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3

Short answer is yes, it comes with practice. But for the best results, you need to focus your practice on your goal, rather than just singing songs, and hoping to improve. Play a single note. This can be on a keyboard, a guitar, pitch pipes, or whatever other instrument you have, including a keyboard app for your phone. Instead of singing immediately, take ...


2

The lighter the gauge the easier it is to bend but that does not mean it is automatically better. I do find some of the finer dynamics of vibrato and bending are lost in the lighter string tensions. Sure you can bend higher easier but subtle vibratos become harder as a consequence. Also the loss of tension in regards to bending does make it harder to bend ...


4

I did some research on this and found some very strong indicators that the string is indeed pressed against the fingerboard. The most convincing point is offered in this book on composing for japanese instruments. The chapter on the Kokyu starts at p.112 and likens many techniqual aspects of playing to the Shamisen, where the strings do indeed touch the ...


0

Drumsticks are not designed to take impacts over a small surface area. (that is, all of the force of your strike placed either at the tip, or along the shaft of the stick) Good drumming ergonomics require the proper setup of your drums and cymbals. Toms and the snare should be positioned so that the drums make contact with a large surface area of the stick. ...


1

I've been playing for over 20 years. I've tried playing with various gloves and tapes/wraps. Nothing works as well (or feels as good) as playing with nothing between you and the drumstick. I've owned a leather stick bag for nearly 20 years now, and I think it makes the difference. If I take a set of sticks right out of the paper sheath, sure they'll be ...


8

Yes, you can use thinner gauged strings to reduce tension and make the strings easier to bend. For electric guitar strings, the standard is usually around .009 or .010 inches for the high-E string (Sets are usually labelled by the gauge of the high-E string. The gauges of the rest of the set mostly depend on how thick the high-E is, but there are also ...


3

In general, smaller-gauged strings will come up to the same pitch at a lower tension. They're easier to bend. They'll also have less "oomph" as a consequence, but amplification can mitigate some loss of volume. As for technique, you want all three of your big fingers all pushing or pulling together. Don't worry about bending with a single finger alone until ...


2

There are some techniques that can only really be done in matched (freehand), other things that can only be done in traditional (lots of brush stuff, certain finger control techniques). The greatest benefit of traditional grip is that you can vary the angle of attack between the drumstick and whatever surface you're playing on (therefore changing the ...


1

Playing to the bottom of the keys no matter how loud or soft makes for a solid and consistently even tone that you can control much better than one created by haphazardly pressing notes at various pressure levels. When playing it's important to use more than just your fingers to produce the tone, and this is done by putting some force behind the moving ...


0

@Nonpop is correct. This is called the double-escapement and was invented by Erard in the early 1810s. It helps with the repetition of notes. Instead of the hammer returning to its full-stopped (bottom) position, it's held part way down to allow for a quick, easy repetition of the same note. Imagine all pianos before that had none and you couldn't repeat ...


0

I would not take the Bach-Busoni edition as an authority. Busoni actually rewrote music because he felt he could do a better job. Your best bet is to obtain a good Urtext edition such as one by Henle which is devoid of all the extra markings. Using pedal in the Baroque music is not the same as it is in the Classical or Romantic period. You use it to enhance ...


2

It is rasguedo, with a touch of tremolo where he plays the same note several times in succession. The rasguedo is strumming the strings with several fingers, one after the other in a sort of flicking motion.


2

Looks like a kind of Rasgueado to me.


0

If you're having trouble playing with the little finger, try using a capo and moving it up the neck. That way, you can get practice with good technique in a position where you don't have to stretch as far. After you've got that working, move the capo a few frets closer to the nut and work out your exercises there. Eventually, you'll have the finger ...


1

To play the chord D/F#, and pretty much anything that involves using my thumb to fret or mute, I usually keep the webbing between my thumb and index fingers wrapped around the neck, so I can bend my thumb over the top. I keep my hand/palm in pretty close contact to the neck- not tight, you don't have to squeeze.. it's hard to describe, but something like ...


2

The second part of your question on playing with pick or fingers has to be determined by what style and guitar you are using. I suggest to learn with a pick first. Fingerpicking can get complicated and frustrating for a beginner. You should learn chords and strumming. If you want to play classical or folk, expect a lot of practice with fingerpicking which ...


3

Fingerings are about playing stuff in the most natural and easy way, but what is the most natural and easy way can be changed with practice. Playing with the pinky is an important asset so it makes sense to integrate it in your practice even though you might be able to work around it. The most important thing for pinky playing (not just on the guitar) is ...


3

The thumb can be used to mute, but there is absolutely no rule about what you 'should' do, unless you are trying to play strict classical. In your D/F# I probably wouldn't mute the A with my thumb, but I might if it made sense based on where my fingers had come from and where they were going next. For that A chord I wouldn't mute the E string at all - I ...


2

The first statement just isn't true. It really needs a player to use whichever part of the fretting fingers/thumb/hand he is comfortable with. Barre chords will have to utilise the soft parts of fingers, so just tips/tops won't do much of a job. Whilst some players will use a thumb over the top of the neck to play lower strings, in D/F# it's best to play it ...


0

I cheat when playing the arpeggio, I just use my thumb and mute the strings as I go down. It sounds ok to me. This guy has it pretty much down as I play it, however the bit after the ...


3

Of course, everything on bass guitar is pizzicato in theory, as nothing is bowed. I've only ever seen pizz. markings in double bass parts, which I've then played on bass guitar. You can imitate a pizzicato sound on bass guitar by plucking with the RH thumb while palm muting. This is also how a pizzicato marking should be executed on classical guitar.


3

While less common for electric bass notation, pizzicato in this context means pluck the strings with the fingers, as opposed to using a pick or playing in a slap/pop style.



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