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1

As I have stated before on this site, terms like "molto allegro" were never intended to convey an exact measurement of beats per minute. Verbal descriptions of tempo, like "allegro", "adagio" and "andante", were used by composers in previous times before the invention of accurate machines that could measure beats per minute. These verbal descriptions are ...


3

One of my metronomes has allegro as 120-168 bpm. Another, 150-180 bpm.The former seems to be the generally accepted.This alone shows that tempo markings are vague, at least. Taking something like a symphony, the interpretation can make a difference of up to 50% extra on the length of a movement, comparing one conductor to another (Toscanini, 1953 - Eroica). ...


8

Tempo indications are more suggestions than hard-and-fast rules. This is even true of metronome markings. There's room for interpretation, especially with slower tempos. To use the Pathetique example, listen to Rubinstein play it. Then listen to Richter. You'll find that Richter's tempos are noticeably faster. However, both performances work musically. ...


2

There is a difference in feeling the rhythm and not responding to the rhythm with certain bodily parts(for example, when dancing). Some muscles(, muscle groups) are more trained to receive commands that others and this is really based on luck when not trained. A way to feel the rhythm is trying at first to count by beating your foot or hand or even ...


2

A little bit of rubato isn't necessarily a bad thing, playing with time is one way to make it music (rather than computer programming). With that said, there are times when it is completely inappropriate. The most obvious is when there is an ostinato figure going on under the melody and counterpoint (if any). For example, think about Granados Villanesca, ...


2

I guess that you'll never be exactly stable but you can be more precise with practice. If your problem is getting good records, you can record your instrument and then "stretch" the track to resolve tempo problems.


12

The important thing is to feel the pulse of the tempo in your head as you play. Tap your foot if it helps you. When listening to music, tap your foot, clap or drum on your legs, to reinforce that instinct for rhythm. Do, however, bear in mind that when playing unaccompanied, it's not always vital to keep a rigid tempo. Some pieces benefit from expressive ...


4

I have always found the input on ultimateguitar quite useful. It's simple and straightforward, but useful nonetheless. 1. Always Practise With A Metronome It sounds simple I know but a metronome is an invaluable tool for any musician when used properly it can keep you in perfect time. I have a metronome app for my smart phone which cost nothing ...


1

"When the Levee Breaks" and "God's gonnacut you down" share a similar tempo, and their' feel' is a little bit similar in that in both there's a kind of off-beat 'strike' whcih gives them a slight swing. I'll do my best to explain what I'm hearing : Levee : If you ignore the bass drum riff itself for the moment, there's a slight echo on the bass drum and ...


-1

I'm struggling to find any common things about these examples. The tempos vary between around 60 to 80 b.p.m., and the drum patterns are dissimilar. Yes, there's a bass drum and a snare, but the patterns are different from each other. Common factor is 4/4, apart from Johnny Cash, which is mainly 4/4 but with odd bars from time to time.


4

There is no common tempo (speed). Tempo varies between your examples. There are differences among your examples, but I see where you are coming from. I'll try to dive into what the 4 patterns share. 4/4 or mainly 4/4 time. The snare drum on the beats 2 and 4 (which some call the weak beats) and the kick drum on every beat or beats 1 and 3 (Led Zeppelin's ...



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