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21

I don't know for sure, but I'm fairly certain "C" means a string bend and "D" means a release. Here's why I think so: Notice the tab in the rhythm part. Where the "C" occurs, you play the D-string, 4th fret---that's an F#. And sure enough, the standard notation shows an F#. But then the standard notation shows that note becoming a G, while the tab ...


17

This is a tie, meaning that the initial D is held through the eighth note, the quarter note, and the first sixteenth note before the hammer-on to E. It appears that the reason it was written this way (i.e. two ties) was to give the rhythm along with the notes, as in standard notation the ties would be written in the same way. The way this tie is written is ...


16

This image shows the note on the stave corresponding to each guitar string: The lowest string is E, then A, D, G, B and E. It might also be useful to refer to a map of the fretboard -- there's nothing there you couldn't work out from knowing the tuning of each string, and that each fret raises the pitch by a semitone: Now, lets take first chord in ...


12

those x are dead notes, I guess you already know that. They can be a bit tricky to play. I have seen multiple approaches to play these, but for me the following worked the best when playing these octave-cords: place your index-finger on the 7th fret on the A-string, and your ring-finger on the 9th fret on the G-string. Be sure, that you use only the tip on ...


12

To answer the question directly - yes, strings are supposed to be EADGBE - in standard tuning. All tabs should have the tuning notes at the beginning. If there are none, assume it's standard. There are many different tunings that can be used for guitar, drop D, for example, where the fat E is tuned a tone lower, to D. This above is open C, as each note is ...


11

If you don't already know how to play the song, you will have to go through the process of learning by ear. If you can, try searching for the chords of a song; there are usually more chord charts for songs than there are tabs. Knowing the chords will give you a basic idea of where to start. When it comes to picking out riffs and lines by ear, try starting ...


11

x means to dampen the string with your fretting hand depending on what you are playing. You see this a lot in tabs for metal and other driven music In the case above, the sounded note is an open string and so shouldn't be too difficult to play; more complex lines may require some finger picking or hybrid picking if you are using a pick. Often you see ...


11

When you hold a guitar the fretboard looks like that: The thickest string at the bottom and the thinnest at the top. Some people prefer to represent chord diagrams in this way, other people prefer to represent chords as they can see the fretboard in a mirror on the wall. It is only a personal preference.


10

I'll answer each of your questions in order: The notes in parentheses are ghost notes. You should play them quietly - certainly don't emphasize them. They do have rhythmic value, however (i.e. they aren't grace notes). The 7 to 9 slide is a legato slide. Pick the 7, then slide to 9, but don't pick again for the 9. The 5-7-5, 7-5-0 are indeed hammer-ons ...


8

Chord sheets simply tell you what chord fits against each part of a song. You can play a reasonable guitar accompaniment to the song simply by fretting the chord's shape and strumming. On other instruments, you can form the chord in other ways, for example by playing a triad on a keyboard. A chord sheet does not provide enough information to know more than ...


8

Doing what you say you did sounds pretty awful, as the F#s clash with the open G. If the writer wanted you to play G open, he would have put 'o' on that string. Otherwise someone could play all 6 strings, 4 open and the other 2 as written. So play the 2 F#s, either with finger and thumb, or with a pick, muting the G (3rd) string in between as you strum. You ...


8

Great question! The answer is that there are multiple layers to any given musician's music, and while some are easy to duplicate, others are impossible. Also, some layers can be easily duplicated by a listener, and while other layers might not be, it still could be in the artist's interest to provide that information. As an example, after just a single ...


8

I didn't know this before, but after doing research on other sites I found that this type of tuning is called Open C Tuning. Here are some references on guitar tuning that I found to be useful: Electric tuner [Hear the notes] How to tune guitar to different modes. List of guitar tunings.


6

What you're talking about is a transcription service. However, these can be expensive, and the ones I found on a quick Google are geared towards musicians who want to put music or tabs on their own websites. Paying someone to make what's essentially sheet music of a song you don't own (I assume this is not music you own the rights to) brings up all sorts of ...


6

The way tablature works is actually more simple than that. You don't need to even think about the key. Just directly transcribe the note you play to a note on tab. eg if you play 5th fret on the 2nd string, just transcribe that. The only question you need to ask yourself is where on the neck you wish to play a particular note, and this will usually depend ...


6

If we call middle C C4, then the open strings of the guitar are as follows: e - E4 B - B3 G - G3 D - D3 A - A2 E - E2 From the appropriate open string note, go up the number of semitones indicated by the fret number to find the written note. Eg. e|--- B|--- G|-5- is G3 plus 5 semitones = C4 D|--- A|--- E|--- One thing to look out for: alternate ...


6

Moderate or Moderato is a convention from back before the invention and widespread use of the quartz-powered metronome. Tempo markings are a relatively recent invention, and they are used for their simplicity and accuracy. However, many composers choose to omit them because the "idea" of the tempo of the piece is more important than an absolute value. Other ...


6

I've seen some sheet music like this before, brought to me by guitar pupils from Hong Kong. The cross-headed notes are quite easy to get your head around; they simply show you which strings to pick while using the chords above the TAB stave, and the rhythm of these arpeggiated notes. The arrows show how many strings to strum for the chords above the TAB ...


5

Tab notation does not include any timing information -- the closest you get is bar lines, which at least helps you orientate yourself. Some books present tab alongside a traditional musical score, so you can get pitch, timing and phrasing from the stave, and choice of string/fret from the tab. The notes on the tabs are lined up with the notes on the stave. ...


5

If you still don't know about it, there is a software for guitar tablatures called Guitar Pro, you can download the trial version from their official site. About open source, can't help you , sorry. In Guitar Pro you will have seamlessly both the tablature (playing midi in real time) and the sheet music that goes with it; the only real problem is that ...


5

I would also recommend some tab tools to make formatting the tab easier. Guitar Pro is commercial software for Windows, Linux, and Mac Power Tab is free software for Windows TuxGuitar is free for Windows, Linux, and Mac All three of these programs will give you a good interface for creating tabs and a quality output at the end - in either text or PDF, ...


5

Until I listened to your example, I wasn't sure if it would be a divebomb (whammy bar pushed all the way down until the strings don't sound any more) or a slide, but in this case it's actually just a slide down from the 12th fret to somewhere near the 1st fret (can't quite tell which fret it stops at but it doesn't sound like it goes all the way) What ...


4

You can't. Your example could be 2/2, 2/4, 2/8, 4/2, 4/4, 4/8, etc.; there's nothing to indicate the time signature. Unless it's explicitly indicated you need to either be familiar with the song or make an educated guess. I'm not overly familiar with drum beats but I would guess that there are common time signatures used with accents on 7 and 13. While ...


4

I haven't used it but I've heard that the software 'Transcribe!' can be used to pitch a song up by an octave and thusly make it easier to hear the bass notes. For slowing down there is also the 'Amazing Slow Downer'. I haven't used that either. Besides technical aids, the more you transcribe the better you will become at not only transcribing but also at ...


4

Here is the notation used by Guitar Pro 6 : They claim that they use a standard notation (standard called Berkeley). There doesn't seem to be a universal standard (another common one is called Agostini). I use GP notation in my tabs and find it quite useful, but I'm not a drummer so I don't know if it is easy to read while playing. I reference GP6 as this ...


4

The word Moderate indicates the name for the tempo; each tempo has a different name. Here is a list of the names: adagio: very slow. allegretto: fairly quick, slightly slower than allegro. allegro: lively, rather quick. andante: rather slow, at a moderate, walking pace. andantino: this used to mean a little slower than ...


3

Tab, in my opinion, is great for getting the general pattern or notes of a song, but pretty poor at conveying real musical information. It would be pretty difficult to sight read a song notated in tab that you had never heard before, as tab does not provide note lengths and expression symbols in the same way that notation does. I have always used tab to ...


3

I think this can help you. But notice, that making a bass tab from guitar tab is like covering sb's cover of sb's cover :) It probably will work, but can be unplayable and inaccurate. The best adaptation would be the one you'd do from original music sheet.


3

It sounds like a minor harmonic scale starting on its fifth. If it is the case, that is called Phrygian major 3rd/Phrygian dominant, and played on a 7b9 chord. Starting on an A (A phrygian major 3rd): A - Bb - C# - D - E - F - G - A Edited to start on G# (G# phrygian major 3rd): G# - A - B# - C# - D# - E - F# - G# ...



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