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6

I had to do an hour set under those sort of conditions once. It was absolute misery: besides the guitar freaking out and needing to be tuned several times as it adjusted to the cold, I couldn't feel my fingers. The instrument needs a chance to acclimate to the temperature. Major temperature swings can cause finish checking/cracking, and/or make inlay pop ...


5

As Ulf mentioned, the main problem is likely to be condensation. If it has been in a cold vehicle and then moved to a warm room condensation is likely to form. This in itself isn't generally a problem, as it will evaporate again once the amp and components warm up to room temperature, but if you turn the amp on before the condensation is gone you can easily ...


4

There's a slight change in exhausted air. When throat is cold, somewhat colder exhausted air becomes densier and that may be a subject of a slight pitch change. There is another question if this change can be audible. If it is, I think it would be momentary- cold / hot throat quickly changes its temperature to natural body's temperature level.


3

This is maybe not exactly an answer to your question, but still: I once left my GK bass combo in a truck in -30°C (-22°F) over night (in Finland). When I took it in and turned it on the next morning there was a loud bang with a flash, and it went dead. It was a chip that exploded, supposedly from a short circuit caused by moisture. I shouldn't have left it ...


2

I haven't found any trustworthy resources about the effect of hot and cold weather on the voice, so I can't comment on that. Humidity of the environment CAN affect the voice, for example the air conditioning in hotels or on airplanes can dry you out significantly, making singing uncomfortable and especially affecting tone (which may be what you mean by ...


1

I have Raynaud's disease. Thus, my digits get unnaturally cold, faster than the rest of my body, gloves or no gloves. I myself have had to play in similar situations, with cold winds cutting through my flesh (sub 30F for an hour, and the only guitarist). And, of course, one cannot wear full gloves in these situations. A few suggestions: Strum hard and fast ...


1

I don't know whether or not the temperature of the drink affects your ability to play a horn, but my band director says that if you drink anything containing sugar it will either: Cause the inside of a brass instrument to rust more quickly than normal. Cause the pads of a woodwind instrument to become sticky and therefore prevent it from forming a proper ...


1

The only I can think of is that when you eat or drink, you potentially have more saliva in your mouth, combined with sugar etc that can make the mouth piece more dirty/disgusting. Personally, I often drink coffee (no sugar) close up to before I play (I play Tuba). Actually in our orchestra practice (not professional orchestra...), the mid break is officially ...


1

The only thing I can think of is burning your tongue with hot drink, or making your mouth go numb with cold drink. The cold/hot drink might also have an effect on your throat. Banana can for example make it kind of sticky (eating banana and singing is not a nice combination), it might be the same with hot chocolate (in that case more from the milk or ...



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