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Depends quite a lot on genre. I'll explain my normal process as they vary so much you can't define a method. 1: Melody/Chords/Sound design Depending on what I come up with first, this almost defines my process. Most often this is sound design and least often a melody, however, as difficult as it is to start with a melody, these bring out the best results ...


-1

All these take practice. I usually start with whatever comes to mind, maybe a chord pattern, a melodic hook, or even a string of patterns. I like to start with lyrics but other people like to start with melodies.


1

Learning to play guitar takes dedication and deliberate practice over a long and sustained period of time! It is a process. There is no short cut that allows you to quickly be able to play like Sungha Jung. I often liken learning to play guitar (or any instrument) as a journey. But the process can be fun if you allow it to be. You can enjoy the journey ...


2

Get a teacher. A really really good teacher. A good teacher will help you set your goals and find the means to achieve them. Don't be afraid to switch teachers or even try a couple of different teachers at the same time.


1

Well first of all, kudos to you for hearing the problem and wanting to improve. So the overall answer of course is the speed at which you change fingerings, and this is something that will improve naturally over time as long as you continue to HEAR the problem and focus on improving. But there are also techynical adjustments and tricks you can use. There are ...


2

It could be the set up of the guitar, but it could also be the fact that you let the pressure off the strings too slowly and for too long. This gives the sound of a well pressed down string a chance to buzz. Try to hold on to each note, or each note of a chord, until you're just ready to change to the next. Then get there as quickly as you can. It won't ...


7

Many (most?, all?) musicians go through phases like this, for some people they'll just recur, and you need to accept it. The stereotype of the tortured artist exists for a reason. If you're doing music for your own enjoyment, and aren't enjoying it then stop. Take a long walk, do some gardening, read or write a book. Take a day, a week, or more, off. ...


0

Most often caused by fingers dragging across the the strings when changing chords. The solution? Practice, practice, practice. It takes a while to build up any muscle memory, and considering each chord shape is a muscle memory in its own right, it takes a lot of practicing to switch between your whole chord repertoire seamlessly.


3

You may buy or prepare a string dampener (elasic hair or guitar version) .


1

I believe that a tenor - for example, sings with the vocal chords 'closed' in head voice but still maintains the tenor range. The same voice singing in falsetto opens the chords and sings in an 'artificial' range. I suppose that an excellent example in (old) popular music is Roy Orbison who seamlessly crossed from chest to falsetto. In classical and ...


4

Dampen the strings below the frets you are tapping. Usually by using a finger on the fretting hand that's not doing anything else. Maybe this means re-positioning your fretting fingers, to free up the index.


0

Typically, I would say that you should end up around the middle of the bow on the note before D. So, just use the rest of the bow. Let me recommend to you a channel on Youtube, Allyson's Violin Studio. She has play-through videos, and practice clips.


0

Play slowly first, then, once you know the piece, gradually start playing it faster. Use a metronome, and do not expect immediate results.


1

Ragtime can be considered as one of the precursors to boogie woogie. Ragtime itself came initially from rearranging marches by the likes of Sousa (considered part of the classical tradition) for piano whilst adding in polyrhythms. The rhythmic changes are in some part down to the limitations of piano orchestration as opposed to marching band orchestration ...


4

I don't know how much the boogie players were classically trained on average, but to answer the question "Is there anything in the pre-20th century classical canon that resembles the boogie-woogie bass line" the Alberti Bass, as pointed out by Laurance Payne, sure comes to mind. But I would add a number of pieces by Bach. Take for example the second prelude ...


17

Beethoven got close in the final movement of his last piano sonata (the relevant part is from 0:30 to the end of the video)


3

I suppose you could draw a comparison with the Alberti Bass. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alberti_bass


2

I was having the same problem as a beginner and wondered the exact same thing. I even tried switching to playing guitar the other way around (fretting with my dominant right hand). That's when I discovered something interesting. You see by the time I became frustrated with my seemingly clumsy left hand because of the things it could not seem to do as ...


1

Like what Todd and Sazid said, don't expect to have an immediate result. Also, it helps if you build up confidence in your left hand. You can do this by plucking the notes, instead of using the bow. Although it might not sound as nice, it builds up muscle memory in your left hand so you don't need to stress over it while playing in a performance. Also, ...


0

I play Piano but it is a very similar thing with coordinating each hand differently. The trick is not to think of each limb playing its own part but instead to think of it as all four limbs playing one part. Don't play the bass drum with your left foot and the snare with your right hand, play the drum kit with your body. Like typing on a computer keyboard. ...


0

few things you can try here, a noise supressor pedal can help eliminate the pick noise but too much can cause you to lose sustain. also see if you can lower your pickups a little and use more volume and eq from your amp to get the tone you need and may lose. most of the time you don't lose enough to notice unless you bottom out the pickups. a pickup too ...


2

CPE Bach certainly made that assertion about his father, but remember that they both had very limited access to anything except "contemporary music", compared with what is available to anyone today. If you look at any collection of 16th century keyboard music written 50-100 years before JSB), it is full of octave stretches, especially for the left hand. ...


-2

I switch back and forth between 3-2 and 4-3 depending on what chord I need to play next...CM7 vs Cm7 vs Cm6 for example


0

I just realized there is a great simple and fun way to instantly improve finger strength and dexterity. I'm sure many people do this by nature, but for people like me it was a great catch. Open this playlist (from the Dave Conservatoire - an great resource for itself), and play all the songs one by one, and use your fingers to clap the beat. I always used ...


1

(Sorry, this was to be a comment continuing on the previous thread, but I wanted to include pictures) This picture was used in a video class I've seen, by Prof. Craig Wright from Yale where he corroborated the perspective that primite (late medieval/early renaissance context) keyboard playing was done without using the thumbs. He also referred to what he ...


9

Rumour or hearsay, I think, abetted by C.P.E. Bach. Yes. Evidently Santamaria's Arte de taƱer fantasia from the 16th century gives examples of quick scale passages using the thumb, and also warns about using the thumb on black keys except when paired with an octave. I'm getting this secondhand (Historical Harpsichord Technique: Developing La douceur du ...


4

Many musicians learn to overcome various handicaps (including missing fingers) and become very accomplished on their instrument of choice. People play with their head and their heart - their fingers are just a means to execute what they wish to express musically. Given enough desire and commitment, anyone can learn to play piano or guitar with fewer than ...


4

As a brass player myself, I'd like to extend some tips for learning how to perform multiphonics on brass instruments. These tips are presented in a specific sequential order. 1.) Practice buzzing your lips while humming (without the instrument) The first thing you need to do is begin getting use to the sensation of doing those two things at the same time ...



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