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2

If I understand your question correctly, the answer is: "prolation". There are two concepts with rhythm, meter - the number of beats in a measure and prolation - the number of subdivisions of the meter. Straight 8's are duple meter, duple prolation and Swing 8's are duple meter triple prolation. Due to the church origins of these terms, where 3 was divine - ...


5

Feel works, and I believe you can also say style or groove. Rephrasing: Groove. Wikipedia: Groove is the sense of propulsive rhythmic "feel" or sense of "swing" created by the interaction of the music played by a band's rhythm section (drums, electric bass or double bass, guitar, and keyboards). Feel and style also work but aren't as specific.


4

Feel is what's typically used then talking about straight vs swing. I've also seen the terms rhythm used to talk about straight vs swing. You could use either when talking about it as these are the typical terms used to compare and contrast them.


1

Let's define both terms, as there seems to be a little confusion with what a motif and a phrase is. A phrase is defined as: A musical phrase is a unit of musical meter that has a complete musical sense of its own, built from figures, motifs, and cells and combining to form melodies, periods and larger sections; or the length in which a singer or ...


2

Why do you require abbreviation? If there's a perfectly good term for this that doesn't use an abbreviation, will it be acceptable? "Notes per octave" or "pitches per octave" seem pretty widely used, universally understood, and tuning-agnostic. As an extension of this, scales themselves can be described as n-tonic, where n is a Greek number (as in, ...


5

No, there is no other term that I know of. The term "crossover" seems to be the term everybody uses, but sometimes they add "nylon-string" to make sure that people know they are not talking about guitars with steel strings. I have written extensively about crossover guitars on my blog, circa 2009. My first blog entry is here: ...


1

Well, before the keyboard instruments were well tempered [think of the Well-Tempered Klavier], it was impossible to play in tune (i.e. with good intonation) in certain keys. And by the old system it would be impossible to do the annual (or semi-annual) tuning in such a way as to be able to play all keys in tune. Modern string players still have this ...


2

I believe the term you are looking for is "bariolage." It is often used to describe passages that alternate between two strings—one open and the other mostly stopped (often playing a melody that is meant to be heard apart from the open-string pedal or cover tone)—but can also be extended to passages involving more strings. There are some good examples at ...


6

A pithy way of saying it is that intonation is the process by which a temperament is achieved. Intonation is what is done in order that the sound is produced at the desired/intended pitch. This can be done as part of instrument setup, e.g. "setting the guitar intonation", or as an integral part of performing the music, e.g. as in expressive intonation. ...


-1

7/8 Time would be an irregular time signature (5 and 7) 3/4 Is just plain ol' 3/4 ...and 13/16 sounds like something the poster made up. You do get twelve time which is compound quad time but 13 sounds to me like rubbish.


2

It literally just means create a piece of music where the time signature alternates between 7/8, 3/4, and 13/16 in that order. There's nothing more to it. Here's a 12 bar score template to give you a better idea of what he means: As you can see, there are 4 complete 7/8, 3/4, and 13/16 measures. Most likely you would want them together to make one ...


0

When musicians talk to each other, this is what is meant by these two terms: Dynamics refers to loudness and softness, and how you vary these to get different effects. Dynamics can spell the different between boring and fascinating! Articulation refers to how connected or separated the neighboring notes are with respect to each other, e.g. dry, staccato, ...


3

Hypermeter is meter at a higher level, combining several measures into one unit. The figure below is taken from an academic analysis of Meshuggah's album "Catch 33" - link: The cymbal plays a normal 4/4 beat (plus one 2/4 measure), but the snare drum and the bass drum superimpose an additional rhythm, which is indicated by the blue lines, and which can be ...


0

I think that different musicians have different ideas about what distinguishes dynamics from articulation. There certainly appears to be a lot of fuzziness along the border between dynamics and articulation. Traditionally, dynamics reference volume and how volume changes over time. This appears to be the general view taken by the wikipedia article on ...


1

To me dynamics may include things like crescendo, decrescendo, fermatas, forte, piano, mezzo forte, mezzo piano, accelerando, legato, staccato and the like. Things that generally effect the speed and loudness Articulation to me is a more specific question about how a performer executes the music he plays. The attack of the picking. The use of playing closer ...


3

Dynamics include everything that changes the sound -- such as speed, volume, tone, and more. Speed varies from fast to slow, while rests often provide dramatic effect. Volume varies from loud to soft, and the decay of volume varies from sustained (compressor) to pizzicato (such as palm-muted). Tone varies from the mechanical changes such as picking style ...


0

In fingerstyle, I often use this with nylon strings and so far (over twelve years of guitar study) I have not seen a notation for it. Thus, I set a figure, double vertical thick line, to use in my sheets and named it as chord-flood. Because feeling of it reminds me flood.


5

The name is indeed tetrad, as pointed out in a comment by Shevliaskovic. However, this term is not very common. Standard tetrads built in thirds are almost always referred to as seventh-chords. The problem is that there are two common four-part chords (yes, that's actually a very good name!) that are no seventh chords, because they contain a major sixth ...


3

the word triad is not specific to music and simply means a group of three. In general the series is, monad, diad, triad, tetrad, pentad, hexad, heptad etc. Check out this list of polygon names (http://mathcentral.uregina.ca/qq/database/QQ.09.96/rosa1.html) I'm reasonably sure you can just replace the letters "agon" with "ad" should you ever need more than ...


4

Finger pedalling, or finger sustain. I've also heard it referred to as "sticky fingers". If you switch fingers it would be part of finger substitution.


3

Lyrical dissonance or agathocacological


2

The 1900 Grove Dictionary of Music and Musicians defines a double appoggiatura as "An ornament composed of two short notes preceding a principal note, the one being placed above and the other below it", and gives several examples that are identical to the first example in your question. So, there is certainly precedent for the term "double appoggiatura." ...


1

It's definitely NOT yodeling and "twang" can describe other aspects of the rockabilly country style of singing besides the sharp pitch increase you refer to. I am not sure if there is actually an official name for that technique. I call it a "Hillbilly Hiccup" and I have used it myself in some of my original country songs. In fact I first herd the ...


1

Judging from the example, I think OP is just referring to the brass swell/"crescendo" happening from 2:55 to 2:59. The voicing helps to create that effect as well. Compare: http://www.proudmusiclibrary.com/en/tag/dramatic-brass-swell I don't know if "brass swell" is proper orchestrator-ese, though.


1

That example you gives just sounds like a good old fashioned crescendo. It means gradually becoming louder. Maybe also has a sforzando piano type of effect as well. Movie scores will also sometimes use a shrill stringed tremolo that gradually increases in loudness until the suspense is released. That may very well be that cat-on-a-tin-roof effect that you ...


5

I'm going to give a very cursory simplification for the answer because asking about Lydian Chromatic theory is just like asking about Set Theory or Serialism. Lydian Chromatic Concept Theory basically asserts that the lydian scale is more closely aligned to the natural, universal properties of sound than the conventional major scale. It explains and ...


4

There's a combination of techniques going on here simultaneously. First is the choice of pitches. As you note, it is a steady disturbing or unpleasant chord. This means there is a single chord being held that contains a lot dissonance. A typical chord such as a major or minor chord contains only consonance. Even in seventh chords, the dissonances are ...



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