to use effects after your psr s550, by connecting the output to any effects device (e.g. a reverb or delay effect) and send this to speakers/mixer/etc. The only usual way to ...


2

In my experience you have to manually map the controls and it depends on what your plug-in is and what kind of controller you have. Here are the controls that a vintage Hammond B3 organ normally has that are usually replicated and available for mapping in most B3 plugins: 9 Drawbars that control the overall tone - these are usually assigned to faders on a ...


2

There are lots of MIDI controllers that are just buttons, sliders, and knobs. See here for a pretty wide selection. The usual way to connect these if you're looking to augment an existing keyboard is to plug the new controller into the keyboard's MIDI IN, so that from the computer's perspective it looks like everything is coming from the keyboard.


1

The question assumes that the waveform at stake is directly human hearable. If that would be the case, an alternative approach to the programmatic one would be to use an additive synthesizer to synthesize the waveform. For those into the computer music/DAW realm, there are a number of free VST synthesizers that perform additive synthesis, and I remember at ...


1

Equations could be fed into e.g. SuperCollider. Another option is to "fencepost" the equation and convert the value of the equation at those points into a pitch (and possibly also a duration, perhaps based on the slope at that point, or whatever), though this will require some amount of fussing to appropriately scale the fenceposts (what the x values are) ...


1

I am not looking to reproduce synth sounds of the analog moog variety, but rather to emulate various instruments that might be in a pop, rock or country or folk music band. I suggest either a physical modeling synthesizer or multisample synthesizer designed to reproduce classic keyboard sounds. Something like a used Nord Electro 2 (around USD 1000 on ...


1

There's no correct answer, but I'd weight the argument this way... If you're recording an entire album over many months, you may choose to pitch the drums specifically for each track, choose to mic the kit differently; even choose to record in a different room or facility. If you're playing a live gig, no drummer is going to retune to fit each song. The ...


1

You can do this with any cheap Soundmodule or Soundcard. Just go to the wind section of the GM module select a Panflute sound, put a low-cut filter on it to filter out the low end and EQ the high end to make it more aggressive. A compressor will give the sound an additional kick. If you are lucky your sound module does have a bottleblow sound as variation ...


1

From the Yamaha page with technical specs for the s550b it looks like you won't be able to upload your own sounds. For this a device needs flash memory that is fast enough (=expensive) so when you press the key (or even multiple keys) the sounds feels like it is played instantly. This is usually only available in high class models and only some middle class ...


1

Most analog VCOs generate almost perfect mathematical waveforms (almost because of minor instabilities/noise but its usually below -60db). But you don't sample VCO, there are many elements in the signal path.. Like high pass filters used to kill DC, usually after VCO, mixer, filter. What you see is just a high-pass filtered "perfect sawtooth". You can try ...


1

Kevin provided advice for making the most of the limitation. I'll offer a couple ideas related to escaping the limitation, in case that's also part of what you're after. If the unwanted aspects occur only on two notes, they're not inherent to the waveform, so if you have the means to sample one note, you can then reproduce it with the sound you prefer on ...



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