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19

The key change you are describing is known as a Chromatic Mediant Relationship. This type of modulation rose to prominence in the Romantic Period and has been used by composers and musicians ever since. Chromatic Mediant Relationships are ones in which the roots or tonal centers of the keys are a non-diatonic 3rd apart. If diatonic (within the key), it ...


11

I would say personally that it's mostly a matter of the music being taught. The main exception to that is voice; all you have to do is listen to, say, Pavarotti and Frank Sinatra to tell the difference. They are obviously each going after a very different sound. Operatic singing doesn't use a microphone and emphasizes natural volume. The sound is ...


8

Well, yes, when listening to pop and rock music, it can seem like much of the vocal harmonisation moves in parallel motion (often in thirds and sixths), but there are plenty of examples of different motion out there, if you listen out for them. I've always thought that The Beatles used some subtly interesting vocal harmonies. Below are the first 8 bars of ...


7

Major and minor chords are both triads: a root note, a third, and a fifth. Major chords have a major third, four semitones above the root. Minor chords have a minor third, three semitones above the root. The fifth is usually a perfect fifth, seven semitones above the root. However, a chord with a minor third may have a diminished fifth (only three ...


6

I've been searching online, talking with musicians about this, and here are some techniques I retained, with some interrogations : Get out of scales from time to time Totally off-scale, no limit (really?) Play a riff and play it elsewhere For instance and play it off one half-tone higher, and then come back / play it a half-tone higher again Ascend and ...


5

While is very tempting to approach improvisation focusing on phrases and licks, your solo may sound very awkward if you play unrelated chunk of melodies/ideas without thinking about beginning/development/ending. One aspect I love - and judge to be very important - about jazz improvisation are 'motifs', and you can't really apply that to a single phrase. ...


5

At this stage, it's learning how to control the bounce of the stick - the second hit comes straight after the first, same hand, but after a bounce. Doing it this way also frees up the right hand after the roll, to maybe hit a crash. Alternating puts the last hit with right hand, so cuts down on time to reach a cymbal. However, every roll or fill you learn ...


5

Do Re Mi and so forth are generally "movable". In the key of G, G is "Do" and B is "Mi". The tonic of the key is "Do". Solfege is usually sung this way, with Do as the key note. This is the "Movable Do" system. If you transposed the song "Do Re Mi" (from The Sound of Music) to any other key it would still be "Do Re Mi". In some languages, French for ...


4

See this SO question. I'm not sure if this is exactly what you need, but it might help. Because I'm just linking another question, I'd normally put this as a comment. However I don't have commenting permissions on this site (yet).


4

I think I know what you're getting at. First, a "musical passage" is just any group of notes that are organized into a single idea. It doesn't have anything to do with being on the beat or not. However... If you've lost the beat, you can stop playing, get back onto the beat, and start back in again while everyone snickers at you. Or, you can play a ...


4

You know what you should do is learn jazz tunes. Learn the heads on the standards then worry about improvisation. It is limitless what can be done in the Jazz world but you have to know fundamentals. Your second post is too general, so I am assuming you need to learn standards and listen to a lot of Miles and look at transcriptions of his playing. Start ...


4

Getting into tracker software might another approach. You could consider the tracker score notation the programming language, and the tracker player the complier/interpreter. There are plenty of music modules (songs) you can load and play with. These are shared all the time. You can use tracker software out of the box to edit your 'input music' (E.g. ...


4

Ritardando, ritenuto, rubato, ritenendo, rallentando are all terms for approximately the same musical idea. A slowing down, for dramatic purposes, before regaining the original tempo, or sometimes changing to another. A chance for the orchestra to get its breath back, and the audience to relax for a moment. It doesn't necessarily have to come to a grinding ...


3

Here are a few things that jazz players play over a dominant chord and give a 'jazzy' sound Let's say the chord that is being played is G7. What you can play is: G#o Arpeggio (G# is b9 of G7, so that note can also be added in the chord) G# auxiliary diminished scale If the chord is G7#5, you can play the whole tone scale. If the chord is G7(alt) (which ...


3

This is not right. The modes of the major scale each have 7 notes; instead you have listed both scales as having all 12 possible pitches, but just starting on different notes. You have listed a chromatic scale on C and a chromatic scale on D. Also, the way you describe a number of the intervals is not correct: for instance C-F# is a 4# (in your notation). ...


3

One can consider Lilypond to fit in this mold: although it is more focused on typesetting music, it can output a MIDI representation of the score. However, I find that, in terms of basic usage, it is not easy to achieve expressive effects in the midi output. In addition, it has no real-time capabilities. I mention it primarily since it may provide ideas ...


3

I am not sure if they include all of the features you require. But the java jmusic library is quite extensive, I think that would be your best shot. Otherwise other options would be JFugue, music21 (python) or the visual programming language CSound, from ircam, also very extensive.


3

Besides Haskore which is already mentioned in the paper you refer to and the ones mentioned by other, there is "supercollider" and "pure data". I absolutely understand you question. I've been looking for such a high-level thing myself. Here are my personal thoughts on this: I haven't found anything good and came to the conclusion, that there are no ...


3

Instead of trying to cover up timing errors with extra notes, you may be better off stopping, listening, and re-starting. In those extra notes, you're just as likely to get out of time again. 4/4, 3/4, 6/8 will all come down, in the end, to being capable of providing this 'passage', but it's like a pill to cover up the symptoms - it doesn't solve the problem ...


3

You're very unlikely to find any sort of polyphonic tonal music that has zero parallel motion. The rules of counterpoint proscribe the use of parallel 5ths and octaves, but not any other intervals (4ths are somewhat frowned upon), so avoiding parallel motion entirely wouldn't be an intent on the part of a composer. The reason that 5ths and 8ths are ...


2

As Jj has said, It's quite a broad topic. I've spent years reading this and that to try and understand the history of music. In General One book I feel was really great is Stephen Fry's 'Incomplete & Utter History of Classical Music'. What's great about is that it takes you all the way from the earliest known instruments all the way through bach, ...


2

So, you just want a detailed book about everything, but one that isn't too large? Most of your questions can be addressed simply by reading a history book. Of them, I believe that the Norton Anthology of Western Music is one of the best documents out there on this topic. Keep in mind that if you want to cover everything in one source, then your knowledge ...


2

I think the 'classical' approach is much more 'proper', as in in dots the t-s and crosses the i-s. Attention to the written detail is very important. Take any music played in a 'classical' exam. Every note must be given its exact timing, dynamics need to be followed, etc. Whilst there certainly is nothing wrong with this concept, it makes each performance of ...


2

Am it is until your stated 3:28 mark.Then it goes into more like E maj. Then about 4:10 ish it modulates back to Am.It doesn't have to have a lot to do with the original key.Although the new key of E is the dominant of Am.This E maj spawns the relative minor of C#m, so that's where that comes in. A song, say, in C can modulate (change key) up to C#. None of ...


2

It seems to me that the C#m chord is a flavoured substitution for the C+ (C augmented) chord that is built from A harmonic/melodic minor. The notes in C#m are as follows: C# E G# The notes in C+ are as follows: C E G# Because there is only one note difference this substitution is easily achieved. Another thing to notice is that there is a C in ...


2

If you have two vibrating strings you can produce a consonant musical interval between them if their vibrating lengths form certain integer ratios, like 3:2. It's appealing to scale this idea up to solar system size - to assume that 'consonant' systems like the planets also exhibit integer ratios in their properties. It's actually wrong though - planetary ...


2

I think Overtone has what you're looking for and more. It's a Clojure library that acts as a powerful front-end to SuperCollider. It may take a while to learn how to use it (especially if you're new to Clojure), but once you do, it's quite powerful and flexible. You can do things like define a melody as a sequence of scale intervals, and then combine that ...


2

Édouard mentions OpenMusic, somewhat similar, and descendant of PatchWork is PWGL (http://www2.siba.fi/PWGL/). Looking at what you need from a language it might be useful especially 'constrains' part of PWGL. Learning curve is steep (LISP) but well worth your time. Some great external libraries for rhythm manipulation too. good luck


2

Scale degrees are always made from the notes in the scale so you have a lot of unnecessary notes in your example above. It should look like this. C Ionian: C D E F G A B C 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 1 D Dorian: D E F G A B C D 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 1 They have the same scale degrees because each scale has 7 notes in it, but the distance between the scale degrees may vary ...


2

Try this: http://monoskop.org/File:Russell_George_Lydian_Chromatic_Concept_of_Tonal_Organization_4th_ed.pdf I can't download it at work, but it probably has what you're looking for. If it does, let me know and I'll tell you how I found it.



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