Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

13

Learning licks and solos by other musicians can be helpful in this respect. Obviously you'll want to develop your own voice, but no musician exists in a vacuum and it's definitely helpful to learn and analyze (if even unconsciously) the kinds of things musicians you admire have played. Depending on your style and the direction you want to go, it may be ...


12

The black and white bits are the same, except you will probably only get 49/61 of them instead of the 88 you're probably used to. The action will be rather different, too. No matter how loudly or quietly you try to play, the volume will remain the same. There is no sustain pedal, so that will be different, too. You'll have to acclimatise yourself to playing ...


11

It's obvious when you think about it, but the biggest difference between an organ and a piano is the way their sounds decay. A piano is a hammer hitting a string. The loudest sound is right at the beginning, and from there on the sound decays organically as the string returns to rest. If you let the dampers do their thing, the decay is shortened, but it's ...


7

As humans, we're not naturally inclined to play music in time. Our speech while rhythmic at times is vastly more complicated rhythmically than the majority of music out there. Just check out this article by Steve Vai in which he talks about polyrhythms. He talks about how one of the toughest challenges he has ever faced in music is transcribing speech. ...


5

At this stage, it's learning how to control the bounce of the stick - the second hit comes straight after the first, same hand, but after a bounce. Doing it this way also frees up the right hand after the roll, to maybe hit a crash. Alternating puts the last hit with right hand, so cuts down on time to reach a cymbal. However, every roll or fill you learn ...


4

To change or not to change. This depends. You've got three choices here: to play the same key with the same finger - Piano Sonata No. 21 (Waldstein), First movement: Allegro con brio by Ludwig van Beethoven to play the same key with another finger - Étude Op. 10, No. 7 by Frédéric Chopin to split the same key between different hands - Toccata in D minor, ...


3

A metronome can do several things. If a piece has a metronome marking, it can give you some idea of a composer's (or often an editor's) idea of how fast it should go. Also, it can give you an idea of whether your tempos through a piece are consistent. Especially when you are beginning to work on a piece, you can find that you are playing easier sections ...


3

It sounds like you're probably going to play the Mendelssohn Wedding March. If so, this should be okay for you to play on the organ. Just looking on Google, there are loads of arrangements of this piece, both for piano and organ. Of course, a piano version will suit you much better, as you won't need to play the third stave, which is the pedal part played ...


3

There is no such thing as "natural voice" in singing, like there is no "natural movement" in sports or "natural look" in makeup. In all of that cases, "natural" is a particularly hard to pull off artificial creation that has to become a second nature to pull off convincingly. Now if you write stuff like Then I try to shape up my voice consciously to sound ...


2

I still remember one of my professors telling me once, when we were looking for a particularly sharp sound on a note in a piece (I think it was somewhere in Copland's "Variations for Piano"), holding his thumb and third finger together and banging down on the key from about eight inches. "That's your 'weapon'!" he grinned. You would be well served by ...


2

Matt's is an excellent answer. One idea behind it is to economize on lateral wrist movement. Interestingly, I had the opposite problem when studying scales. I found that passing the thumb under the fingers was more difficult, as I had developed the habit of raising the fingers rather high when playing notes. It stands to reason that this makes it difficult ...


2

Good choice of song! I Asked about the very same passage to my piano teacher, and it's actually not as difficult as you might imagine. Ok, here goes. Notice that the beginning arpeggios are all just a D major, and you have the exact same shape on the keys for each chord. I don't know what fingering you are using, but if you take 3 notes per ...


2

More often you go over the top, because there's a lot less room under your hand than over it. Sometimes if the moving hand is on white keys and the other hand is on black, it makes sense to go under. Hold your hands to minimize movement. Position your fingers over the notes. (Sorry, but that's where you're probably having trouble; you probably are on ...


2

Practice. Specifically, practice long tones so you can concentrate on nothing but the sound quality. At least for a while, don't worry about the attack (start of the note) either, as that's a tricky thing all its own. Make small adjustments to your embouchure and mouthpiece "roll" to see what leads to the cleanest sound. Then keep doing long tones to ...


2

Two additional points beyond BobRodes's answer For using the metronome as a gauge for progress with specific agility/speed exercises: e.g. taking a given exercise and increasing the metronome rate each day for a period of time. Focusing on listening to the click is a basic step towards being able to listen to other performers when in an ensemble situation. ...


2

Ok fella, I took a look here's your review. First: technical exercises are dull. Simple. Liszt is said to have done them while reading a book. Call me closed-minded if you will, but someone who claims to have "fixed" this problem hasn't. Here are some claims made on the site, with my comments in italics: Practicing the intermediate, virtuoso, and ...


2

In relation to the last part of your question, yes, it's directly related to time sigs.There are metronomes which can be set to 'ping' on beat one, whether the time sig. is 2, 3 4 5 or 6 on the top.So you can hear when each new bar starts. The tempo can also be used as a good guide, in that, say it's 80 b.p.m. - if you wanted, you could set 160 to give a ...


1

When I practice with the metronome I often imagine the ticks are on the off-beats, so if I were counting out loud "one and two and three and four and" then a tick would fall on each "and", rather than on a number. If you don't already do this, you have to try it. The skill in this is that you must mentally construct the unheard on-the-beat tick. With ...


1

It sounds as if you're trying to plunge into ``real'' music headfirst. You might want to begin with easier pieces instead, designed for beginners to practice. There is plenty of free sheet music for entry level on the web. I myself find Carl Czerny's practical method really helpful in the sense that it is both manageable and challenging for a beginner. Ans ...


1

There are slight differences between keyboard technique on organ and piano, but if you're a good pianist and have a decent ear, you'll probably make a lot of the adjustments automatically. As an experienced pianist, I did not find it difficult to learn to play organ manuals. Note that organ notes sustain as long as you hold the key, but there's no sustain ...


1

Putting on a tone while singing is much the same as trying to write in a consciously different font, or speaking in an American accent when you know deep down you're only good at Irish ones. It's perfectly fine to try to spice up your singing with some extra flavour, but there are limits to how effective it is. If the new font you write in is illegible, it ...


1

I'd make a sort of barre with index (1st) finger,across the lot on fret 7, then use ring on (bottom, not top) E. G string with little finger, leaving the middle finger for the B string. Thumb is an option, frowned upon by classical purists, and is o.k. if one's hand is big enough, but may slow down the change for the next bit, as the thumb puts the whole ...


1

I thought I would add an organist's perspective to the already excellent answers. On the organ, you often start playing a note with one finger and without lifting it up, finish the note with another finger. This is due to the lack of a sustain pedal, and the fact that the most comfortable fingering from the previous note to the current note might not be ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible