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6

Using a metronome only has the demoralizing effect of making me want to turn it off. It's okay to turn your metronome off, so long as eventually you turn it back on again. The reason it's demoralizating is that it's exposing the faults in your playing. The reason that it's helpful is that it's... exposing the faults in your playing. The metronome is ...


4

I play and now teach ancient style rudimental snare drum, which has all kinds of screwy tempo things that happen and weird technique that makes certain patterns want to drag. Generally, the biggest hurdle to keeping a steady beat is fluency - your body gets in the way of what you're trying to do. To demonstrate this, can you clap to a beat? If you can, ...


4

If it's that frustrating, don't start out trying to play a piece to the metronome. Just practice rhythm and timing separately from the melody. Does your metronome have a visual option, where you can turn the volume off, but it's still keeping time? Count a few beats with the metronome audible at a moderate tempo (80-120 bpm), and then turn the volume off, ...


3

Sliding as Tim suggests is definitely a possibility, but my teachers always discouraged it. As you noted in the comments it can be difficult to move while pedalling, and it is generally a somewhat awkward and inaccurate movement regardless (especially if the bench is leather or something and you must lift off it to slide down). I think a combination of ...


3

Playing in tempo needs your brain to focus on the music and the tempo at the same time. Play very easy music with metronome (i would start doing quarter notes only) so your mind can focus on the tempo. Record yourself to listen relaxed after. And smile and have fun!


2

You need to measure the primary frequency your drum puts out, convert that to a wavelength, then set your drums that distance or half that distance from a sound-reflective back wall. Probably somewhere in the neighborhood of 10-20 or 5-10 feet for the half distance. A fourth of that distance (which is unfortunately a more likely location) will actually ...


2

One technique my college band used, since we were using electronics anyway, was to mike the drum and play it with an extremely soft beater so as to minimize the ictus. Then, with amplification, you can adjust the volume up very high so that the resonant boom caries well.


2

One of the arguments I have heard is to keep time on a cycle, not a line. If you're tapping your foot, think of it as though you were moving in a circle, with a tap near the bottom (realistically your foot will still move in a line, but what matters is how your mind is thinking about the motion, not the actual motion itself). When you tap your foot up and ...


2

Maria, from West Side Story, uses exactly that for the first line.(Not sure if it's that key, but, hey) The underlying harmony is root, the first note is also root, and the tritone is the second , leading to 5th on the 3rd note.. It sounds like it may modulate, as Matt says, but it doesn't. The fact that the triton is a semitone from the target is good, as ...


2

Not so much how to practise, but how to make the difference between a regular strike & a rimshot easier to determine, plus an unexpected extra benefit. Change your snare drum angle. Or even all your drums' angles, if you want to be able to do this with accurate repetition round the entire kit. I have my entire kit set in such a way that the difference ...


2

I have a few ideas. Play with a live person. It's fun to play duets. Or you could each take one hand of a piano piece. Connect some earbuds to an electronic metronome to give yourself a click track. Record the right hand of your piece on an mp3 player, listening to the click track in your ear while you're playing. Then plug the earbuds into the mp3 ...


1

The simplest is to slide along the seat so that there isn't a great reach any more. With scales, unless they're contrary, make sure your body is central to the central part of whichever scale you play. You may need to start an octave lower, or higher, to compensate. Most people will be able to play to 5 octaves apart, but not very often will the need to ...


1

There is a story of noted British percussionist Gary Kettel being asked by a conductor how to get more tone out of a bass drum. He scratched his head and finally said: "Well, maestro, you could tell 'im to 'it it 'arder".


1

As mentioned in my comment, it would be best to ask the user who answered that other question what he exactly meant. Here I can tell you what I think he meant, and also what my take on this issue is. First of all I think that "scooping" is not at all a standard term when it comes to right-hand guitar technique. What I think is meant by it in the context of ...


1

In the answer you linked, the reference to scooping could have meant to keep your pick close to the strings as you move up and down the neck as opposed to allowing your picking hand to "scoop" (drop) below the neck. Obviously the only person who can say for sure is the person who posted said linked answer. This advice applies to playing fast picking ...


1

Particularly when using only upstrokes with tones on the same string, at least I get a more pronounced scooping motion when the pick moves towards the string. You still strike perpendicular to the string. I believe what is described is whether or not this motion is parallel to the body of the guitar. If you try striking a a chord using up- and downstrokes, ...


1

You can't avoid playing with the tongue, especially if you need to split notes. It's also goofy to spend the whole time looking up. Do not attempt blowing out to clear spit; That just makes it worse. Here's what to do: If you must do some intense extended blowing, those are times you need to be looking up. Otherwise, as part of your routine, be aware of ...


1

To a certain extent it may depend upon what kind of music you are playing, and what the R.H. is doing. When playing single-line stuff (riffs, melodic lines etc.) a lot of electric players would rest the heel of the hand (near the wrist) on the guitar, either just above string 6 or on the bridge, or if playing on the highest strings actually resting on the ...


1

In your classical position, you are resting on the right leg, whereas typically the waist of the guitar rests on the LEFT leg (so that the lower bout is between the player's two legs -- you can find pictures or video of classical playing). Also, the neck is usually tilted so that the peghead is up higher in the air. Both these things mean that the right ...


1

I'm a left hander who plays open handed on a right handed kit and I've recently been retraining to also play open handed when keeping the pulse on the right hand side of the kit (eg floor tom), as I was sometimes getting tangled up when playing fills in that situation. I talked to my drum teacher about it (who is a normal right hander) and she reckons ...



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