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25

Let's start a list! Hip Hop is around 80-115 BPM Triphop / Downtempo around 90-110 BPM Concert marches are typically ~120 BPM. House varies between 118 and 135 BPM UK garage/2-step is usually between 130-135 BPM UK funky is around 130 BPM Techno 120-160 BPM Generally around 120-135 Acid Techno 135-150 Schranz around 150 Dubstep is around 140 BPM Trap ...


25

The term you are looking for is A piacere (It.). This basically means that the piece should be played at the performers discretion with regard to tempo and rhythm. Literally, "at pleasure".


23

Tempo primo, or Tempo 1ᵒ means “at the same tempo as the piece started”.


22

Tempo 1 or Tempo I instructs a performer to return to the first tempo of a movement or piece of music, where there has been a different tempo marking since the first marking. The marking Tempo Primo is also used. It is the equivalent, on a larger scale, of an a tempo marking following a rit. or rall. marking.


17

I'd definitely recommend a metronome, especially when the rythms are trickier. I basically use it for these types of exercises: the ones with difficult rythms, and the ones where the point is to build up velocity. The latter ones, I use a metronome to keep in check, because the main mistake in virtuosity exercises is to want to go too fast too soon and then ...


16

YES! Of course. That's the best thing to do. Every time you can't play a song at its normal bpm / speed (tempo), decrease the speed to a point where you feel comfortable with, and practice it there. After some practice, you'll be able to increase the bpm/ speed and after a while, you'll be able to play it at its normal speed. This is good practice for ...


14

It sounds to me like you are using the metronome in an effective manner. Your teacher might have been concerned that you, as a young student, would have seen playing in perfect time as an artistic objective. Of course it is rarely such. The musical artist is expressing emotion and other aesthetic insights. Variety of all kinds should be deployed for that ...


13

Agitato is generally understood to be allegro agitato — allegro plus agitation — unless there is something to indicate otherwise. Allegro is generally around 3 times as fast as lento (~144 versus ~50 bpm), so you can get an idea of the tempo change from that. It's quite significant. (So in one sense, I disagree with Mark; the house on fire ...


13

The important thing is to feel the pulse of the tempo in your head as you play. Tap your foot if it helps you. When listening to music, tap your foot, clap or drum on your legs, to reinforce that instinct for rhythm. Do, however, bear in mind that when playing unaccompanied, it's not always vital to keep a rigid tempo. Some pieces benefit from expressive ...


13

Counting is an absolutely necessary step when learning a new piece.It is the rhythmic framework of any piece. Without it, you may well be playing a different tune. 'All the right notes, but not in the right timing'. You ask 'do they count all the time?' Well there's no need once a piece is well known to the player. We sound out words as kids, but eventually ...


12

For the most part, the time signature indicates what kind of feel the beat of the piece has. Consider waltzes, usually written in 3/4 – the beat goes ONE two three, ONE two three, ONE two three. Although you could write it as ONE two three, FOUR five six, ONE two three, FOUR five six with a time signature of 6/4, there's no point because the beat still ...


12

Whilst even time-sigs are far more common that odd ones, once the 'feel' of a tune is running, most people will go with the flow. Even when there is a change of time in the middle of a line, most people don't spot it. Having sung/played 'The 12 Days of Christmas' (topical !) for many years, it took me by surprise when I looked at the music; the time changed ...


12

The answer here is deceptively simple: Polytempo. There are other names, such as multi-tempo, polytemporal, and others, but they all describe the same phenomena. Here is a link for further reading on Wikipedia. For a list of composers that have used this technique, as well as the pieces in which this technique was used, check out this page and look under ...


12

This means "approximately equal to". I found this with a quick Google search. Here is an example of a webpage confirming the meaning of this symbol. I must confess, I prefer to use "c.", the abbreviation for circa, in metronome markings. Here's an example: I've also seen the "wiggly" equal sign used in metronome marks. It's the top one at this webpage ...


11

It's a good start that you are aware of the problem because many people never become aware of their timing issues. I suggest you use a simple DAW or a drum computer for producing drum grooves with variable tempo. Choose a comfortable tempo and keep playing a 4-bar vamp which is technically not challenging for you. The latter is important because as long as ...


10

A sense of time varies from person to person. Some people have an acute sense of time and have less need for a metronome, while others may struggle with time. So the use of a metronome is relative to your personal sense of time. But even good time keepers will sometimes devote themselves to a steady regimen of metronome exercises in the spirit of improving ...


10

How does the genre of music affect the feel of speed? And how does a genre hit upon an inherent range of tempos to use, as in this question? Before I answer your question, it should be clarified that there is a difference between genre and ensemble. Genre concerns identifiable stylistic traits, whereas ensemble concerns instrumentation. In other ...


10

To find the length in seconds of each beat for any given metronome marking in beats-per-minute (bpm), you would divide 60 (the number of seconds in a minute) by the bpm marking. For instance, if a piece has a metronome marking of crotchet (quarter-note) = 120, each crotchet beat is 0.5 seconds long (60/120). You can follow this simple rule to find the ...


10

Is changing tempo during the song and back again a common device used on modern popular music? Or is there a good reason to avoid this type thing? No, it is not a device commonly used in popular music. However, this technique is extremely common in other forms of music. There are no good reasons to avoid this technique, band musicians are still ...


10

Since you don't mention any specific pieces, this may not be relevant to you, but it does apply in many situations. If you want to progress from studies like Czerny and Hanon, which are mostly about finger-technique, to things like the Chopin or Debussy Etudes (and most of the 19th-21st century piano repertoire), you have to leave behind the mindset that ...


9

I believe that the person a step beyond a layman would be the most likely to interpret an odd meter as a mistake, however, there are many factors that weigh in here. First of all, we have to say that our layman is of the Western music persuasion, as odd meters are very common in other cultures (including some that fall very near the Western tradition). The ...


9

As you beginner, I strongly suggest you keep doing that. What I did when I first begun, was to count everything with my foot. After a while, I didn't really need to count every single thing with the foot, because I could hear/feel it in me. So, no, I don't think pro musicians count every little thing, but they can if you ask them to. Is counting the ...


8

Two things can help with this that I can think of: Setting a metronome to a large beat, like one beat a measure to see where you rush and and speed up. Subdivide, subdivide, and subdivide. :-) If you have a strong inner pulse that is beating a smaller beat like 8th notes this can really help. Slow tempos are hard to keep study, so keeping the subdivided ...


8

Try and fully understand what rhythm you are working towards - and if necessary tap it out on a drum or something else so you can feel the beat. If you can describe it as 4/4 6/8 or standard structure then it should be straightforward. If you can't time it physically, you will have problems getting it into a DAW. Assuming you can do it audibly and make the ...


8

Time signatures are primarily for notational purposes. Beat, tempo, and meter all describe a certain thing about the music, but the time signature is just how that's codified when it's written down. As you know, Tempo is the frequency of the beat, and Beats are a kind of rhythmic emphasis that happens at regular intervals in most music. Meter is an ...


8

If a computer plays them, they are the same. However, it may influence how a human player interprets it, even if they don't know anything about what it meant historically, because all those extra beams will make the score look thicker, less spacious, and the notes seem to be more connected. A good player should be able to find a working interpretation ...


8

If your piece is in 6/8, then the eighth-note is NOT the unit of the beat, it is the dotted-quarter note. Most time signatures with 8 on bottom are compound time signatures, not simple. Thus, in your example, if the eighth notes are happening 150 times a minute, then the dotted-quarter beat is 150 divided by 3, or dotted-quarter = 50. This is the same as the ...


8

Tempo indications are more suggestions than hard-and-fast rules. This is even true of metronome markings. There's room for interpretation, especially with slower tempos. To use the Pathetique example, listen to Rubinstein play it. Then listen to Richter. You'll find that Richter's tempos are noticeably faster. However, both performances work musically. ...


8

I know a professional conductor who can pretty much nail it right on. It's just like perfect pitch, in that it's something you learn to do by being exposed to a ton of music and having reference points ingrained in your memory through sheer repetition. They're not magical skills that you're born with and either have or don't have. You can probably find ...


8

I've worked with quite a few dance band drummers who hit the correct tempo for particular dances - and believe me, serious dancers can tell if it's not right! It's sort of the opposite of what the OP is asking, but could very easily work the other way round. Basically, it's experience, the more you do it, the more consistently right it gets. Having said ...



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