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There's two parts to your question: (1) "Where does my passaggio end?" and (2) "What's going on when I sing up to E5 like this?" (1) Unfortunately, there's a lot of disagreement in the terminology and classification of the vocal registers, especially in the male voice. Some vocalists don't even really consider passaggio to be a real thing, since your vocal ...


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Sliding as Tim suggests is definitely a possibility, but my teachers always discouraged it. As you noted in the comments it can be difficult to move while pedalling, and it is generally a somewhat awkward and inaccurate movement regardless (especially if the bench is leather or something and you must lift off it to slide down). I think a combination of ...


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The simplest is to slide along the seat so that there isn't a great reach any more. With scales, unless they're contrary, make sure your body is central to the central part of whichever scale you play. You may need to start an octave lower, or higher, to compensate. Most people will be able to play to 5 octaves apart, but not very often will the need to ...


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There is a story of noted British percussionist Gary Kettel being asked by a conductor how to get more tone out of a bass drum. He scratched his head and finally said: "Well, maestro, you could tell 'im to 'it it 'arder".


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You need to measure the primary frequency your drum puts out, convert that to a wavelength, then set your drums that distance or half that distance from a sound-reflective back wall. Probably somewhere in the neighborhood of 10-20 or 5-10 feet for the half distance. A fourth of that distance (which is unfortunately a more likely location) will actually ...


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You can't avoid playing with the tongue, especially if you need to split notes. It's also goofy to spend the whole time looking up. Do not attempt blowing out to clear spit; That just makes it worse. Here's what to do: If you must do some intense extended blowing, those are times you need to be looking up. Otherwise, as part of your routine, be aware of ...


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One technique my college band used, since we were using electronics anyway, was to mike the drum and play it with an extremely soft beater so as to minimize the ictus. Then, with amplification, you can adjust the volume up very high so that the resonant boom caries well.


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As mentioned in my comment, it would be best to ask the user who answered that other question what he exactly meant. Here I can tell you what I think he meant, and also what my take on this issue is. First of all I think that "scooping" is not at all a standard term when it comes to right-hand guitar technique. What I think is meant by it in the context of ...


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In the answer you linked, the reference to scooping could have meant to keep your pick close to the strings as you move up and down the neck as opposed to allowing your picking hand to "scoop" (drop) below the neck. Obviously the only person who can say for sure is the person who posted said linked answer. This advice applies to playing fast picking ...


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Particularly when using only upstrokes with tones on the same string, at least I get a more pronounced scooping motion when the pick moves towards the string. You still strike perpendicular to the string. I believe what is described is whether or not this motion is parallel to the body of the guitar. If you try striking a a chord using up- and downstrokes, ...


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5 min won't get any a day get is not nearly enough. You need to spend 10,000 hours to truly master something. That something can be anything. So since you play the guitar and you don't put the time in and the right type of time, you won't get anywhere. A master pianist once told me you need to eliminate mistakes first. So practice scales or the piece of ...


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One of the arguments I have heard is to keep time on a cycle, not a line. If you're tapping your foot, think of it as though you were moving in a circle, with a tap near the bottom (realistically your foot will still move in a line, but what matters is how your mind is thinking about the motion, not the actual motion itself). When you tap your foot up and ...


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Using a metronome only has the demoralizing effect of making me want to turn it off. It's okay to turn your metronome off, so long as eventually you turn it back on again. The reason it's demoralizating is that it's exposing the faults in your playing. The reason that it's helpful is that it's... exposing the faults in your playing. The metronome is ...


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Playing in tempo needs your brain to focus on the music and the tempo at the same time. Play very easy music with metronome (i would start doing quarter notes only) so your mind can focus on the tempo. Record yourself to listen relaxed after. And smile and have fun!


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I have a few ideas. Play with a live person. It's fun to play duets. Or you could each take one hand of a piano piece. Connect some earbuds to an electronic metronome to give yourself a click track. Record the right hand of your piece on an mp3 player, listening to the click track in your ear while you're playing. Then plug the earbuds into the mp3 ...


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I play and now teach ancient style rudimental snare drum, which has all kinds of screwy tempo things that happen and weird technique that makes certain patterns want to drag. Generally, the biggest hurdle to keeping a steady beat is fluency - your body gets in the way of what you're trying to do. To demonstrate this, can you clap to a beat? If you can, ...


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If it's that frustrating, don't start out trying to play a piece to the metronome. Just practice rhythm and timing separately from the melody. Does your metronome have a visual option, where you can turn the volume off, but it's still keeping time? Count a few beats with the metronome audible at a moderate tempo (80-120 bpm), and then turn the volume off, ...


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A few extra + Pick points to add to leftaroundabout's answer: Easier to evenly accent 8ths / 16ths patterns, even when playing fast Even if you can go as fast with three fingers as you can with a pick, you can get more appropriate accenting from the natural up/down motion of picking when playing 8ths / 16ths than you can when using three fingers. This ...


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On a grand piano, you can play ff with the soft pedal down if you want. You get a different tone color by moving the hammers sideways so a different part of the hammer strikes the string, but the volume of sound doesn't change much if your fingers use the same amount of force with una corda and tre corde. But that doesn't work on an upright piano, where the ...


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I presume this is the passage? Under the circumstances, I don't think you can play it dry: you'll need to play the latter three quavers (eighth notes) of each group of quavers with the left hand. You will have to pedal with the LH semibreves (whole notes) and minims (half notes), although you can delay the onset of pedal until slightly after the start of ...


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Hanon also has finger strengthening and trill exercizes.


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My advice: relax. You can't make a trill faster by straining; as soon as you notice you start straining, take a step back and begin slowly and relaxed again. I would advice against flicking, since this will induce unnecessary strains in your finger, and will not be a viable option in the long term. Another trick: my piano teacher always used to try and have ...


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If you're spending a lot of time behind a computer you might have started slouching when sitting. This posture can result in reduced blood flow to your arms causing them to fatigue more quickly when strained. If this is the case you could try the Brugger's Relief Position, and try to be more aware of your posture (also during other activities). If this is ...


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The anatomical problem is not so much that the 5th finger is weak (on its own it is as strong as the others) but that the 4th and 5th are not fully independent since they are operated by different parts of the same muscle, and in "normal life" they don't get much use that develops their independence. A simple demonstration of this: put your hand flat on a ...


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From my experience as a guitar teacher there are some people who (with some practice) are able to play that chord, and some simply aren't. You're dependent on the size of your hand and especially of the flexibility of your third finger. People who can flex their third finger in the "wrong" direction will find it easier to play that chord. Also your pinky ...


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Some basic things to learn. Patterns Root Fifth Root Fifth Octave Root Fifth Flat Seventh Root Fifth Sixth Boogie Woogie Bass Chromatic Approach Notes Straight & Shuffle Rhythms


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You're probably already doing something similar in adjusting your tonguing to the embouchure you're using for different notes, using a wider, more open lip position for the lower notes. If you're not, then you need to experiment with it, or you'll produce a sharper attack and therefore a different tone on the higher notes than the lower ones. To see the ...


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Czerny has an exercise for right hand trills on all finger pairs: Exercise #36 in "125 Exercises in Passage Playing, Opus 261, Book 1". It's short just musical enough to not be overly boring. A little Czerny every day has really helped my technique.


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Anything that works for you is legit! Try holding the arm very steady,so that your bent fingers have just the tips touching the keys. Articulate from the knuckles closest to the palm. Some trills can work from a side to side movement of the hand. Pinkies are the weakest, therefore the worst to trill with. Move the hand across, so you use other fingers. ...


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The word that I have heard used for this technique is "covering," as in "he shifted to a more covered tone for that high note." As Greg noted, it involves manipulating the resonance chambers of the throat to change the formant structure of the vocal tone.


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There are numerous online resources available. See Scott's Bass Lessons on YouTube to start with. He as an excellent video on postures, fingering, etc. for electric bass guitar. I'm sure with a simpe search you could find the same info for stand-up / acoustic bass as well.


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If you are taking the theory knowledge as a given, off the top of my head, you're left with Instrument choice Fretless? 4-, 5-, or 6- string (or more?) Short scale? Active or passive? In some ways, bass is like a family of instruments. Do you want to focus on one, or spread yourself around a bit? Posture and holding the instrument Just standing and ...


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It's often been said, and I certainly agree, that teaching something makes you learn it really well. You're already a teacher, why not get the bassics (sic) and start some pupils. You will always be a few steps ahead, if not more! Finding your way round a bass is not difficult, and techniques can be your own. Nothing wrong with that. For the more advanced ...


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Do you also have the basics of the instrument's hand positioning for chords, etc. down? No one can teach feel...it must come from your soul. That said however technical ability can be taught - you say you are all set there. Excellent!! Now, find your voice and play! I suggest that you choose a few amazing Bass Players in the genre of music you prefer, find ...


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I was always taught NOT to stick my tongue out. You are supposed to whisper 'too' into the flute to separate notes, and more of a 'doo' for something a bit more Legato.


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I'm not familiar with any specific name that technique has, and, really, it's a rather subtle thing that I wouldn't call a distinct technique in itself. You may hear this variously described as having a "darker" tone, or sometimes as being "throatier". What these singers are doing is opening up the back of the throat more (lifting their soft palate and ...


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Some terms that come to mind, which you can look up and learn a lot about, are: Cacophony Discord Tritone Dissonance Harmonic tension Atonality Sturm und Drang Dissonant intervals This should be a good start, at the very least!



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