New answers tagged

0

The "classical" technique for repeated notes, in twos or threes, is to "change fingers", e.g. fingering a fast triplet 1,2,3. This may be what Tim meant.


0

There is a link at the bottom on this page http://www.piano.christophersmit.com/repetitionMech.html which has an animation of how the repetition mechanism works in a grand piano action. I would expect a piano tech did a careful job of regulating those pianos before that performance! The grand piano repetition action works well, and is consistent between the ...


1

The key recovery time on grand pianos is much less than on uprights, due to a different mechanism, so it's more difficult to execute this on most uprights.Thumb,index and middle are the usual way, with the hand suspended over the key.


0

I alternate between a pick and fingers for various reasons. I'll mainly use my fingers when I'm playing songs which only require the low end strings, however I'll switch to a pick if I need to play songs which require the high strings to be used. Why? Mainly due to the fact that my index finger is significantly shorter than my middle finger (my two plucking ...


0

I think I've (almost) found a solution, at least for situations involving just one tapping finger. it involves using the palm to mute similar to normal playing. the trick is to instead aiming for the very tip of the tapping finger and pulling off towards the adjacent string, hammer-on very slightly below the string and pull of upwards. i got the idea from ...


0

Yes! I am a left handed guitarist! And yes i look at right handed diagrams. It is basically identifying your fingers. Remember! the index finger is always number 1, the middle number 2, ring number 3, and pinky 4. You cannot go wrong!!!


0

It I were to practice a fast piece, Patience is key. I would first start with a metronome at a slow speed. Try to figure out all the best fingering patterns and gradually increase your speed when you feel more confident. Don't rush it. Second, you could try some finger exercises like etudes and studies. Practicing scales would help too. If there is a ...


2

In my observations of many guitar players at the many Open Mic events I have attended over the past ten years, I have found that some guitarist tend to strum closer to the fret-board than the bridge. I have also observed that where a guitarist strumming lands on the strings will often vary depending on whether he/she is playing standing with a strap or ...


4

Picking near the octave (specifically, an octave above the fretted notes) can produce a neat effect since it emphasizes the second harmonic. However, I find it's better for individual notes or slower glides across the strings than for rhythm strumming. In either case, however, striking the guitar top is poor technique. Even extreme angles of attack ...


0

The closest I've come to the Rooster clean tone is with using a CE-1 Anolog Chorus from my POD HD500, a EHX Deluxe Electric Mistress Flanger, and a dual amp setup with one of the amps being a Yamaha RA-200 rotating speaker. The chorus and flanger are blended on two paths of my signal (lets call them 'A' & 'B') Then those two signals run through a VOX ...


0

Bro I think I'm starting to have the same issue, no inflammation, but tightness and pain in the forearm below the elbow - I've been stressing about it for the last week and scouring the net for solutions. This video is the best I've found - do the digging in exercises, in and around the areas in your forearm that are tight. Do your stretching as well. I've ...


0

With 6 notes and 5 fingers, you obviously need one hand position change in each sextuplet. Work systematically through every possibility of where to use your thumb in the middle of each group, then find the best way to finger the other notes around that thumb position. The "best" fingering for you will depend on the size of your hand and your playing ...


3

Fret wraps (or hair bands, basically anything that can wrap around a fretboard and mute the strings) are used to mute the open strings while performing a tapping passage. They are placed around the strings near the nut of the instrument to prevent the open strings from sounding. This limits the use of open strings during performance. A sponge mute can also ...


0

short answer: no. long answer: it depends the position of the thumb behind the neck isn't as important compared to the orientation of your wrist. rather the thumb should be able to support any position required to facilitate proper wrist orientation. as long the thumb isn't exerting excess pressure (really it should just sit there), and isn't in an ...


0

Apart from the point that many guitarists seem to rather like using, ahem, questionable technique†, it's a fact that fret-hand-leg (FHL)‡ doesn't work very well with most guitars – at least when you're just sitting on a normal chair. Even with classical guitar this doesn't make much sense – FHL with a footrest is how I originally ...


1

It looks cooler. You're absolutely right about the ergonomics being better; it promotes better posture and less stress in the wrist and back. But to the Average Joe, it does look "Square", even though many metal and prog (read: technical) guitarists promote that posture, as well as holding the guitar higher up while standing. I think you'll find people ...


1

I was intrigued, and had a go putting it on my left leg for a change... the main problem was that it wasn't a very natural angle for my right hand and arm when using with a pick - as my hand was moving at more of an angle to the strings, I had to move further, and it was harder to adjust to get the pick at the correct angles for different techniques. It was ...


0

You can basically make any finger work. Really depends on what feels good to you and which fingers you primarily use while playing. I go over a few different ways of doing it in this video I did.


4

I'm going to assume that by "left leg", what you mean is "left leg in the style of a classical guitarist, with the left leg elevated on a small stool and the neck of the guitar raised up very high". Left leg with the neck parallel to the ground would be ridiculous, and impossible for a steel string acoustic for one to get one's picking hand around to the ...


0

I'm not sure that the fact you are a bass singer makes a difference to the question of trying to sing higher - I think that singing higher could be a goal of both basses or tenors, and so I offer some general advice for singing higher. First off, do you understand what your falsetto is? Every male singer has a falsetto, and while you may never be able to ...


0

In this case, you would play the first two bottom notes (E and G), then shift your bow to play the top two notes (G and D), since it is very difficult to play on three strings at once.


0

Tutorial This guy has a decent video explaining the kickdrum. To add the extended bass to it, push your lips slightly forward and keep connecting your breath from your lungs to the initial sound you make from your lips. I think it's important to keep in mind that the kickdrum only requires pressure to be built up from your lips. If you don't have the sound ...


2

Something that you may want to do is slowly work your voice into a higher range, by slowly trying to make yourself sing higher. For example, try practicing something that you think is slightly higher than you're comfortable with. You could try singing a Bass 1 or a Tenor 2 part if you sing Bass 2 for a majority of your choir's pieces. Another ...


5

These are called triple stops. There are also double stops and, I think they're called, quadruple stops. Double stops can be easily played by keeping your bow level between the two strings so that it touches both. Harder to play are triple and quad stops. These are usually played with a rolled bow quickly. Usually for these, you try to keep them bow ...


9

Depends on the era. Baroque violins had a less curved bridge and less string tension. This made it easier to play three notes simultaneously without sounding out of line. The given chord is sort-of unusual but can be fingered in second position as 4-2-1 on G-D-A strings. Now here is where it gets strange: this is labeled "easy can-can" and a chord in ...


5

It is not easily seen in this video, she uses an up bow playing the 4 notes as two double-stops in succession. Hahn - Mozart - Violin Concerto No.3 starting at about 1:18. The first one is a G the second chord is an A I believe. Here is another one on youtube What Is a Chord? | Violin Lessons . So I would play the bottom two as a double-stop and then ...


13

It's very common to write 3 or 4 note chords for strings, and the implication is to play it as two gestures in quick succession. Here is the first page of the first movement of Beethoven's first symphony: On the fourth bar, there's a 4-note chord (mercifully, with two open strings). The standard way to play this is to quickly play a double stop on the ...


13

You're right, you can't play three notes at once on the violin with a normal bow and pressure. What's almost certainly meant here is an arpeggio, playing the three notes quickly one after the other. This is often notated sloppily as a chord which is not really possible to play- even Bach did this in his violin sonatas, leaving generations of violinists ...


3

Having played both piano and harpsichord, let me throw another idea out there on top of all the excellent academic sources people have quoted: In harpsichord it does not matter how hard or soft you hit the key (since it plucks rather than hits the string). Good technique is, thus, centered around control of the "touch", and typically the goal is to keep ...


-1

3 and a half is indeed a good description. For blues or rock it seems that fretting and bending the fret a step up from the fret your index is on with your middle finger and fretting and bending the fret one and a half steps up from the fret your index is on with your ring finger lends itself to a more powerful, confident sound, especially if you're using ...


6

Your basic problem is that your organ technique will "get you by" on the piano in the sense that you can play the right notes at the right time, but the techniques of the two instruments are really very different. Probably the quickest way in the long run is to put most of your effort into technical exercises that force you to use "piano technique" rather ...


5

Yes, in principle you should try to keep the larynx low in order to achieve higher and clearer high notes, but "rock solid" is perhaps not the best metaphor, as what's needed is a high degree of relaxation and keeping that relaxation when changing register. Any attempt at exerting strength (over the larynx) will produce crispation of the larynx, the opposite ...


0

Relaxation, both physically and mentally, and not expecting too much too soon, are probably the key aspects. What degrees of dexterity or difficulty in specific aspects of piano playing could be expected, considering you are an experienced organist, is debatable. But what's certain is that anxiety and over expectations will only add to the (presumed) ...


1

Funfact not sure if you have seen them yet, you can now buy rock tips a small bottle with an apllicator hardens your finger tips for those high and repeated bends and vibrato. Especially if you are using 11s or 12s top E String


2

It's not clear from the question whether your fingering is for your own playing, or whether you want to add fingering to the score for other people to play. For professionally published scores, usually there is no fingering, or the fingering is added by the editor, not by the composer. So if you are "a bit of a novice", don't put any fingering at all in the ...


0

I would rather say : 3/1 ; 4/2 ; 5/3 ; 5/3 ; 4/2 At the transition 5/3 just lift your hand to help your fingers. It allows you to be fully relaxed.


0

The minim gives time to change fingers, so it's possible to put 3/5 on G/B, then change both to 1/3. Or, go straight to 1/3 on G/B. The original way works quite well, though.It's also playable leaving 3/5 on G/B, and using a little jump to get to A/C with the same 3/5, although it needs a bit of doing to make it smooth(ish).


3

My opinion? I don't think the difference in sound he noticed has much to do with magnetic interactions between the pickup and the metal pick. He used a metal pick instead of a plastic one, simple as that. (Try using different picks on an acoustic guitar, or an electric with only piezo pickups, if you don't believe me.) Changing your pick or just your ...


1

Isn't this what an E-bow does? Get one of those and go wild with it...


0

I don't know whether this is bad practice, but I "cheat", according on everyone's responses so far. Why can't we just use non-consecutive fingers to perform trills? It's much easier, faster, and less tiring. Why use finger 5 at all (worse yet, finger 4 with it)? 2-5 or 1-5 could work, though awkward. My piano teacher advised to use fingers 2-4 or 1-3 to ...


2

Step 1 is to get your normal single tonguing as clean as possible. Make sure that the tongue is moving quickly and without any extraneous movement. Also check that your jaw isn't moving at all; it's somewhat common for people to develop a "chewing" motion. If your single tonguing has extra motion, double tonguing is going to be nearly impossible. Step 2 ...



Top 50 recent answers are included