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1

I think Mingus himself called this structure of melodies stacked on top of each other - in many of his pieces there are more than two, e.g. in Wednesday Night Prayer Meeting - a "pyramid".


1

This can be a Mashup. A mashup is a song or composition created by blending two or more pre-recorded songs


8

As @user13484 pointed out, the general concept of two (or more!) melodies sounding together is counterpoint ("note against note"). The term counterpoint is used when the melodies that are sounding simultaneously are independent and are more or less of equal importance. Both rhythm, pitch but also timbre can be used to achieve independence. The term is about ...


8

Formally, it would be counterpoint, but since the music is not as a whole constructed in that manner, I'd just call it a countermelody.


10

In this context, the word "gajo" means joyful or merry. The composer seems to want you to underline the shift to G Major by playing in a noticeably more exuberant style. In most styles of tonal music, the shift from minor to major already implies a change of mood along those lines, but "merry" is a nicely evocative description of the precise shade of ...


1

For formal, technical purposes (e.g. when discussing musical audiation and other aspects of musical cognition) the terms "acoustic event" or "notated event" or "vertical event" is pretty much standard terminology within psychology of music for referring broadly to any individual single tone or simultaneosly experienced combination of tones (i.e. an ...


0

I normally use the word "figure", or "passage", preceded by its defining term e.g. "octave-figure", "passage in sixths", otherwise just the defining term "scale," "arpeggio" or whatever. In my experience people take the word "scale" in the context of a composition to mean a scale comprising a single voice, as opposed to one consisting of two or more ...


0

Genre means "type" or "category". It refers to broadly defining aspects shared by musical compositions, most often aspects of the music's instrumentation or its particular use, ethnicity etc. - e.g. popular, rock, punk rock; Latin-American music, samba, tango; jazz, trad jazz, bee-bop, improvisatory jazz; classical, orchestral, symphonic music, symphonic ...


1

Both great answers,but there's also the RHYTHM of the bar that comes into the equation. Each bar in 3/4 or 4/4 etc. will have a distinctive rhythm pattern that goes with a particular piece. Not all 4/4 songs have the same rhythm. For example, a simple 4/4 can have either a straight or a dotted rhythm, which makes each very different in FEEL.The tempo could ...


1

The accepted formal term you are seeking is METRE (US English = METER). In ordinary language, the word "time" is more common. A waltz is said to be in "3/4 metre" (or time) or, alternatively, in "triple metre" (or time). For more, visit http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Meter_(music)


1

What are the correct technical terms for one count, like a 1 It is simply called a beat. for a set of counts that is repeated, like 1-2-3? 1-2-3 is a bar, so those three together could be called a bar. What might help you understand is called time signature, which counts the beats of each bar.


5

Try "hits". I looked up "orchestra hits" for a more specific answer, as searching Google for just hits in a music context will often lead to "greatest hits." "Stab" is also related: "Orchestra hit" on Wikipedia


3

Your question could be interpreted a bunch of different ways. If every note from a given instrument is consistently played a bit before or after where the beat "officially" lies, then that instrument is considered "early" or "late" / "pushing" or "laying back", respectively. In a "syncopated" rhythm, notes are accented in places other than the ...


0

Both syncopated and off beat can be used. In my book, these are not entirely synonymous! I would characterise the difference much as what Caleb's and Shevliaskovic said: off beat means, you put accents on weak beats (but the strong beats are still played quietly, perhaps as dead notes or at least "pronounced rests"). Whereas syncopated means, you play ...


1

"off beat" has been mentioned here. That's basically the name for rhythms that are accentuated, well, on a beat, just a different one than the "normal" beat. So a swing accent is on beat 2 and 4 rather than 1 and 3. "Syncopated", in contrast, usually implies coming in early or late by fractions of a beat. Like { c'4. c'8~ c'4 c' } a typical tango ...


10

Syncopation is the technical term for off-beat rhythms. There are many genres that incorporate a syncopated style, as noted by Louis Armstrong: Ah, swing, well, we used to call it syncopation, then they called it ragtime, then blues, then jazz. Now, it's swing. Louis Armstrong, on the Bing Crosby radio show (as quoted on the wikipedia article for ...


7

It can be called Off beat. Per the above Wikipedia article In music that progresses regularly in 4/4 time, counted as "1 2 3 4, 1 2 3 4...", the first beat of the bar (downbeat) is usually the strongest accent in the melody and the likeliest place for a chord change, the third is the next strongest: these are "on" beats. The second and fourth ...



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