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An advantage of the approach you describe is that if one finger is solidly fretting the second string, it won't matter if another finger lightly touches it. Having the upper-fret barre finger cleanly fret some strings while cleanly missing the next nearer one is hard; it's much easier to fret 3-4 if the finger is allowed to touch 2 without cleanly fretting ...


1

I have seen people who can get that F on the first (highest) string, but it is almost freakish. Usually that highest string is muted for me. Also, I would never fail to barre the sixth (lowest) string. Just remember in this voicing, your root note is on the fifth string. If you are "boom chucking" (playing root/chord/fifth/chord' etc.) it puts that lower ...


2

If I want the high E string, if I need the high note, I play it with the middle finger on the G string, the ring finger on the D string and the pinky on the B. If I play the two-finger chord, I don't even want the high E. I know you can, but it isn't what I'm doing.


1

Another option is to use the 4th finger to barr the 3 notes at the 3rd fret - my 4th finger will bend further and be able to leave the top string untouched. (Took a few weeks of practice though!)


4

Rather than asking what's correct, try it and see whether you like it. If you play a part without any muting and you like how it sounds, stick with it. However, most bassists mute a lot, and here's why: Bass parts are generally monophonic, rooting the music, and having other notes hanging around confuses things. Whereas guitarists often finger chords even ...


6

Both answers are great, but do you know there are other ways to play this chord here. The index barre can be over all 6 strings, which can all be strummed. It just gives an inversion of Bb. 3 fingers can be used, on 2nd, 3rd and 4th strings. Otherwise, two fingers can be used, with two strings held down by one finger, and the other with another finger. As ...


32

I use this kind of "A-shape" barre chord all the time, although I must admit I rarely teach it to students. I actually find it easier than using fingers 2, 3 and 4 to play the three fret 3 notes. All you have to do is bend your third L.H. finger backwards, so that the joint nearest the knuckle moves forwards and away from string 1. Here's a picture of me ...


27

Not everybody can do this but the trick is your finger forms a 2nd, partial barre at the 3rd fret, but bends so it raises above the highest string. Some people play A like this as standard however I believe it partly comes down to luck how long your fingers are, how practical this technique will be. Check out this awful drawing:


2

I play bass myself, started off with guitar of course, and I must say that both instruments are very different when it comes to muting. While a guitar, depending on the genre or the part you're playing (like harmonic parts and ringing notes), can sound quite good without muting... A bass often does not. The reason for that is that the bass forms the ...


1

Because of the bass’s fundamental roles in harmony and rhythm, it’s especially important to play cleanly, clearly, and deliberately. Among other things, that means muting any unwanted tones. Bassists have a variety of muting techniques, using either hand or both together. On the fretting hand, you can touch unused strings with your fingertips, or lay ...


4

Generally players do mute unused strings. The commonest is using RH thumb on the bottom string (unless being played!) Some will use spare fingers of RH, and/or fleshy part of LH fingers. I know a bass player - session guy, incredible player, who devised his own muting method which involves each digit muting an unused string, leaving one spare for playing the ...


0

I'd like to throw something out there from a physiological perspective. In your wrist there are 8 carpal bones, two forearm bones, several major tendons, a couple veins and 3 nerves. The more structures in a smaller space means that that space is easier to injure. More different surfaces of bones are rubbing together, therefore more wear and tear. Your elbow ...


2

Well, it is a vague instruction so there is a lot of freedom in interpreting it. For me, it means making use of the full bow length, being in charge of the expression, developing particularly the long notes (which means that you don't just start them and then some time later they end and nothing happens in between) with an organic quality of dynamic, bow ...


1

The pro-style 4 mallet grip allows for a very wide selection of intervals and easy switching between them. It gets kind of fidgety at the extremes, but a good player should really have no trouble reaching anything that the mallets can physically reach. For context, I am by no means a great percussionist and I honestly have little problem playing any ...


2

To add my $0.02 - There is actually a really wonderful text for percussion writing called How to write for percussion by Samuel Z. Soloman, which is fairly comprehensive (and has some really handy beater charts!) Remember to think of physical distance - a simple 4 octave jump that would be easy on a piano might mean a marimbist having to move 6-8 feet! ...


1

http://www.wisegeek.com/what-does-cantabile-mean.htm says:. ..in order to have a singing quality, the performer needed to execute the music with expression, flexibility and an overall sense of naturalness. The idea was to convey as much humanness and drama through the line as possible, even if the music was not for the voice. You need to play ...


4

Hmm. On vibes I think you can safely and easily expect each hand to be able to reach an octave span; it depends some on the player and what part of the instrument you're in generally (e.g., on marimba you can probably get a noticeably wider range - maybe out to a 10th - at the upper end of the instrument, where the bars are closer together). On vibes that ...


2

Oddly enough, I actually ran into this very scenario yesterday as I was giving a guitar lesson. I initially had the student play the G in the way you describe, with pinkie on the high "e" (I always play this way as it is much easier for many other chord shapes). After seeing the student struggle quite a bit, we switched to the other fingering indicated in ...


2

It's something , as a teacher, that I've never addressed. Whichever is the easier option is the one taken. It's after all, within the first half a dozen chords a beginner will learn. Fingers will be weak, but one way or other will suit most.At some point, they need strengthening, so why not start immediately? Occasionally, pupils will also use the 3rd fret ...


0

There are already a whole load of answers but I thought I'd share some nice videos on the topic - and also to reiterate "everybody struggles with this!" There's no magic 'trick' to barre chords, you just have to practice both the technique and build up some strength. Just like you have to build up calluses on your fingertips over time, you have to build up ...


0

Long term success with barre chords comes from repetition and proper form. Be sure your thumb is directly behind your barre finger when you form the chord. To make things easier as you build strength, try tuning the guitar a half or whole step flat which will reduce the string tension and make it easier to play barre chords. If you don't want to play your ...


0

Aside from double/triple tonguing there is really no different technique. However, what you noticed is a discrepancy on how one should tongue. A vast of majority of teachers in the elementary and or high school level will teach their students to either tongue either right behind their teeth (what you were probably taught) which is the "tut" deal or right in ...


2

In The Jazz Theory Book, Mark Levine defines playing in the pocket simply as grooving, where the rhythm section is locked in and working as a unit. in the pocket When the music is rhythmically in a groove. groove The “lock” between members of a rhythm section playing well together.


0

There are several variations but try this one. After some practice it should flow easily. "-" sign means "ligado" or hammer-on/off 5.p - 4.p 3.i 2.m 1.a now comes the jump to A on 2nd string played with i then m, a - , i, m, now jump back and play with "a" finger all 4 remaining notes, like sliding with a finger. Use the same technique on all arpeggios ...


5

I notice two differences in the drum beat at this point. One is what Tim mentioned in his answer, the beat takes on a swing rhythm, specifically the 16th notes are swung. The other difference, which I think might be what you are referring to, is that the snare hits start to happen on the upbeats and twice as frequently. This would be called a Double Time ...


2

If it's between 1:00 and 1:25, it's gone into a swing feel, same tempo, but the bars are played with a triplet feel instead of straight 4s.Found more in a jazz situation, but, hey, why not put it in and keep it in?


-1

'In The Pocket' refers to recognizing an action of accomplishment. Imagine you are watching a game of 9 ball in some pool hall somewhere in some town during a 'dark and storming night.' Player A calls out, "9 ball in the left corner pocket." The ball goes into the left corner pocket. Game over. Player A wins. "Good shot," declares player B. When the ...


1

I'm not a medical doctor, but I am a middle-aged guy who's played both keyboard and guitar for years, and I have found that shoulder and back issues definitely affect the way my hands and forearms feel, to the point that whenever my fingers tingle or my forearms ache, I reflexively think about keeping the shoulders back and low and making sure my posture is ...


5

1. Stop Playing 2. Go to the Doctor Seriously, your health is more important than your studies and your playing. Why potentially damage a half century of playing guitar and your career to save a few hours? What you describe doesn't sound trivial to me and could be indicative of something more serious that could affect all areas of your life, not just your ...


4

I don't know the answer but I feel for you - but seriously: See a doctor!! This is your health you're talking about, and although it might not seem so at the moment, that's much more important than your exams. I know you can get pain in all sorts of weird places when your nerves are messed up, and back pain may be a factor in that, but I'm no doc. It may be ...


4

You should try to sweep without palm muting any strings that you play, otherwise you will not be able to produce a fluid and open sound. In your example, you should palm mute the E and A strings because they are not used. Note, however, that this doesn't mean that your picking hand is totally fixed to the bridge. It should be able to move freely, which can ...


4

You may be familiar with the concepts of semiotics, where words have meanings that have nothing to do with their supposed dictionary definitions, and have everything to do with signifying that the user of the term is part of an identifiable group. People who use the phrase "in the pocket" knowledgably are usually communicating understanding of a particular ...


0

Internet video lessons are an amazing resource - whether free or paid - and good ones will show you great technique plus you can watch over and over rather than get confused and have to wait until your next lesson to check with the tutor. The main thing you miss is someone watching you and noticing the things you are doing wrong. But "online" doesn't have ...


2

I think "in the pocket" typically refers to a groove where the snare drum (on 2 & 4) is ever so slightly late (milliseconds), meanwhile everything else is tight and grooving without slowing down. edit - possibly mistaken, in the pocket might describe a snare that's exact on time. http://tweakheadz.com/midi-drum-tips/ edit2 - this one supports the idea ...


7

You're on the right track. It's actually a combination of some of the elements that you've mentioned. If the band is not playing together, then they won't be "in the pocket", this much is clear. It goes a bit deeper than just simply staying together and playing at the same tempo. It can also be song-based, meaning it's dependent on the tempo of the song. ...



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