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2

If you wrote the song to have tempo changes then you had an artistic reason to make that decision which should overule all - so I certainly would not advocate locking it to one tempo. The best option for recording with a click and capturing the best performance is to go through and automate your click. This can be a lot of work but it's definitely worth it, ...


2

One of the arguments I have heard is to keep time on a cycle, not a line. If you're tapping your foot, think of it as though you were moving in a circle, with a tap near the bottom (realistically your foot will still move in a line, but what matters is how your mind is thinking about the motion, not the actual motion itself). When you tap your foot up and ...


6

Using a metronome only has the demoralizing effect of making me want to turn it off. It's okay to turn your metronome off, so long as eventually you turn it back on again. The reason it's demoralizating is that it's exposing the faults in your playing. The reason that it's helpful is that it's... exposing the faults in your playing. The metronome is ...


3

Playing in tempo needs your brain to focus on the music and the tempo at the same time. Play very easy music with metronome (i would start doing quarter notes only) so your mind can focus on the tempo. Record yourself to listen relaxed after. And smile and have fun!


2

I have a few ideas. Play with a live person. It's fun to play duets. Or you could each take one hand of a piano piece. Connect some earbuds to an electronic metronome to give yourself a click track. Record the right hand of your piece on an mp3 player, listening to the click track in your ear while you're playing. Then plug the earbuds into the mp3 ...


4

I play and now teach ancient style rudimental snare drum, which has all kinds of screwy tempo things that happen and weird technique that makes certain patterns want to drag. Generally, the biggest hurdle to keeping a steady beat is fluency - your body gets in the way of what you're trying to do. To demonstrate this, can you clap to a beat? If you can, ...


4

If it's that frustrating, don't start out trying to play a piece to the metronome. Just practice rhythm and timing separately from the melody. Does your metronome have a visual option, where you can turn the volume off, but it's still keeping time? Count a few beats with the metronome audible at a moderate tempo (80-120 bpm), and then turn the volume off, ...



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