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in terms of position or general role in a band i don't find much distinction between he term "lead" and "solo" guitarists. whens the last time you heard a guitarist who ONLY played solos? one of the useful distinction between the two, i find, is compositional focus. if the part played by the lead guitarist becomes the focus of the song at that point he or ...


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Here is my 2 cents worth. The answer probably depends on the situation and context. It also probably depends on what whoever uses the respective terms mean. "Lead Guitarist" is commonly understood to refer to the guitarist in a band who plays the "guitar solos" and fancier fills, runs, and licks along with a "rhythm guitarist" who maintains the rhythm ...


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"Lead Guitar" is a term used in 60s-style "groups" (like the Beatles) where Lead Guitar played the clever stuff, Rhythm Guitar strummed the chords. A "Solo Guitarist" is a guitar who has a solo to play. Maybe completely alone, maybe in a concerto situation, maybe as a featured member of a guitar ensemble. Don't over-think it!


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Lead guitarist usually plays in a Band and have interludes and solos parts to play also he plays along the riff or the riff itself in the song. Eg Kirk Hamette from Metallica But solo guitarist plays only solo and have its own band to play with. Eg. Joe Satriani.


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A solo guitarist is always the only musician. I disagree that guitar + drums gives "solo guitarist".


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Typically a lead guitarist plays melody lines with a rhythm guitarist and other instruments such as bass, drums, keyboard etc. A solo guitarist, however, is always the only guitar, and is sometimes the only instrument (you can have a single person singing and playing solo guitar, or you can have guitar and drums etc.) So the definition is simply to ...


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There's a huge difference between the two. A tonal center is the note your harmony and melody will sound at home at while guide tones are the notes that not only greatly define the harmony at that point, but typically help lead from the last chord to the next chord. Think of it this way. In a typical ii7 - V7 - I7 in C major, C is the tonal center ...


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In the key of C Major using 7th chords as in jazz, the chords are C Major 7, D minor 7, E minor 7, F Major 7, G7, A minor 7, and B minor 7 flat 5. Count starting with C Major, 1,2,3,4,5,6,7. So in answer to your question, What would a ii, V, I be? Answer is D minor 7 (the ii), G7 (the V) and C Major 7 (the one). Other common chord progressions in jazz are ...


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Chord progressions are written with a sequence of letters representing the chord along with its attributes such as minor, suspended, or diminished. (Note: All chords are assumed to be major unless otherwise indicated.) An example would be C,G7, Am, F with the assumption that it would be repeated. Typically the bass line defines what your progression will be. ...


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They just want to know how the harmony of a song progresses though the chords of a song. The chord progression can just be viewed as the precises order of the chords in a song. The chords used and the order appear in offer a lot of information about the song and how they can play it. For example off the top of my head I know the chord progression for Let ...


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All the answers so far are correct but I would like to see if I can explain it in a different way that might make it easier for some folks to understand. Every song has a basic harmonic structure to go with the melody of the song. The chords provide the harmony and appear in a predictable predetermined order. So the chord progression of a song is not ...


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"Imitates" is probably best, but another option would be "follows". The initial melody is called the leader (or dux), while the imitative melody, which is played in a different voice, is called the follower (or comes). From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canon_(music)


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Actually, "chord progression" connotes a different level of abstraction than simply "chords". For each chord in a particular key, let's say the key of C: C major would be the "I" chord. D major would be the "II" chord, etc., up to B major which would be the "VII" chord. Of course, major chords are composed of minor thirds on top of major thirds. Minor ...


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The IAMX example is pretty much oom-pah bass, which typically goes root - chord - 5th - chord. The downbeats are strong single notes (from the tuba in a brass band), usually alternating between the root and the fifth of the current chord, and the offbeats are chords (played by the higher pitched horns in a brass band). This puts a kind of emphasis on the ...


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A chord progression is a series of chords that are played in a song (or a part of the song). If a song has the chords C, Em, F, G, It means that all these chords together form the chord progression of the song. Many people abbreviate 'chord progression' to 'chords'. It's the same thing. You might also hear harmonic progression and/or chord changes (or ...


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You could say it's imitation: In music, imitation is the repetition of a melody in a polyphonic texture shortly after its first appearance in a different voice. Wikipedia uses this example from Bartok's Mikrokosmos, which is similar to yours: Also, this example from Bach's Fugue no. 16: The 1st violin imitates the 2nd violin at the start of ...


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The difference between tessitura and range is distinct. The range is the lowest to highest note, either of the piece, or the pitch at which one can comfortably sing, or play on the instrument in question.. Tessitura is the general position, most used register, or lie, of the vocal lines.If a piece has a lot of high parts, that may well tax a singer's vocals, ...


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Yes, "tessiatura" is a posh term meaning "range". As always, niceties can be discovered. An individual singer has an overall range, outside which he CAN'T sing. But he will generally be able to sing a particular song in several keys, without exceeding those limits. We might say he can use a higher or lower "tessiatura" within his "range".


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"Andando" does mean "walking" both in Portuguese and Spanish, and is used to describe the Andante tempo marking in common words, but as far as I know and have ever seen, the word is not used as a substitute for the traditionally instituted Italian words. Incidentally, there is a link between Riddler and the Portuguese culture, as his major 1956 hit Lisbon ...


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You don't have to state a dynamic immediately before the crescendo unless you want a change there. You DO need to state a dynamic after it though, otherwise how does the player know whether it's a crescendo to mp, f or ff? Computer scoring programs, and the tricks required to get expressive playback out of them, have encouraged a generation of composers to ...


6

At first I thought you were misreading the quirky script used for "Andantino". But I see that "Andantemente", "Andare" and "Andando" also appear. They all have meaning in Italian (see Google), though not generally used in musical Italian. Just Riddle (or his copyist) being a bit creative, I think!



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