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9

You can use ordinario or normale: ordinario or normale: to bow in the ordinary or normal fashion, canceling a previous instruction to play s.p. or s.t. abbreviations: ord. ; norm.; N. - source


9

I do see why you prefer the imiimi fingering, you are following a pattern where your fingers are used to three notes on each string, and that feels good. There are some rare but serious classical guitarists that use a three finger technique (imaima) that get a similar feeling without the problems that I discuss below and @Matt also stated. It can be an even ...


4

Taking the C note from your example - you will need to play the same note a couple of beats later, so it makes sense to leave the finger on until you need it somewhere else. Yes, it's tricky to keep it there, without catching the open top string, but use the tip of your finger rather than the pad, and it will keep out of the way of the top string. In bar 2, ...


4

In this case I see no reason to deviate from alternating between m and i. Your way of playing this phrase limits fluency and speed. Imagine playing the same phrase much faster. Will you still be able to pluck two consecutive notes with your index finger? There are indeed cases where it is easier or more natural (for most players) to use i or m for two ...


4

Try recording either the output of monitor speakers along with your singing, or at least rerecording the signal you are getting on your headphones on a separate track with your singing. Is your singing off-time with regard to the rerecorded track? If so, it is your singing. If it isn't, then you are having latency. Figure out whether your soundcard ...


4

Each player's physiology is different - length of fingers/thumb, flexibility, etc. There may, or may not, be a 'standard' way to position, but basically, it's going to be down to individuality, and each player will find his own best method, which will change as the chord shapes change, or when playing only one or two strings. Or when seated or standing.Or ...


3

Holding the pick just between thumb and one finger gives enough movement to play across two or three strings without moving the part of the palm that is muting. If you move, say, to the top three strings, then slide the whole hand downwards so that the palm mute part of your hand is over those strings. When you move to the E, A and D strings, slide the ...


3

You are hearing the device's latency - the amount of time it takes to process the signal in & again out of the computer. You can reduce the latency, depending on DAW software, by reducing the buffer size used for the interface - but this is at a cost of increased processing power required. The usual solution is simply to not listen to the throughput ...


2

Your fingering is not necessarily more or less "correct", but you will get a slightly different sound. The suggested fingering will have a more even delineation of the notes, while your fingering will add a little variation in the shaping of the phrase. So,it's a matter of musical interpretation. If you are changing the fingering because you prefer the ...


2

It sounds like in the case of learning simple written music, you are relying primarily on muscle memory. This means that your brain has memorized the series of movements, rather than a series of conscious decisions, in order to perform a piece. When you look down at your hands, your conscious mind gets in the way of the largely unconscious process that is ...


2

It puts your visual analysis in gear and makes you conscious of your movements. But watching your movements arrives with a delay and detachment as opposed to initiating your movements: for anything but trivial play, movements are anticipated, so the brain activity in the motoric region precedes the actual action while your watching it trails in behind. You ...


2

The secret to superfast, blazing alternate picking is knowing the fundamentals and ergonomics of your right hand. First, the picking motion should come from rotating the wrist just like opening a doorknob. Some call it sarod picking. Watch pebberbrown on youtube youll get the idea. Second, holding the pick with the SIDE of your index finger and PAD of the ...


2

This style of singing is known as singing with an aspirate tone. It is desirable in pop music for many reasons that are not necessary to list here. You can create this sound by not moving an adequate amount of air through your vocal cords; the result of improper vocal resonance and escaping air produces the aspirate (raspy, airy, wispy) sound you find ...


1

Here is the answer I got from Peter Forrest: People tend to play often with the thumb protruding when playing open chords like F, C, G when playing near the nut. I do it myself. It all depends on the next chord that you will be playing and will moving that thumb make more effort for one's changes. When playing up the fretboard, the thumb ...


1

This is probably most likely to occur if you are stretching your hand, playing notes for apart, then a part of your finger could get stuck under a key, which wouldn't be good fun while playing a piece. However, if you have good piano technique and keep your hands over the keyboard, rather than beyond the end of it, this shouldn't really happen.


1

Some stuff is too fast to just use downstrokes. I will assume that you play metal, the technique isn't used very much outside of those genres. Then one thing to consider is string gauge. It might seem intuitive to have thick strings to pound away on, but a lot of metal players actually use quite thin strings. Then palm muting will be easier both up and ...


1

Its tricky, I need to alter my palm mute hand shape and finger position for picking depending on what sound I want. Just play around and experiment until your get the right sound for the most comfort, this will change depending on what your doing & make sure your not tensing your muscles. (If I learn something new I have to repeatedly and consciously ...


1

To me both sound like falsetto used to great effect in combination with microphone technique. In the lower range, both use a breathy kind of falsetto with incomplete closure (which is what most people occasionally using falsetto end up with). That's good for a "husky female" variant. In their higher range, they use reinforced falsetto (with good closure, ...


1

I don't know how you practice (you may already do this) but slow it right down to half speed and and focus on your accuracy. Practice the chord changes without the melody lines and go back and forth between each chord very slowly until you can do it without thinking, gradually bring the speed up again. Don't worry about rhythm just yet, all you want to do ...


1

It is easy to forget that your vocal chords are muscles. They need warming up and cooling down just like any other muscle in your body if you want to progress and prevent injuries. If you find you have little endurance singing, a warm up might make the difference between shooting your voice out early and being able to sing for much longer periods. This can ...


1

Ugh! I used to be initimidated by this modal thing initially. Turned out to be the simplest thing once I got it down. It's all about how you think of it. And it was during this time that I learnt the actual function of chords. Say, you're playing C-F-G-F-C, a I IV V progression in Cmaj. Now, play anything you want from Am/G-mixo/C-maj scale, yes I know they ...



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