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14

A fugue is one of the most polyphonic musical pieces you can write. In a typical fugue there are 3 or 4 voices in play that are each treated independent melodies. While this is going on, you have to not only have to keep all the rules of counterpoint in mind for each voice and make sure the harmony always make sense, but you have a structure to keep in mind ...


12

You are missing the fact that you are looking at two different keys. The chord progression (C G Am F) is in the key of C. The chord progression (G D Em C) is in the key of G, which contains F#. The first site you were looking at, shows you alternatives for a C major chord in different keys than C. (Maybe compare the third alternative when you are ...


11

Independent in rhythm & contour means that the voices may have different rhythms and contour, respectively. For example, if a voice goes up and another goes down, the voices would be moving in opposing motion. Moreover, one voice may be going up, and then down while the other remains going down only. All this means that the voices are independent in ...


11

This system is the result of the specific historical evolution of Western music notation. The five-line staff was not the first try at writing down the pitches being used in European music. The first systems were just mnemonic, consisting of neumes (squiggles, basically) drawn above the words of a religious text, much like the cantillation symbols that ...


10

I've used this before and I know there is a ton of documentation for this program. If you scan the documentation you can find out what the results of each event means. This is directly from the documentation: Track, Time, Note_on_c, Channel, Note, Velocity Send a command to play the specified Note (Middle C is defined as Note number 60; all ...


9

There is a distinct pattern going on in this (known as a sequence) which is actually easier to see in the sheet music for it. I'll include it so it can easily be referenced. Let's look at the bass note in the first measure. The first three notes are just descending in the key (A minor) then jumps up a major 3rd to "lead" to the next note. The upper part ...


7

Parallel movement in intervals is when two voices (notes) move the same distance( 2nd, 3rd, 4th, ect ) in the same direction. This can be applied to any interval including 7ths. Here is an example of parallel 7ths: As you can see, C to B is a 7th and then both move up a 2nd to D and C respectively which is another 7th creating parallel 7ths because of how ...


6

Definitely sounds like a chord sequence in D Minor to me. Particularly because it starts on D Minor, and the A Minor chords at the end have a dominant function, despite not being major. (An A Major chord at the end would create a strong perfect cadence, A - Dm, when it repeats, which I presume it is supposed to...) These chords are all found in D Natural ...


6

As MartinK said, this alternative is simply the same chord sequence, modulated to another key. What I'd still like to say: even in a given key, it may be possible to use notes which aren't in the key's standard scale. For instance, it's possible to substitute a D chord in another way into the original sequence: C G D7/F♯ F That would sound quite ...


5

I've seen ppp, pp, p, mp, mf, f, ff, fff used commonly giving you 8 levels. ffff and pppp seem pretty rare. There's also no standard for EXACTLY how loud each of these are. Eh, it's the arts. Whattayagonnado ?


4

What you're doing is sometimes called modal interchange, i.e. you 'borrow' chords from other modes with the same tonic. The chords you mentioned when you play in major are taken from the major scale (I and IV), from the parallel minor key (bIII, bVI, bVII), and from the parallel phrygian mode (bII). When you play in minor you just borrow one chord from ...


4

In the history of western music, the 7 notes came first. The twelve arise from adding the necessary notes to play the 7-note scale starting on any note of the 7-note scale. In the key of C major, no sharps or flats are needed. C D E F G A B C When you modulate a fourth to F, you need to add the soft B or B♭. F G A B♭ C D E F And for each ...


4

Giovanni Gabrielli started it all with just two: piano and forte. Before long, there were also pp (pianissimo, "softest") and ff (fortissimo, "loudest"). Beethoven used fff if I recall correctly, but few composers used more than 2 of each. I know that Tchaikovsky's sixth symphony has ffffff and ppppppp. (Most conductors substitute a bass clarinet for ...


3

Dm C Dm Am C Dm Asus4 Am - I agree with you that it's a nice chord sequence, and I agree with the other answers, that it's in Dm, not E phrygian. it's pulling towards D, not E. (Dm contains a Bb, whereas E phrygian contains the same notes as Am, including a B natural. As there is no B at all in the chords used, I doubt a computer tool like the one you used ...


3

To add to Bob's excellent answer - E Phrygian contains the same notes as C major, which contains the same notes as A minor. If this were in E Phrygian, there would be a pull towards E. There isn't. All the chords are from C/Am - apart from the recently changed A, which could, as Bob states, put it into Dm. Not sure where E Phrygian came from, but I feel it's ...


3

This is described somewhat in the answers here: Scale degree naming Basically, scale degrees are typically numbered according to the (parallel) major key, even if you're actually playing in a minor key, or some other mode. Thus in your case, A major would have a G# and an F#, so the bVII and bVI tells us that they have to be lowered (the sharps removed). ...


3

The other answers are pretty good already. Here's a very quick and dirty description of a MIDI file format: A MIDI file may contain up to 65,536 tracks (usually these tracks are intended to play simultaneously). Each track is just a sequence of events. Each event occurs at a specific time (specified as the number of "ticks" since the beginning of the ...


3

In case I am not too late, here is a great theoretical paper on the exact topic. http://www.academia.edu/2835618/A_Multipitch_Approach_to_Tonic_Identification_in_Indian_Classical_Music I have a smallish program that implements section 2.3 of the paper as a Java program. Sections 2.1 and 2.2 are provided by the author as a Vamp plugin and can be used with ...


3

If you were in C (ie it wasn't a key mixup as noted above), D Maj would be a Major II chord, which could be considered to be a secondary dominant of V. (D is the V of G). This would normally be seen more commonly as II7 with a C natural on top, but if you were playing only triadic harmony, it might be a simple D triad. It's commonmore in standards (ie ...


3

Fusion originated with Miles Davis's "B****** Brew" album. Pat Metheny, Larry Coryell and John Mclaughlin are probably the avatars of fusion jazz, but there are many many other practitioners of the genre, including Martin, Medeski and Wood, Bird Songs of the Mesozoic and the "downtown sound" of Bill Laswell and John Zorn.There are very interesting ideas that ...


3

If fusion players sound to you like 'not in key' or 'playing random notes', then you're either listening to bad players or you're not yet accustomed to the sounds they use. The latter may also have to do with the development of your musical ear. I suggest to listen to good fusion guitarists (e.g., Alan Holdsworth, John Scofield, Scott Henderson with Tribal ...


3

Yes. It means you can distinguish 2 or more different melodies that sound pretty together. This is not the same as melody and accompaniment; in that case there's one melody and one more voices that form a rather static backdrop. That said Independence is to some extent subjective; a counter melody will be perceived as more independent if it has different ...


3

All it means is that is that both voices add up to some kind of harmony (think of chords although they don't have to be), while the the musical lines themselves don't sound or feel alike. These voices can also typically each be perceived as a different melody. There is a much simpler way to say what counterpoint is which is "The study of how to make two ...


3

There is no limit, but for any normal performance pp to ff would be all you need. A p itself means quiet and an f itself means loud. When you add another p or f to each it technically adds "very" in front of each. Examples: pp - very soft ff - very loud ppp - very, very soft fff - very, very loud pppp - very, very, very soft ffff - very, very, very loud ...


3

Writing a fugue is a mixture of imagination, organization, and mastery of your tools. If you are making a drawing, keeping track of the perspective, the objects you want to appear, and just what object will obscur what other object can be done using ruler and overpainting/erasing as you go. How much time spend masters erasing obscured objects? Fugue ...


3

A single bassline can be harmonized in a number of different ways. Assuming you are working only with diatonic triads (three note chords that require no accidentals), you'll typically have three options for your harmony for each note. In the key of G major, those options look like this: G: I, vi6, IV64 A: ii, viiĀ°6, V64 B: iii, I6, vi64 C: IV, ii6, ...


2

On your exploration of why we have certain notes, the ear is only so sensitive to frequency differences. In theory, G# and Ab are different notes; however, the modern equal temperament system makes them into the same. I suggest you start exploring different tuning systems, and the system of cents and commas. Here is somewhere to start. ...


2

Most songs are built within a key, however it is not uncommon to have chords outside the key in a song. There are several ways to incorporate chords outside the key including: secondary dominants Substitutions Borrowing Chromatic With all the above examples you are still in the key you started in, just the harmony is temporarily not reflecting the key. ...


2

So you can produce some musical putput which pleases you, fairly regularly. More easily, when you have the luxury of time, and not so much under the pressure of the moment in a jam session. It's pretty much the same skill, you just have to be further along the road to have it on tap instantaneously. You say you can improvise melodies vocally on the fly ...


2

Well, counterpoint is not harmonization. The main difference is that counterpoint has its own melodic and rhythmic identity. If you take a look at, say, Bach's great choral works, you'll find some pieces labelled "Choral" which are mainly a melody with harmonization, and some pieces labelled "Chorus" which are strongly oriented along lines of counterpoint ...



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