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8

Playing deeply between the black keys can be problematic. Suppose you want to play a C major scale; only white keys. Now you don't need to play any black keys, but you need to move your fingers over them. If you want to play this at larger speeds, this becomes a major obstacle. Another example is playing a large chord, say, B flat - E - G - C (C dominant ...


6

This is a common problem, and being able to effectively damp notes after they are played is, to my ears, one of the differences between a decent amateur guitarist and someone with real control of the instrument. In fact, it is a good idea to damp notes when playing clean, too, although many players don't recognise the need until playing with distortion, ...


5

Not only is this quite normal for a singer, it can actually be a sign that you're breathing correctly in the more intense passages. I first experienced it when learning to breathe from the diaphragm when I first began taking voice lessons. When we sing intensely, we tend to go through a lot of air. Compared to normal breathing, this looks an awful lot like ...


4

it seems that playing deeply between the black keys is the right thing to do, because it makes it easier to press the black key as needed. That is correct, for passages with a fair number of black keys in use. But your hand needs to be free to move in and out of the black-key zone. In all-white or almost-all-white-key passages, the default position is ...


3

I would say that's situation dependent. Sometimes you can let the note ring and don't need to silence it. When I need a more staccato note, sometimes I lift my fretting finger just enough that the string no longer sounds (finger still in contact with string, the string just comes up off the fret). There are also situations in which I'll explicitly move a ...


3

I would say to make sure the action on your guitar is at the lowest it can be for ease of playing. Also, you may consider playing slide guitar if it hurts to press strings. Also look into open tunings, you may find songs that are easier to play as well. Hope some of this advice helps and don't give up.


3

Start by giving yourself the most advantage: Location on a string: Start with all your fingers fretting notes on the same string in the middle of the neck. The closer to the 12th fret you are, the more it is possible to move the note. String selection: Start with a string where you can get a good grip on the string (a wound string). I recommend the 4th ...


3

To a great extent it is going to depend on the physiology of ones hands and fingers. Some players tend to use very curved fingers, others fairly straight. You may have noticed this on videos. There can be no right or wrong with this, or maybe even any common ground. In 50-odd years of playing (some very odd...) it's a question I've never asked myself. ...


3

Not really. You can always mess around and see if you find anything, but you're not going to find anything simpler than the main fingering. Pennywhistle involves a ton of half-holing, you'd better just get used to it.


2

Your teacher was right. You do have to count. It is essential because as the music becomes more complex or more parts are added your ear can deceive you. I hate to say it but until you can read without tapping you are probably going to have to put yourself in beginner mode. I'm intimately familiar with this because I played the cello for 20 years, played ...


2

By nature, recorders (especially wooden ones) are sensitive beasts, and producing reliable high notes can be difficult. So a few random thoughts: The instrument must be scrupulously clean. A wooden recorder may need the block removed so that the windway can be cleaned and the block smoothed. A simple but scary job. Damage around the labium area will cause ...


2

Tremolo. Yes, it's also the name for a wangy bar that was coined erroneously by a certain Mr. Fender. Can be performed using a pick, or 2,3 or 4 fingers.


2

Although it would be best NOT to look at the hands while playing, in some part of the initial stages of learning and in some cases later on, this 'peeking' will occur (and maybe NEEDs to occur). However, there are many reasons NOT to look at the hands, and to train not to look: Firstly, if you ever plan to be able to read music and perform it at the same ...


2

If you compare the standard modern piano keyboard with other older keyboard instruments like the pipe organ or harpsichord, you will notice there is a much deeper region of white keys on the piano in front of the black, and also that the black keys are longer. The basic reason for that is the difference in playing technique caused by the greater force needed ...


2

The fingering you're using looks fine to me, although coming down you may want to adjust the first figure and personally I would use (1,3,1) instead for the begining to keep it closer to the chromatic scale fingering. Coming down 1,2,1,2,3,5 may not work well. In my head it seems like it would be easier fingering it a different way and it's not unheard of ...


1

Try playing a classical guitar instead. With a thicker and wider neck, and with nylon strings, which require much less finger pressure than steel strings, you might find that a classical guitar is easier to play. Go to a music store that sells classical guitars and try one for a few minutes. It may seem like a paradox, but many older players believe that a ...


1

You can always start to do vibrato exercises. Do your scales with vibrato. You can do them with the three main vibrato techniques. The cocking of the wrist movement. The vibrato in the left hand fingers bending the notes up and down and the vibrato in the left hand finger bending the notes right to left (Along the neck) Mastery is achieved when you can ...


1

I do this a lot as I learnt electric guitar without a pick at first, then learnt to use a pick later. I end up alternating between the two a lot. I have a few methods that I use : 1) Stick pick between teeth/lips - works on but there's a yuck factor (as others have mentioned) and it takes too long to do. Need it out of the way instantly really. 2) I play ...


1

Try finding a song with a lot of activity on the snare and make all (or even some of) the accents rim-shots. I find Californication really fun to practice rim-shots and drags to because the snare part is very involved with drags, rim shots and accents immediately after rim-shots (a skill which can be harder to learn than you may expect), but really any song ...


1

I have been working the cajon for the past 10 years or so on gigs from jazz to flamenco. The use of the Vater Blue Brushes are very effective in creative performance. Add the foot Afrushe-cabasa on one free foot, a bass foot pedal on the other and hand held castanets for Kata Palo Ceco patterns on the cajon's rim and see what happens.


1

I have unfortunately had tennis elbow in both my elbows over the years. I am a panel beater and a guitar player. I've tried icing and stretching exercises and had cortisone injections when it got unbearable. By far the best for pain relief is a clasp that fits over my forearm just below my elbow. A simple device made of material and Velcro , a bit Like a ...


1

Double kick pedals are not specific to 32nd notes! It also makes playing 8th, 16th and 32nd notes far easier to play... your best bet is to get one and practice using two feet. you are essentially only playing 8th notes with each foot then halving the effort it takes. You could also use the "Heel Toe" technique. In regards to the comment, to perform Heel ...


1

There is no reason why if you have large fingers you cannot do a two string barre with middle or ring fingers but this is not really the easiest way of doing it. What I find works pretty well is the half positions or what some I think call the cage system. Instead of going from a normal open A chord and breaking your locked hand and then going for another ...



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