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Remember you don't have to connect everything. Where you lift and breathe (which should make sense with the music) can simplify fingering. Fingering can help articulate. I would play 5-4-3-2-1 and then jump to get the chord with (124). You said that doesn't work with the span of your hand, but I bet it would if you move your wrist properly (to put the hand ...


1

Old thread but here is my suggestion: I have a strange ability to do tremolo crazy fast by kind of "spazzing-out" my right arm, from the elbow. The way I do this, is to hold the arm rigidly and try to force it both up-bow and down-bow at the same time, if that makes any sense? It's like the muscles on either side of the arm (bicep vs. tricep) are both ...


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just a suggestion; (1) If you are using the e-guitar with extremely hi-gain settings, then you should also logically use/practice power chord structures in this case, as using full or extended chords with this type of setting would only sound like mud (2) Use your acoustic or the e-guitar (with a classic rock / blues type of distortion) to practice the full ...


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I actually feel like that is one of the easier combinations to play. There are far worse ones, for sure. MattPutnam gave you one answer, but I think in a lot of ways it is more difficult than playing it with the standard fingers. Start out with a metronome, playing it roughly half the required performance tempo. Then gradually increase the tempo by a couple ...


2

One other option would be to finger both B and D as 1+3, and the A as 3. Normally, this fingering is too sharp for both B and D, but you can kick out the first valve slide to correct for this. Really though, I think that the normal fingering should work just fine. The problem is with the sheer length of the run causing repetitive motion fatigue. The ...


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Yes. Another well-known example is Fly Me to the Moon, written in 3/4 but far more often played in 4/4, both as a slow or fast tune. Most tunes can be stretched or squashed to add or subtract a beat (or two!), but lots won't actually sound successful. I used to play Lullaby of Birdland in 5/4 which did work well. Often, just making the last note of each bar ...


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Flatwound strings It's an extreme option to be sure, but flatwound strings have drastically reduced scraping noises compared to roundwound. It's in their very design. Rather than a rippled profile like with roundwound, the edge of flatwound strings is nearly flat, with tiny gaps between the windings. When very new, they may have a slight very high pitched ...


4

I play acoustic guitar primarily but I do use a great deal of sliding on strings to emulate bends that I would do on an electric guitar - and I like to keep the string noise toned down a bit. Most of the string noise I get comes from the lateral movement of my fingers down the strings which can sound like sawing wood on the wound strings as my fingers run ...


6

How often do you play loud volume/high gain? This is definitely a skill that is "picked up" over time, and playing in that kind of environment will help you out. One definitely needs to "learn" to play loud. If that makes sense. It can be tackled a few thousand different ways, as I'm sure we'll see in the answers here but what has worked for me is ...


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Yes and the 3/4 one is the original and the 4/4 one is an arrangement. A lot of songs have different arrangements for different reasons which have many, many different effects on the resulting piece. You can make Mary Had a Little Lamb swing if you want to or make it more harmonically complex if you wanted to and that would be a different arrangement of that ...



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