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Traditional music theory is basically diatonic harmony. I disagree with previous poster saying that the guitar is not an ideal instrument to learn theory on. Of course it's ideal, because it's a harmonic instrument (you can play chords on it). It and the piano are both ideal to learn theory on. Plenty of music teachers can instruct you in theory. And there ...


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You can go to a music shop that is well stocked with sheet music, method books, etc., and ask them to point you to the music theory workbooks section. Pick out Volume 1 of each series (all the major publishing houses have such a series), take them over to a comfortable chair, and choose one that appeals to you. Please don't be put off by the small amount ...


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You are right. Guitar method books don't teach much traditional music theory. This is because the guitar is not an ideal instrument upon which to learn music theory. Traditional Western music theory, as it is taught in colleges, is based around choral music. You learn to read and analyze choral music, and later to arrange and write your own chord ...


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Get a teacher. Nice and simple. One with a college degree where he or she did at least four years of theory studies. Ask him or her what kind of melody and harmony work he or she did. If he or she can write fugues and has a good knowledge on counter point then he or she would get you far. Just remember that for every 10 practical teachers there may be one ...


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For your two examples in particular we have a very precise naming convention in german. Let's see if this works in english, too. 'Achtel-Feeling' vs. 'Triolet-Feeling' As you can see the word 'Feeling' is very german ;-))) In english this would be STRAIGHT- FEEL vs. SWING-FEEL... Groove is the groove of a LP(LongPlay, Schelack, Record) and just means ...


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Adding to the answer from dwoz -- In the string sections, the first chair plays the solos. It's helpful to be able to keep a cool head, and to have just a bit of a strong ego. The first chair might organize a section rehearsal. The first chair does a bit of conducting through movement, to help all the section members make their entrances together. One ...


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First Chair is a position of distinction that will usually go to a highly competent player...though not necessarily to the best player in the section. The first chair is also leader of the section...the rest of the section will take their cues and direction on inflection, dynamics, bowings, etc. from the first chair. The physical location of the chair with ...


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I'm afraid that there is no indication on playing notes randomly. You sometimes have a cadenza but this is just a passage where the performer is given a chance to solo a bit. This is not entirely random though as the performer still has to somewhat stay on theme. You also have Ad libitum which can be considered "At ones pleasure" This is when a performer is ...


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"High C" or "top C" might be used. The "F6" terminology was invented for use with MIDI and related computer software. It might be used when talking about the range of an instrument or a voice in that context, but probably not for human performance. Note that some groups of performers use rather "unconventional" conventions for describing pitch. For example ...


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If it's at the upper range of the student's voice, the teacher will just use the word "high." For example, "the high C" or "the high F" or whatever.


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This kind of singing is called scat singing.


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It's kind of a strange story. In an early form of notation there were two kinds of notes, long and short. "Longa" means "long" and "breve" means short. So the longest note you are ever likely to see in modern music (twice as long as the longest note you usually see) is a "short". At some point someone needed a shorter note than the short, thus the "half ...


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Wikipedia has a very good breakdown of how notes are named. Here's a snippet of just the names of the ones that are different: American Name British Name double note | breve whole note | semibreve half note | minim quarter note | crotchet eighth note ...


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Typically, it's an opportunity for new composers to hear their music played by a real orchestra, as opposed to the playback option in their notation computer software. "Reading" implies that this is usually close to sight-reading by the orchestra (and sometimes by the conductor as well!)


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There is a long list of styles of music with particular distinct rhythms and time signatures at the Wikipedia article on Ballroom Dance. That is to say that these are competition styles of dance, but each dance has its own style of music that goes along with it. Here is a partial list from that link Waltz: 3/4 time Tango: 4/4 time Viennese Waltz: 3/4 time ...


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In the Baroque style period (roughly 1600–1750) the rhythms of a number of folk dances from all across Europe were incorporated into instrumental compositions -- at the same time, what we now know as ballet was being developed in France. There are numerous Baroque dances and rhythms. Many great composers wrote famous instrumental pieces called suites which ...


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Here is a long and detailed list of many Bulgarian folk dances and styles of music (going back centuries) which make use of various odd-time signatures like 7/8, 11/16, 5/8, and many others. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bulgarian_dances


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From the Wikipedia article on Time Signature: 4/4: Widely used, rock, country, blues, funk, pop 2/2: Marches and musical theater 2/4: Polkas and marches 3/4: Waltzes, minuets, scherzi, country and western ballads, R&B, pop 3/8: Same as above 6/8: Double jigs, polkas, sega, salegy, tarantella, marches, barcarolles, Irish jigs, loures, and some rock ...


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Uh, is this a trick question? "Für Elise" is (at least regarding the well-known beginning) rather particular in its "accompaniment" in that accompaniment and melody line alternate (which makes it a nice beginners' piece since you don't have to focus on both hands at once) with the overlap provided by pedalling and with the arpeggiated line running from bass ...


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As already mentioned in Dom's answer, everything you wrote is correct. I'd just like to add a few things concerning the term diatonic. As you said, one meaning of "diatonic scale" is a scale with five whole tones and two half tones where the two half tones are maximally separated, i.e. at least by two whole tones. This includes the major scale and all its ...


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A piece of classical music will almost always have, at any given moment, a functional bass note that allows the current harmony to be heard in root position (root in the bass) or an inversion (some other chord tone in the bass). In this example, the bass line consists of the low notes at the downbeat of each measure, beginning A, E, A, which are also the ...


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Not really. Repeating a previous song is called a reprise, but there's no term that I'm aware of for when several reprises run together.


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You could call it "Industrial Music". John Cage, Phillip Glass and even Rassahn Roland Kirk (beating on metal chairs to accentuate his enthusiasm...") used this concept quite a bit.


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It could be considered an "overture". In classical music, an overture is used to restate previous or upcoming themes that are part of the overall piece.


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Yes you are correct, I'll just put it in simpler terms. The major scale is both diatonic and heptatonic. Heptatonic just means that there are 7 notes per octave in the scale. The diatonic scales just a name for the specific name for scales that contain a specific whole step, half step pattern TTSTTTS in some why, shape, or form. All the 7 natural ...


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It certainly can be. Historically though, the bass part (whether played by a bass or not) was often considered more of an arrangement detail than a composition detail. In "figured bass" notation, the bass part, while written, is considered to be largely improvisational.


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One name that comes to mind is "reprise."


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Do you think specifically about 3/4, or time signatures in general? Pop, rock and metal are almost always 4/4, and rarely change meter, though there can be exceptions (e.g. Iron Maiden - Number of the beast alternates between 4/4 and 6/4, Oingo Boingo little girls - alternates between 4/4 and 2/4). Great exceptions are postrock and avant-garde metal, where ...


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If you are talking about stylistic appropriate time signatures you can also add that Irregular Time Signatures are a distinct characteristic of modern music. They where extremely rare before the Modern scene was invented.


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It's called either a "vamp" or a "coda"


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In a general-usage sense, the word "counterpoint" could serve, though the word counterpoint names a very specific technical form that follows certain rules of construction. Because of that, the two lines in Fables of Faubus fail to be "counterpoint" but are most definitely "countermelody." They could be called "contrapuntal lines" without raising the ...


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Tenuto is a notational device to make it easy to add selective legato within a phrase. The tenuto mark indicates that the note is to be sustained as long as possible before the next note is articulated, in whatever way is appropriate for that next note. Legato just means "do that same thing for every note for the entire length of this phrase". As an ...


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Low End = bass Top End = treble (high end, etc.) The terms describe the frequency domain of a tone.


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Quodlibet ( Latin: “what you will”) musical composition in which several well-known melodies are combined, either simultaneously or, less frequently, sequentially, for humorous effect. Quodlibet can also refer to an amalgamation of different song texts in a vocal composition. While simultaneous combinations of two or more melodies go back to the 13th ...


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It seems that the prevailing opinion is to use the word "skank" although I would personally go with the word "chop", as "skank" has another meaning - it is also the name of the type of dance that people do to reggae and ska music. Using a term such as "reggae off beat chops" on a popular search engine will yield a few results confirming the usage, although ...


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Check out "tempo rubato." That is the vocalists instruction to a band when s/he wants it to follow the way it is being sung without regard to the song's usual beat.


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The term is "skanking" (a la the Marley song "Easy Skanking"), and it's also part of other Jamaican music, such as Ska. You are correct that it's about the high strings. When I've done it, it's been more about muting by releasing tension in the chording hand, rather than with the palm of the picking hand. The picking hand stays loose, keeping with the ...


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I know it as the "skank", though other names are used (see the link). I think it would be reasonable to say "The guitarist skanks on that song" for example.


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If I understand your question correctly, the answer is: "prolation". There are two concepts with rhythm, meter - the number of beats in a measure and prolation - the number of subdivisions of the meter. Straight 8's are duple meter, duple prolation and Swing 8's are duple meter triple prolation. Due to the church origins of these terms, where 3 was divine - ...


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Feel works, and I believe you can also say style or groove. Rephrasing: Groove. Wikipedia: Groove is the sense of propulsive rhythmic "feel" or sense of "swing" created by the interaction of the music played by a band's rhythm section (drums, electric bass or double bass, guitar, and keyboards). Feel and style also work but aren't as specific.


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Feel is what's typically used then talking about straight vs swing. I've also seen the terms rhythm used to talk about straight vs swing. You could use either when talking about it as these are the typical terms used to compare and contrast them.


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Let's define both terms, as there seems to be a little confusion with what a motif and a phrase is. A phrase is defined as: A musical phrase is a unit of musical meter that has a complete musical sense of its own, built from figures, motifs, and cells and combining to form melodies, periods and larger sections; or the length in which a singer or ...


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Why do you require abbreviation? If there's a perfectly good term for this that doesn't use an abbreviation, will it be acceptable? "Notes per octave" or "pitches per octave" seem pretty widely used, universally understood, and tuning-agnostic. As an extension of this, scales themselves can be described as n-tonic, where n is a Greek number (as in, ...


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No, there is no other term that I know of. The term "crossover" seems to be the term everybody uses, but sometimes they add "nylon-string" to make sure that people know they are not talking about guitars with steel strings. I have written extensively about crossover guitars on my blog, circa 2009. My first blog entry is here: ...



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