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0

I don't think you'll find an exact term for this, but what you are referring to is "texture." In the type of piece you describe, the texture starts "thin" and then layers or builds to a "dense" texture. For the reverse(at the end of the piece) you could describe the texture as "thinning out" or "layering out." If there is one instrument, the texture is ...


0

This rhythm (or rhythmic cell) is so common that it appears in everything from Opera to Reggaeton: Reggaeton example: (Menealo) https://itunes.apple.com/us/album/reggaeton!-20-latin-hits-very/id83091088 Opera example: Carmen: l'amour est un oiseau... https://itunes.apple.com/us/album/carmen-lamour-est-oiseau-rebelle/id454403092?i=454403701


2

I would start on Pandora searching for an actual percussion ensemble. A good start would be So Percussion. Then continue to like their music.


3

Where did this idea originate? West Africa, then transplanted to the New World. It is a defining characteristic of African-American music, and all the styles of music that grew out of and were influenced by African-American music. It then spread to the rest of the world via the 20th-century music of the USA, Cuba, Brazil, Jamaica, and other nations with ...


2

Andrew Lloyd Webber's musicals are significantly different from 'golden age' musicals of the 40's and 50's. You call such pieces is rock opera, but this is probably not the most accurate term as it more often refers to a musical album with connecting narrative through the songs (and no element of staging). Thus, I prefer (and will be using) the term ...


8

The key difference between a musical and an opera is that a musical contains spoken word. While a musical alternates singing with "regular" acting, an opera's story is completely conveyed through singing. Of course, an opera may have a few spoken lines here and there, and a musical may have a very high singing versus speaking ratio. You can already tell what ...


0

Some writers, e.g. the User Manual for Finale, are perfectly happy talking about "key signature accidentals."


4

For practical purposes, the two words are mostly interchangeable. Style: sometimes people say "style" to refer more to the conventions of rhythm, harmony, melody, arrangement and production that might be associated with music of a particular type, from a particular area, or of a particular genre. Because of this you can hear people say things like, "I ...


5

These words are very dependent on the context, and in many cases, they can even be treated as synonyms. That's one reason why you see them being used interchangeably: in case there is no possible confusion, either word can be used. One way to look at it I am not completely sure if this is the correct way to look at it, but I've always seen it like this: ...


9

This is quite a common modulation, to a tone, or semitone highter. It's a pretty severe one, too, unlike modulations round the cycle of fifths, which can pass unnoticed and lead you smoothly into new keys, this is a 'kick' and it's noticed by anyone listening, even if they're listening passively. It's used a lot in popular music, and it's referred to in ...


0

Also, consider this: When the composer wants to play the melody line 4 times, it would be more tiring than to play the melody 3 times and the last to change the pitch; meaning if the last time the melody was a bit higher, it would give a different effect and it would be less tiring to the ear of the listener.


29

This type of modulation is sometimes jokingly called "truck driver's gear change". It's supposed to add excitement due to the rising pitch but it's been done to death so now it became just a bad cliche.


4

There's a simple key change. It starts in F, with parts in Dm, which is the relative, and as such, sounds like it's hardly gone anywhere. Then at 2:34 there is an abrupt key change to F#/Gb. The tempo, however, is static.It happens in quite a few songs, to give a lift or break the tedium.Often it's preceded by the dominant chord of the new key, to sort of ...


2

I think if I were trying to make this distinction, I'd call the first referent (the em in C) "the third degree of the scale" and the second referent (minor third of that em chord) the "third above the root": Ie. "In C major, the chord of em is built on the third scale degree, and the note G is the third above its root." rwf


0

Normally it means to go back to the first tempo. Probably, the tempo was changed somewhere. Chopin's pieces have this sort of thing in his tempo.


3

I think 'chordal' is the term you're searching for. As in that G would be a 'chordal minor third'. Chordal coming from 'of the chord'.As opposed to its place in the parent scale of 'dominant'note.


4

In my experience, to avoid this confusion, people generally treat the chord-scale as a giant chord, naming each of its notes as if it were part of the chord. root, third, fifth, seventh, ninth, and so on. In other words, the "2" would be referred to as a 9 regardless of if it's inside the voicing or above it. This would give rise to the feeling that "scale ...


21

Tempo 1 or Tempo I instructs a performer to return to the first tempo of a movement or piece of music, where there has been a different tempo marking since the first marking. The marking Tempo Primo is also used. It is the equivalent, on a larger scale, of an a tempo marking following a rit. or rall. marking.


22

Tempo primo, or Tempo 1ᵒ means “at the same tempo as the piece started”.


6

Without seeing a picture, I would guess that section A had some tempo, section B some other and section C has to return to the first tempo, to the tempo of section A; thus 'Tempo 1'



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