Tag Info

New answers tagged

4

As humans, we're not naturally inclined to play music in time. Our speech while rhythmic at times is vastly more complicated rhythmically than the majority of music out there. Just check out this article by Steve Vai in which he talks about polyrhythms. He talks about how one of the toughest challenges he has ever faced in music is transcribing speech. ...


1

Two additional points beyond BobRodes's answer For using the metronome as a gauge for progress with specific agility/speed exercises: e.g. taking a given exercise and increasing the metronome rate each day for a period of time. Focusing on listening to the click is a basic step towards being able to listen to other performers when in an ensemble situation. ...


2

A metronome can do several things. If a piece has a metronome marking, it can give you some idea of a composer's (or often an editor's) idea of how fast it should go. Also, it can give you an idea of whether your tempos through a piece are consistent. Especially when you are beginning to work on a piece, you can find that you are playing easier sections ...


0

What you're creating here is a G7 sound. You're fingering is a subtle variation on a traditional dom7 fingering that alternates bass notes between the 1 and the 5 of the chord, like this. E|------7------7-- B|------8------8-- G|-----10-----10-- D|---------------- A|--10------------ E|---------10----- Yours just moves from the 5 to the 3 of the chord, more ...


1

It sounds as if you're trying to plunge into ``real'' music headfirst. You might want to begin with easier pieces instead, designed for beginners to practice. There is plenty of free sheet music for entry level on the web. I myself find Carl Czerny's practical method really helpful in the sense that it is both manageable and challenging for a beginner. Ans ...


2

Practice. Specifically, practice long tones so you can concentrate on nothing but the sound quality. At least for a while, don't worry about the attack (start of the note) either, as that's a tricky thing all its own. Make small adjustments to your embouchure and mouthpiece "roll" to see what leads to the cleanest sound. Then keep doing long tones to ...


0

It really depends on how much time you have to prepare. You can probably adjust to the organ well enough to play a simplified version of the march at the wedding in 6 months, assuming you find a qualified private teacher and diligently follow his instructions. It will require a lot practice for you but is doable if you have the time.


0

Theoretically if you master this roll, there should be no difference between the two versions you mention, so it's of course good to practice both versions. However, as others already have indicated there are other considerations. I'll add another: from what I know, this exercise, among others similar, is also an introduction to playing tremolo with double ...


0

The pipe organ itself is not related to the piano in any way other than the scales of notes, and is about as similar to a piano as a xylophone is (actually it is more similar to a harpsichord). To be a good organist, you have to scrap much of what you have learned about piano technique, because very little of it will help you when you get onto the organ ...


1

There are slight differences between keyboard technique on organ and piano, but if you're a good pianist and have a decent ear, you'll probably make a lot of the adjustments automatically. As an experienced pianist, I did not find it difficult to learn to play organ manuals. Note that organ notes sustain as long as you hold the key, but there's no sustain ...


11

It's obvious when you think about it, but the biggest difference between an organ and a piano is the way their sounds decay. A piano is a hammer hitting a string. The loudest sound is right at the beginning, and from there on the sound decays organically as the string returns to rest. If you let the dampers do their thing, the decay is shortened, but it's ...


4

Organ playing requires more legato, learn to slide around the keyboard. Sometimes it helps to change fingers while the note is still held down so that you can move more smoothly to the next note. It's a good exercise for a pianist wanting to get a cleaner legato line.


5

At this stage, it's learning how to control the bounce of the stick - the second hit comes straight after the first, same hand, but after a bounce. Doing it this way also frees up the right hand after the roll, to maybe hit a crash. Alternating puts the last hit with right hand, so cuts down on time to reach a cymbal. However, every roll or fill you learn ...


0

That depends on what you mean with "different tune". It will sound different for sure, which you probably have noticed, and it will not be the intended exercise.


12

The black and white bits are the same, except you will probably only get 49/61 of them instead of the 88 you're probably used to. The action will be rather different, too. No matter how loudly or quietly you try to play, the volume will remain the same. There is no sustain pedal, so that will be different, too. You'll have to acclimatise yourself to playing ...


3

It sounds like you're probably going to play the Mendelssohn Wedding March. If so, this should be okay for you to play on the organ. Just looking on Google, there are loads of arrangements of this piece, both for piano and organ. Of course, a piano version will suit you much better, as you won't need to play the third stave, which is the pedal part played ...


3

There is no such thing as "natural voice" in singing, like there is no "natural movement" in sports or "natural look" in makeup. In all of that cases, "natural" is a particularly hard to pull off artificial creation that has to become a second nature to pull off convincingly. Now if you write stuff like Then I try to shape up my voice consciously to sound ...


1

Putting on a tone while singing is much the same as trying to write in a consciously different font, or speaking in an American accent when you know deep down you're only good at Irish ones. It's perfectly fine to try to spice up your singing with some extra flavour, but there are limits to how effective it is. If the new font you write in is illegible, it ...


1

I'd make a sort of barre with index (1st) finger,across the lot on fret 7, then use ring on (bottom, not top) E. G string with little finger, leaving the middle finger for the B string. Thumb is an option, frowned upon by classical purists, and is o.k. if one's hand is big enough, but may slow down the change for the next bit, as the thumb puts the whole ...


0

I would play the first chord as shown in your second option: 10 X X 10 8 7 with fingers 3 4 2 1 Then I would leave the 3rd and 4th finger where they are and lift up my 1st and 2nd finger to play the following notes: 10 X 9 10 8 X with fingers 3 2 4 1


2

Good choice of song! I Asked about the very same passage to my piano teacher, and it's actually not as difficult as you might imagine. Ok, here goes. Notice that the beginning arpeggios are all just a D major, and you have the exact same shape on the keys for each chord. I don't know what fingering you are using, but if you take 3 notes per ...


2

More often you go over the top, because there's a lot less room under your hand than over it. Sometimes if the moving hand is on white keys and the other hand is on black, it makes sense to go under. Hold your hands to minimize movement. Position your fingers over the notes. (Sorry, but that's where you're probably having trouble; you probably are on ...


2

Matt's is an excellent answer. One idea behind it is to economize on lateral wrist movement. Interestingly, I had the opposite problem when studying scales. I found that passing the thumb under the fingers was more difficult, as I had developed the habit of raising the fingers rather high when playing notes. It stands to reason that this makes it difficult ...


0

What helped me was to think it terms of the vocal melody to get ideas for the solo. Use the vocal melody as a starting point and improvising will become much easier as you have a starting point. The listener will hear bits of the melody in the solo which give them a feeling of cohesiveness with the song. Hopefully this will give you a starting point to base ...


0

TL;DR: Learn solos you like. Practice the things that are important to you. Keep practicing. The number one lesson I learned from playing the guitar is that practice works, but it takes time and there are no shortcuts. Longer version: What worked for me was learning other people's solos that I liked. And continue to practice them. One of the first ...


0

I think that you should improve your skills up to a level where you can have the melody of the solo in your head and be able to transpose it directly on the guitar. This requires a lot of practice. As my guitar teacher says "The music doesn't come from your fingers, it comes from your head." So going up and down the scales doesn't mean/do anything (i.e. ...


0

there are two important aspects of soloing: phrasing and selection of good target tones. Spend time with the pentatonic scale working on these two aspects. The pentatonic scale works over most chords in the key, so that's why it's the best starting point. Work on making "meaningful" phrases with the pentatonic scale, using specific tones you choose from that ...


0

This is a bit like this post : What is the best way to learn scales in order to improve improvisation/writing of lead guitar parts? My answer was to 'gain inspiration' from either other guitarists or from within yourself (by deciding how your solo will sound in advance). From what you describe, you have a knowledge of scales and technique. However just ...


13

Learning licks and solos by other musicians can be helpful in this respect. Obviously you'll want to develop your own voice, but no musician exists in a vacuum and it's definitely helpful to learn and analyze (if even unconsciously) the kinds of things musicians you admire have played. Depending on your style and the direction you want to go, it may be ...


0

To answer your question: evenly. :) That's why we use the fingerings that we do, because they are generally considered "best practice" to get the scales even. Now, I always start the Ab scales with the second finger in the right hand. There's no technical reason to pass the thumb under the fourth finger instead of the third, and for me passing under ...


2

I still remember one of my professors telling me once, when we were looking for a particularly sharp sound on a note in a piece (I think it was somewhere in Copland's "Variations for Piano"), holding his thumb and third finger together and banging down on the key from about eight inches. "That's your 'weapon'!" he grinned. You would be well served by ...


0

For scales and finger exercises, the Hanon studies are good. You can find them here. Part II has all the scales and arpeggios. I wouldn't read the introduction and try to do as recommended (go through all the exercises from end to end over the course of a couple of years). Those Victorians were gluttons for punishment, after all. Pick and choose. That ...


1

I thought I would add an organist's perspective to the already excellent answers. On the organ, you often start playing a note with one finger and without lifting it up, finish the note with another finger. This is due to the lack of a sustain pedal, and the fact that the most comfortable fingering from the previous note to the current note might not be ...


4

To change or not to change. This depends. You've got three choices here: to play the same key with the same finger - Piano Sonata No. 21 (Waldstein), First movement: Allegro con brio by Ludwig van Beethoven to play the same key with another finger - Étude Op. 10, No. 7 by Frédéric Chopin to split the same key between different hands - Toccata in D minor, ...


5

I'm wondering if there are any important benefits to either technique. Where speed is needed, alternating fingerings on the same note really do help, and it pays off to take the time to learn this, however unnatural it might seem at first. Of course, you'll find up to a certain speed you'll be able to tap out the same note again and again without an ...


17

If you would like to see a tour de force in the use of repeated notes, have a look at Martha Argerich's performance of Scarlatti's D Minor Sonata: You will notice that she uses 321321 ...


9

Getting an even touch with alternating fingers might feel hard at first. However, try knocking the table with one finger and alternating two or more. You find you can tap a lot faster in the latter case. This speed reserve gives you more overhead and more control. On the other hand when you're playing two different notes you're mostly using different ...


4

Several factors are involved in the process of deciding, which finger must be used to play the key. Reasons to change a finger in sequence of repeating keys may be one of the following: If in the continuation of the piece it will be needed to change your hand position, so you can play next part easily. A key played with different fingers sounds more ...



Top 50 recent answers are included