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24

Yep, the second one is far better for precisely the reason you say. A general rule is that you shouldn't have dotted-notes that start on an off beat and carry through the next beat. There are exceptions even to this rule, but showing the underlying beat structure of the meter is paramount in the vast majority of situations. Elliott Carter is an example of ...


24

One option if you're primarily interested in representing the individual digits of pi is to use a representation in a base other than 10. For example pi base 12 would have an individual digital for each chromatic note. Here's a website that might help get you started: http://www.virtuescience.com/pi-in-other-bases.html


20

I feel like I've already at least partly answered this question here. But I'll endeavor to add more here. First of all, you aren't quite right in your description of the note-naming system. There are seven letters, and every one of these can be sharped or flatted: A♭, A, A♯ B♭, B, B♯ C♭, C, C♯ D♭, D, D♯ E♭, E, E♯ F♭, F, F♯ G♭, G, G♯ It's just that many ...


13

The number 10 doesn't necessarily map well to values in traditional musical theory. (For instance, there are 12 chromatic pitches per octave, using conventional divisions of the octave; diatonic scales have seven pitches; note durations are related as powers or negative powers of 2). So, for this reason, the world is your oyster! I guess you can choose any ...


9

I think you're about right. Homophony is the concept of a single 'line' as such, potentially split across several parts, but all moving at the same time - parts mainly follow the same rhythm. Polyphony is when there is multiple melody lines at the same time, interacting with each other. What's important to remember is that there should be a degree of ...


9

In my experience, unfortunately, writing melodies is one of the most "magical" parts of writing music. Some melodies just sound great, some just don't. There are, however, a few things to keep in mind that can help you deliberately write a melody for a particular emotion or style and help you understand why a particular melody sounds good. Intervallic and ...


9

The very simplest answer is that A is 440Hz (* 2^n, as you say) and that C is a minor third higher than that (523.251 Hz). However, the mapping of absolute pitches to note names is only a convention, and in reality the absolute pitch of C only needs to be agreed between the people performing a piece of music. When I pick up my guitar, for me C is the ...


9

Theory is just that - theory. It ain't law. The 'rules' don't have to be adhered to necessarily. Obvious in this (and many, many other) case(s). If it needs pigeon-holing, it could be explained that it isn't only in full minor, whatever that may be, but has slipped into mode. Dorian mode, as it happens. This mode sounds quite minor, but has its 4th chord as ...


8

If you are referring strictly to music written obeying to traditional rhythmic conventions (with rational time signatures and regular/even division), then your second example is more suitable. Please keep in mind that the first example is not wrong, but the second will make sight-reading much easier, as our own expectations when seeing a piece in 4/4 make us ...


7

I would say that since Music is a hobby for me and I do not plan to play in any kind of band or such learning to sight read isn't really important. It depends on you. I prefer reading normal music sheets rather than tabs or whatever, but this is just me. If you have time and energy to learn how to sight read,it most certainly won't be wasted. but ...


6

Pi can also be expressed through various infinite series. I like François Viète series discovered in 1593: Square root from 2 is half octave distance. Maybe it is possible to represent the series as some sequence of sounds? Or maybe some other series would fit better? This might reproduce the spirit of Pi even better than replaying its decimal ...


5

Here's a common chart showing how the notes break down: Notice how each row is a full measure in 4/4. The general rule is that a note can span its direct children, or one of its children and one of its nephews. That is, a quarter note can span the 2nd and 3rd eighth notes, but not the 4th and 5th. A dotted note can only borrow from its sibling, not its ...


5

In my experience, a vocal arrangement or piano arrangement might be your best bet. Guitar is a C instrument so you should be able to follow any of the chord progressions outlined in a piano arrangement. You might have to actually buy the sheet music, though. Vocal Arrangement: Usually for a vocal arrangement the chords are specified as to facilitate a ...


5

The "base names", i.e. the letters, are much older than 12-edo. Music used to be played in just one diatonic scale (derived e.g. from Pythagorean/Ptolemaean tuning), and only when switching to another key you'd adjust some of the scale steps by way of an accidental. The order of accidentals you need to introduce is dictated by the circle of fifths. This by ...


4

Usually, polychords are written like this: (with a fraction). So, let's say you have Am {fraction} G7 and we are in the C major scale. You could symbolize that as VIm {fraction} V. Notice that for the polychords, there is no slash, but a fraction. Slashes are for the slash chords or hybrid chords (inversions). For the slash chords inversions, if the ...


4

Wheat gave a very good explanation of voice leading and I thought I'd just add a bit about counterpoint. Up until relatively recently (1600s/1700s) the concept of a chord wasn't around - composers may have thrown a C-E-G out there but they didn't refer to it as a 'C Major' chord. However there were certain rules prescribed that told what was legal or ...


4

One Idea I haven't seen mentioned is rhythm. Perhaps you can use some of the spare digits as a change in pace (f.e. switch from eights to quavers). Or you could map the spare digits to pre-conceived rhythmic motives. Another idea would be to use the digits that are not mapped to a note to switch instrument. HTH.


4

How would you define a C? You define it using frequency, like you said. But usually, people don't calculate the frequency of the note C, but the frequency of the note A. The 'standard' tuning pitch that is used nowadays for most Western music, is 440 Hz, is named a′ or A4. I think this thread will also help you: Why is music theory built so tightly ...


4

This is a very good question, and you're on exactly the right track to be looking away from frequency. I think the place to start is with taking apart some concepts that, for convenience, most of us group together most of the time. This means defining some terms, but I'll try to keep it to the most essential. When you ask to define "a C", you are asking to ...


4

This is a technique in compositional music called Borrowed Chords. In "traditional" music, you would have only 6 chords (3 majors and 3 minors) to use in a song. However, some composers became creative and tried to use other chords from outside the scale. Using Borrowed Chords is one way of using them. When you use Borrowed Chord, you essentially change ...


4

Is it possible to create a completely new genre of music This question might appear really weird, but still I ended up asking. Its not weird at all. Many composers throughout history have asked this very question. I will give a tentative "yes" to this portion of the question, with the clarification that by genre we are referring to the stylistic ...


3

Sometimes just singing over a chord progression can do wonders. However a melody that sounds 'good' on vocals may flub on the keyboard (or other instruments). Try changing the chords under the melody - sometimes its easy to dismiss a decent melody because it wasn't in a very good context (chord substitution is a great way to go here). Try to identify what ...


3

As the PC Set Calculator you link to shows, [0, 1, 2, 3, 5] is the Prime Inversion of [0, 2, 3, 4, 5]. However, as [0, 1, 2, 3, 5] has a lower interval at the bottom, it is considered the correct prime form of these two equivalent PC Sets. Another page on the website you link to gives a rigorous method for determining the Prime Form of any PC Set. The last ...


3

The ideal is to keep each beat self-contained, so the second is preferrable.In 4/4 it's certainly best to keep each half of the bar separate, so anything which goes between beats 2 and 3 are shown as tied.It's easier to read, and the ties actually make you aware that the tune is syncopated.The same thing should happen in 6/8 too, which is effectively two ...


3

Why use base 10? You have to make some compromise somewhere, and since π is already transcendental, there is no rational radix that will accurately represent π. If you use heptary, π ≈ 3.0663651432036134110263402244652226643520650240155443215426431025161154565220002622436103301443233631. These digits map perfectly to the seven pitches in an octave. Using ...


3

If you want to make a nice piece of music (which I presume you do, simply encoding pi would seem a bit wasteful), I'd avoid trying to generate the music mechanically, and instead use pieces of pi as inspiration. For instance: Writing it in 22/7 (an approximation of pi) Using the first 5 or so digits as a motif in some way, and using the others not as ...


3

Why are the notes named what they are "instead of something else?" All note-naming schemes are ultimately arbitrary. There are, in fact, many other systems for naming notes. For example, a good portion of Europeans use H for B and B for B♭ whereas, in other parts of Europe, the notes are named Do Re Me Fa Sol La and Ti (or Si). Sa Re Ga Ma Pa Dha and Ni are ...


2

I don't know of an established term. I'd propose "prosodic counterpoint". While this would include more than the verse metre (for example inflection), "metric counterpoint" would be too ambiguous since "metre" has an established meaning in music that is different from that of verse, and the lyrics do not need to rise to the actual level of metered poetry ...


2

It is important to be able to read music to some extent. But the ability to sight read, which means to be able to pick up the music and just play it, is not all that essential. I can sight read a single vocal line, but in theory classes, we used complex scores that there was no way I could ever sight read them. In fact, sight reading was part of a different ...


2

I think you forgot to test inversions -- you should measure the distance between the first two and last two classes, and find the form that packs the smaller intervals to the left. If you invert [0 2 3 4 5], you get [0 1 2 3 5], which succeeds in packing the shorter distance to the left of the form (starts with a distance of 1 instead of 2).



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