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There's a key difference in string gauges. Under the same tension, a thinner gauge has less mass and it can move more easily when it receives an impulse, as opposite to a thicker gauge. In thinner strings, more harmonics are generated because, aside from the fundamental vibration, smaller harmonic vibrations occur on the string more easily. That makes for a ...


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Some additional details. There is a very small change in pitch due to the change in tension that occurs when the string is fretted. This change in tension varies along the neck, generally larger changes further up (away from the nut) the neck. This change is small enough that it is usually imperceptible in single note playing; however this difference does ...


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All else being equal, a thicker string will damp out transverse vibrations more rapidly because it experiences more drag (inter-molecular deformation) per unit length. (See section 4.6 of [not my work] http://www.people.fas.harvard.edu/~djmorin/waves/transverse.pdf.) (If we consider strings made of different materials or under different tensions, this rule ...


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The other two answers are true however it seems your question is about sounding a unison as opposed to replicating one sound on a different string, even though you pointed out string thickness as a possible reason for the sound you are noticing. What happens when a string vibrates is that it actually stretches from side to side or up and down depending on ...


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Technically speaking two notes with the same pitch have the same frequency as the fundamental. However this does not explain why two notes of the same frequency also called unisons, sound different on strings of different diameters or lengths or both. The guitar and the entire orchestra string family as you may know have numerous unisons (unlike the piano). ...


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So the difference between the quality of two notes that are the same pitch (two different strings, or even with two different instruments) is not in the frequency necessarily (though my guitar is always a bit out of tune...) but rather the overtones each string produces. I don't know exactly how to mimic that but read into the overtone series - maybe bassier ...


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The next step is to add some kind of recording system, so that you can play some drum loops and record multiple keyboard tracks over them. As great as your synthesizer is by itself, it has a MIDI port that can integrate with a recording system and open up multitrack recording and many more sounds. What you want to do is start with some drum loops as a drum ...


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Wheat's answer (Pianoteq) is certainly the best in terms of a high-quality commercial solution. I've known people to tweak parameters in that (seemingly endlessly!) to get exactly the piano sound they want. As an alternative, I tend to worry less about quality, and just use free soundfonts, which are sample-based. I have several, but the only one whose name ...


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Try Pianoteq Stage for Mac or Windows. It is exactly what you want. It costs €99 or US $129. Using a physical-modeling synthesizer, not samples, it really sounds like a grand piano -- in fact, you can choose between several different kinds of grand pianos. You can download a free trial version. If you buy the more expensive Pianoteq Standard or Pianoteq ...


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OK. The sound in that video was not actually that excellent! Although, sequencing a piano can be just as detrimental to how it sounds than the sound quality itself. Watch this video: ...


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Synth programmers always tried to synthesize a piano sound, but they effectively gave up. Nowadays any piano sound that you hear coming from a software or hardware synthesizer is sampled (meaning: recorded note by note) from a real piano. Here's a VST I found by Googling: http://www.steinberg.net/en/products/vst/thegrand3/start.html EDIT Okay, I take it ...


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Take some introductory piano lessons to get the necessary minimum of knowledge that does not differ much between various keyboard instruments and is even similar between all instruments (music notation, chords, etc). While keys may not be weighted, they layout is the same as for the piano keyboard, and between numerous voices of the synthesizer you should ...


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In addition to loop suggestion, I'd also see if you can split the keys into different instruments. This will allow you to play bass or percussion with one hand and melody with the other making for a full sounding performance without having to rely on recording layers. In terms of backing tracks, check out the fantastic app iReal Pro


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Your wife might also consider a breath controller like this http://www.tecontrol.se/products/usb-midi-breath-controller You can see it demoed in the video


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The first thing I'd do is find a loop station. This will allow you to record various parts, and layer them, using all the various new sounds available from your synth. Most have rudimentary drum tracks if you need them, and if you mess up with the next layer of sound, you can delete it without losing anything else. Another option is to use some of the ...


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A synth is a machine that generates (synthesizes) sounds. There are many different types: old-school 80's style FM synthesizers, even more old-school modular synths like Moogs, software synthesizers that run on a computer, etc. Although some have a keyboard, that is not part of a synthesizer per se, that's just the controller. A controller is a thing that ...



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