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4

While either are correct, there are subtle differences for each fingering that can be taken advantage of especially when going from power chord to barre chord. You can and should take advantage of the different types of fingerings. The 1,3,4 fingering for power chords let's you take advantage of the E major, E minor, A minor, D major, and D minor shaped ...


3

Singing a cappella means the sound only comes from the singers' mouths. It is probably far easier to retain a balance of voices this way. Using mics introduces another dimension - where the sound is now coming from. It's much harder for singers to hear and respond to a mix coming from somewhere 'disembodied'. It also introduces the 'power' syndrome in some, ...


3

For rock blues and metal styles (thumb up top) the only time you should barre is with power chords with the root on the G string (144). All other 3 note power chords are 134 with the exception of the sixth string root which may be T34.or 134. Which is a matter of preference. The important part is muting the unplayed strings. The index finger must mute any ...


3

Like with anything else, barre chords take time to play properly. I bet that your 1st finger isn't strong enough to correctly bar the 2nd fret all the way. I suggest figuring out where your limit is (where you can actually play an A shaped barre chord) and try switching to and from it to get use to it. A viable option if you need to play this progression ...


3

A couple of points. You don't have to leave out the bottom string. It can still be barred and played on the 2nd fret. You don't have to use three fingers for the strings 2,3 and 4. Obviously, 3 can be used, but you could make do with 2 or even 1, sort of 'barred' across the 3 strings, bent up so that the 1st string still sounds. B7 would work, although you ...


3

Half position in reference to a barre chord using one finger to bar 2-5 notes instead of all 6 strings. There's a lot of chords that don't to be fully barred. Simple example is there is a "mini" version of the typical F chord that is: %X/X.X/X.3/3.2/2.1/1.1/1[F] Notice only two notes are barred so you are in half position. The distinction is made so you ...


3

Slide it, Man! In your "impossible" transition, I'm assuming you are already fingering an open A chord. The 2,3 and 4 fingers are in the same position as the B chord, right? Just two frets down (toward the nut). So, just leave them in position and "slide" them up to fret 4, then as they come into position plop your index finger for the barre. This will ...


2

The root of the problem is probably your overall left hand position. The A-shape barre chords need quite a lot of pronation to get the fingers all “in line”. By far the easiest setting to achieve this is a proper classical guitar position, i.e. with the arm reaching towards the guitar neck in almost a right angle from below. Buy a footrest and ...


2

The disconnect between chest and head voice that you experience is completely normal. It is called the passaggio. To minimize the difference in sound between the two vocal registers, you must gradually make them meet in the middle. Chest For your chest voice, try and raise your overall range in half-step increments. Use any of the standard effective ...


1

The manner in which I used the term and it may very well be incorrect is that instead of using your Index / Middle and Ring finger to hold down the open E Major chord you do with the next set of three left hand fingers (Middle, Ring and Pinky) This leads to having your Index finger free to bar when you go from the open E chord to any of the various E shape ...


1

NO, writing a tenor-recorder part for an oboist would be about as helpful as me giving you a sandwich to breath underwater. Oboe is a non-transposing instrument. Tenor recorder transposes. Oboe players have no skills transposing in their heads (horn players on the other hand, are experts). Fingering wise, the only thing you really need to think about is ...


1

First I would say try a more rounded pick and see if it helps you achieve the sound you want. I personally never got used to the pointy edge of a jazz III. For a thick rounder pick I'd recommend tortex .88 It might help, and if it doesn't you only spend 50 cents!. Secondly, the absolutely hands down best way to improve the "sound production" aspect of ...


1

I think all drumers with a dominant hand experiences this. The way I've been best able to get my hands even were 3 steps (for me anyway ) First, play all your rudiments with a click. On all 3 go for longer periods of time, but make sure everything is clean before you crank up the speed. 2nd I'll play 16th noted 4 bars of 16ths 9n each hand, and throw 8n a ...


1

I've seen several drummers use different techniques to play the "JB triplets ", but imo, and experience heel toe is by far the easiest. You just don't sit, and play em at 100 bpm. It took me several weeks at 45 min a day to get it. Watch the guy Jared on Drumeo. It's a youtube vid, and he explains it perfect. Yes, you will see you knee raise a bit (like JB) ...


1

You can amplify your own voice to your ear by cupping your hand, with the heel in firm contact with the side of your jaw, near your mouth, and your fingertips resting lightly on your cheekbone. If you try this you will find that your voice is getting funneled toward your ear. Perhaps you could put an ear plug in the other ear. Sightsinging exercises might ...


1

Swing really doesn't consist of triplets at all. When you play a lot of triplets you actually destroy the swing. It seems to me there are several elements: 2-bar or 4-bar phrasing. This is very important. The moment you go into thinking 1-bar phrases the swing stops. long bass notes. Classically trained players will typically play quavers followed by ...


1

Learning to quickly form certain chords often takes an abundant amount of repetitive practice. There is not really a magic order of finger placement to make the chord in question easier to form quickly. The chord you describe is commonly referred to as an "A shaped barre chord". That chord shape is form of "movable" barre chord that can be used to play ...


1

I've wondered about this term for a long time. I've also asked fellow musicians about it's meaning ... and these are people who actually use the term ... and they haven't been able to define it. Ha. That being said, here's my take on it: the term "playing in the pocket" is not usually used for the whole band. If fact, in my experience, it usually refers ...


1

I think achieving full symmetry is really hard because for most people there are differences between their right and left hands, both physically and mentally. That being said, my best results for keeping both hands at similar technical levels has definitely been working through the classic rudiments and alternating which is the "lead" hand in the rudiment. ...



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