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6

A pithy way of saying it is that intonation is the process by which a temperament is achieved. Intonation is what is done in order that the sound is produced at the desired/intended pitch. This can be done as part of instrument setup, e.g. "setting the guitar intonation", or as an integral part of performing the music, e.g. as in expressive intonation. ...


6

Maybe somewhat controversial. There is definitely some serious hokum going on here, you're right. BUT, I think you're underestimating the color differences a number of keys have on some instruments. The string section is the most dramatic—they generally have three strings that are free to vibrate sympathetically when they are playing a single pitch on the ...


5

As some of the other answers have eluded to, there are two basic problems with your question: The first is the question of how you generalize a "tritone" in a non-12-TET based system. One possibility is to interpret it literally as three whole tones (which then begs the question as to how you define a whole tone in a non 12-tone system). Another ...


5

Yes, and one can go a little bit further. The traditional qualities associated with common keys in the 18th century can be correlated with orchestration, in that different instruments sounded better (or, sometimes, could only really play well) in certain keys. Examples: A and E major had the reputation of being "fiery" -- probably because both keys would ...


4

There might be a second question here, which regards the internal tuning of the cello strings, relative to itself. Cellos are typically tuned in fifths (C-G-D-A) of course, but there are pieces that require a different tuning (a technique called scordatura). In this case, wikipedia mentions that Bach's 5th Cello Suite was written for a scordatura in which ...


4

These days many musicians who play Baroque music such as Bach tune their instruments down to the lower pitch of A=415, which is exactly one half-step below the modern standard of A=440. It is generally accepted by modern performers of early music in the historically-informed style that A=415 was the tuning that Bach himself used for the string pieces he ...


3

All the manuals and documentation for the Yamaha CP5 can be found at this link: http://download.yamaha.com/search/product/?language=en&site=usa.yamaha.com&category_id=16365&product_id=1048812 The answer to your question is on page 27 of the English-language Reference Manual at the above link -- it is not found in the Owners Manual, which is a ...


3

I know that you state that you are not looking for "workarounds", but I should point this out. There is indeed not a properly-supported means of doing microtonality within the MIDI specification itself. However, there is an extremely well-established and widely-accepted and implemented system for microtonality with synthesizers and virtual instruments ...


3

The MIDI Tuning Standard allows for arbitrary remapping of all 128 note values. It was ratified in 1992, and can be implemented by both GM and GM2 devices. (Very few do, however.) There are also Scale/Octave Tuning messages, which allow slight adjustments to the 12 tones in an octave. Only these are required by GM2.


3

There's scattered support for other 12-tone temperaments, but MIDI just isn't going to be able to work with tuning systems with more notes. It's an issue of the amount of information that a MIDI message can encode--the existing standard is for a 7-bit (128-value) note number, which is enough to encode over 10 octaves of 12-tone, but only 5 octaves of ...


3

Note: For the sake of discussion, I'm limiting myself here to equal temperaments, which is the most common way of tuning keyboards. Other systems exist, of course, but would probably only confuse the matter. Why do B and C and E and F not have a sharp note between them? Simply because, acoustically speaking, there is no room in our current system for ...


3

It is significant when you are trying to tune an instrument by ear, using the purity of intervals as your guide. You (and the pages you link) refer to jumping up 7 octaves vs. 12 fifths, but don't forget that any notes you reach that way can also be brought down by one or more octaves as well. To illustrate this, let's bring all the notes down into the same ...


3

It is only significant to someone designing an instrument with a finite set of fixed pitches like a keyboard. Tuning such an instrument in a system based on pure fifths causes octaves to not be equivalent - which is terrible because the octave is the only truly pure interval, you can hear the beats from a mile away because it doesn't form a difference tone ...


3

The point of unequal well-tempered tunings is that the keys don't sound the same. Temperaments like Werckmeister III or Vallotti or 18th century French ordinaire are meant to be usable in any key while letting each have its own colour. (Vallotti is quite commonly used on fortepianos.) For most of what you're doing, you could probably get away with a mean ...


2

As MarkM pointed out, your claim is unsubstantiated. Consider further that "concert pitch" is not a fixed value. In the Good Old Days of Yesteryear, middle-A could be anything from 409Hz on up ( Wikipedia). Whether any particular YouTube recording was pitch-shifted in postprocessing is unknown.


2

Maybe you could point out which videos you're listening to. Period tuning is sometimes lower than A 440, but from a random sample of top results in youtube I found: Mischa Maisky : Mstislav Rostropovich: Both squarely in D minor and A440 as I would expect.


2

Equal temperament is key-agnostic. Well-tempered tuning isn't. The point of well-tempered tuning is that all keys are tolerable, but some are still better than others and each has its own character. This own character was pretty much the whole point of Bach's "Wohltemperirtes Clavier" (it is usually assumed that some Werckmeister tuning reflects the ...


2

If you are talking about microtonality - of which I know little, there will have to be a lot more than just changes to E/F and B/C. It's possible to have notes between any adjacent semitones. There could be as many extra notes between G and G# as between E and F. It just happens that it's accepted (and has been for centuries) that the note called F is ...


2

Any single string creates harmonics as it rings. Up to eight parts a C would generate C C G CEG Bb and C, essentially a dominant 7th chord. The lower partials are louder and than the upper partials due to string length influencing volume. A longer portion of the string vibrating will be louder. Tempered tuning requires that octaves and fifths sound good ...


2

Why do you require abbreviation? If there's a perfectly good term for this that doesn't use an abbreviation, will it be acceptable? "Notes per octave" or "pitches per octave" seem pretty widely used, universally understood, and tuning-agnostic. As an extension of this, scales themselves can be described as n-tonic, where n is a Greek number (as in, ...


1

Well, before the keyboard instruments were well tempered [think of the Well-Tempered Klavier], it was impossible to play in tune (i.e. with good intonation) in certain keys. And by the old system it would be impossible to do the annual (or semi-annual) tuning in such a way as to be able to play all keys in tune. Modern string players still have this ...


1

The simple answer is that the layout of the piano keyboard is the most useful and efficient possible for playing in equal temperament. If you want to play music in all 12 Major and all 12 Minor keys, this is the keyboard you need. As another answer has observed, our notation system is centered on the key of C Major, so it is only natural that the keyboard ...


1

There are some ambiguities in the way your question is stated. It is difficult to interpreted it in a non-arbitrary way; if you suggest adding one key for E# in addition to the present F key why not suggest for example the addition of two keys for B-flat and A-sharp respectively? And if you suggest reinterpreting E# as the quarter-tone between E and F, why ...


1

Strings are tuned in perfect fifths, brass uses the overtone series and valving compromises in its scales. While instruments with per-note strings, keyholes, tines or whatever can be tuned in equal temperament, quite a bit of the characteristic substance of an orchestra does not belong in that class. This also affects orchestration, further adding to the ...


1

Edouard provided a perfect explanation. I don't have to add anything to that. Just a couple of comments: I would be very surprised if your digital piano was tuned with sharp low notes and flat high notes. Perhaps the samples Roland uses for the high notes have particularly strong (flat) harmonics and you are sensitive to them? It would be interesting if ...



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