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One point that I don't think is covered in other answers is the effect on the timing of the notes. Musicians will generally concentrate on getting the beginning of each note to fall rhythmically at the correct time. But the timing of note endings will me much less accurate and often quite arbitrary. So when the music is played backwards the rhythm will ...


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For one thing, attack and decay are exchanged. For another, anticipation and resolution. And even for instruments with continuous tone the onset is strictly on the beat but the release position depends on articulation and is rarely on the beat. So all of the onsets in the reversed music, assuming that they are reasonably hearable, are timed fuzzily and ...


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In the question several descriptive terms were used that have little to no absolute definition. However i think most of us would agree that "Bad" being a matter involving judgement to determine, and"demonic" which some may deem to be a purely imaginative term, also the word "Strange".... same thing. I would use the word "Negative" to more clearly state what ...


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4 years on but still relevant to people coming back to this question... Look at Veil of Maya's Bassist, especially in their song Lucy. He does some crazy Arpeggio stuff and has a need sweeping technique, using his index finger and thumb pinched together as a kind of pick.


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I'm a keyboard player not a guitarist, but the same issue of finger independence is relevant. I'm not sure your statement is an accurate description of cause, at least for a normal hand anatomy. AFAIK the limitation is the arrangement of the tendons in the hand, not the nerves. For what it's worth, if my hand is in a relaxed position with all the finger ...


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It may sound glib, but study the playing of guitarists such as Django Reinhart, who managed very well with a couple of fingers - the others were there, but in a similar manner to yours, worked together rather than independently.


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I as well disagree with the notion of limiting playing to only the fingers.Its almost analogous to attempting to use your pinky without the ring finger moving. I am not a doctor, however,if one moves the fingers, the muscles, tendons, etc,in the forearm move as well. So many other factors are involved with the keyboard other than purely the fingers. One ...


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Without knowing all of the dimensions - your height, leg length, arm length, upper to lower body proportion, height of existing chairs, size of books, etc. etc., it's almost impossible to answer sensibly. However, what you use is patently obviously not good! Everyone will sit in a slightly different posture to play. Ideally, the keyboard starting height ...


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I definitely use a guitar foot rest. My teacher recommended this one to me and it is awesome and has helped with my technique and lower back pain. I love it and it looks super cool. Check it out if you decide to get one! https://www.etsy.com/listing/245301966/the-ultimate-guitarists-foot-stool-solid?ref=shop_home_active_1


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Let your arms and hands hang down to the left and right of your torso. Note the posture of your relaxed fingers. Now lift your arms and put your fingers in exactly that posture on the keyboard. That is the perfect position of your fingers. As for your arms: the part from your fingers upwards should be horizontal up to your elbows. Never let your body put ...


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May this not be counted as a complete answer for I unfortunately do not have enough reputation to comment. A few possibilities: the top staff is for another instrument or vocals (in which case I think it would possibly be smaller); I think the piece might be written for an organ as well.(see Bach's Toccata and Fugue example); as others have stated, the ...


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The name for the sounds you are describing are indeed called Subharmonics. They were discovered by violinist Mari Kimura in the early 1990's and first presented in 1994. As her website states, I first discovered the technique from an age-old bowing exercise, a modified version of "Son Filé", drawing the bow very slowly but applying slightly more ...


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Use the pickups closest to the neck and make sure your hand is as close to the bridge as can be without ruining the sound. I found changing pickups not only makes it sound heavier, but bigger too.


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Stop playing and go see a doctor From what I've read, this sounds like Carpal Tunnel. WebMD says: Many things can cause this swelling, including:... Making the same hand movements over and over, especially if the wrist is bent down (your hands lower than your wrists), or making the same wrist movements over and over. And: Carpal tunnel ...


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If you play a glissando remember to relax your hand. A glissando should not cause any great pain. Even if you were playing in a large concert hall, it should not be the case that you hold your fingers so stiff that you have to make the glissando so loud for the audience. Loosen up and practice a glissando with just one finger even by just using your index ...


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I have an alternate suggestion, but you may not want to do this at first as it may actually interfere with your progress with more normal exercises (like the other fine answers here). In addition to working on metered picking, there is also unmetered speed picking which is more like the tremolo technique used for melodies on the Mandolin. Think Dick ...


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The suggestions above are great. I would only add that once you've reached a 'desirable' speed with notes, you begin changing time signature. For example, once you got 4 notes licked at 4/4, begin practicing the following notes at 5/4, 6/4,7/4 etc. This way you don't get used to playing in a 'regular' tempo. The fingers will get used to phrasing riffs ...


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Assuming we're talking about alternate picking, there are basically two exercise methods for building speed. The first and the better known one is to start slow. Set your metronome to a comfortable tempo and play the exercise a few times. Then go up 2 bpms or so and repeat. Continue alternating between plus two and minus one. Back down some 10 bpm when you ...


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This kind of singing is called scat singing.


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To add to what Jeroen has answered. You need to do exercises that train your hands in more than just picking speed. That includes... Vibrato exercises. That includes wide and regular vibrato with the fingers and also by pivoting the wrists. Slides / Glissando's This is somewhat self explanatory. Also remember the backwards slide. Hammer on's and Pull ...


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Do exercises for both left and right hand. Exercises for pickig hand 16th notes as fast as you can on G string 5th fret. Start with 120bpm and raise by 10 Play triplets on the open strings, moving from low E to high E string. Start at 80bpm Same triplets, but with string skipping. From string 6(low E) to 4, then 5 to 3, 4 to 2, 3 to 1 and back to low E. ...


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The key to an effective hammer on is speed. The velocity of your finger as it strikes the string is the important thing. If you strike the string with insufficient velocity, you will mute the string before the note rings out. Think about hitting a nail with a hammer. If you slowly press the hammer onto the head of the nail, the nail will not go into ...


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You may want to get a lighter string gauge and have the action of your guitar lowered. If you have high action and thicker strings, it would be harder to play a hammer-on than if you have lower action with lighter strings. Finger callous shouldn't really play into whether or not you can play a hammer on.


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Callous or no callous, be firmer with the hammer on. That's why it's called that! Try to hit the string just behind the fret wire, not in the middle of the fret, and keep the finger pressed down after contacting the string. Callouses probably make little difference, but having played for years, I don't have any. If you have, maybe the action has taken its ...


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Do not worry, this is a very common problem on tuba. The low range of the tuba takes a long time to develop and will naturally sound better over time - given that you play regularly. Something I always tell students, is that you have to balance your range. If you want to increase your low range, you need to increase your high range as well - you can't do ...


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Speed and strength are the key, make sure you hit the hammer-on string with speed and be firm; tips of fingers are best rather than the flatter part. A callus may make a slight difference. Try working on a pull-off, this will mean the string will actually be plucked and ring louder.


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A friend o' mine did the double barre in a song many years ago and I was like, "Whoa, what's that?" He showed me and I went home and practiced it until my fingers ached, then practiced more. It's great to have that major chord at such a quick flick from the majors above it G to C, A to D, etc.. Nice for speed songs like punk rock too. Attack it and ...


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If you are writing two-voice species counterpoint according to Fux's rules, and the cantus firmus is in the bottom voice and that bottom voice descends by step to the final in the Phyrgian mode--that is, the bass moves down a minor second from F to E in an untransposed mode; then the upper voice in two-voice counterpoint sings D--E, because the final ...


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I've found that my left and right hand postures, without consciously thinking about it, arrange so that no matter what note I play on what fret with what finger, there's a "spare" finger touching each of the other three strings, preventing it from ringing. The finger might be a left or right hand finger.


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I'm going to disagree with some of the advice in other answers. There is a very basic mistake which is easy for beginners to fall into without really thinking about it, and that is to assume that "you play the piano with your fingers". To get beyond simple playing technique, you have to realize that you really play with piano with your arms, and even with ...


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The key (as is almost always the case when you feel aches and pains from piano) is relaxation. Each of your fingers only needs to be "active" (i.e. not relaxed) at the instant it actually strike a key, because you can move from key to key and hold keys down while relaxing that finger. In fact, if you are not relaxed, you are inhibiting your movement ...


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Play with two barres, but lift the 2/3/4 string barre finger a little so the top string can sound. It's a very common way to play it. This usually works better further towards the dusty end of the fingerboard, so lower I encourage students to use the pinky as well. This leaves the top string to sound more easily. As Rockin' says, there's nothing wrong with ...


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If you insist on skipping the first and sixth string, you will find it easier to do if you strum by anchoring the heel of your strumming hand right behind the bridge and strumming with a short sweep of the wrist as opposed to moving your entire arm. Or anchor your forearm on the top edge of the guitar and keeping the heel of your hand on an imaginary ...


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I would like to add that the guitar neck wood species and construction can make a difference also. I have developed some wrist pain and now wear a compression wrap and I notice a mahogany set neck guitar will aggravate it much more quickly than a maple bolt on neck. For me, complex chordings or fingerings are not the main culprit, but rather the increased ...


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I have also played guitar (classical) for 4 years. I practised a lot, especially the last 2 years 4 hours a day, and I was diagnosed with Epicondilitys. I did some exercises and I got much better, I'm about to start using a brace. The most important thing to do is relax while playing, as mentioned earlier. Very wise, but also very difficult if are not ...


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Positioning The correct way to play octaves is to keep the wrist completely still and relaxed while your fingers do all the "leg work." Moving your wrist up and down will cause your fingers to have uneven lengths when reaching the keyboard. Keeping your wrist still and slightly below the keyboard will even out the length of your fingers so that they have ...


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If you're going up or down the piano playing octaves you'll need to move your arm, but you should minimize the movement as much as possible. A lot of times beginners will move their arm up much more than they need to in general when moving up or down the piano. Minimizing the movement minimizes the distance you need to move from one octave to another. As ...



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