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Positioning The correct way to play octaves is to keep the wrist completely still and relaxed while your fingers do all the "leg work." Moving your wrist up and down will cause your fingers to have uneven lengths when reaching the keyboard. Keeping your wrist still and slightly below the keyboard will even out the length of your fingers so that they have ...


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If you're going up or down the piano playing octaves you'll need to move your arm, but you should minimize the movement as much as possible. A lot of times beginners will move their arm up much more than they need to in general when moving up or down the piano. Minimizing the movement minimizes the distance you need to move from one octave to another. As ...


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On the one hand... Often the plucking hand thumb will look after the E string, and some players use the extra fingers on that hand to damp the upper strings. Or use the side of the palm/pinky to damp other strings. An acquired idea, but it leaves the gap where your finger joins your palm with a gap for the played note to ring. On the other hand... Use the ...


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When playing a fretted note on the A string, the fingers of your left hand have to pass over the D and G strings anyway. If you want to mute the strings you aren't playing, you can use this to your advantage. Allow your fingers to gently touch these strings, not enough to fret, simply to rest there. Also, if you're playing an open note on the A string, ...


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I believe the term you are looking for is "bariolage." It is often used to describe passages that alternate between two strings—one open and the other mostly stopped (often playing a melody that is meant to be heard apart from the open-string pedal or cover tone)—but can also be extended to passages involving more strings. There are some good examples at ...


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Forget it! If you are playing a large organ with 3 to 4 keyboards and upwards of 30 or 40 stops or more you may be eaten alive or worse - disappear for good. To play an organ well needs a lot of time and effort, without that you don't stand a chance against the beast. It won't sound right without using the pedal board and a least 2 manuals for the wedding ...


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Modes are just a very old type of scale. It was just the way in which the pre baroque era Medieval music was made. It is in essence the musical system that predates the current classical inspired system. If you want to go in depth about how you can see the different modes for what they are you can always just look where the semi tones in the scale / piece ...


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Modes are differentiated by the interval patterns, or in short by the movement of the notes. The things common to all the modes of a scale are the involved notes. All the modes of a scale will share the same key signature.


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Why do you want to extend your lower range? If your specs are correct, you already reach lower than basically all Western literature. That's like a painter who wants to be able to hold an even larger brush. You should focus on actually working with what you have rather than putting it on hold for something else. It's certainly good that you are not ...


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Well, I'll have to disagree with your teacher. Do aim at one finger per fret as a default! The three-fret technique is essentially a variation of the standard way to finger notes on double bass, due to Franz Simandl. Double bass requires about five times as much force as electric bass (apart from having a considerably longer scale), so it's really tough to ...


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As a beginning bass player I've been working through Ed Friendland's Hal Leonard Bass Method, which starts out using just first, second, and fourth fingers spanning three frets. He introduces one finger per fret (spanning four frets) as an advanced technique in volume two, and teaches that you should pivot between second and third fingers rather than ...


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Dependent mostly on the length of fingers. One finger per fret works pretty well on guitar, but not so on bass. it is more noticeable on the bottom 4 or 5 frets (one of the reasons I prefer 5 string - no real need to play down there!). Playing scalar stuff, o.f.p.fret does actually work at the bottom, but for playing I, IV, V as you do a lot I might use ...


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Like everything else in music, fingering is definitely a preference thing. There are some ways that are more economical than others, but it ultimately boils down to what is more comfortable for the player. In general, the one-finger-per-fret rule still applies for bass. In a lot of music genres, bass players do a lot of roots, fifths and octaves. If you're ...


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Until 0:07, they're merely using different velocities (hitting it harder) to emphasize every fifth 16th note. After that, they're playing eighth notes (or maybe sixteenth notes that are hard to distiguish) and alternating having the hihat open and closed on the eighth beats. The "disco" sound you may be have been referring to before your edit comes from ...


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My approach would be to assume that this was written for double bass, and that the intention was to give that section a different texture and/or rhythmic feeling than the previous section. And I'd try to listen to the group as a whole and figure out how you can help create that same sense of contrast in your group's performance (without necessarily trying ...


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Can you find some other way to break the problem into simpler steps other than by starting slow and gradually speeding up? For example, go straight for your target tempo, but practice shorter fragments? Also, have you taken a step back and looked at your technique? Maybe it would be worth experimenting with different fingerings or hand positions? A ...


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good luck with all your singing.....you musnt strain to push out your lowest notes too much..you can damage your voice....I did.....the cure for me was rest and making sure that you dont "push". Treat your voice as a freind, I try not to speak low, I speak gently....when you want the big notes....warm up first, sing mainly in your tessitura, and you'll find ...


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Basically it depends on what definition you are using. Most people nowadays when they talk about headvoice are really just talking about a non-breathy falsetto. The old term headvoice though, meant what people are calling mixed voice now - staying in your chest or real voice but the resonance shifts to the head or "mixes". I've made a detailed video ...


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I don't think there is a any "technical" terms that is used for percussive fingerstyle as they usually end up being nothing more than descriptors of what the guitarist doing (from my knowledge). Case in point, this individual points out the following techniques: String Slap, Thump and thumb, Thump and nails, Nail Knocks, Drum and Strum, the Tap and Slap. ...


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Practice longtones with crescendos and decrescendos, practice all your scales, and practice scales with different tongueing patterns like tongue slur, tongue two slur two, etc.


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I am only eleven years old but I have found that it is easier if you pinch the bow with your thumb and forefinger.


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3 1/2 fingers is a good way to describe it. I think 3 fingers is optimal for bends/vibratos. When bending with 4 fingers, you'll notice that the fingers tend to bunch and become tense, and this can slow down a player. If anything, it's probably optimal to fret notes with the pinky when it is JUST fretting. Otherwise, the ring finger feels optimal for bends, ...


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Judging from the example, I think OP is just referring to the brass swell/"crescendo" happening from 2:55 to 2:59. The voicing helps to create that effect as well. Compare: http://www.proudmusiclibrary.com/en/tag/dramatic-brass-swell I don't know if "brass swell" is proper orchestrator-ese, though.


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That example you gives just sounds like a good old fashioned crescendo. It means gradually becoming louder. Maybe also has a sforzando piano type of effect as well. Movie scores will also sometimes use a shrill stringed tremolo that gradually increases in loudness until the suspense is released. That may very well be that cat-on-a-tin-roof effect that you ...


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There's a combination of techniques going on here simultaneously. First is the choice of pitches. As you note, it is a steady disturbing or unpleasant chord. This means there is a single chord being held that contains a lot dissonance. A typical chord such as a major or minor chord contains only consonance. Even in seventh chords, the dissonances are ...


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NO, writing a tenor-recorder part for an oboist would be about as helpful as me giving you a sandwich to breath underwater. Each instrument responds very differently throughout their range, and while the core fingering principles may be similar (as with saxophone, flute, clarinet, and bassoon as well), each instrument has its own nuances. Fingering wise, ...



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