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1

It means slide. There are many variations in how tab is written. Some people will use sl, and some use /. Bends are sometimes notated with an arrow and a number (usually 1/2 or 1) to indicates how may tones to bend up, sometimes it will be like --7-b-(9)- meaning bend the note at the 7th fret until it matches the pitch of the note at the 9th fret. If in ...


2

Everyone is different in terms of motivation, natural ability, physical anatomy, and ability to assimilate information based on various learning mediums. So I can't definitively say how well you will do learning to play guitar in the absence of a teacher who can assess and evaluate your current skill level and show you how to get from where you are today to ...


1

You can definitely teach yourself, especially with the range of tutorials on YouTube etc. That said, the value of a teacher is inestimable at various stages: in early learning, a teacher will ensure you don't pick up bad habits later to get past blocks to your progression even later to add skills from other disciplines at any time to add theory and ...


2

Absolutely. I taught myself to play guitar when I was 15, and I didn't even own a guitar :) I drew a fretboard on some cardboard so I could practice chord fingerings. When our daughter wanted to learn guitar, she asked us for some lessons. We said no, on the reasonable basis that we both know how to play guitar. Eventually the need in her to play guitar ...


2

Of course you can. I have taught myself to play drums and guitar. Teachers are nice because they have perspective that you don't, and can save you a lot of energy in the mistakes that young players will make. Keep on keepin' on. If you do decide to take a lesson or some, you will have your own perspective of what you have learned to bring to the table.


0

If the tabs had chord names above the fingerings it would be much easier to play and memorize. The chords guide you on how to finger the melody. If you know basic guitar chords then it should be easy to recognize how to play the piece. Looks like the song uses F, Am, and G chords shapes at the 7th position using a capo. I would use my thumb for the F ...


2

"bis" is just Latin for "twice", it's a pretty common expression in romance language countries, not so much in other ones, I guess. I had never seen it in tablatures before, but I suppose the meaning should be to repeat the previous segment.


1

Simply: Strum but not quite as fast as normal. This is also used in piano music where the musician is instructed to play the chord "strummed" in that the notes are played in rapid ascending order but still held as one chord. In this case, move up the strings over the course of about half a second to a second. It needs to be fast enough to still be a strummed ...


5

It's an arpeggio, or perhaps more precisely, an arpeggiated chord. You play the notes in rapid succession, from the lowest to the highest. The symbol is the same in traditional sheet music. Note that it is not a "broken chord" arpeggio: it should be thought of as a single chord, each individual note struck rapidly after each other (you could, possibly, just ...


2

Just adding to the previous two answers, there are three types of minor scales: Natural Minor - all notes are the same going up and coming down Harmonic Minor - The 7th note is sharp going up and going down Melodic Minor - The 6th & 7th notes are sharp going up but natural coming down. In the example you've given, they're using the Melodic Minor ...


3

In the Common Practice Period (technical name for composers doing what I'm describing), the keys were (and still are) divided into two modes, major and minor. Each of the 12 (not counting enharmonic things like C#=Db) major keys consist of the usual 7-note major scale pattern: SSHSSSH (from C, DEFGABC). The minor modes have a flat third (Eb in the case of C) ...


3

The two accidental signs after the high A are natural signs. You play G-natural and F-natural when descending in the A Melodic-Minor Scale. The A will never be altered in any kind of A-scale. More generally, the 6th and 7th scale degrees in a Melodic-Minor Scale are considered movable and may change through the course of a piece to suit the melody. The ...



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