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14

I'd definitely recommend a metronome, especially when the rythms are trickier. I basically use it for these types of exercises: the ones with difficult rythms, and the ones where the point is to build up velocity. The latter ones, I use a metronome to keep in check, because the main mistake in virtuosity exercises is to want to go too fast too soon and then ...


14

YES! Of course. That's the best thing to do. Every time you can't play a song at its normal bpm / speed (tempo), decrease the speed to a point where you feel comfortable with, and practice it there. After some practice, you'll be able to increase the bpm/ speed and after a while, you'll be able to play it at its normal speed. This is good practice for ...


11

Whilst even time-sigs are far more common that odd ones, once the 'feel' of a tune is running, most people will go with the flow. Even when there is a change of time in the middle of a line, most people don't spot it. Having sung/played 'The 12 Days of Christmas' (topical !) for many years, it took me by surprise when I looked at the music; the time changed ...


9

Agitato is generally understood to be allegro agitato — allegro plus agitation — unless there is something to indicate otherwise. Allegro is generally around 3 times as fast as lento (~144 versus ~50 bpm), so you can get an idea of the tempo change from that. It's quite significant. (So in one sense, I disagree with Mark; the house on fire ...


8

For the most part, the time signature indicates what kind of feel the beat of the piece has. Consider waltzes, usually written in 3/4 – the beat goes ONE two three, ONE two three, ONE two three. Although you could write it as ONE two three, FOUR five six, ONE two three, FOUR five six with a time signature of 6/4, there's no point because the beat still ...


8

Two things can help with this that I can think of: Setting a metronome to a large beat, like one beat a measure to see where you rush and and speed up. Subdivide, subdivide, and subdivide. :-) If you have a strong inner pulse that is beating a smaller beat like 8th notes this can really help. Slow tempos are hard to keep study, so keeping the subdivided ...


8

A sense of time varies from person to person. Some people have an acute sense of time and have less need for a metronome, while others may struggle with time. So the use of a metronome is relative to your personal sense of time. But even good time keepers will sometimes devote themselves to a steady regimen of metronome exercises in the spirit of improving ...


8

Try and fully understand what rhythm you are working towards - and if necessary tap it out on a drum or something else so you can feel the beat. If you can describe it as 4/4 6/8 or standard structure then it should be straightforward. If you can't time it physically, you will have problems getting it into a DAW. Assuming you can do it audibly and make the ...


7

If a computer plays them, they are the same. However, it may influence how a human player interprets it, even if they don't know anything about what it meant historically, because all those extra beams will make the score look thicker, less spacious, and the notes seem to be more connected. A good player should be able to find a working interpretation ...


7

How does the genre of music affect the feel of speed? And how does a genre hit upon an inherent range of tempos to use, as in this question? Before I answer your question, it should be clarified that there is a difference between genre and ensemble. Genre concerns identifiable stylistic traits, whereas ensemble concerns instrumentation. In other ...


7

I believe that the person a step beyond a layman would be the most likely to interpret an odd meter as a mistake, however, there are many factors that weigh in here. First of all, we have to say that our layman is of the Western music persuasion, as odd meters are very common in other cultures (including some that fall very near the Western tradition). The ...


7

The 107 defines the tempo(speed) of the song. If you see a metronome, you'll see that you can determine the speed. The speed of the specific song is 107 bpm (beats per minute). Also, you can see that the duration of the note is a quarter. That means that if you set your metronome at 107 bpm, every tic would be a quarter. So, the correct name for this would ...


7

I'm guessing this is from guitar tab, with 6 lines. The 6/8 really means 2 beats per bar, made up with 3 triplet quavers (1/8 notes). This will give each bar only 2 beats, despite numbers like 6 and 8.The tempo mark found above tells how many b.p.m. (beats per minute) the tune should be played at, In this case, 107. A metronome can be set to this, and every ...


6

The musical terms for what happens at 1:45 is half time followed by an accelerando back up to the original tempo. If, prior to 1:45, you start feeling every other beat, you will notice that the new tempo at 1:45 matches exactly. In other words, there is an instantaneous tempo change to half speed. What occurs next is a gradual change in tempo that occurs ...


6

Time signatures are primarily for notational purposes. Beat, tempo, and meter all describe a certain thing about the music, but the time signature is just how that's codified when it's written down. As you know, Tempo is the frequency of the beat, and Beats are a kind of rhythmic emphasis that happens at regular intervals in most music. Meter is an ...


6

You can use a metronome in different ways to study complex rhythmic figures. You can set the beat to correspond to a quarter note and work on subdividing the beats evenly. Or you can double the tempo so it corresponds to eighth notes and subdivide the sixteenths. Or you can double that so it corresponds to sixteenth notes, and work on counting beats for the ...


6

Those two problems you describe (mishitting strings and inconsistency in volume/tone) are only fixed by practice. Lots and lots of practice. They are things you can get away with in a live environment, but they do show up in a studio where every mistake is very evident. I had the same problem - I love gigging, but the first time I went into the studio I ...


6

The general consensus is that the larger the note value, the easier it is to read at faster tempos. This is why many composers use cut-time (2/2) for quick tempos. The more beams / notes there are, the more people get freaked out. If the piece feels like it is slowing by half, it is considered to be called "half-time" (used in jazz, much like ...


6

If your piece is in 6/8, then the eighth-note is NOT the unit of the beat, it is the dotted-quarter note. Most time signatures with 8 on bottom are compound time signatures, not simple. Thus, in your example, if the eighth notes are happening 150 times a minute, then the dotted-quarter beat is 150 divided by 3, or dotted-quarter = 50. This is the same as the ...


6

Moderate or Moderato is a convention from back before the invention and widespread use of the quartz-powered metronome. Tempo markings are a relatively recent invention, and they are used for their simplicity and accuracy. However, many composers choose to omit them because the "idea" of the tempo of the piece is more important than an absolute value. Other ...


5

Swing is generally somewhere between e. s and e e depending on the tempo, style, and drummer. You could suggest instead of playing [q e]3 triplets that he move to a 16th note upbeat, or move ahead to somewhere between the triplet and the straight 8th. Really, though, he should just listen to some recordings of drummers that do this sort of swing style. You ...


5

Simple rule: Changing the bottom number of a time signature, and the tempo correspondingly, has no effect. As you say, 4/8 at 60 bpm is the same as 4/4 at 120 bpm. It's also the same as 4/2 at 240 bpm. Likewise 3/8 at 80 bpm is the same as 3/4 at 160 bpm, and so on. Changing to top number is a different story, as the other answers allude to. That ...


5

A metronome is the best tool for learning a new rhythm (besides a good piano teacher). I would highly recommend you use a metronome when learning complex rhythms. You should not, however, soley depend upon the metronome to do the work for you. I am not a piano teacher or expert, but these are my suggestions: First, try playing the piece slowly without the ...


5

Everything by Messiaen is extremely difficult, so that doesn't count... but congratulations for being brave enough to try it. It's important to count those weird multiply-dotted notes and non-integral measures correctly. But Messiaen aside, slow is almost always more difficult than it looks. In addition to tempo problems, slow pieces are all about tonal ...


5

@Matthew Read gave some good suggestions, to which I'll add: Try rehearsing the problem sections at a wide variety of tempos, particularly ridiculously fast (once the choir knows the section reasonably well). Unwanted tempo changes become habitual. One way to break that habit is to go much faster (or slower, if the problem is acceleration) than desired, ...


5

You might as well ask "How fast does a person walk?" You will get as many different answers as there are people. In the case above, unless there is an actual MM value set, these can be equal or one can be faster or slower than the other. Allegro simply means a "lively" tempo. Andante means a "walking" tempo. Moderato means a "moderate" tempo, or when ...


5

Metronomes, and measuring a tempo exactly in beats per minute, were not invented and put into practice until the mid-1800s. Handel lived before that time, and in his era there was no accepted way of precisely notating a tempo. Moreover, tempos in these pieces are really only guidelines. The composer himself would vary the tempo in different performances, ...


5

Beats per minute (BPM) is dependent of time signature. The time signature tells which duration gets the beat. A song with a time signature 4/4 can have the same BPM as a song with as a song with a time signature of 4/8 or 4/2. They would also most likely feel the same and would be hard to differentiate without the music in front of you. Because the time ...


4

Interesting question. Literally "Agitato" means "Agitated". If that doesn't seem like a tempo, consider that "Allegro" means "Happy", "Andante" means "Walking", "Largo" means "Wide" and "Presto" means "Soon" or "Hurry up!". Play it like you're nervous and agitated. Play it like there's an earthquake and the baby's in the bedroom upstairs and you're ...


4

I can't speak to the psychological reasons or addressing them, but there are a couple things you can try that basically apply to all types of music. 1) Have the weaker members listen to and follow the stronger ones. Ensure they can hear them, of course; don't put them on opposite sides of the stage. The mediocre members will probably do well enough if the ...



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