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0

Well, first your won descriptions make it very likely that you get the pitches all wrong. A5 is about the top pitch for a choir soprano, and you state that it is in your non-falsetto zone. My guess is that you've checked your pitch on some chart without taking into account that tenor parts are these days generally written one octave higher than they sound ...


1

I dont' think resting your hand behind the bridge is too bad - a lot of the overtones produced there aren't desirable anyway, and lots of mandolinists use mutes on that side to mute these overtones. However, if you have pretty small hands/arms (as I do) you will find it is hard to pick closer to the fretboard without muting in front of the bridge. It is ...


6

Most of the players I've watched play with a floating pick hand. I pulled up a Chris Thile video and am seeing that maybe he rests his forearm on the edge of the body but otherwise floats his picking hand. If you want to mute the strings like a guitarist would, that's fine, but for most cases, it's probably better if it doesn't touch at all.


6

If you rest your hand on the strings or the bridge, you will be damping the instrument's sound. Even the part of the strings behind the bridge has a small contribution to an instrument's sound. It's best to either hold your hand above the instrument, or rest it very lightly on the body.


1

As a percussionist in a percussion ensemble, I tend to breathe in at the start of a phrase or on the prep beat before a musical transition. I would breathe out after the tension resolves or after I've completed my part of it. Above all, breathing should feel natural. Don't always think that you have to breathe in a certain way for a certain piece, though I ...


3

Excluding wind and vocal instruments, I would say precise breathing technique is probably not important for it's own sake. However... Breathing problems often indicate a more systemic problem with muscular tension, and this can definitely be an issue with any instrumental performance. Especially since, in your case, you seem to be switching technique during ...


1

In this case I use downstrokes when moving up (towards the high E string), and upstrokes when moving down (towards the low E). This feels most natural to me. However, I'm convinced that there are (and shouldn't be) any rules as to what is right or wrong with such things. You should be open to try all possibilities to see what works best for you. It is true ...


0

Let me start off by covering the kinds of picking. As you mentioned, there is playing only down-strokes, called "downpicking". Mainly beginners do this, but some say it's also good to get a certain tone. Next, there's alternate picking -- which usually means playing a down-stroke followed by an up-stroke and maintaining that pattern for every note. ...


4

I recommend you to learn synthesis through a graphical patch-based synthesis environment. This makes very explicit and clear how everything works and is connected (literally). The most popular are Reaktor, Max, and Pure Data. Pure Data is free, so grab it and see if you are into it. While learning it you'll be learning synthesis at a very deep level. It's a ...


-1

From my experience, the practice to avoid, whether with an electric or an acoustic guitar, is playing all six strings for all four beats (or all three, or all five, you jazz cats). Also, another consideration is whether you are playing by yourself or with others. If by yourself, it is good to distinguish between the down beats and up beats by playing a ...


0

Like any good wine taster can tell you, the palate is in the mind, not the taste buds. One needs to train their inner ear so that sonic finesse and accuracy can be achieved. The question is not asking whether or not this is a rule one must always follow, but rather if this is "good teaching". From a teaching perspective, YES, this is a good practice to ...


0

Raphael's answer is patently false. This stems from using distortion and/or overdrive on an amplified instrument. Power chords (or specifically the interval of a fifth) create a strong implied "almost major" overtone when distorted (asymmetric distortion; symmetric distortion creates additional harsh overtones which is why most people prefer the former). ...


1

Check out Scott's Bass Lessons https://www.scottsbasslessons.com/. He creates educational videos for all abilities. Most of his videos are free but he also has a paid for area with access to more resources.


0

My main advise when switching to a regular / long scale bass from a short scale would be to avoid stretching too much with your fretting hand. I try to play one finger per fret when I'm playing above the 5th fret but when you're down below the 5th move your hand instead of stretching. For example when going from a low F (1st fret on the E string) to an ...


1

I think the best option here is to set your strap so it's tight when you're sat down but the bass still sits on your knee. This way the position of the bass is the same when you're standing as when you're sat down. This also means you'll not have to adjust your playing style to play standing as everything should be the same. Also when it's set at that ...


3

I often find myself playing all six strings on electric. More than I should, even. I was listening to a Nile Rodgers tutorial the other day, and he talked about hearing cover bands play good times, hitting a lot of strings, and he says "No! I didn't play it like that! I played it like this!". It's hard to tell the difference, because he's talking and you ...


2

If you are playing with other musicians, playing all six strings at once will tend to create a muddy mix where it becomes difficult to distinguish who is doing what. Depending on the style of music, that may or may not be a desirable outcome.


2

6-string chords can work on an electric guitar. Increasing distortion greatly increases the chance that it won't sound good, but there are still situations where it can provide flavor. And that's not even considering alternate tunings. But I think your friend may have been trying to point out something important that took me a while to learn. Playing any ...


1

I agree with Dr. Mayhem, you shouldn't strum all 6 strings with distortion. When you play clean, it sounds great. But, with distortion, you lose some of the frequencies, and a lot of the notes get muddied. Its better to play power-chords or 3 note chords with an electric guitar. They just add more to the overall mix of the music.


1

An electric guitar can be used to play in many styles that would sound silly on an acoustic, or produce effects that an acoustic guitar simply can't match. Some styles and effects are apt to work much better when playing fewer notes than when playing more. As others have mentioned, distortion only works well when playing certain combinations of frequencies; ...


9

The only rule is, "If it sounds good, it is good."


24

The direct answer: No, this is not good teaching There is very little difference between electric and acoustic guitar. Playing all 6 strings can be absolutely fine on either. Many barre chords are 6 string. The question should really be "...shouldn't play all 6 strings together when using distortion" When you use distortion you add in harmonics which ...


4

Well, I don't see it as a key difference between electric and acoustic since I am not overly fond of just hitting all six on the acoustic either. And when playing the acoustic, I don't even have to share sound texture between lead and rhythm guitar. On the other hand: how are you going to start off "A Hard Day's Night" without playing all six? It's right ...


3

That principle stems from the fact that electric guitars, in a band setting, share frequencies (specifically mids) with a lot of other instruments. It's right up there with the piano, keys, vocals, even some horns and of course, with other guitars. So it is encouraged that as electric guitar, you should play differently i.e, find variations when playing ...


10

The very first thing to know, is to Never assume there is a certain rule you should or should not apply, of course some ways are better than others, but you can do and experiment everything you want, in music only comes to the ear is what matters. In case you have heard AC/DC songs before, "Highway To Hell" for example, open chords are played, they thing ...


1

Like almost everything it's about practice, practice, practice. That aside, there are some other things to consider. What string gauge are you using, and what tuning? Usually quite thin strings are used since less force is needed, which makes it easier to play with precision. Pay attention to your picking hand. Make sure there are no wasted movements. The ...


7

This depends on the piece of music (genre, style), not to mention what the composer may have wanted. Some pizzicatos are meant to be plucked simultaneously while others are basically strummed -- and in the latter case sometimes from top to bottom! There are notations such as vertical arrows which can indicate the strum direction.


0

here is a good test for the correct size guitar,hold down a barre chord F on the first fret and extend the little finger to the 5th fret and pluck each string to see how clear it is ...if you can reach the 5th fret comfortably that's fine....if the notes individually are not clear,but you can reach the 5th fret,then that is ok,you just need to practise on ...


2

I had issues with the G chord as well. Training myself in classical style for discipline requires the pinky to hold down the high E string. Like you, I was either muting the A string with my ring finger or muting the high E string because my pinky wasn't pushed down hard enough. In observing very carefully what I was doing, I noticed that rather than ...


1

I've been researching for years. I've been trying different teachers, books, forums, etc... The only real help I got came from Brett Manning's cd lessons. I am not affilated at all and I can say that he allowed my voice to do things impossible for me before. Just one last thing: without a (great) teacher you're taking more than twice the time you need to ...


3

I would answer agreeing with Tim and Lee White - but I'd like to add one thing: People sometimes talk in terms of right /wrong when it comes to playing a musical instrument. True, there are techniques learnt which have proven time and again to make things easier but the bottom line is you're just using an instrument to make a sound. And the sound you make ...


5

Tim's answer is pretty good, but there is one thing I can add to it: you should try to choose your fingering depending on which notes are to come next! For instance, if the G is followed by an F# and an F, it is indeed useful to have your index and middle finger on the first and second already, so that you can descend on the string smoothly. On the other ...


6

Both methods are used. The first is useful for playing a long note that needs vibrato. Watch B.B.King's butterfly vibrato - except he usually uses the index finger on a fret, with no thumb behind the neck.Incidentally, as you are a beginner, I guess, the usual fingering at the bottom frets is as in the pic., index on 1, middle on 2, etc. However, you will ...


4

Absolutely, you can add extra fingers on the string behind the fret. You probably don't want to use all your fingers all the time because that would severely impede your speed, but sometimes extra fingers can give you more control over a vibrato or a bend. With barre chords of course, you're pressing several of the strings down in more than one place. ... In ...


5

There are already some good answers on how to learn technique, and just getting out there and singing. I wanted to give some ideas as to how to listen to yourself outside your head. One method to listen to yourself is to use an audio recorder. The average phone will be adequate, although if you have higher quality equipment, it might be better. But speed ...


7

The unfortunate thing about singing is that you can do your voice and yourself damage if your technique is wrong or you over exert yourself. It's for this reason that I would say getting personal feedback is a top priority; however this doesn't mean you need to shell out hundreds on a face to face teacher. you can: Join some singing forums Sign up to ...



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