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0

On a grand piano, you can play ff with the soft pedal down if you want. You get a different tone color by moving the hammers sideways so a different part of the hammer strikes the string, but the volume of sound doesn't change much if your fingers use the same amount of force with una corda and tre corde. But that doesn't work on an upright piano, where the ...


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I presume this is the passage? Under the circumstances, I don't think you can play it dry: you'll need to play the latter three quavers (eighth notes) of each group of quavers with the left hand. You will have to pedal with the LH semibreves (whole notes) and minims (half notes), although you can delay the onset of pedal until slightly after the start of ...


1

Hanon also has finger strengthening and trill exercizes.


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My advice: relax. You can't make a trill faster by straining; as soon as you notice you start straining, take a step back and begin slowly and relaxed again. I would advice against flicking, since this will induce unnecessary strains in your finger, and will not be a viable option in the long term. Another trick: my piano teacher always used to try and have ...


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If you're spending a lot of time behind a computer you might have started slouching when sitting. This posture can result in reduced blood flow to your arms causing them to fatigue more quickly when strained. If this is the case you could try the Brugger's Relief Position, and try to be more aware of your posture (also during other activities). If this is ...


2

The anatomical problem is not so much that the 5th finger is weak (on its own it is as strong as the others) but that the 4th and 5th are not fully independent since they are operated by different parts of the same muscle, and in "normal life" they don't get much use that develops their independence. A simple demonstration of this: put your hand flat on a ...


2

From my experience as a guitar teacher there are some people who (with some practice) are able to play that chord, and some simply aren't. You're dependent on the size of your hand and especially of the flexibility of your third finger. People who can flex their third finger in the "wrong" direction will find it easier to play that chord. Also your pinky ...


1

Some basic things to learn. Patterns Root Fifth Root Fifth Octave Root Fifth Flat Seventh Root Fifth Sixth Boogie Woogie Bass Chromatic Approach Notes Straight & Shuffle Rhythms


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You're probably already doing something similar in adjusting your tonguing to the embouchure you're using for different notes, using a wider, more open lip position for the lower notes. If you're not, then you need to experiment with it, or you'll produce a sharper attack and therefore a different tone on the higher notes than the lower ones. To see the ...


3

Czerny has an exercise for right hand trills on all finger pairs: Exercise #36 in "125 Exercises in Passage Playing, Opus 261, Book 1". It's short just musical enough to not be overly boring. A little Czerny every day has really helped my technique.


2

Anything that works for you is legit! Try holding the arm very steady,so that your bent fingers have just the tips touching the keys. Articulate from the knuckles closest to the palm. Some trills can work from a side to side movement of the hand. Pinkies are the weakest, therefore the worst to trill with. Move the hand across, so you use other fingers. ...


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The word that I have heard used for this technique is "covering," as in "he shifted to a more covered tone for that high note." As Greg noted, it involves manipulating the resonance chambers of the throat to change the formant structure of the vocal tone.


1

There are numerous online resources available. See Scott's Bass Lessons on YouTube to start with. He as an excellent video on postures, fingering, etc. for electric bass guitar. I'm sure with a simpe search you could find the same info for stand-up / acoustic bass as well.


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If you are taking the theory knowledge as a given, off the top of my head, you're left with Instrument choice Fretless? 4-, 5-, or 6- string (or more?) Short scale? Active or passive? In some ways, bass is like a family of instruments. Do you want to focus on one, or spread yourself around a bit? Posture and holding the instrument Just standing and ...


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It's often been said, and I certainly agree, that teaching something makes you learn it really well. You're already a teacher, why not get the bassics (sic) and start some pupils. You will always be a few steps ahead, if not more! Finding your way round a bass is not difficult, and techniques can be your own. Nothing wrong with that. For the more advanced ...


2

Do you also have the basics of the instrument's hand positioning for chords, etc. down? No one can teach feel...it must come from your soul. That said however technical ability can be taught - you say you are all set there. Excellent!! Now, find your voice and play! I suggest that you choose a few amazing Bass Players in the genre of music you prefer, find ...


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I was always taught NOT to stick my tongue out. You are supposed to whisper 'too' into the flute to separate notes, and more of a 'doo' for something a bit more Legato.


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I'm not familiar with any specific name that technique has, and, really, it's a rather subtle thing that I wouldn't call a distinct technique in itself. You may hear this variously described as having a "darker" tone, or sometimes as being "throatier". What these singers are doing is opening up the back of the throat more (lifting their soft palate and ...


2

Some terms that come to mind, which you can look up and learn a lot about, are: Cacophony Discord Tritone Dissonance Harmonic tension Atonality Sturm und Drang Dissonant intervals This should be a good start, at the very least!


5

I believe that when J. Rudess is referring to "pattern based" he is talking about describing musical phrases as a series of relative intervals, and then repeating those series of intervals from different starting pitches. On a guitar this is straight forward to do by moving up and down the neck: play a particular passage, and then play the same ...


4

I assume he partly means that it's not Isomorphic (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Isomorphic_keyboard). The guitar is not fully isomorphic either when tuned in a standard way due to the G-B interval being different to all the others, though you can use a different tuning with consistent string intervals. I also think he may be noticing that the Axis and ...


-1

There's really no technique. I've been playing for 15 years, can do the Bonham GTBT triplet but not everything Zeppelin yet. It's about just improving YOUR technique. Only reason I can do it is I've played for so long. But also, Bonham was a rhythmic genius too. Those crazy crossover triplets in Moby Dick is all meticulously planned out but almost impossible ...


1

I would advise you to first master one type of picking technique before you go on to another. It takes years and many hundreds of hours of practice to truly master the picking technique so if you are constantly changing between the two you risk becoming a jack of all trades and a master of none. Main difference is the amount of notes you can play together ...


1

Using simple examples, just as Michal has never seen 'Recuerdos de la Alhambra' performed with a plectrum, I have never seen 'Tumeni notes' performed finger style. I can't say either is impossible but then, neither is moving Scafell Pike with a soup spoon - how much time do you have to work on it? There are no negative effects of trying either provided you ...


0

I agree with pretty much everything said so far. But want to add that the difference in sound actually goes beyond which strings are emphasized. A big part of the difference in sound is which strings are omitted in the up strum. In basic rhythm guitar playing (which strumming usually is) our strumming serves to establish a certain rhythmic feel to the ...


1

Some of this answer will address your original question before all the edits. Learning to play the guitar is very rewarding, but the rewards come slowly in the beginning and require dedication, persistence, and commitment (and pain tolerance). One thing that has become abundantly clear to me after many years of playing guitar, is that no matter how much ...


1

It is important to note the differences in attack, as well, that are available. Though it is a generalization that master players mitigate through careful technique, use of a plectrum usually introduces an attack with a different sound profile than the attack one hears from finger picking. Of course there is is continuous spectrum of softness to harshness ...


3

Playing with your fingers allows you to play multiple notes on distant strings at precisely the same time and to play cross rhythms with ease. It is, on the other hand, a lot easier to learn to use a plectrum and it is especially much easier to learn to play fast using plectrums. There are no negative effects with learning to use one. They are different ...


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I think that a well-rounded guitarist should use both. Regarding negative effects, my answer is no, provided that you continue to occasionally go back and practice the other style. For example, if you've been using a pick for a long time, and then decide to play fingerstyle for an extended period of time, don't hesitate to go back to using a pick every ...


0

A chord sounds different in an up/down-stroke predominantly because you're playing the notes in a different order: Firstly you are you playing in order of increasing vs decreasing pitch - and specifically you're not playing the bass note first The various notes which make up that chord voicing are (almost always) going to be played in a different order e.g ...


0

Actually, there are many different correct ways to tongue depending on the sound / articulation you're looking for, which is something commonly used in brass playing. (Single Tonguing) For example: "Too" and "Toh" both have a crisp articulation, but "Toh" focuses the sound a bit more. "Doo" and "Doh" both have a slightly softer articulation (Double ...


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The cheapest way to learn good technique is also the slowest and most risky - trial and error. Why are all techniques not created equal? Two big reasons: First, poor technique will limit your ability and quality of your playing. Second, poor technique can lead to repetitive motion injury and limit or halt your ability to play at all. Since you write that ...


1

You have almost answered this in the question - you really do need lessons from an experienced instructor to make sure you learn good technique. I'm not saying you need a full course necessarily, but especially at the start there is no alternative, and you'll want to have a check at regular points through your learning.


-1

Singing scales from your diaphragm.



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