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14

Technically, there could be, you just keep extending the pattern. You could even keep extending it to the point where you need to start using double flats, though this is almost never done in practice. The key of F contains: B♭ The key of B♭ contains: B♭, E♭ The key of E♭ contains: B♭, E♭, A♭ The key of A♭ ...


9

It's an octave clef. It's telling you all the notes written are actually down an octave. Since the guitar is already a transposing instrument where everything is transposed down an octave, it's essentially showing you the actual notes being played instead of the implied octave transposition. So for simplicity's sake you can just ignore it and play as you ...


8

Dots in general start to get messy after the first one and can lead to confusion to while sight reading if more than one is used. For the sake of sight reading there are even some syncopated lines where a normal duration like a quarter note or eighth note are represented as ties to show the beat better. Using more than one dot is more theoretical in ...


8

This is an Ab major 7 flat 5 (Abmaj7(b5)) chord (if you hear Ab as its root). Many people would call it an Abmaj7(#11), because the b5 and the #11 are enharmonically the same note, and if you have a #11 you almost never have the perfect fifth in the chord anyway. I often use this voicing (from low to high): Ab G C D In the key of Bb major, this chord can ...


7

I'm guessing that tied notes have rather taken over. They're easier to read - were there two or three dots?- and the grouping probably is easier to follow. Let's face it, it's simpler to read a crotchet tied to a shorter note than do the sums to work out how long the (double) dotted note needs to be.


5

I'm going to give a very cursory simplification for the answer because asking about Lydian Chromatic theory is just like asking about Set Theory or Serialism. Lydian Chromatic Concept Theory basically asserts that the lydian scale is more closely aligned to the natural, universal properties of sound than the conventional major scale. It explains and ...


5

Everything you analyze in roman numeral analysis needs to reflect the key you are in and where the chord comes from. If the chord is not in the key, it needs to be marked appropriately. There is no scenario where you would mark a C7 as vi7 in the key of E major because: The standard vi chord in E major is C#, thus a root of C needs to be denoted with a ...


4

A curved line connected two notes that are the same pitch is a tie. If they are different pitches, it is a slur. In this example, the C sharps in the bottom voices in the right hand are tied, and the other voices are played legato according to the slurs.


4

Chords outside the key that you find within a piece of real-world music are called Secondary Dominants or Borrowed Chords. Or in some cases the music may temporarily modulate from the main key into a related key and then back to the main key again. In that case you would see several chords in sequence that outline the modulation to the different key. There ...


4

Yes they are both triplets. If they were not eigth note triplets, the measure would not add up to 4 quarter notes, but instead 5 quarter notes. Another thing to note is notice how the notes are beamed to make 4 groups. This is to clearly show each beat i.e. each quarter note. As you can see, those notes form one group together equaling 1 quarter note so ...


4

As you said, all the notes "on the beats" in the first 2 bars belong to a C major chord, and the piece ends on a C major chord. So it's a reasonable assumption that the key is C major. Before you can identify the "chord changes" you need to decide on the "harmonic rhythm", i.e. where the changes occur. The first step towards that is finding where the ...


4

I think there's a small element of your question kind of fulfiling itself in that you're asking why a kind of music which has solid snare, has a solid snare- answer there is: because that's partially what makes it that genre. but also you're asking why it's such a solid sound .. If the rhythm starts with an implied thud (usually taken by a bass drum, but ...


3

Baroque composers thought in terms of figured bass. To them the bass note was foundational and they thought of the structure above it in terms of the intervals of the notes from the bass. This was because they were trained in using and playing from a figured bass. Analyzing Bach by means of figured bass gets you inside the composer's mind better than any ...


3

The reason why a Bb is used instead of a B has to do with the key aspects of the Lydian mode itself which is the #4 and how it acts. The only difference between the Ionian mode and the Lydian is the 4th which is perfect in the Ionian mode and augmented in the Lydian mode. In Fux's counterpoint whatever mode you were in, you would want your cantus firmus and ...


3

Note: For the sake of discussion, I'm limiting myself here to equal temperaments, which is the most common way of tuning keyboards. Other systems exist, of course, but would probably only confuse the matter. Why do B and C and E and F not have a sharp note between them? Simply because, acoustically speaking, there is no room in our current system for ...


3

Here is a quick basic analysis of the passage in question. Note that the first note in the bass in your edition is wrong (it should be an F, and is in the Schotts Söhne edition I've copied here). The notes under crosses are all accented non-harmonic notes; as such, they are resolving into chord tones in the following quavers. That's not to say that they ...


2

The 1900 Grove Dictionary of Music and Musicians defines a double appoggiatura as "An ornament composed of two short notes preceding a principal note, the one being placed above and the other below it", and gives several examples that are identical to the first example in your question. So, there is certainly precedent for the term "double appoggiatura." ...


2

If you are talking about microtonality - of which I know little, there will have to be a lot more than just changes to E/F and B/C. It's possible to have notes between any adjacent semitones. There could be as many extra notes between G and G# as between E and F. It just happens that it's accepted (and has been for centuries) that the note called F is ...


2

Here's one possibility, MySong by Dan Morris and others. The technical paper there is worth a read, and its introduction has further references which will probably be worth hunting down. This system doesn't actually play along - it requires a vocal/lead line to be input first, runs an analysis to determine key and fits chords etc. then plays back. Though ...


2

I am a composer and I agree with tpburch. I am familiar with music theory but never studied it detail. Any good composer with a good ear will do a lot of those things naturally. As a musician, I can figure out just about anything that makes sound and translate it accordingly. Music theory or engineering won't teach you how to write good music. ...


2

It probably is trying to indicate that the following two bars is played in the second position. (fret 2 to 5)


2

These time signatures are very interesting in nature and have a very specific purpose just like most things in music. A measure of (3/5)/4 would mean each measure contains 3/5 of a quarter note or 3 eighth note quintuplets. A simpler example is 2(1/2)/4 where where would be 2 and a half quarter notes or 5 eighth notes. As Matthew Read pointed out in the ...


2

The reason why C7-F (I7-IV) sounds good, is because the C7 is the V7 of F. So, the C7-F wouldn't exactly be I7-V, but V7-I in F. The reason C7-F might not sound that good is the above. The C7 has E, which is the leading tone that leads to F. The ear wants to go there. But if you like the sound of C7-G, there is no law against it. It is an unexpected ...


2

Partial answer : The circled numbers are the string numbers and the uncircled numbers are the finger numbers. For example, the first chord annotation asks you to play the F-sharp by placing your 4'th finger (at the 7'th fret) of the 2'nd string (i.e., the B string), and to play the D-natural by placing your 3'rd finger (at the 7'th fret) of the 3'rd string ...


2

To answer the second question, you can use the "voices" feature of GP6 : You can have 4 voices. Each voice has it's own "bar duration count" which is independent from the other. To change the current voice, use the "1", "2", "3" and "4" buttons. When you'll add a note, it will be added to the currently selected voice. The notes from the other voices are ...


2

The whole last measure looks like V to me and I would even consider it V7 as there is a Bb in the measure. There does appear to be a lot of non-harmonic tones in this section, but if you look start at the beginning of the measure, you can see how the harmony creates a V7 chord. V1: (F) E (D) C (D) E V2: G C (B) C Bb C VC: C C ...


1

A chord analysis has less to do with the the chords that are traditionally at each tone degree and more with what notes you see in front of you. Yes the Sub Mediant chord in a Major scale is a Major chord but what happens when an accidental is used and this chord does suddenly not conform to the norm? You need to be able to look at any chord and tell me is ...


1

When you talk about resolutions, you always have to look at how the notes move. Let's first look at C7 to F which can be looked at as I7 to IV, but most people would be more tempted to look at is as a tonic-dominant relationship (V7 to I). C -> C or G if root E -> F G -> F or A Bb -> A There are certain features about this that are very ...



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