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1

You know what to play by listening. Some numbers will already be busy, backing-wise, so not much may be needed. There's a time to play a 'wash' over some, as in a gentle chord palette on a strings type sound under everything else. You may, in a more punchy number, match the bass line with a synth sound, to beef things up.Listen to how brass stabs work in a ...


1

I don't know if this will help you or not, but I've recently watched a set of videos on youtube that talks about how to develop a simple piano style for "comping" (playing accompaniment chords, with no melody). It starts out pretty simple, but he's got a ton of other videos with more advanced techniques. You might find something of interest in there, given ...


3

Based on your question I'd recommend a keyboard controller and a midi-connected laptop. You can choose the key action you prefer and you can achieve many different sounds via software. Regarding keyboard action; I'm more concerned with good dynamic detection and snap-back but you may be most interested in key weight. I've played a lot of piano but piano ...


0

SP5500. Branded under at least 4 different names, Thomann sell it. 88 note, not too bad action, loads of sounds. More than £150, I'm afraid, but probably the cheapest half decent 'board for the money. Try Ebay.


1

I am excluding from my answer new synths with built-in keyboards. That would broaden things too far into the area of product-recommendation. Suffice to say there are lots of MIDI keyboards on the market, and all of them will function as a MIDI sound module if you want to control them from a different keyboard. Other than to say you want to play 80s music, ...


2

I can't answer whether or not your keyboard can do this, however a lot of midi keyboards have a 'split key' mode which allows precisely this. The best advice is to google the specific make and model of your keyboard followed by the word 'manual'. Most gear has a digital version of it's manual available online, and this should tell you if it has 'split key' ...


1

You don't actually need another keyboard. I use a Roland JV series,which is the 'brain' of a synth, without the keyboard part - much smaller, easier to store/carry. There are cards available which fit in, to give an extra 200+ sounds each. MIDI in/out, so controllable with your existing keyboard - and cheaper, as no keys.


3

Yes you can control any synth with a MIDI input with your electronic piano. Don't worry about the range, the range of a synth (128 notes at the very least) is bigger than the keys in your keyboard (88 keys in the bigger ones). If you want cheap 10 note polyphony, the cheapest option I can think of is the Novation MiniNova. In good quality synths you'll ...


0

There's a key difference in string gauges. Under the same tension, a thinner gauge has less mass and it can move more easily when it receives an impulse, as opposite to a thicker gauge. In thinner strings, more harmonics are generated because, aside from the fundamental vibration, smaller harmonic vibrations occur on the string more easily. That makes for a ...


2

Some additional details. There is a very small change in pitch due to the change in tension that occurs when the string is fretted. This change in tension varies along the neck, generally larger changes further up (away from the nut) the neck. This change is small enough that it is usually imperceptible in single note playing; however this difference does ...


5

All else being equal, a thicker string will damp out transverse vibrations more rapidly because it experiences more drag (inter-molecular deformation) per unit length. (See section 4.6 of [not my work] http://www.people.fas.harvard.edu/~djmorin/waves/transverse.pdf.) (If we consider strings made of different materials or under different tensions, this rule ...


2

The other two answers are true however it seems your question is about sounding a unison as opposed to replicating one sound on a different string, even though you pointed out string thickness as a possible reason for the sound you are noticing. What happens when a string vibrates is that it actually stretches from side to side or up and down depending on ...


13

Technically speaking two notes with the same pitch have the same frequency as the fundamental. However this does not explain why two notes of the same frequency also called unisons, sound different on strings of different diameters or lengths or both. The guitar and the entire orchestra string family as you may know have numerous unisons (unlike the piano). ...


1

So the difference between the quality of two notes that are the same pitch (two different strings, or even with two different instruments) is not in the frequency necessarily (though my guitar is always a bit out of tune...) but rather the overtones each string produces. I don't know exactly how to mimic that but read into the overtone series - maybe bassier ...



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