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1

As far as anchoring goes, my old teacher taught me to rest my thumb on the top of the neck pickup. Not sure if it's the best practice, but it's served me pretty well over the years. What I do a lot of to help warm up is run various scales in triplets, both along and across the strings. Not sure how to post tab on here, but something to the effect of the ...


2

A simple but interesting exercise is playing octaves, or fifths (start with fifths, then move to octaves) but play the lower note once, and the higher note twice, but always alternating the two fingers you're plucking with. The result is that you play the lower note once with finger 1, the next time with finger 2, then again with finger 1, etc. Do it slowly ...


2

Rule #1 is to do what works for you. I don't do everything on the recorder the same way my teacher does, because I don't get on with some of her playing technique (particularly her method for left-hand thumb placement). You do have to know why you're doing what you're doing though, you can't just say "that looks hard" and do something else because it might ...


4

That's how Geddy Lee plays, using one finger up and down. I think it's a good technique to learn, you can use it in certain cases. As others have already mentioned, it does sound different from two alternating fingers, so when you're playing something you have more options to choose from and your criteria won't only be "oh how can I play this with less ...


3

Famous jazz bassist Victor Wooten has been known to pick up and down with his thumb. He has published many educational materials over the years and hosts an annual Bass Camp in Tennessee. I do not know if or where in his teaching output that his thumb technique might be covered.


2

After one has been playing for a while, one often finds that idiosyncracies have wormed their way in to playing styles. Any way that produces the desired effect HAS to be legit! There is no right or wrong, as long as it sounds good. Using a finger down and up will even vary from player to player, one with long and one with bitten nails.Try thumb/finger, ...


4

No reason why you can't do that. If it works, it works! You will get a different sound than using fingers normally. But it won't be as clicky as a pick. Maybe somewhere in between. You'll probably find you'll wear away your finger nail pretty fast.


5

In my opinion, what works for you is what works. Everyone's hands, wrists, and recorders are different. You seem to be analyzing your movements with great attention to detail; keep doing that. Practicing the 'best' movements will get them into your muscle memory and they'll become, if not quite second nature, at least third. You may find that you'll use ...


1

You don't need to use your diaphragm..you may also use your chest voice in singing, or singing without raising your neck , larynx and head...i am just only 13 years old..and i discover when i read books about how to position your larynx when singing..... it tells me that i should control it...after two days i try those techniques and when i sing high notes ...


6

It is known as a pick slide or pick scrape and it is used most often in punk and rock. Read this article for information on what is is. The second article is the forum on proper execution http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pick_slide http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/archive/index.php?t-616306.html


1

If you experience soreness and pain in your wrists while playing the piano, it is ALWAYS "doing something something wrong" pain. My best guess is that you are unnecessarily tensing up your wrists and holding your hands very rigidly to fit the "chord" shapes. Hold your hand above your lap and drop it like you can't control it and gravity is the only force ...


1

Without sticks I start with left hand open and palm facing up then starting with the index finger tap your finger into the palm of your hand at a regular speed maybe x16 then move onto the middle finger and so on. Go back and forth through the fingers and gradually speed up making sure intervals are regular. Also try with the palm facing down. Gradually your ...


3

One of my favourite guitar players - Tuck Andress, outlines all methods of picking a excellently on his site. Be sure to read through it and try it all out. He outlines each method of holding the pick, finding the angle of picking, rotation vs up-down motion, as well as thumb-only (ala Wes Montgomery) and pure old school classical fingerstyle technique and ...


0

With any solo, you want to tell a story. The licks, riffs and grooves are your words. Writers structure stories as narrative arcs. A narrative arc is usually: Exposition: The introduction the story in which characters are introduced, setting is revealed. Rising Action: A series of events that complicate matters for the protagonist, creating a rise in ...


4

I suggest starting with some basic rhythmic patterns on the guitar body, practice all your standard drumming patterns e.g. paradiddles and the likes. Once you've got a solid base for the percussive stuff going on, start trying to incorporate more fretting hand work to bring some harmony in, whether it's just tapping work or you are playing the strings ...


1

If you find that sometimes the notes don't sound when not hitting the bottom, then it's important to hit the bottom. If this isn't the case, then it doesn't matter - unless you're interested in playing unfamiliar pianos regularly. The way to play softly is with a slower action, or with the soft pedal, or both. Different pieces may require different ...


2

An interesting thought !On all of my acoustic pianos, so it's not just one, a key can be pressed down less than a quarter of the way to make the note sound.HOWEVER, if that key is pressed in the conventional way, straight downwards, it may or may not make a sound.Pressed all the way gently, no sound. Pressed with more force, sound. Mostly with volume ...


7

The let-off on an acoustic piano is adjustable. Your tuner can show you how to do it. It determines how softly you can play. The answer to your question is: it depends on how the let-off is adjusted.


1

I have done some more research on this, and found this forum post to be very useful. It explains some very basic and logical ways to make sure you produce less saliva. In a nutshell: Try to play with the harmonica tilted slightly upwards. This way, the saliva does not flow into the harmonica as easily. Try not to touch the harmonica with the tongue. ...


4

Playing quietly through a sax is all about having a sufficient embouchure (mouth position/tension), to create a sound when pushing less air through. It's very normal to initially be playing loud when first learning the sax, and your embouchure is less developed - unfortunately this develops mainly through sustained (loud) practice. I wouldn't say there's a ...


1

Muteeee the strings! Take your right hand (assuming you're right handed) look for the fleshy part on the bottom and rest it gently on the strings. Muting unwanted string noise is one of the most important things when playing with even a little bit of overdrive. Try also muting with your left hand. I'm not in a position to give you a detailed description ...


7

Three things: Make sure you lift directly away from the string. Don't pull the string downwards or push it upwards; this will produce a similar effect to a pull-off. Don't lift your finger completely off the string in one go; instead, do what I call a "self-damping-note". Your finger lifts slightly, to let the string lift off the fret, but the finger is ...


1

A John petrucci training exercise I used a while back helps a lot with finger dexterity You start off with a basic chord of : 1 2 3 4 X X Then move your index up a fret and switch positions with the middle finger like so: 2 1 3 4 X X Then you move up the whole 4 strings you are fretting with the index When you're done you should have: 4 1 2 3 X X Then you ...


0

If you're starting again after a long break, you might want to consider taking the opportunity of revising your technique. I was fortunate enough to be given classical guitar lessons at an early age, and the first thing I learnt was that the thumb goes on and behind the neck opposite the fingers, not sticking out this side with the neck cradled in the web ...


2

Play within your reach. The time necessary to stretch out for certain +1 and +2 chords may inhibit you from playing them at tempo. If you must, use them at the beginning or after a suitable rest period, so that you have time to set them up. If you take the opportunity to watch jazz masters, you may discover that there are an incredible number of chords ...


2

Might be a good idea to combine finger stretching exercises with actually learning some guitar basics. If your goal is to eventually play solos/lead guitar, then you could learn the pentatonic scale in the most common shapes. There are tutorials like this one all over the web. I often struggle with the stretches for just one or two chords (basically ...


1

If you play E minor pentatonic as 9/4, 12/4, 10/5, 12/5, 10/6, 12/6 (first number is the fret. Second number is the string.), everything on the 12th fret is done with the pinky, and that's half of the scale, so that would help with training your pinky.


4

In 20 years of playing guitar, I've never heard of this. The description would apply to Travis picking which uses only the thumb and forefinger (variations use additional fingers). Using the two fingers gives more of a point--counterpoint effect than can be achieved with just a single finger, and makes syncopated accompaniments in country/folk/blues styles ...



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