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26

There was a trick for these that I used all the time based on what the rests look like. The whole rest looks like a hole. The words sound the same so it's a good way to equate them. The half rest looks like a hat and since hat and half both start with the letter 'h' they go together. I like this trick a lot because it associates the rests more with ...


19

Qualities a guitar teacher needs to have: Patience. You need patience to sit through lessons with struggling students while keeping a positive attitude. Motivation. You really need to be motivated about teaching. A lot of guitar teachers aren't motivated about teaching but see it as a way to earn money with their guitar skills. Communication. This is a ...


19

In elementary school, I was taught to think of the rest like a raft in water. Since a half rest gets two beats, it's like a raft carrying two people - light enough to float on top of the water: The whole rest, on the other hand, gets four beats (in common time, anyway) and so it's like a raft carrying four people - enough weight such that it sinks down ...


17

I'm sure that you would be able to teach your child how to read music and play simple pieces; the nice thing about the piano is that the basics are easy to pick up. Where you'll run into trouble is technique; a lot of what my teacher drilled into me at a young age is stuff like "keep your wrists up, make sure your fingers are curved, don't tense your ...


14

I think @Ulf is on the right track--I'll elaborate here. It sounds like your student is at the point where you'll need to work on the absolute basics of rhythm. Before you get anywhere near subdivisions, time signatures, even the concept of a quarter note, your student needs to become proficient with steady beat. This is, in many ways, the concept that ...


13

It sounds to me like you are using the metronome in an effective manner. Your teacher might have been concerned that you, as a young student, would have seen playing in perfect time as an artistic objective. Of course it is rarely such. The musical artist is expressing emotion and other aesthetic insights. Variety of all kinds should be deployed for that ...


12

A whole-note (semibreve) rest hangs D-O-W-N from the line (four letters, so four beats). A half-note rest points U-P from the line (two letters, so two beats).


11

I think you should start as if it is a game. Your child should be interested in this game, and its rules should be easy. There is nothing hard about creating a random sound with a harmonica, and at first it will be ok just to leave him to this. Once your son is more familiar with the instrument, you should start the main phase of the learning: Find the ...


11

I would say personally that it's mostly a matter of the music being taught. The main exception to that is voice; all you have to do is listen to, say, Pavarotti and Frank Sinatra to tell the difference. They are obviously each going after a very different sound. Operatic singing doesn't use a microphone and emphasizes natural volume. The sound is ...


9

As everything teaching "device" (and there is a lot of academic literature studying this, across disciplines, this is not specific to bowed string instruments), fingerboard tapes or any kind of marks on or on the side of the fingerboard should not : be used systematically without observation phase be permanent be used alone without having an exit strategy ...


9

Virtually everything about piano playing is slightly less obvious than you would at first think. You just press down the appropriate keys, right? Almost certainly you already know that there's more to it than that. At the most basic level, which fingers to set where is a question that opens a whole world of possibilities. A good teacher knows this world ...


9

You can say the whole rest hangs below the bar because it's "heavier", so it's value is bigger than the half rest, which sits above the bar, indicating it weighs less, and therefore has half the resting time.


8

Perhaps you could try working on walking in time. That should be simple enough to explain and includes basic physical feedback on the activity. The difference in the pace between walking and running might be helpful. Gradually you could add extremely simple hand clapping patterns while walking. (Your question is really interesting, and I'd love to hear an ...


8

When beginning with a six-year-old, all they really need is to learn (as much as they can) the names of notes and their positions, the basics of tempo (mostly "play evenly"), and rudimentary sight reading (a couple types of notes, a few positions on the staff). It's more of a get-used-to-this-new-way-of-making-cool-noise process than anything else. As such, ...


8

I've had two guitar teachers. One of them was a solid, competent musician and an incredible teacher. I learned more in the year-plus I studied with him than I've ever learned about any subject from anyone over any two year period. The other teacher was a brilliant musician, highly regarded and successful, played with some of the biggest names in the ...


8

Generally, there are two factors that contribute to quiet playing: 1.) They are insecure with their part - not comfortable physically playing the music. For children, it is often because they don't practice enough. For older kids and adults, it's often because they don't practice enough. :) 2.) Social psychology: by playing as a soloist they are ...


8

I actually had a piano teacher politely ask me if I was sure I wanted to keep going, as I wasn't really that interested in playing, but sort of went (I was about 10 years old). I regret that, as a few years later I picked up the guitar and loved it. I think the thing was, I was playing stuff I just couldn't relate to - at all. 'Oh when the saints go ...


7

If you apply the four stages of competence, there will probably be certain techniques on piano that fall into each of the following categories: You're not doing it right, and you aren't aware of it. ("unconscious incompetence") You're not doing it right, but you're aware of it. ("conscious incompetence") You are doing it right, but it takes concentration ...


7

I think I can understand what your teacher was trying to say. He wanted to make you feel the music. Music needs to breathe. If a computer and a human play the same song, it will sound different; the human version will be more natural; the computer version will be more mathematically correct. Your teacher might be worried that if you kept practicing with a ...


6

I think that picture is what you need. There is a pattern from C to C, an octave. All the notes are in that octave and then they just repeat themselves. So, actually the picture didn't need to have more than 12 keys, after each 12 keys the pattern repeats itself. I think this is good info for a 7 year old who will start piano lessons. What that image does ...


6

You are missing independent coordination between your limbs. Your brain has not yet developed neurological connections that supports such kinesthetic interdependence as it is something that takes time to do - some of us longer than others. In order to develop strict and evenly developed competence with all of your limbs, it therefore stands to reason that ...


6

While it is possible that your metronome banning teacher was just a bad teacher (Such a thing is clearly possible), because as a rule metronomes are good, I often save metronome work for intermediate and advanced students. This is primarily because in the beginning it can be frustrating to achieve music on an instrument. Metronome work can compound that ...


5

Dance! If you can forget about the actual playing of the guitar, play a recording of the tune which we're learning, and ask your student to just groove in their seat. Then introduce a bit of free-style muted strumming, but continuing the chair dancing. The most important aspect in this approach is to get them to loosen up and not be shy about it, "look at ...


5

I think that every piece of music deserves the best possible method of being prepared in a such a way that both the musicians and audience have a pleasing experience. Preparation includes time, rehearsal, and every member stepping up to meet the challenge including the conductor's interpretation so that the entire group is a part of the solution. If your ...


5

Ear training is an unfortunate problem here in America. For children during their earliest formative years, precedence is given to visual and tactile learning. While this learning is undoubtedly important, too often are ears left under-developed. If hearing were trained the same way as sight, everyone would have perfect pitch. If I were teaching this ...


5

.To your question "is it good method?" I would say there are different "schools", different ideals of how to work repertoire, bowing and holding. The European and Russian schools being the biggest. Mathieu Crickboom was a great violinist who played with for example Pablo Casals. His books are good. More important is the guidance you have of your teacher ...


5

Striking the balance between teaching the fundamentals and keeping the child interested can be a difficult balance to meet. It may be trivial for some children naturally gifted, curious, and interested, and it may be that some other children are just not ready (yet) for an instrument. I don't think there is a technique that will work for all children even ...


5

I’m a player, not a teacher, but the topic of how to teach young children comes up fairly often on the discussion boards at www.violinist.com. I’d suggest searching for ‘Teaching young children’, and ‘5 year old’. Some of the high points that come up repeatedly: Don’t expect the child to concentrate for more than 5-15 minutes. Some kids will be on the low ...



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