Tag Info

New answers tagged

1

Change your track settings from tempo based to time based. Then change the tempo of your project to fall with your recording. It is the little icon with the clock (when your track is time based) or a note (when it is tempo based). Then you can revert your track back to being tempo based.


-1

A teacher would ban the metronome, if he/she is clever enough to realize that, playing or practicing according to the metronome destroys the music, and turns that player into a brainwashed, boring, run-of-the-mill player... as so many players (esp. classical players) are today. Not using the metronome displays an intelligent, humanist, anti-mechanical, ...


-3

Since everyone jumped down my throat about my previous answer, I wanted to share this: http://www.creativitypost.com/psychology/8_things_top_practicers_do_differently And note how many of these simply do not work with a metronome running. Practice was with inflection early on; the initial conceptualization of the music was with inflection. ...


1

It sounds fairly strange that a teacher would disallow the use of the metronome for beginners. For the more mature player, one could argue that being too dependent on the metronome is a bad thing. Before we walk, we crawl though, and in order to get a good internal rhythm, one must be familiar with what a steady rhythm is. It also seems to be a ...


1

Actually, I would guess the reason for banning a metronome from piano students to be similar to banning ruler and compass from technical drawing classes of engineering students. And yes, there was a professor at the university who did that here, including and specifically in written exams. The idea presumably being to avoid a dependency on tools you cannot ...


6

While it is possible that your metronome banning teacher was just a bad teacher (Such a thing is clearly possible), because as a rule metronomes are good, I often save metronome work for intermediate and advanced students. This is primarily because in the beginning it can be frustrating to achieve music on an instrument. Metronome work can compound that ...


4

I little history lesson might be relevant here. Czerny used the fact that he was a pupil of Beethoven, and recording Beethoven's interpretation of Bach for posterity, as a major selling point. Beethoven certainly saw a few copies of Bach's music that had survived in the Imperial Court Library, but at that time, Bach's entire musical output was unknown and ...


1

See this section of a Wikipedia article criticism of metronome use Here is a brief excerpt: "[...] using the metronome as a constant guide to ramp up the speed or to keep the rhythm. This is one of the worst abuses of the metronome. [...] If over used, it can lead to loss of your internal rhythm, loss of musicality, and bio-physical difficulties ...


6

I think I can understand what your teacher was trying to say. He wanted to make you feel the music. Music needs to breathe. If a computer and a human play the same song, it will sound different; the human version will be more natural; the computer version will be more mathematically correct. Your teacher might be worried that if you kept practicing with a ...


12

It sounds to me like you are using the metronome in an effective manner. Your teacher might have been concerned that you, as a young student, would have seen playing in perfect time as an artistic objective. Of course it is rarely such. The musical artist is expressing emotion and other aesthetic insights. Variety of all kinds should be deployed for that ...


12

This means "approximately equal to". I found this with a quick Google search. Here is an example of a webpage confirming the meaning of this symbol. I must confess, I prefer to use "c.", the abbreviation for circa, in metronome markings. Here's an example: I've also seen the "wiggly" equal sign used in metronome marks. It's the top one at this webpage ...


1

Bach's music frequently allows a wide range of interpretations. Both Czerny's "Allegro Vivace" and his metronome mark are completely editorial of course. Bach (characteristically) didn't seem to give any indications at all. I like the idea of "Allegro Vivace", many performances strike me as drab or over-"expressive". Maybe Czerney saw q=138 as a goal to be ...


1

I've just listened on YouTube to the two songs you mention. If notating the intro to "Shanghai" I might write "Freely". Any time signature I chose would be arbitrary, there is no real beat or pulse to the music. "Colorblind" has a beat, but it slows down at the end of each phrase. There are occasional half-hearted attempts to "pay back" the time by ...


1

Nobody mentioned the point of view of dancers yet. Personally, I find it very difficult to dance to songs which change tempo, but I am not a very good dancer. Many people love it, especially if they have heard the song before and know that a change of tempo is coming up. Or if the change of tempo is telegraphed by the music (for example, I am not sure what ...


1

if you have some of the same drummers i've had, you're not not going to have a choice, the tempo will vary! :) seriously, you probably already vary tempos slightly naturally just as an expressive means, and doing so intentionally as you want to build or release energy is good practice. Doing a big jump is sort of unusual, but there's certainly no law ...


6

Rubato is a good term for the sort of micro-speedups and slowdowns that you're talking about, but it isn't a word for songs that sound good when performed that way, it's a term for the performance style. Some composers will explicitly write rubato or "Tempo rubato" in a score, but there are plenty of times when it's appropriate performance technique even ...


0

Sounds like an interesting technique. It could work quite well. I would say to keep going with the idea and something good could turn out.


8

Is changing tempo during the song and back again a common device used on modern popular music? Or is there a good reason to avoid this type thing? No, it is not a device commonly used in popular music. However, this technique is extremely common in other forms of music. There are no good reasons to avoid this technique, band musicians are still ...


5

It's not that common, but that's why it can work very well to make your song stand out. Often it's important to prepare the listener's ear for the change. Three great examples are Billy Joel's "Scenes from an Italian Restaurant" Queen's "Bohemian Rhapsody" Lynyrd Skynyrd's "Freebird"


0

Metro -- System of a Down (the one on the Lonely Day Single) has an odd speed change that fits quite nicely in my opinion.


0

How about Deep Purple's "Child in Time"? I find that pretty acceptable.


0

It may be challenging for the band to return to the previous tempo after the change as well as make together a smooth transition, but it definatelly has its use and it's a nice effect, even I have used it in one of my songs. Two examples that come to my mind, where I think that tempo changes are: Time, by Pink Floyd (I think the chorus is a bit slower) ...


4

It's unusual - listen to a hundred songs and you may well not hear this idea in even one. However, the song is your baby to bring up how you like. Others may or may not like it when it's grown up! When there's one performer - singer/guitarist, maybe, there's no problem, as he knows the acceleration rate. With multiple performers, someone will have to ...


1

Neilsen's 5th symphony was an early example (1922). Towards the end of the first movement, the side drum part is in a different tempo and time signature from the rest of the orchestra. The first edition of the score instructed the drummer to "improvise as if at all costs he wants to stop the progress of the orchestra". In a later edition that instruction ...


12

The answer here is deceptively simple: Polytempo. There are other names, such as multi-tempo, polytemporal, and others, but they all describe the same phenomena. Here is a link for further reading on Wikipedia. For a list of composers that have used this technique, as well as the pieces in which this technique was used, check out this page and look under ...


2

This sort of thing has been explored pretty deeply by, among other people, Conlon Nancarrow. He used player pianos to perform pieces which would most likely have been too complex for anyone to perform organically. One way in which he complicated things was that he used what he called a tempo canon. As discussed here, one such piece was his Study for Player ...


1

There is both polymeter and polyrhythm. Polymeter is sometimes referred to as "tactus-preserving polymeter." The measure size differs, the beat is the same. Since the beat is the same, the various meters eventually agree. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Meter_%28music%29#Polymeter A good example of polymeter is the Tala which is an extream form of ...



Top 50 recent answers are included