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13

You're right, you can't play three notes at once on the violin with a normal bow and pressure. What's almost certainly meant here is an arpeggio, playing the three notes quickly one after the other. This is often notated sloppily as a chord which is not really possible to play- even Bach did this in his violin sonatas, leaving generations of violinists ...


12

It's very common to write 3 or 4 note chords for strings, and the implication is to play it as two gestures in quick succession. Here is the first page of the first movement of Beethoven's first symphony: On the fourth bar, there's a 4-note chord (mercifully, with two open strings). The standard way to play this is to quickly play a double stop on the ...


9

Depends on the era. Baroque violins had a less curved bridge and less string tension. This made it easier to play three notes simultaneously without sounding out of line. The given chord is sort-of unusual but can be fingered in second position as 4-2-1 on G-D-A strings. Now here is where it gets strange: this is labeled "easy can-can" and a chord in ...


6

Your basic problem is that your organ technique will "get you by" on the piano in the sense that you can play the right notes at the right time, but the techniques of the two instruments are really very different. Probably the quickest way in the long run is to put most of your effort into technical exercises that force you to use "piano technique" rather ...


5

Yes, in principle you should try to keep the larynx low in order to achieve higher and clearer high notes, but "rock solid" is perhaps not the best metaphor, as what's needed is a high degree of relaxation and keeping that relaxation when changing register. Any attempt at exerting strength (over the larynx) will produce crispation of the larynx, the opposite ...


5

These are called triple stops. There are also double stops and, I think they're called, quadruple stops. Double stops can be easily played by keeping your bow level between the two strings so that it touches both. Harder to play are triple and quad stops. These are usually played with a rolled bow quickly. Usually for these, you try to keep them bow ...


5

It is not easily seen in this video, she uses an up bow playing the 4 notes as two double-stops in succession. Hahn - Mozart - Violin Concerto No.3 starting at about 1:18. The first one is a G the second chord is an A I believe. Here is another one on youtube What Is a Chord? | Violin Lessons . So I would play the bottom two as a double-stop and then ...


4

I'm going to assume that by "left leg", what you mean is "left leg in the style of a classical guitarist, with the left leg elevated on a small stool and the neck of the guitar raised up very high". Left leg with the neck parallel to the ground would be ridiculous, and impossible for a steel string acoustic for one to get one's picking hand around to the ...


4

Picking near the octave (specifically, an octave above the fretted notes) can produce a neat effect since it emphasizes the second harmonic. However, I find it's better for individual notes or slower glides across the strings than for rhythm strumming. In either case, however, striking the guitar top is poor technique. Even extreme angles of attack ...


3

Fret wraps (or hair bands, basically anything that can wrap around a fretboard and mute the strings) are used to mute the open strings while performing a tapping passage. They are placed around the strings near the nut of the instrument to prevent the open strings from sounding. This limits the use of open strings during performance. A sponge mute can also ...


3

My opinion? I don't think the difference in sound he noticed has much to do with magnetic interactions between the pickup and the metal pick. He used a metal pick instead of a plastic one, simple as that. (Try using different picks on an acoustic guitar, or an electric with only piezo pickups, if you don't believe me.) Changing your pick or just your ...


3

Having played both piano and harpsichord, let me throw another idea out there on top of all the excellent academic sources people have quoted: In harpsichord it does not matter how hard or soft you hit the key (since it plucks rather than hits the string). Good technique is, thus, centered around control of the "touch", and typically the goal is to keep ...


2

In my observations of many guitar players at the many Open Mic events I have attended over the past ten years, I have found that some guitarist tend to strum closer to the fret-board than the bridge. I have also observed that where a guitarist strumming lands on the strings will often vary depending on whether he/she is playing standing with a strap or ...


2

It's not clear from the question whether your fingering is for your own playing, or whether you want to add fingering to the score for other people to play. For professionally published scores, usually there is no fingering, or the fingering is added by the editor, not by the composer. So if you are "a bit of a novice", don't put any fingering at all in the ...


2

Step 1 is to get your normal single tonguing as clean as possible. Make sure that the tongue is moving quickly and without any extraneous movement. Also check that your jaw isn't moving at all; it's somewhat common for people to develop a "chewing" motion. If your single tonguing has extra motion, double tonguing is going to be nearly impossible. Step 2 ...


2

Something that you may want to do is slowly work your voice into a higher range, by slowly trying to make yourself sing higher. For example, try practicing something that you think is slightly higher than you're comfortable with. You could try singing a Bass 1 or a Tenor 2 part if you sing Bass 2 for a majority of your choir's pieces. Another ...


2

I have just found an e book written in 2014 by Chaun C .Chang called "Fundamentals of Piano Practice " which is the best advice I have ever seen about learning the piano . Chapter 7 covers Trills and muscle tone etc.


1

It looks cooler. You're absolutely right about the ergonomics being better; it promotes better posture and less stress in the wrist and back. But to the Average Joe, it does look "Square", even though many metal and prog (read: technical) guitarists promote that posture, as well as holding the guitar higher up while standing. I think you'll find people ...


1

I was intrigued, and had a go putting it on my left leg for a change... the main problem was that it wasn't a very natural angle for my right hand and arm when using with a pick - as my hand was moving at more of an angle to the strings, I had to move further, and it was harder to adjust to get the pick at the correct angles for different techniques. It was ...


1

Isn't this what an E-bow does? Get one of those and go wild with it...


1

Funfact not sure if you have seen them yet, you can now buy rock tips a small bottle with an apllicator hardens your finger tips for those high and repeated bends and vibrato. Especially if you are using 11s or 12s top E String



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