New answers tagged

1

Listening to the two versions, the original is a LOT faster than yours- not sure whether that's deliberate but one effect is that you have to hold the notes much longer in the slower version, which possibly makes it seem more difficult than it needs to be. Your timing is good, and your voice itself sounds like it has a nice tone. I'm no singing coach but ...


0

Dropping your jaw is one part of opening up your voice, but it isn't the only part. How does your throat feel when you sing? Is it tight? Do you tense up your throat? Keep your throat relaxed and loose. It may feel like you'll lose control if you do, and it might make you sloppy for awhile, until you're used to it. But once you're used to it, singing as a ...


3

From what you describe, I wonder if what you need to work on isn't singing, but listening. You hear that you go out of tune when you listen to the playback: good! The thing to do now is listen while you sing. Try singing along with the original track, but quietly, not full-voice. Listen more than you sing. Worry only about whether you match what the track ...


-1

It is definitely best to try to play it by ear. Sheet and tab can only convey so much, as it can't really capture the tone, nuance, emotion, feel, etc. So learn to play by ear and your skills will last a lifetime, versus playing tabs which will fade if you don't practice for 5 years...but if you can play by ear, you'll always be able to play.


0

Use all the resources you have. I would get the tabs from a source that is reliable like books or magazines. You can also go to YouTube and find the most trusted videos of a demonstration. I find going with a video at full and half speed can help. Use a combination of both and you will be fine. You also don't have to be note for note on every solo. Some ...


1

The best way to learn a solo depends on your current ability and your preferred learning style. Since I don't know either as it relates to you, allow me to offer what I personally do when learning a solo. I perform mostly covers either solo or as part of a duo or full band. When covering a solo, my goal is to play something that the audience will ...


2

What you're asking is not too clear. However, if you want or need to faithfully reproduce a solo, the best way is to listen to it many, many times, and try to copy it exactly.Even considering the tone, effects used, etc. It will depend on how good a player you are and how experienced you are as to how well that works, and how long it takes. If it's for a ...


1

When initially learning, or if trying to play an exact cover, you will want to copy the artist's style, and try to learn it note for note, including all nuances. Once you can confidently play a range of pieces, you will realise you are developing your own quirks and style, and you'll probably change notes, licks, bends and timing. If it is painful, you may ...


1

You sound OK for that style of music, but I can hear what you're saying... it's not "garbage" though without some context... how long have you been singing? How long have you been singing "seriously" ?... keep improving breath and diaphragm ... I've been running and singing at the same time at a park nearby, has improved my singing strength tremendously... ...


0

You could try reproducing the notes at the same time with some instrument (piano or guitar), practicing with triades and scales. I belive that is a good exercise to sing in tune in right notes. Try to find your tone.


1

I don't think one should really get stuck into learning one specific way to switch from one chord to another. I'm self taught and playing for a year now, so my methods may not be the best, but here are my take on this: One thing that I have learned is to not get stuck on one shape to play a chord or a specific way to change between chords. This can cramp ...


5

The answers given so far offer excellent and accurate advice on learning chord changes in general! But I will offer a tip that will help many beginning (and some experienced) guitarist with the specific change from G to C which is what your question is about. I am not sure how you are fingering your G and C chords but there are several different ways to ...


3

A few thoughts for you. Learning to play chords on guitar doesn't really fit the mechanics that most people are used to with their hands. Having difficulty with some chords (or chord voicings) after one month is not surprising or uncommon. You could try arpeggiating the chords (playing out each note of the chord individually). This would allow you to ...


2

First finger the C chord. Take as much time as you need. Then move your fingers up and away from the fretboard and refinger the chord, trying to get all of your fingers hitting the frets accurately and all at the same time. Start with a short distance and then gradually increase the distance until you can do it with all of your fingers fully extended at ...


0

Are you using headphones to hear yourself while singing? I have been taking the singing success lessons and find that the exercises in Discovering Your Voice help to warm up. After those exercises I sing alone with a mic and headphones. Sometimes recording myself too, in order to match my tone and style against the original.


5

Well, yeah, the first four bars are the easy bit.... < grin >. Just "playing it slower hundreds of times" won't work. Everybody can play this 100% accurately if they go slow enough to take aim at each individual note, one note at a time. Start by playing scales (diatonic and chromatic) in jumps, for example in 10ths C E' D F' E G' etc or 12ths C G' D ...


0

I tried it a few years with different kind of wraps/tapes (hockey grip tape etc), it gave me enough grip but I never liked the feeling & hated WHEN it got a bit messy because of dissolving adhesives. :) I ended up with covering the grip of my 5B sticks with a few 1 inch long rings of thin heat-shrink tubing (sometimes a bit sanded). Rings instead of ...


1

I teach that there are essentially three fundamental fretspans to learn on a standardly-tuned bass guitar: three-frets, four-frets and five-frets. Three-fret span is incredibly useful, as it limits your vocabulary in a way that gets you thinking in terms of very useful basslines. It makes the root, fifth, and octave extremely playable in a way that is ...


0

Great input all around...I've been a heeltoe, player40years 54 going on 30 can do what ever double stroke roll with my feet that i can do on top. Developing the technique to go beyound that into 5,7,9,11. Stroke groupings reaching 32 note and 64 note patterns. That's when people half your age are looking at your feet and asking what the hell are you doing. ...


1

You probably don't mean "legato" as much as you mean "arco" (namely bowed as opposed to plucked). Yes, using pizzicato and arco next to each other is quite possible as violinists don't necessarily put aside the bow when doing pizzicato. Paganini even combines bowing with simultaneous left-hand pizzicato (of course, this needs careful consideration of ...


1

It sounds to me like the song alternates between a fast 6+6+4 section and a 3/4 section. I'm assuming you're talking about the more complicated 6+6+4 part because I do hear lots of muting in that. I may not have the pitch right, but the riff sounds to me like it's roughly like this: $6.8.$5.5 $6.X.$5.X $6.8.$5.7 $6.8.$5.7 $6.X.$5.X $6.8.$5.5 $6.X.$5.X $...


3

Absolutely; you just write a little marking to indicate to the performer when to switch between pizzicato and regular bowing. In the score, we use the call arco to signal that the performer should bow regularly. It's similar with brass instruments: a composer tells them to use a mute, and then a composer tells them when to quit using the mute. Note that ...


0

Fingering will be subjective. Everyone's finger lengths, relatively speaking,and stretchability, are slightly different, so what suits one may well not suit another. Your theory is sound, and what works better for you will usually be the one to embrace. You may even find that on a different guitar, with different neck profile, etc., you need to adapt how you ...


0

I have used many picks of different gauge (thickness) and materials but once I tried V-Picks (stiff acrylic) I couldn't go back to any other pick. Although available in various gauges the many shapes along with special edging define these picks and the sound you can obtain. I had been using what I thought was heavy to extra heavy (around .96mm - 1.20mm). ...


3

You have a few issues there. I'll go for the obvious ones: you are taking too much time to change notes you are stopping a note before you play the next one you aren't using a compressor Practice sorts out those first two - timing your pick hand and fretting hand will make a major difference. Slash plays some notes as hammer-ons and pull-offs as well. A ...


0

If you start a note with JUST air pressure, what you call "just the abdominals", it proves that your embouchure is set up correctly - you're not "kicking" the note into starting with violent tonguing. This may be why you've been recommended to practice this way. Or maybe you've fallen into the habit of starting AND ending a note with too much tongue, so ...


2

The "classical" technique for repeated notes, in twos or threes, is to "change fingers", e.g. fingering a fast triplet 1,2,3. This may be what Tim meant.


0

There is a link at the bottom on this page http://www.piano.christophersmit.com/repetitionMech.html which has an animation of how the repetition mechanism works in a grand piano action. I would expect a piano tech did a careful job of regulating those pianos before that performance! The grand piano repetition action works well, and is consistent between the ...


2

The key recovery time on grand pianos is much less than on uprights, due to a different mechanism, so it's more difficult to execute this on most uprights.Thumb,index and middle are the usual way, with the hand suspended over the key.


0

I alternate between a pick and fingers for various reasons. I'll mainly use my fingers when I'm playing songs which only require the low end strings, however I'll switch to a pick if I need to play songs which require the high strings to be used. Why? Mainly due to the fact that my index finger is significantly shorter than my middle finger (my two plucking ...



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