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4

As mentioned in a comment by Caleb Hines, there is no clear-cut definition of the concept of stability in music. When talking about chords, the two notions of stability that I consider most important are the stability with respect to a given key, and the stability of a chord without any context. In a given key, the tonic is perceived as the most stable ...


5

The concept of tonality is partially based on the idea that certain chords "want" to go to other chords. For instance, the dominant (V) wants to go to the tonic (I), mostly because it has the leading tone (scale degree 7). A more complex example is the augmented sixth chord. The augmented sixth is VERY unstable, because it has two notes (the flat-sixth and ...


1

Broken chords are in essence just a type of arpeggiation the difference being the order in which the notes are played. This is more like an arpeggio. . And this is something more like a broken chord.


1

"Arpeggio" is literally "like a harp". Notes are not stopped before playing the next note. If you take a look how a harp plays a multi-octave chord or run, you have to alternate hands and play the fingers one by one (to give the inactive hand time to move to its next position without interrupting the flow of the arpeggiated phrase). When arpeggiating on a ...


3

Well every arpeggio is a broken chord, but not every broken chord is an arpeggio. A broken chord is just as it sounds: a chord that is broken up in some way, shape, or form where you are not playing the the full chord at once. An arpeggio is a specific way of playing a broken chord that has a defined texture to it. While the definition is not a very ...


1

ABRSM seems to think there is a difference in that broken chords are played, in the earlier exams, as 1,3,5,3,5,8,5,8,10,8, then in reverse. Or using a 4 note pattern. Sorry, I don't have exam books to hand till tomorrow!. Whereas arpeggios go 1,3,5,8,5,3,1, or 1,3,5,8,10,12,15,12,10,8,5,3,1 for two octaves, etc. The sequence would appear to be different, ...


2

The left hand of this is basically arpeggiated chords. So it's just putting an accompaniment with the appropriate harmony under the melody.


5

Would this fall into the boundaries of harmony? The answer is simple and it's yes. There are many kinds of harmony. The blues harmony is different than the jazz which is different than the classical etc.


1

From the perspective of piano, a measure that has a clear arpeggiation may or may not have an indication to use the pedal, which would pretty much leave every note to ring until it was released. Not pedaling would, in turn, have a more staccato effect. In my experience, it's either called "pedalling," which is fairly straightforward, but which only relates ...


2

You can use English: let vibrate Or Italian: l.v. lasciar vibrare


2

Uhm, arpeggio? "Leave all the notes ringing together" (the effect depending on the sustain of the respective instrument, so one pretty much needs a percussive instrument) is rather the definition of arpeggio. Otherwise you have something else, like a broken chord. You cannot arpeggiate on a monophonic instrument (like voice or most wind instruments).


7

Depending on how you are using it, pedal point/tone or drone may be the right terms for it. A pedal point is typically a sustained bass note where the melody changes over it, but it can also be a repeated note between itself and other notes as shown in the example below similar to what you describe. A drone is very similar in nature, however it is more ...


0

I am the developer of Chordastic, I think this is the software you are looking for. It can produce really nice lyrics and chord sheets with minimum effort and with very easy UI.


5

Most of your name suggestions aren't wrong. Chords and lyrics sheet -> This seems a bit long, but it is accurate, since it describes exactly what we are looking at Chord charts [with lyrics]-> Short and to the point. Music chord tabs -> Tabs seems wrong here, because you don't include a tablature in your app. Lead sheet -> Like Tim said, the app isn't a ...


3

A chord progression specifies a series of chords, and when they are played: | C | C | C | C | F | F | C | C | G | F | C | C | A chord progression doesn't tell you how to play the chords, only what they are and when they change. It doesn't tell you want instrument to use, what inversion of the chord to use, what rhythm or strum pattern, whether to play ...


2

A riff is (usually) played on top of a chord progression. A riff is a progression of notes, usually played on top of some chords (could be played a capella, could be played over one chord, could be anything). There isn't any rule that specifies how long a riff is. A riff could be half a measure, could be 3, could be 6. A chord progression is a progression ...


0

A band has a distinct modern element to it. Though you can have bands with classical instruments in it they tend to play some type of modern music be it Jazz, Swing or Blues. Also electricity often makes it into the mix where an orchestra usually shuns amplification.


0

My understanding is that the "Band" term began at the commencement of the French Revolution and was the first time a full musical group was composed solely of instruments that were portable and could be played while the musician was walking. The groups paraded Paris gathering followers because of the rousing music. Nowadays the terms are essentially ...


1

The manner in which I used the term and it may very well be incorrect is that instead of using your Index / Middle and Ring finger to hold down the open E Major chord you do with the next set of three left hand fingers (Middle, Ring and Pinky) This leads to having your Index finger free to bar when you go from the open E chord to any of the various E shape ...


3

Half position in reference to a barre chord using one finger to bar 2-5 notes instead of all 6 strings. There's a lot of chords that don't to be fully barred. Simple example is there is a "mini" version of the typical F chord that is: %X/X.X/X.3/3.2/2.1/1.1/1[F] Notice only two notes are barred so you are in half position. The distinction is made so you ...


1

I've wondered about this term for a long time. I've also asked fellow musicians about it's meaning ... and these are people who actually use the term ... and they haven't been able to define it. Ha. That being said, here's my take on it: the term "playing in the pocket" is not usually used for the whole band. If fact, in my experience, it usually refers ...


0

The two words can be quite identical to the meaning it gives to set a musical term for the music performed or composed. So... Genre: meaning the identification to an original musical form that may also relate to an era and or place of reference, e.g.; SAMBA, BAIAO, CLASSIC, ROCK, SALSA, BRAZILIAN, LATIN, JAPANESE, etc Style: meaning the variation from ...


2

This question is really broad, but I'll take a crack at it. There's no universal emotional language of music. Compare, for instance, the writings of Plato on emotional qualities in music (The Republic) to our contemporary genres. Even though we have only vague ideas what his music sounded like, the instruments seem to have sounded roughly like bagpipes, ...


2

A register in the context in music is very close to and can be thought of as a different way of talking about the range of an instrument, group of notes, ect. The definition of it is as follows: In music, a register is the relative "height" or range of a note, set of pitches or pitch classes, melody, part, instrument, or group of instruments. A ...


8

If the melodic contour is similar, either exactly transposed or adjusted to retain the shape but remain diatonic in the prevailing key, it's a sequence. If the contour of the melody changes, it's a rhythmic mode. Edit: Now that I see the example, ms.3-6 form a (mainly) diatonic melodic sequence in D minor. I say "mainly", because you get the usual sharping ...


1

It's part of the general rule - don't double up on what someone else is doing. Keep out of the other guy's way. No-one said "chord register", so don't waste time trying to analyse it!


3

The term "Bass VI" applies to the Music Man Silhouette Baritone Bass. The Bass VI name comes from the Fender Bass VI introduced in 1961 before "normal" six string basses existed (or at least were widely known). At least some other makers, e.g. Eastwood t (Sidejack Bass VI) and Schecter (Hellcat vi), have adopted this naming. This is one of those cases ...


0

There is little point in two guitarists playing exactly the same chord shape,unless the rhythm or tones are different. It's to do with the VOICING of chords. If, for example, one player uses an open C( at the head end of the guitar), then it increases the sound for another to play a barre C at the 8th fret. This means that some same notes are played by ...


0

I suppose it could be a baritone guitar, although there is a model that is tuned A-A. The strings don't look very thick. The reason most BASSES are tuned BEADGC is to keep the 4th tuning between strings. The reason GUITARS are tuned EADGBE is to facilitate chord playing. Generally, basses are not used for chord work, so this is maybe an attempt to get ...



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