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I know you wanted to avoid it, but it sounds like any solution may be far more trouble than its worth, so just go with a click on the actual loop. But if you definitely want it in sync with the internal click I would try these out... Use a midi out from your drums, set its clock to master. Midi in to your DAW, set clock to external. Set the bpm you want ...


4

Each of these can be thought of as a conversion factor. Typically, you're converting everything to or from beats (which are the basic unit of time in music). If you recall "dimensional analysis" from high-school physics, this is a great place to use it! Time signature numerator = beats/bar Time signature denominator = beats/whole-note (i.e. what division ...


4

Another question and answer give answers for any beat type and tempo, but for the examples above, it depends upon which note length beat is 120 bpm. For instance, a crotchet bpm of 120 (as would probably be used in 4/4), will always give a crotchet length of 0.5 seconds, whole-note length of 2 seconds, half-note length of 1 second, and so on. If, on the ...


2

It depends. The BPM is telling you the tempo based on a reference. If it is 4/4 then it is most likely this: This pretty much means that there are 120 quarter notes a minute so each quater note would be a half second long. If you wanted to know how many half notes there are in a minute it is just simple math. Since there is two quarter notes in every half ...


7

To find the length in seconds of each beat for any given metronome marking in beats-per-minute (bpm), you would divide 60 (the number of seconds in a minute) by the bpm marking. For instance, if a piece has a metronome marking of crotchet (quarter-note) = 120, each crotchet beat is 0.5 seconds long (60/120). You can follow this simple rule to find the ...


2

There is no standard "Moderate 4". For one thing "Moderate" is English while the normal language would be Italian, "Moderato". And incidentally more than half of the answers are for "Moderato", missing the fine difference. So that is a good indication that this is a non-standard thing to write over a score. Then "Moderate 4" is a crutch since "4" is not ...


1

I would be very careful about assigning specific numbers to tempo names, where the composer did not specify those numbers. In general they don't match up that precisely, and its likely that the composer did not have that specific of a tempo in mind. "Allegro" for example, does not convey a specific range of tempos. It just conveys a brisk or lively mood ...


1

What I have seen from pieces I've played is that they specify that. At the top of the score, there would be a quarter note = 140 or eighth note = 140 or dotted quarter note = 140 or half note = 140 or something. To be honest, I think that in a 6/8 piece it would be odd to have quarter note = 140 it should be dotted quarter or eighth imo. Per the related ...



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