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19

Qualities a guitar teacher needs to have: Patience. You need patience to sit through lessons with struggling students while keeping a positive attitude. Motivation. You really need to be motivated about teaching. A lot of guitar teachers aren't motivated about teaching but see it as a way to earn money with their guitar skills. Communication. This is a ...


16

I'm sure that you would be able to teach your child how to read music and play simple pieces; the nice thing about the piano is that the basics are easy to pick up. Where you'll run into trouble is technique; a lot of what my teacher drilled into me at a young age is stuff like "keep your wrists up, make sure your fingers are curved, don't tense your ...


13

I think @Ulf is on the right track--I'll elaborate here. It sounds like your student is at the point where you'll need to work on the absolute basics of rhythm. Before you get anywhere near subdivisions, time signatures, even the concept of a quarter note, your student needs to become proficient with steady beat. This is, in many ways, the concept that ...


12

I think if one wanted to be a concert pianist or part of a symphony or something, there's no question that one should get a good teacher. Precision is necessary in these areas, and precision is exceptionally difficult to teach oneself. As well, you might never be exposed to some concepts through picking up things on your own that a teacher would deem ...


11

I think you should start as if it is a game. Your child should be interested in this game, and its rules should be easy. There is nothing hard about creating a random sound with a harmonica, and at first it will be ok just to leave him to this. Once your son is more familiar with the instrument, you should start the main phase of the learning: Find the ...


11

I would say personally that it's mostly a matter of the music being taught. The main exception to that is voice; all you have to do is listen to, say, Pavarotti and Frank Sinatra to tell the difference. They are obviously each going after a very different sound. Operatic singing doesn't use a microphone and emphasizes natural volume. The sound is ...


9

As everything teaching "device" (and there is a lot of academic literature studying this, across disciplines, this is not specific to bowed string instruments), fingerboard tapes or any kind of marks on or on the side of the fingerboard should not : be used systematically without observation phase be permanent be used alone without having an exit strategy ...


8

When beginning with a six-year-old, all they really need is to learn (as much as they can) the names of notes and their positions, the basics of tempo (mostly "play evenly"), and rudimentary sight reading (a couple types of notes, a few positions on the staff). It's more of a get-used-to-this-new-way-of-making-cool-noise process than anything else. As such, ...


8

I've had two guitar teachers. One of them was a solid, competent musician and an incredible teacher. I learned more in the year-plus I studied with him than I've ever learned about any subject from anyone over any two year period. The other teacher was a brilliant musician, highly regarded and successful, played with some of the biggest names in the ...


7

Perhaps you could try working on walking in time. That should be simple enough to explain and includes basic physical feedback on the activity. The difference in the pace between walking and running might be helpful. Gradually you could add extremely simple hand clapping patterns while walking. (Your question is really interesting, and I'd love to hear an ...


7

Generally, there are two factors that contribute to quiet playing: 1.) They are insecure with their part - not comfortable physically playing the music. For children, it is often because they don't practice enough. For older kids and adults, it's often because they don't practice enough. :) 2.) Social psychology: by playing as a soloist they are ...


6

Is the quality of online lesson good? With very detailed, in-depth instructions like Youtube:ProfessorV's Violin lessons, one can confidently start learning an instrument. (find something similar for your instrument) Are you aware of your mistakes? Would you know if your posture is wrong or stressing some of your muscles unnecessarily? Could you detect ...


6

Virtually everything about piano playing is slightly less obvious than you would at first think. You just press down the appropriate keys, right? Almost certainly you already know that there's more to it than that. At the most basic level, which fingers to set where is a question that opens a whole world of possibilities. A good teacher knows this world ...


5

I think that every piece of music deserves the best possible method of being prepared in a such a way that both the musicians and audience have a pleasing experience. Preparation includes time, rehearsal, and every member stepping up to meet the challenge including the conductor's interpretation so that the entire group is a part of the solution. If your ...


5

.To your question "is it good method?" I would say there are different "schools", different ideals of how to work repertoire, bowing and holding. The European and Russian schools being the biggest. Mathieu Crickboom was a great violinist who played with for example Pablo Casals. His books are good. More important is the guidance you have of your teacher ...


5

The only reason not to use a slash is that it implies division. But it's the closest match to standard notation and the symbol there looks even more like division. You're trying to reproduce what standard notation does, so use / That / will be the least of your learners' worries. I'd say the numbers themselves will be more worrisome. Triple meter? Have ...


5

If you apply the four stages of competence, there will probably be certain techniques on piano that fall into each of the following categories: You're not doing it right, and you aren't aware of it. ("unconscious incompetence") You're not doing it right, but you're aware of it. ("conscious incompetence") You are doing it right, but it takes concentration ...


4

From learning the flute as a kid, I would say that you will probably benefit from an instructor. But I don't think you need to see the instructor very often. If you can get to an instructor once every couple of months to make sure you aren't making any mistakes in your basic technique, that is probably enough. So maybe instead of an instructor, you can call ...


4

If you need somewhere to start, I would make sure he can hear differences in pitch. This can be as simple as playing a note, playing another note, and then asking if it was higher, lower, or the same. Then you can start applying that skill to his own voice, though, it sounds likely that he has some production issues to work through first. The ear isn't going ...


4

Ear training is an unfortunate problem here in America. For children during their earliest formative years, precedence is given to visual and tactile learning. While this learning is undoubtedly important, too often are ears left under-developed. If hearing were trained the same way as sight, everyone would have perfect pitch. If I were teaching this ...


4

I'm ignoring the organizer's desire, because nobody can learn to play an instrument in a week. The best you could do is give them all percussion instruments and have them bang along. Instead, try letting them organize it. See if they'd rather sing or make music. Then if you can get the raw materials, let them design their own instruments. Just coach ...


4

In plain text you can use the vertical bar symbol | (aka pipe) instead of /. It's a very common character, so your keyboard should have an easy way to type it. It would look like this: 4|4. You can check the list of Unicode characters and search for other characters that might be used instead of /, like ⧘ ⦙ ⬍, there's a lot of them (some have mathematical ...


3

If you want your child to actually have a musical future, I'd refrain from teaching him/her yourself. Technical problems are very hard to correct down the line. The early years are the most important! So I don't seem totally unhelpful, buy a copy of Barbara Lister Sink's "Freeing the Caged bird" It discusses the basic piano technique in a fairly ...


3

Getting everyone "on the same page" is probably not the best option in this situation--it would probably end up being stifling and uninteresting for those with more aptitude, or the less advanced students would end up getting left in the dust. If all of the students are self-motivated, then keeping each person moving at their optimal pace (whatever that may ...


3

Am I correct in assuming this is a theory for non-majors course of some kind? If that is the case, you're going to have a huge variance in the amount of reading ability, from none at all to students who could have been music majors if they had chosen to. However, everyone is probably going to have some similar intrinsic knowledge about the aural aspect of ...


3

Dance! If you can forget about the actual playing of the guitar, play a recording of the tune which we're learning, and ask your student to just groove in their seat. Then introduce a bit of free-style muted strumming, but continuing the chair dancing. The most important aspect in this approach is to get them to loosen up and not be shy about it, "look at ...


3

Striking the balance between teaching the fundamentals and keeping the child interested can be a difficult balance to meet. It may be trivial for some children naturally gifted, curious, and interested, and it may be that some other children are just not ready (yet) for an instrument. I don't think there is a technique that will work for all children even ...


3

I’m mostly self taught, but I also take lessons occasionally when time and money allows. A good teacher can help you with technique, can give you direction, and can overall help you progress faster. They can help with simple things, like how to sit and play to avoid injuring yourself, with things like how to finger pieces, and how to figure out how to ...



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