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24

The direct answer: No, this is not good teaching There is very little difference between electric and acoustic guitar. Playing all 6 strings can be absolutely fine on either. Many barre chords are 6 string. The question should really be "...shouldn't play all 6 strings together when using distortion" When you use distortion you add in harmonics which ...


10

The very first thing to know, is to Never assume there is a certain rule you should or should not apply, of course some ways are better than others, but you can do and experiment everything you want, in music only comes to the ear is what matters. In case you have heard AC/DC songs before, "Highway To Hell" for example, open chords are played, they thing ...


9

The only rule is, "If it sounds good, it is good."


7

This depends on the piece of music (genre, style), not to mention what the composer may have wanted. Some pizzicatos are meant to be plucked simultaneously while others are basically strummed -- and in the latter case sometimes from top to bottom! There are notations such as vertical arrows which can indicate the strum direction.


7

The unfortunate thing about singing is that you can do your voice and yourself damage if your technique is wrong or you over exert yourself. It's for this reason that I would say getting personal feedback is a top priority; however this doesn't mean you need to shell out hundreds on a face to face teacher. you can: Join some singing forums Sign up to ...


6

Both methods are used. The first is useful for playing a long note that needs vibrato. Watch B.B.King's butterfly vibrato - except he usually uses the index finger on a fret, with no thumb behind the neck.Incidentally, as you are a beginner, I guess, the usual fingering at the bottom frets is as in the pic., index on 1, middle on 2, etc. However, you will ...


6

If you rest your hand on the strings or the bridge, you will be damping the instrument's sound. Even the part of the strings behind the bridge has a small contribution to an instrument's sound. It's best to either hold your hand above the instrument, or rest it very lightly on the body.


5

Most of the players I've watched play with a floating pick hand. I pulled up a Chris Thile video and am seeing that maybe he rests his forearm on the edge of the body but otherwise floats his picking hand. If you want to mute the strings like a guitarist would, that's fine, but for most cases, it's probably better if it doesn't touch at all.


5

There are already some good answers on how to learn technique, and just getting out there and singing. I wanted to give some ideas as to how to listen to yourself outside your head. One method to listen to yourself is to use an audio recorder. The average phone will be adequate, although if you have higher quality equipment, it might be better. But speed ...


5

Tim's answer is pretty good, but there is one thing I can add to it: you should try to choose your fingering depending on which notes are to come next! For instance, if the G is followed by an F# and an F, it is indeed useful to have your index and middle finger on the first and second already, so that you can descend on the string smoothly. On the other ...


4

My suggestion would be to work on singing from your center - using your diaphragm. While it will be nice to hone the edge of the tool (fine-tuning the pitch of your voice), you must first shape the tool into its form. Once you are able to effectively sing from your center, I think you will find that your range will be defined by how you sing when you are ...


4

Absolutely, you can add extra fingers on the string behind the fret. You probably don't want to use all your fingers all the time because that would severely impede your speed, but sometimes extra fingers can give you more control over a vibrato or a bend. With barre chords of course, you're pressing several of the strings down in more than one place. ... In ...


4

Well, I don't see it as a key difference between electric and acoustic since I am not overly fond of just hitting all six on the acoustic either. And when playing the acoustic, I don't even have to share sound texture between lead and rhythm guitar. On the other hand: how are you going to start off "A Hard Day's Night" without playing all six? It's right ...


4

I recommend you to learn synthesis through a graphical patch-based synthesis environment. This makes very explicit and clear how everything works and is connected (literally). The most popular are Reaktor, Max, and Pure Data. Pure Data is free, so grab it and see if you are into it. While learning it you'll be learning synthesis at a very deep level. It's a ...


3

Excluding wind and vocal instruments, I would say precise breathing technique is probably not important for it's own sake. However... Breathing problems often indicate a more systemic problem with muscular tension, and this can definitely be an issue with any instrumental performance. Especially since, in your case, you seem to be switching technique during ...


3

I often find myself playing all six strings on electric. More than I should, even. I was listening to a Nile Rodgers tutorial the other day, and he talked about hearing cover bands play good times, hitting a lot of strings, and he says "No! I didn't play it like that! I played it like this!". It's hard to tell the difference, because he's talking and you ...


3

That principle stems from the fact that electric guitars, in a band setting, share frequencies (specifically mids) with a lot of other instruments. It's right up there with the piano, keys, vocals, even some horns and of course, with other guitars. So it is encouraged that as electric guitar, you should play differently i.e, find variations when playing ...


3

I would answer agreeing with Tim and Lee White - but I'd like to add one thing: People sometimes talk in terms of right /wrong when it comes to playing a musical instrument. True, there are techniques learnt which have proven time and again to make things easier but the bottom line is you're just using an instrument to make a sound. And the sound you make ...


2

I think the standard is "everybody follows the drummer", and the drummer anticipates the groove. The drummer provides the heartbeat of the band. The heartbeat has to adapt to the needs of the music, but it's still regular. If the groove takes up pace, the heartbeat goes along. The drummer has to keep in harmony with the band as such but without picking ...


2

It's not just a case of 'following the bassist'.That presumes the bassist is leading. A team needs to be formed within the rhythm section, which could also involve guitar and/or keys.Whilst the drummer should be relied on to keep a steady beat in the majority of songs, the bassist will often follow the bass drum pattern to put some notes to the drum beat. ...


2

I had issues with the G chord as well. Training myself in classical style for discipline requires the pinky to hold down the high E string. Like you, I was either muting the A string with my ring finger or muting the high E string because my pinky wasn't pushed down hard enough. In observing very carefully what I was doing, I noticed that rather than ...


2

If you are playing with other musicians, playing all six strings at once will tend to create a muddy mix where it becomes difficult to distinguish who is doing what. Depending on the style of music, that may or may not be a desirable outcome.


2

6-string chords can work on an electric guitar. Increasing distortion greatly increases the chance that it won't sound good, but there are still situations where it can provide flavor. And that's not even considering alternate tunings. But I think your friend may have been trying to point out something important that took me a while to learn. Playing any ...


1

As a percussionist in a percussion ensemble, I tend to breathe in at the start of a phrase or on the prep beat before a musical transition. I would breathe out after the tension resolves or after I've completed my part of it. Above all, breathing should feel natural. Don't always think that you have to breathe in a certain way for a certain piece, though I ...


1

In this case I use downstrokes when moving up (towards the high E string), and upstrokes when moving down (towards the low E). This feels most natural to me. However, I'm convinced that there are (and shouldn't be) any rules as to what is right or wrong with such things. You should be open to try all possibilities to see what works best for you. It is true ...


1

I agree with Dr. Mayhem, you shouldn't strum all 6 strings with distortion. When you play clean, it sounds great. But, with distortion, you lose some of the frequencies, and a lot of the notes get muddied. Its better to play power-chords or 3 note chords with an electric guitar. They just add more to the overall mix of the music.


1

An electric guitar can be used to play in many styles that would sound silly on an acoustic, or produce effects that an acoustic guitar simply can't match. Some styles and effects are apt to work much better when playing fewer notes than when playing more. As others have mentioned, distortion only works well when playing certain combinations of frequencies; ...


1

Like almost everything it's about practice, practice, practice. That aside, there are some other things to consider. What string gauge are you using, and what tuning? Usually quite thin strings are used since less force is needed, which makes it easier to play with precision. Pay attention to your picking hand. Make sure there are no wasted movements. The ...


1

I've been researching for years. I've been trying different teachers, books, forums, etc... The only real help I got came from Brett Manning's cd lessons. I am not affilated at all and I can say that he allowed my voice to do things impossible for me before. Just one last thing: without a (great) teacher you're taking more than twice the time you need to ...


1

I think the best option here is to set your strap so it's tight when you're sat down but the bass still sits on your knee. This way the position of the bass is the same when you're standing as when you're sat down. This also means you'll not have to adjust your playing style to play standing as everything should be the same. Also when it's set at that ...



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