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13

It's important to understand that mode doesn't have to be, and often isn't, an explicit choice. You wrote: The notes we play and the order is based on sound and emotion. and that's true enough, but—if you've mostly written notes from a single western key and are writing in a more or less traditional style—then the way you've used those notes will be in ...


12

Well, without any further context there is no possible distinction between a minor third and an augmented second as they are indeed the same note, technically. However, the phrases minor third and augmented second make reference not only to that space of three semitones, but also to the relationship that this interval plays within a given chord or scale. ...


11

A chord with those five pitches is a Gmaj7(#11). A major-seventh chord has a root, major-third, perfect-fifth and a major-seventh. So, a Gmaj7 chord has the notes G, B, D and F#. The fifth (D) would often be left out of this chord, without affecting the overall sound much, or the naming of this chord type. This article about extended (tertian) chords points ...


11

In common-practice theory, secondary dominant chords are chromatic harmonies used to approach a non-tonic chord with greater urgency. Let's use C major for examples: I might want to approach the V chord (G) with a secondary dominant to give greater direction or "color" to the approach. I construct the secondary dominant by going to the V chord of the V ...


10

You are looking at the chords in an interesting way, but you are over complicating the subject a lot and have a few slight misconceptions. I to V or i to V is a very normal chord movement and it is quite strong, but the the opposite is much stronger i.e. V to I or V to i. The movement is so strong at the end of a phrase the movement is known as an authentic ...


10

A few ideas: The most difficult but most flexible approach would be to continue playing with the synth programming until the synth sounds in tune on more notes, or program more synths to have similar sounds on different notes. Use pedal point. A bassline using pedal point constantly plays the same note, regardless of the changes in harmony. Done well, ...


10

"Folk music" is not a genre. "Folk music" is many hundreds of different genres. There are three broad categories of music, "classical", "folk", and "commercial". Folk music is simply whatever music that is made by people as a part of their culture, casually, and with no real expectation of earning money from it. Folk music depends upon the culture from ...


8

A key thing to keep in mind is that technically a minor 3rd and an augmented 2nd are different pitches (have different notional fundamental frequencies), at least in anything other than equal temperament. In just intonation, these two pitches differ by approximately 40 cents (list of intervals), enough to make a perceptable difference in the degree of ...


8

Harmony refers to the "vertical" relationship between simultaneous pitches in a musical texture (usually, but not always, chords - see below for the exception). However, it also refers to the "horizontal" relationships between successive vertical relationships of pitches; it's probably easiest to think of these as chord progressions. The exception, mentioned ...


7

When it comes to choosing a key signature, there is no standard. Except that most players are loathe to read music in keys with more than 7 sharps or flats. Aside from a few diehards who insist that F# is a different key than Gb (and it was, before the equal temperament system was developed), one rule of thumb is to use the key most commonly used for the ...


7

"All music is folk music. I ain't never heard a horse sing a song." -- Louis Armstrong First off, let's narrow things down a bit here. It sounds like you're talking about American folk music rather than folk music as a whole. Other folk musics would take a book to explain. American folk music has the following characteristics: Acoustic ...


6

Per Wikipedia, there are three classic octatonic scales which are made up of 2 interlocking diminished seventh chords. The scale that you mention can be described as a diminished seventh chord interlocked with a dominant seventh chord (with note renaming): E - F - G - A - B♭ - C - D♭ - E♭ - E which is created with an Edim7 chord E - G - B♭ - D♭ and an F7 ...


6

Modes and scales are just a way of ordering a series of notes. A bit like there's an order for letters - alphabet - but those letters never get used in that order (apart from the word 'no'...). A song in a particular mode will be based around a particular note. As in, that note feels like home, often a start place, and usually a finish place in a journey. ...


6

Music Theory is an academic discipline that throughout history has been developed in order to better understand the music being written and played by composers and performers. As such, it is also an incredibly useful tool in teaching all kinds of music to beginners. In many cases, the composers of the day were teaching students to follow rules that they ...


6

Harmony supports the melody. Polyphony is when there is more than one independent melody. The basic idea is that in polyphony is that each melody can stand on its own independent of the other melody. Common examples of this are rounds, fuges, and counterpoint. In the case of harmony, everything supports the melody. Their may be secondary melodies or the ...


5

Well, you can think of it in one of two ways. Interpretation 1: Relation to popular music: Popular music tends to be based on the major scale, which you've probably encountered. The major scale has a whole, whole, half, whole, whole, whole, half structure. I'll provide two examples because music theory books always use C major and I think that stunts ...


5

He’s referring to tension and release, an element of music theory which states essentially that music uses tension to create an expectation, followed by a release that fulfills the expectation. Dissonance and consonance are a very common method for tension and release, but you can also use rhythm, dynamics, and other musical elements to create tension and ...


5

Tension and release is a very important concept in music structure. A lot of chord schemes are built so that a certain chord will cause a feeling of tension, which can then be released or prolonged as desired. This is something our ears pick up instinctively; anyone with or without musical knowledge will subconsciously notice this tension and release. Take ...


5

As the other answers have said, a secondary dominant is a 7th chord that resolves to a chord other than the tonic. The classic example is a D7 chord in the key of C: the D7 resolves to G, which itself resolves to C. Dominants create tension To understand the theory and practice behind secondary dominants, you have to understand that all dominant chords ...


4

For stringed instruments such as the violin, playing in sharp keys (more accurately, 0 to 4 sharps) means making multiple main notes of the tonality coincide with open strings. This amplifies the instrument's show-off potential in two ways: In fast passages, fingering is simplified because any time the melody touches on one of the four open strings, ...


4

A lot of things come into play here. Often, the harmonies are analyzed (using Roman Numerals if it's Common Practice Tonality, using something like set theory if it's post-tonal, etc.) in order to see where the composer has followed standard progressions and, more interestingly, when they haven't. We look at the specific voicings of the harmonies and see how ...


4

Very interesting !! Just listened to the opening bars, and it's in C#minor. That's probably why it sounds like a C#, not a D. Now whether the recording has been slowed down a smidgen is conjecture, or whether the cello is actually tuned differently I don't know. So, yes it sounds like C# 'cos it is. Couldn't find one in 'Dm'.Unless, of course, the tuning was ...


4

Without getting into an entire lecture, here are some things you can do to make someone feel as though a piece of music is being concluded: Go to an extreme (pitch, dynamics, tempo, instrumentation) either to the most/high/loud or the soft/slow/low end for example. Typically rhythmic, harmonic, and melodic motion slow down. If there are motives or ...


4

There is an interesting irony here, because the song Lee linked to ("Taro") doesn't do any of the things that one would immediately think of as concluding: it doesn't actually bring the rhythm to a stop, nor does it end on the tonic chord. Instead it fades out on a repeating, open-ended cycle of simple diatonic chords (ii - I - vi - V). I would guess that ...


4

A good starting point is to write out all the notes in the chords you're playing (although if there are more than a few this might be harder). Usually (but not always), these chords are likely to be linked in some way harmonically, and so you may notice that all the notes are within one or more familiar modes or scales. For instance, the notes in the chords ...


3

Learning how to sing involves mostly learning the technical aspects of singing itself. That is producing a good tone, having a good range, building stamina and confidence. Recognizing the notes or to put it better "feeling" the notes and then reproducing them (as long as they are inside your current comfort zone) is something you discover yourself through ...


3

This is certainly not universally accepted, but I say a half-step isn't really a fixed entity; rather there are a couple of different "half"-steps of different size that can serve different purposes. That particular leading vii-I step, according to some performers – Pablo Casals was perhaps the most radical propagator of this idea – should be ...


3

Theory Secondary Dominants are chords that are the Dominant (V) chord of a certain key other than the Tonic (I) key. For example, let the current key be C Major. An F Major chord is the Subdominant (IV) of the current key (C Major). How about a C Dominant 7th chord? That is not in the current key, but you know it's the Dominant 7th (V7) of F Major, and F ...


3

The term for chord connections like this, where each note of the chords changes (usually chromatically, almost always step-wise) one-by-one, is linear harmony. It's quite common in Liszt, Scubert, Schumann, etc. Roman numeral analysis is mostly pointless during linear harmony passages, most analysts will either just label it as linear harmony until the next ...


2

Some more tips from Jazzology: Here are some notes that can be added to a chord to give a more 'jazzy' sound. Major triad: add 6th and 9th add M7 and 13 add #11 to either of the above for extra dissonance Minor 7th (works as ii): add 9 add 11 and/or 13 above the 9th for extra dissonance Minor triad (works as i): add 6 and 9 add M7 add 9 and/or 13 ...



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