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14

The pentatonic scale is a great vehicle for moving outside. It has a very clear structure and sound which the listener is familiar with. Due to its simplicity and familiarity, you can get away with playing it, even if it does not fit the harmony in a traditional sense. The first thing I experimented with when I got into playing outside was "side-stepping", ...


8

An up-bow doesn't have to start at the tip of the bow. It often does, but to get this bar, it can be taken off momentarily, then re-applied, still as an up-bow, for the last note, which will more often be an up, so the downbeat of the next bar can be a downbow.I wonder why the first slur looks printed, while the other two look hand written.


7

Things that will fret wear fast: Lots of pitch bends / vibrato - these scrape the fret really quickly. I've almost lost the whole 9th fret on one of mine Pressing really hard - as you develop you'll be able to reduce the pressure needed. Once you improve your technique, you can ideally lower the action which helps you lower the pressure needed. In fact ...


7

You stop the bow just like you would when changing direction and continue just like if you had changed direction: this is not supposed to sound differently from a normal note (and if you made some bowing mistake on the way here, you just resynchronize with the bowing instructions at this point). The phrases here are short enough that you won't need to reset ...


6

The frets might start to rise at the ends, making it hard to avoid scraping against them. This can be made worse by dry weather. One can try to fix it by e.g. carefully work on the ends of the frets with a rubber mallet, and then file them down. While it is possible to do it yourself, I leave this kind of work to professionals. If you decide to make a go for ...


6

For me, the most important tool when it comes to the outside concept is the Jazz Minor scale. The jazz minor scale is essentially the ascending melodic minor scale. (In the classical world, this scale is different depending on whether you are ascending or descending the scale, but in a jazz context it remains the same. Study the jazz minor scale in all ...


4

One simple technique for playing outside is to play around on the pentatonic scale based on the extension of V chord you are playing. Since most outside/extensions/alterations happen on the V to create a stronger resolution to the I, it "sounds" right to go outside on the V rather than the ii or I. So, if I were playing a ii-V-I in C, I would add an ...


4

As @RockinCowboy pointed out, for most of the tapping sequences he simply tucks the pick into his palm and holds it there with his 3rd finger. Retrieval is simple, as you can see at 0:40, in fact at around 3:10 you can see very clearly how he just uses his 3rd finger. There is a sequence around 1:35 where he holds the pick normally and taps using his 3rd ...


3

The metronome is always a great place to start. But to improve your non-metronomic time keeping, here's a neat little exercise. Find a metronome where you can silence subdivisions or beats, preferably from a whole phrase. Then set a phrase to play in 4/4 for however many bars you want. I like sixteen. Mute the last bar and see how you come back in on the ...


3

I will share 3 of the methods I know for playing outside: Chromatic Approach Notes: Right before you hit a very consonant note, especially if it's a downbeat, you can place a chromatic approach note in the upbeat, which is one semitone apart from the target (usually the root or a tone of the chord being played). Arpeggios are a great way to educate ...


3

As is often the case with questions about bow direction, it helps to think about the musical phrasing - how would you sing this? That F# at the end is an anacrusis, a pickup note that forms part of the next phrase. It makes sense that there should be a slight pause (a "breath") between the end of one phrase and the beginning of the next. To get that ...


3

I ran into a similar problem with a descending note run that had two quick notes back to back on the 5th and 6th strings on same fret (3rd fret) on a song I was learning to play. The problem I was having before I learned to overcome it was when I barred the 5th and 6th string as part of a fast run, I was inadvertently hammering on the 6th string and the ...


2

Supposing that every non-legato note is being played with a different bow, then, yes you'll have to pause for a tiny bit there. At first the pause might be slightly longer than needed, but with practice you'll be able to find the 'right amount' of pause. The reason the pause needs to be there is because if it isn't, these two notes will sound like legato ...


2

This sharp sensation at the tip of your fingers is usually a combination of a minor bone bruise, damaged nerves and damaged muscle tissue from using too much pressure when fretting a guitar and extended use. Your hand is full of what are called peripheral nerves that go from your spinal cord to your arms, hands, legs and feet. The nerve endings of the ...


2

+1 to making yourself a metronome slave and self-recording. One exercise I did as a kid was clapping along to metronome beats. If I was successful, I couldn't hear the metronome click, only the clap. Another trick I try to keep myself in the habit of (especially when counting off, but also when playing) is subdividing in my head, or silently with my mouth ...


2

The way you do it is called "matched grip" because the hands are the same, and the other way is called "traditional grip". Traditional has been used for centuries for military drumming: Notice the way the drums are tilted--this keeps them from being tripped over, but it would be impossible to play with a matched grip due to the angle. Nowadays some ...


2

Practising studies (estudios, in Spanish) provides an excellent way to improve your playing technique. This is because pieces of this kind usually isolate a particular aspect of technique, allowing you to focus upon it. In order to do this, a study will usually simplify some aspect of the composition, so that it becomes easier to learn the piece and ...


2

For years, I too wore frets out quite quickly. I learned how to refret my guitars because I couldn't afford to have it done every 6 months. ( I switched to using .008s for a while, while doing the below, because it required much less pressure. I also lowered the action on my guitar, to relieve the amount of pressure needed to clearly ring the note out. ...


2

To answer broadly, studying traditional scale fingerings and technical sequences (like Hanon) will give you an intuitive sense of what fingerings to use in most situations. I'm not really sure why you would expect the reverse of right hand fingerings to work for the left hand -- the keyboard itself is not symmetrical, so different fingering patterns are ...


1

To complement @Dr Mayhem's perfectly good answer: Notes about the pressure you apply to the strings: Style makes a difference. You can get a better tone by pressing down harder and striking the string harder and using heaver strings. Bluegrass players notoriously like that heavy tone for example. You can achieve faster speeds with a lighter touch and ...


1

Use something hard pushing the string away from the fingerboard. Hard, just like the objects in John Cage's compositions for prepared piano: screws, clothespins, very hard rubber, etc. Of course cellists don't want to damage their fingerboards or strings, so some compromise must be made.


1

First of all - I would like to congratulate you on beginning a journey which, if you stay the course, will lead to untold hours of pleasure, relaxation and enjoyment. But it can be daunting and painful in the beginning. Sounds to me as if you are experiencing more than the normal and usual pain encountered by new guitar students. Even though there are ...


1

If those fretwires are actually proud of the edge of the fingerboard, that guitar needs returning to the seller, assuming it was sold to you as a new guitar. No guitar should be a health hazard, as this sounds to be. Sharp fret ends shouldn't be there. Maybe it's a rogue guitar, maybe that model is how it is, but it needs returning.Leaving traces of blood ...


1

Your guitar is dry, you need to humidify it. See my answer here for an explanation how to do this and more details. Don't file the frets, fix the problem properly and humidify your guitar. It will improve the life and the tone of your guitar. If it is a good guitar(i.e. expensive, well made) then dressing the frets hides the problem, if it is a bad (i.e. ...


1

Since there were some wonderful technical answers already, I will provide you with a pragmatic answer: Do nothing. Many beginning guitar players feel also sorts of discomfort when they are first learning. Common complaints are that the frets, and the strings are too sharp. Now don't get me wrong, I'm not saying that you guitar isn't misconfigured: it could ...


1

Well this could be an issue with your technique, an issue with the guitar, or both. Technique-wise, you may be pushing down a little too hard on your bar chords or putting too much pressure upwards and into the guitar. Those chords take a lot of muscle buildup, so that's understandable if that's the case. Also, you'll want to do your best to keep your ...


1

I guess there are instruments, where the online approach is more difficult. For sure the double reed instruments fall into this category, where every so often my teacher says: 'Let my try that reed', and after short diagnosis resorts to the tools. In the initial phase I would strongly advise against it - I tried learning bassoon on myself (i.e. even ...


1

I am able do this by suspending my foot over the bass drum pedal with my heel up, and using only my toes to contact the pedal. The technique is shown in this video (not my video). Experiment with spring tension changes as well. youtube.com/watch?v=11gLbvLb1yg


1

Edit I didn't realise YouTube links would naturally inline. I've inlined them all now, for easy ref. I had a look at the instruction video mentioned by Matthew Brings - & also ...


1

My experience of Yamaha uprights is that they are very good pianos for beginners (and especially young beginners) to learn on, because the touch is light and even and you can get a useful range of dynamics and tone colors without much physical effort. But to give an analogy with driving a small car, the acceleration is very good up to say 40 mph but after ...



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