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The 'grt', sometimes designated 'I', is the manual closest to the player on a two manual organ. It's called the great manual. The other is called the swell, or 'II'. Hence 'sw'. Different sounds can be made using the stops for each manual, and sometimes they are coupled, so playing one manual operates both, giving more sound options.


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Just to add to @MattL's answer... Great and Swell are usually assigned to different manuals. (Although they can be linked by couplers.) The Great manual will usually be assigned to principal stops, or as this page describes it, the Great manual usually: contains the meat and potatoes of the organ: the principal chorus. The Swell manual will be linked ...


13

They refer to divisions (manuals) of the organ: Grt. for Great (French 'Grand Choeur', German 'Hauptwerk') and Sw. for Swell (French 'Grand Orgue', German 'Schwellwerk'). For English, American and German organs, in a two-manual configuration, the lower manual is the Great, and the top manual is the Swell. French organs usually have the Swell at the bottom. ...


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In popular music, this device is usually called Line Cliché. It is a chromatic line over a static chord creating the illusion of harmonic motion. Line chlichés are most often found in a minor key. The line usually moves near the 7th of the chord. A very common descending line (over a minor triad) is: root -> maj 7th -> min 7th -> maj 6th. This is exactly ...


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As Bob mentions, this can be described as a descending chromatic bass line. If descending a fourth, from tonic to dominant, this can also be called a "Lament Bass". As a technique, it dates back at least to the early Baroque Era (famously used in Dido's Lament, that character's dying aria from Henry Purcell's Dido and Aeneas, and also in Bach's Crucifixus ...


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A series of pitches which move down by semitones is a descending chromatic scale. If this line is in the bass you could call it a descending chromatic bassline. If the harmony above this bassline remains unchanged, the resulting chords can be described as a series of inversions. In popular music terminology this is most easily achieved using ...


1

They have been called Rimba tubes. Possibly from the term marimba. Could have been a tuber, but I think there's something similar in existence...


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Papers on Horogram Rhythms can be found at http://anaphoria.com/hrgm.PDF and at http://www.anaphoria.com/horo2.pdf with a discussion of a possibly better algorithm by Viggo Brun at http://anaphoria.com/ViggoRhythm.pdf You use horograms to algorithmically generate long rhythmic and scalar patterns using the Golden Ratio (Phi). Horagrams are diagrams ...


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Good answers from @luser and @ulf. In some genres, the terms mean something slightly different. For example in traditional fiddle music, "shuffle" and "swing" mean the same thing except that a "fiddle shuffle" is the fiddler playing the roots of the chords but swinging them while "diggin in" -- playing with strong bow pressure. And "swing fiddle" means ...


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Whether music "swings" or not is almost entirely independent of the duration of the eighth-notes. That said, it's very rare that music that truly swings treats a pair of eighth notes as a quarter-eighth triplet; more often, that's a recipe for sounding like Lawrence Welk, or a mediocre high school jazz band. There certainly are exceptions - and performances ...


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This is very often called musique concrète, or avant-garde as a broader term. The technique you are mentioning is also referred to as ready-made or found object (objet trouvé in French). A ready-made is an object/sound/whatever that already existed without any artistic context, which is then turned into art by giving it that artistic concept. Two relatively ...


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You can call it in various ways, depending on the style of production / performance. It can be called Found Object if you are using sounds like you mentioned without performing it. It can be called Experimental, if you are improvising it - sampling it live. You can call it Experimental Electronic if you are using your computer / digital sampler. You ...


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GENRE (in music) is the bed-rock, the DNA if you will, that a derivative style is derived from. Eg. Rock and Roll, is a STYLE of BLUES MUSIC. The derivative style must elementarty depart from a genre to become a genre of it's own. All types of Rock and Roll are derivative styles (styles derived from a genre) Rock and Roll does not depart deeply enough from ...


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I've never heard "coldplay" used but I would assume it would be the same as "playing a song cold". This is when a group plays a song together (typically in a live setting) either without having practiced the song at all or could also apply if the group hasn't player or practiced a song together for an extended period of time. I've also heard the term "cold ...



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