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2

I think the technique is best described as a yodel, which is defined as a quick flipping between vocal registers. A yodel isn't specific to the release of a note, but is the closest thing to a proper term for the general technique. If you're trying to describe the style for a someone, "like a yodel" might be clearer, since most people associate yodeling ...


1

As mentioned in my comment, it would be best to ask the user who answered that other question what he exactly meant. Here I can tell you what I think he meant, and also what my take on this issue is. First of all I think that "scooping" is not at all a standard term when it comes to right-hand guitar technique. What I think is meant by it in the context of ...


1

In the answer you linked, the reference to scooping could have meant to keep your pick close to the strings as you move up and down the neck as opposed to allowing your picking hand to "scoop" (drop) below the neck. Obviously the only person who can say for sure is the person who posted said linked answer. This advice applies to playing fast picking ...


1

Particularly when using only upstrokes with tones on the same string, at least I get a more pronounced scooping motion when the pick moves towards the string. You still strike perpendicular to the string. I believe what is described is whether or not this motion is parallel to the body of the guitar. If you try striking a a chord using up- and downstrokes, ...


6

The answer is actually quite simple: it's called a double-diminished triad. Played in first inversion it's usually referred to as Italian augmented sixth chord. As mentioned in other answers, our ears have a tendency to hear it as a dominant seventh sound.


1

By analogy with Why does the C7 chord on guitar omit the G note (5th) in open position? this chord could perfectly acceptably be named as an F7 (no 5th.) As others have said, Eb F A is going to sound like an F7, and the chord shape discussed in the question I have linked shows there is indeed a precedence set for naming chords like this as 7ths. Many ...


4

A D# chord like this could never occur in any scale degree of a major or minor scale with the #d note as a root so there would be no need to name it with reference to the #d. However this notes could occur together, for example in a B7b5 chord without the root (b). Since music theory doesn't care for something that could only happen outside a harmonic ...


6

This is a tough question. [0,2,6] probably isn't what you're looking for, but I believe is the best way to address it. It's going to sound like an F7(4 2), but is certainly not written that way. It could resolve to E, as F7 can be a tritone substitution for B7 in terms of function. To support this, both D# and F could resolve to E (upward and downward, ...


3

Not every set of notes yields a nice, clean chord name just stacking in thirds. Sometimes it is necessary to rearrange the notes to see how they fit better especially since there are no chords that are contain a diminished 3rd. If you rearrange the letters like so: F A _ D#/Eb You get and F7 like others have stated. The full name would be F/D#. If you ...


3

I would interpret this as an F7 chord with the 5 missing. If you respell the D# as Eb, it will make more sense. In my experience I have never encountered a diminished third as a definitive chord voicing.


1

It'll SOUND like a dominant 7th , although technically it won't be called that. As we are aware, the 5th of a chord is one that can be left out.


-3

Perhaps there is confusion between polyrhythm and polymeter because there is actually no such word as polymeter: http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/spellcheck/english/?q=polymeter I think it's best to stick to polyrhythm and then use other words to describe the type or characteristics of the polyrhythm.


3

To add to the excellent answer by @PatMuchmore, "gajo" has nothing to do with fruit, it is but a slightly antiquated spelling for the Italian "gaio", which means "gay" (which is incidentaly a cognate word), whose interpretative meaning is self-explaining: play gayly :)


0

Schenkerian Analysis is a fairly advanced technique if you're just learning about music theory, and it was designed primarily for classical music, but one of its key concepts is prolongation -- the idea that some notes in a melody are more important (more functional, if you will) and can be, in some abstract sense, extended throughout an entire passage of a ...


1

One way to label this is a melody that arpeggiates the tonic chord. To clarify what that means, the melody is only using the notes of the C chord, which is the tonic chord of that key (the chord that has the name of the key, also which has its root on the first note of that key). And it arpeggiates that chord, meaning it goes up and down the notes of that ...


1

These terms are mainly used for describing guitar playing styles. Chord melody means that a piece is arranged as a solo piece for guitar, where the guitar needs to play melody and chords. Note that usually not every melody note is harmonized, because this is often neither practical nor the most musical solution. On the other hand, a chord solo is usually a ...



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