New answers tagged

-1

Pragmatically: the Beat is mostly for writing purposes. "Pulse" is often used synonymously with beat and if I start clapping a "pulse," or "beat," you wouldn't know if it's a quarter-note or an eighth-note etc. It is a pulse, an undefined beat. It has a tempo but not necessarily the same as the song tempo. We get the song tempo once we decide what the ...


2

Playing the 1 op 10 after 5 years is a little "ambitious" should we say :-) That being said: that etude has caused tendinitis to many piano players so be on the watch for that: never let the increased speed cause you to tense up your forearm. Not to mention that relaxing will be key to keep your performance accurate. accuracy is tough on that etude as ...


2

This was intended to be a comment, but since I don't have enough reputation I must write it down here. Joseem gave you very good advices, but I wanted to add a few things. No one requests you to play at 170 bpm. There's no point in trying to play like Cziffra and other professionals. If you can play it consistently at 130 bpm and cannot go any higher, ...


0

I can play it consistently at 130, but every time I try to go higher, I stumble and play very badly. Don't forget the remark attributed to Einstein: "Insanity is endlessly repeating the same procedure, but hoping for a different result". If you are "stuck" at a particular tempo, and you have been playing for (only) 5 years, most likely your technique ...


3

First of all, attempting that piece after 5 years of study is probably too early. I guess it's possible, depending on your study "regimen" for these 5 years, your age, and your natural talent, but to give you a reference, Chopin's Op.10 is in the Syllabus of the Associate Diploma (ARCT) in Piano Performance of UK's Royal Conservatory. I'm not fully familiar ...


1

I don't have a Bitwig installation to test, but from the user manual, the tempo indication in the display section (the section with blue figures and indications) of the window header is "a control for the project's current tempo". Again, I have no way of testing this, but my understanding is that in your current play position (indicated in the same display ...


5

"Andando" does mean "walking" both in Portuguese and Spanish, and is used to describe the Andante tempo marking in common words, but as far as I know and have ever seen, the word is not used as a substitute for the traditionally instituted Italian words. Incidentally, there is a link between Riddler and the Portuguese culture, as his major 1956 hit Lisbon ...


6

At first I thought you were misreading the quirky script used for "Andantino". But I see that "Andantemente", "Andare" and "Andando" also appear. They all have meaning in Italian (see Google), though not generally used in musical Italian. Just Riddle (or his copyist) being a bit creative, I think!


2

Play an easier piece. Think of playing with a metronome as a skill to be learned. You'll be frustrated if you try to use a metronome and learn something else at the same time, so start with music that's so simple that it requires almost no conscious attention to play. If you have a lesson book, try the metronome with one of the early lessons. Playing the ...


0

There are two ways to get an audio part and tempo track to line up. Since you're looking to change the tempo to match the audio, the first method is what you're looking for. Method 1: Change tempo to match the audio track First, select the audio part you want to get the tempo changes from. Then, look for an item in the audio processing menu in the main ...


1

If I would have a guess I would say that it is a poor score and what the piece really wants is a return to the original tempo. It would be better to indicate that with the terms tempo primo or a tempo. It is confusing as you rightly point out. Moderato is a indication of character not mere speed or tempo. As with such things the character is indicated at ...


4

I would certainly read it as: Start accelerating at the accelerando so that you are playing at a moderato tempo when you get to the moderato, then continue to play moderato until you reach another tempo marking or the end of the piece. That might not be exactly how others play it, and every performance involves interpretation of the score by the ...



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