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5

The answer is actually quite simple: it's called a double-diminished triad. Played in first inversion it's usually referred to as Italian augmented sixth chord. As mentioned in other answers, our ears have a tendency to hear it as a dominant seventh sound.


1

By analogy with Why does the C7 chord on guitar omit the G note (5th) in open position? this chord could perfectly acceptably be named as an F7 (no 5th.) As others have said, Eb F A is going to sound like an F7, and the chord shape discussed in the question I have linked shows there is indeed a precedence set for naming chords like this as 7ths. Many ...


4

A D# chord like this could never occur in any scale degree of a major or minor scale with the #d note as a root so there would be no need to name it with reference to the #d. However this notes could occur together, for example in a B7b5 chord without the root (b). Since music theory doesn't care for something that could only happen outside a harmonic ...


6

This is a tough question. [0,2,6] probably isn't what you're looking for, but I believe is the best way to address it. It's going to sound like an F7(4 2), but is certainly not written that way. It could resolve to E, as F7 can be a tritone substitution for B7 in terms of function. To support this, both D# and F could resolve to E (upward and downward, ...


3

Not every set of notes yields a nice, clean chord name just stacking in thirds. Sometimes it is necessary to rearrange the notes to see how they fit better especially since there are no chords that are contain a diminished 3rd. If you rearrange the letters like so: F A _ D#/Eb You get and F7 like others have stated. The full name would be F/D#. If you ...


3

I would interpret this as an F7 chord with the 5 missing. If you respell the D# as Eb, it will make more sense. In my experience I have never encountered a diminished third as a definitive chord voicing.


1

It'll SOUND like a dominant 7th , although technically it won't be called that. As we are aware, the 5th of a chord is one that can be left out.


-3

Perhaps there is confusion between polyrhythm and polymeter because there is actually no such word as polymeter: http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/spellcheck/english/?q=polymeter I think it's best to stick to polyrhythm and then use other words to describe the type or characteristics of the polyrhythm.


3

To add to the excellent answer by @PatMuchmore, "gajo" has nothing to do with fruit, it is but a slightly antiquated spelling for the Italian "gaio", which means "gay" (which is incidentaly a cognate word), whose interpretative meaning is self-explaining: play gayly :)


0

Schenkerian Analysis is a fairly advanced technique if you're just learning about music theory, and it was designed primarily for classical music, but one of its key concepts is prolongation -- the idea that some notes in a melody are more important (more functional, if you will) and can be, in some abstract sense, extended throughout an entire passage of a ...


1

One way to label this is a melody that arpeggiates the tonic chord. To clarify what that means, the melody is only using the notes of the C chord, which is the tonic chord of that key (the chord that has the name of the key, also which has its root on the first note of that key). And it arpeggiates that chord, meaning it goes up and down the notes of that ...


1

These terms are mainly used for describing guitar playing styles. Chord melody means that a piece is arranged as a solo piece for guitar, where the guitar needs to play melody and chords. Note that usually not every melody note is harmonized, because this is often neither practical nor the most musical solution. On the other hand, a chord solo is usually a ...


1

In a musical context "Tone" can be the hi-cut filter on an old record player or radio. It can be another word for "Timbre". It can be the British name for a whole-step interval (half-step is a semitone). It can just mean a single-pitch musical sound - a chord consists of several tones played together. "Note" could be the same as that last definition of ...


0

This should be thought of as a root-position seventh chord with a ninth added to it. You wrote: I know it isn't some kind of inversion, since the V9 inversions are indicated differently. In fact, it's even easier than you thought. :) It's not an inversion, it's in root position. Basically, it's almost the same as just writing "7", which is also root ...


0

They want you to add the ninth and the seventh of the chord. You can leave out the fifth. It is the least important note of the triad and just add those two notes. Remember the seventh still has to resolve. I'm curious as to why the indications are between the staves. That seems poor to me. I have never seen that before.


7

It's figured bass and while typically associated with analysis and chords the meaning typically differs. As you said typically when thinking in chords or analysis in a V9 the 7th is implied. However, in figured bass only the typical triad is implied unless otherwise noted so just putting the 9 would make the harmony add9 instead of dominant 9. So yes it is ...


1

This is called comping. You play the same chord in different positions. It creates movement and exhibits the whole range of the instruments while in some cases it generates interesting voicings like your Gsus. It sounds cool and its the dirty job of a guitarist.


1

I don't think that there's a specific name for such a progression. You basically repeat a chord in different inversions. However, the way I hear the second chord (with A in the bass) is not as a version of G. Of course you can call it Gsus2, but the question is if you hear it as a Gsus2. I don't because the 2 in the bass (A) is quite uncommon and suggests ...


0

Slash chords could be what you mean. It's a way of describing a chord with a note other than the root at the bottom. Common are G/B and G/D, which are G chords with B and D as the lowest note respectively. Otherwise called 1st and 2nd inversions. When A is underneath the chord is G add 2 or sometimes G sus 2, if B is absent, and here is written G/A. If there ...


1

I've just listened on YouTube to the two songs you mention. If notating the intro to "Shanghai" I might write "Freely". Any time signature I chose would be arbitrary, there is no real beat or pulse to the music. "Colorblind" has a beat, but it slows down at the end of each phrase. There are occasional half-hearted attempts to "pay back" the time by ...


6

Rubato is a good term for the sort of micro-speedups and slowdowns that you're talking about, but it isn't a word for songs that sound good when performed that way, it's a term for the performance style. Some composers will explicitly write rubato or "Tempo rubato" in a score, but there are plenty of times when it's appropriate performance technique even ...


1

Neilsen's 5th symphony was an early example (1922). Towards the end of the first movement, the side drum part is in a different tempo and time signature from the rest of the orchestra. The first edition of the score instructed the drummer to "improvise as if at all costs he wants to stop the progress of the orchestra". In a later edition that instruction ...


12

The answer here is deceptively simple: Polytempo. There are other names, such as multi-tempo, polytemporal, and others, but they all describe the same phenomena. Here is a link for further reading on Wikipedia. For a list of composers that have used this technique, as well as the pieces in which this technique was used, check out this page and look under ...


2

This sort of thing has been explored pretty deeply by, among other people, Conlon Nancarrow. He used player pianos to perform pieces which would most likely have been too complex for anyone to perform organically. One way in which he complicated things was that he used what he called a tempo canon. As discussed here, one such piece was his Study for Player ...


1

There is both polymeter and polyrhythm. Polymeter is sometimes referred to as "tactus-preserving polymeter." The measure size differs, the beat is the same. Since the beat is the same, the various meters eventually agree. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Meter_%28music%29#Polymeter A good example of polymeter is the Tala which is an extream form of ...



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