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4

Singing is of course something requiring training and/or endurance. If you ask "how do I get to run a marathon", the answer will involve lots of running. That being said, if you are hoarse/strained after two or three songs, that's comparable about being shot after going up two stories of stairs. If that's your starting point of doing a marathon, either ...


4

I think I know what you mean, I've faced the same issues from time to time. As I understand you're not a professional singer. Yes, a voice should become stronger over time as you train more. The muscles that control your voice will indeed get a bit stronger but to be honest I don't think singing should be compared to weightlifting for example. It's more ...


1

I have the same issue. A friend of mine gave me a tip which helped me. Try to sing from deeper down your throat. It is hard to explain, but basically, by doing so, you will stress your upper part of the throat less.


2

The approach you are using now is to learn play the rhythm by seeing it visually. You can also come at the problem from the other direction: learn to play the rhythm by ear, then learn what that pattern looks like on the page. For me, the second approach is much, much easier for complex or off-beat rhythms. Find or make a recording of the challenging ...


0

Count each beat with your mouth. In a 4/4 measure you would say 1 2 3 4. For eighths, add an and (+) in between, counting 1 + 2 + 3 + 4 +. Then, add sixteenths. The second sixteenth is e and the fourth one is a, counting 1 e + a 2 e + a 3 e + a 4 e + a. Triplets are 1 + a 2 + a etc. For more complex tuplets, find a word with that number of syllables ...


0

Well, you asked how to prevent this in the future. You need to build those muscles back up, preferably stronger than they were before the injury, without causing muscle strain/damage. How do you do this? Just do your guitar stretches!!! Do your stretches!!! And do them well. If your fingers and arms do not feel limber (appropriately lubricated) before ...


1

This has been a problem for me as well. I started taking vocal lessons to correct a "slow wave" (vocal chords vibrating at different rates due to thyroid surgery). Most of what everyone is saying is dead on in terms of not tensing up the neck which restricts airflow and does not help your cause. The one thing that I will add is that my teacher has me ...


1

How I prevent it from coming back? To build on atoth's answer and his first point about relaxing your hand and arm: I feel it is worth mentioning to all others who come and see this question, the possibility of changing your seated guitar playing position to help in the prevention of these sorts of problems. Having started with a classical guitar and ...


1

You mention you notice the pain more with jazz and bar chords. You also say you've been playing for several years, so your level of expertise may mean what I'm about to say is less relevant, but here it is: when trying out new chords, or using those that are a stretch for you or you find fiddly to get the fingers in the right place, don't make the mistake of ...


1

Ignore pain felt while playing at your own risk. I did just that and, after a while, ended up with a ganglion cyst in my wrist that required corrective surgery. Kept me on the shelf for nearly a year between diagnosis, conservative treatment (that failed), waiting for and then recovering from the surgery. Generally speaking, pain is the body telling you ...


5

@Grey's answer is good. I have had similar problems in the past, which caused me to get some repetitive stress injury in my wrist and get ganglions on the back of my left hand as well as carpal tunnel syndrome. I'm no doctor but the solution, for me, was to change my technique so that my left wrist was straight at all times when I played. This meant: I ...


1

'Wrist pain' would not usually be anaerobic / lactate pain, since there's no muscle there for lactate to build up in. Sounds more like a stress pain. Sure a doctor can help with treating your pain, but once you're better it could happen again. So, perhaps you need to get help with your technique, a good teacher should know. If lessons aren't your thing, ...


3

Difficult to pinpoint without actually seeing what is going on. However, it may be the angle of the guitar, both vertically and horizontally, making the fretting wrist strain more than needed. It may be the action is too high, strings too heavy, that means you're having to press harder than necessary to get clean notes. It may be that you simply are pressing ...


13

Wrist pain may be "normal" in the sense that many players encounter it at some point. But it is not "normal' in the sense that you should ignore it. I have seen injuries take down some very talented and able people. If you experience pain and discomfort, especially at times when you are not playing, then you should consult with a doctor, not other guitar ...


2

I used to think rhythm and chords are the best way for most people to start. And they do form a very important foundation. But after teaching hundreds of students how to play the guitar, I have realized that it's most important to learn what is in your grasp to learn, right now. That means that learning a few simple chords and how to play them rhythmically ...


0

It is true that rhythm guitar keeps the background of any music, but to my own opinion, you first learn how to crawl before learning how to walk. Remember that chord has it lessons which is derived from the basics of guitar lesson. In the case like this you need the basics to lay the rhythm foundation.


1

I think that stop is caused by the double escapement mechanism which is used, afaik, in practically all grand pianos nowadays. You can see the action in this video. It should be possible to get a sound the way you describe but also, as you can see, if you depress the key just a little bit too far then it might not produce any sound. I personally would not ...


1

A good guitar solo should do exactly what the vocalist does i.e. express the emotions of the song!! Once a solo can do that, it's a great solo! A couple of things I would like to point out. The solo you play always depends on the mood of the song. If the song is a soft emotional song or a ballad that leads to aggression, well, so should the solo. It can ...


0

A memorable guitar solo tells a story. Roy Buchanan once played an amazing guitar solo where he only played one note many different ways. See Guitar solo techniques, particularly my answer about solo stories and narrative arcs.


1

I've only played a few Yamaha grands, but they all felt like I had to work hard at pressing the keys, and because of this, it all came out loud. Pressing gently seemed not to trigger the hammers as easily as other pianos. My Yamaha studio, though, is a delight to play, both loudly and quietly. It's obviously not the same mechanism in an upright to a ...


2

Good sites and great suggestions especially in the second link. Give them a try. But always stay under the limit and don't go beyond such that you end up breaking your precious fingers. For practicing on the guitar I would suggest following finger exercises (while playing): Using fingers 1 and 2: $6 1 3 $5 1 3 $4 1 3 $3 1 3 $2 1 3 $1 1 3 and back ...


0

I had the same confusion but i later learn that its all about being original. Sing you voice with certainty and expect good of you . Listen to you self as as you break the air during your practice. Finaly believe in you today so that you tomorrow will be great.



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