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5

Well, yeah, the first four bars are the easy bit.... < grin >. Just "playing it slower hundreds of times" won't work. Everybody can play this 100% accurately if they go slow enough to take aim at each individual note, one note at a time. Start by playing scales (diatonic and chromatic) in jumps, for example in 10ths C E' D F' E G' etc or 12ths C G' D ...


5

The answers given so far offer excellent and accurate advice on learning chord changes in general! But I will offer a tip that will help many beginning (and some experienced) guitarist with the specific change from G to C which is what your question is about. I am not sure how you are fingering your G and C chords but there are several different ways to ...


3

From what you describe, I wonder if what you need to work on isn't singing, but listening. You hear that you go out of tune when you listen to the playback: good! The thing to do now is listen while you sing. Try singing along with the original track, but quietly, not full-voice. Listen more than you sing. Worry only about whether you match what the track ...


3

A few thoughts for you. Learning to play chords on guitar doesn't really fit the mechanics that most people are used to with their hands. Having difficulty with some chords (or chord voicings) after one month is not surprising or uncommon. You could try arpeggiating the chords (playing out each note of the chord individually). This would allow you to ...


3

Absolutely; you just write a little marking to indicate to the performer when to switch between pizzicato and regular bowing. In the score, we use the call arco to signal that the performer should bow regularly. It's similar with brass instruments: a composer tells them to use a mute, and then a composer tells them when to quit using the mute. Note that ...


3

You have a few issues there. I'll go for the obvious ones: you are taking too much time to change notes you are stopping a note before you play the next one you aren't using a compressor Practice sorts out those first two - timing your pick hand and fretting hand will make a major difference. Slash plays some notes as hammer-ons and pull-offs as well. A ...


2

The "classical" technique for repeated notes, in twos or threes, is to "change fingers", e.g. fingering a fast triplet 1,2,3. This may be what Tim meant.


2

The key recovery time on grand pianos is much less than on uprights, due to a different mechanism, so it's more difficult to execute this on most uprights.Thumb,index and middle are the usual way, with the hand suspended over the key.


2

First finger the C chord. Take as much time as you need. Then move your fingers up and away from the fretboard and refinger the chord, trying to get all of your fingers hitting the frets accurately and all at the same time. Start with a short distance and then gradually increase the distance until you can do it with all of your fingers fully extended at ...


2

What you're asking is not too clear. However, if you want or need to faithfully reproduce a solo, the best way is to listen to it many, many times, and try to copy it exactly.Even considering the tone, effects used, etc. It will depend on how good a player you are and how experienced you are as to how well that works, and how long it takes. If it's for a ...


1

The best way to learn a solo depends on your current ability and your preferred learning style. Since I don't know either as it relates to you, allow me to offer what I personally do when learning a solo. I perform mostly covers either solo or as part of a duo or full band. When covering a solo, my goal is to play something that the audience will ...


1

When initially learning, or if trying to play an exact cover, you will want to copy the artist's style, and try to learn it note for note, including all nuances. Once you can confidently play a range of pieces, you will realise you are developing your own quirks and style, and you'll probably change notes, licks, bends and timing. If it is painful, you may ...


1

I don't think one should really get stuck into learning one specific way to switch from one chord to another. I'm self taught and playing for a year now, so my methods may not be the best, but here are my take on this: One thing that I have learned is to not get stuck on one shape to play a chord or a specific way to change between chords. This can cramp ...


1

You sound OK for that style of music, but I can hear what you're saying... it's not "garbage" though without some context... how long have you been singing? How long have you been singing "seriously" ?... keep improving breath and diaphragm ... I've been running and singing at the same time at a park nearby, has improved my singing strength tremendously... ...


1

Listening to the two versions, the original is a LOT faster than yours- not sure whether that's deliberate but one effect is that you have to hold the notes much longer in the slower version, which possibly makes it seem more difficult than it needs to be. Your timing is good, and your voice itself sounds like it has a nice tone. I'm no singing coach but ...


1

You probably don't mean "legato" as much as you mean "arco" (namely bowed as opposed to plucked). Yes, using pizzicato and arco next to each other is quite possible as violinists don't necessarily put aside the bow when doing pizzicato. Paganini even combines bowing with simultaneous left-hand pizzicato (of course, this needs careful consideration of ...


1

It sounds to me like the song alternates between a fast 6+6+4 section and a 3/4 section. I'm assuming you're talking about the more complicated 6+6+4 part because I do hear lots of muting in that. I may not have the pitch right, but the riff sounds to me like it's roughly like this: $6.8.$5.5 $6.X.$5.X $6.8.$5.7 $6.8.$5.7 $6.X.$5.X $6.8.$5.5 $6.X.$5.X $...


1

I teach that there are essentially three fundamental fretspans to learn on a standardly-tuned bass guitar: three-frets, four-frets and five-frets. Three-fret span is incredibly useful, as it limits your vocabulary in a way that gets you thinking in terms of very useful basslines. It makes the root, fifth, and octave extremely playable in a way that is ...



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