New answers tagged

1

From my own experience (I've been separated from the piano for 5 years), you'll need one or two months to fully recover. That is something which has stayed in your brain and muscles. As Czerny said : "One should never have to relearn (technique, especially, EdN) what he already had". Now, I'd say it's even better to step away, from times to times, and ...


1

Here are the main reasons why legato fingering is advised: There are many times when a note (or notes) is sustained through a pedal change. Sometimes this happens during a harmonic change in the underlying notes, while the melodic note must sustain through to the new harmony. The sustained note can be anywhere, but usually in the melodic and bass lines. ...


-2

I've been playing guitar for 5 years (I'm 14) and I have found that because I had my thumb draped over the top of the neck that I have Tennis Elbow and am at a risk of my muscles detaching from my arm. So I asked ALOT of imformed people and they all told me that you have to hold you thumb at the middle of or beneath the middle of the guitar neck.or this will ...


1

Considering your prior level (Inventions, Fur Elise, etc.), prior amount of practice per week (3 hours), amount of time off (4 years), and current age (17?), you should not have any difficulty picking right back up almost within the first month, maybe even 1-2 weeks. Find a good teacher, listen to that teacher, and enjoy. I promise you that what you're doing ...


0

If you are gonna try for marching band, I think that if you are trying to get a snare part you ahould try to learn trad. But becasue everything else is played matched, if you want tenor or bass learn matched. I was able to pick up trad better than most people say its possible. I was playing as fast as matched in a few weeks with just short day to day ...


1

A good example of the G/B chord which illustrates why it matters which note is in the bass is the main progression/riff from "Blue on Black" by Kenny Wayne Shepherd. The riff starts on a D chord with the bass note moving briefly down to C and then back to D. The next chord is introduced by a "walk" up the A string, playing the notes A, B, C to finally form ...


2

Weak head voice is a common problem for many singers, but it's definitely something that can be circumvented. Usually, beginners find there's a "weakening" in the head range. A weaker head voice also comes from fear or reluctance. There are ways you can strengthen your head voice... Head Voice Techniques: To work on head voice, the first advice is to ...


2

"Head voice" refers to any singing where the singer 'feels' resonance in the head/cheek area, or alternately refers to high notes that sound strong (even falsetto). In other words it's a vague and confusing term. "Chest voice" similarly refers to singing where resonance can be felt in the chest (e.g. if you place your hand over your chest and sing). It has ...


1

The opening section of Spanish Dance No 3, by Granados, I think provides a clear example of non-contrapuntal music. Notice how each of the different voices move in the same contour and the same rhythm. It's probably my least favourite of the 12 dances, but it's one you never forget because it is so rigid.


2

Counterpoint is the relationship between voices that are harmonically dependent, yet are independent in other aspects like in rhythm and shape. Counterpoint is only really observed in pieces that have multiple independent melodies or in other words polyphonic in nature. The example you are talking about is homophonic or consists of a distinct melody and ...


-3

not sure if this will work or not, but i'm having trouble with catching notes on bends atm, and I remember my mate used to put glue on his fingertips (and let ut set obviously) before he played. Research it before you go ahead and try it. Just a thought.


3

Techniques to follow for a proper singing: Firstly, you should be able to put 2-3 fingers inside of your mouth when you sing vowels. Drop your jaw much more than you do in your daily conversation. Open your mouth much wider while you sing and shape it like an 'O', lest the sound gets trapped while you sing. To practice dropping the jaw - Massage all the ...


0

I have the same problem. In Fernando Sor's study in Em (Op. 35, No. 24), the tempo is quarter note=88, and the passage is as follows (the b-chord is in the second measure): If I place the d#, b, and f# fingers first, I can add the b note. But since the b note is played first, and the tempo is 88, I place the b no problem, but I can never nail the other ...


0

There are two main approaches to this: Muscle memory (technique) and biomechanics. They are synergistic. Muscle memory in your left hand is surely poorer then your dominant hand, due to the obvious reasons. To improve this would be simply to simply play more and do technique related excercises like picking drills and scales etc. Biomechanically, your ...


-2

The rule of thumb in singing is "your throat DOESN'T exist". The only organs you need to produce sound are your diaphragm for pushing the air from the bottom of your lungs and your hard palate to make the sound resonate. If you EVER use your throat, then whatever it is you're doing, you're doing it wrong. NOTHING should happen in the throat. As someone else ...


0

The strum pattern. Pattern is important. A pattern is something that repeats, so a strum pattern, specially in pop music, is going to be basically the same thing for each bar. Pretty well regardless of the rhythm of the melody. It needs to complement the melody, of course, but it rarely copies the melody rhythm. As joseem states, it's basically (in a 4/4) ...


2

I would say there is not a direct relationship between the notes chosen for the melody and the strumming pattern that would be most appropriate for the song. They are two completely different elements of the music and are chosen by the composer independently. The rhythm and choice of notes used in the song or musical piece are but two of the many elements ...


0

Generally speaking the strum pattern (and other accompaniment techniques) will depend more on the generic characteristics of the song (tempo, style, genre) and the effect you want to achieve than the particulars of the melody (although sometimes, for momentary effect, a particular combination of strummed chords and sung words may be used). For the most ...


0

Another consideration: do you slouch at the table, resting your upper body weight on your elbows? I noticed that after correcting for this bad habit, my forearm pain diminished. Could be related.


0

To play Mr. Bojangles on guitar in first position (open strings), you'd play the famous chord progression notated "C G/B Am" with bass notes C, B, A. For 'best' voicing, you wouldn't play any of the notes available to you on the 6th string, although each chord triad has at least one reachable note. If you are the rhythm guitarist playing in a band with a ...


0

Try practicing your scales with "classical"-style vibrato. Like a violin vibrato, not pushing and pulling the string, but shaking your hand. If you can get a nice fluid vibrato from each finger while dancing up and down the neck like a tarantula in a tutu, you'll have to shake some tension out to get there.


0

In my experience, pain is usually weakness in the body, and strengthening that area can eliminate the pain. Take a look at Finger Strengthener and Hand Exerciser for Piano/Guitar Therapy on Amazon. There are lots of options for finger/hand fitness available. I got back into piano after 12 years, and it made a world of difference for me. In fact, I bought ...


3

It's a combination of spiccato bowing (bouncing the bow off the strings) alternating with left-hand pizzicato. Of course the real Paganini did this sort of party trick having slashed three of the violin strings with a knife, and then holding the violin upside down, if some of the stories about him are to be believed. ...


6

Looks to me like the player is interspersing conventionally bowed notes with left-hand pizzicato notes. This is similar to the pull-off (ligado) technique on guitar, but has a quite different sound. I only watched the clip once, but it appears that the passages that combine bowed and L.H. pizzicato are executed as follows: a note is fingered with the little ...


3

You played piano for a fairly extensive length of time, and reached a fairly high level of playing (Inventions aren't the easiest thing to play), so you would probably jump back into it fairly quickly. The muscle memory from playing never completely disappears, so with consistent (and productive) practice, you could easily reach the skill level you were at, ...


2

It's hard to say for your specific case, but it only took me about six months to get back to where I was when I went back to classical piano, and I didn't have a teacher when I came back to it, and I had a longer break. I think you'll find the skills come back very fast, but not the stamina. So you have to hold back and slowly build up how long you play ...


0

Depends quite a lot on genre. I'll explain my normal process as they vary so much you can't define a method. 1: Melody/Chords/Sound design Depending on what I come up with first, this almost defines my process. Most often this is sound design and least often a melody, however, as difficult as it is to start with a melody, these bring out the best results ...


-1

All these take practice. I usually start with whatever comes to mind, maybe a chord pattern, a melodic hook, or even a string of patterns. I like to start with lyrics but other people like to start with melodies.


2

Learning to play guitar takes dedication and deliberate practice over a long and sustained period of time! It is a process. There is no short cut that allows you to quickly be able to play like Sungha Jung. I often liken learning to play guitar (or any instrument) as a journey. But the process can be fun if you allow it to be. You can enjoy the journey ...



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