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15

If you're looking for a magic number upon which scales are based, take a look at 1.5. That's the ratio of an interval called a pure fifth. It's also called a just fifth; the terms are interchangeable. (They are not necessarily the same as a perfect fifth, however. And if you're wondering why they're called fifths at all, don't get hung up on that just yet. ...


15

The reason there are multiple names for notes is that the same note may function differently in different contexts. If you just play a single note with no context, then it could have a multitude of different names. For example if you played the note in between F and G you could call it F# or Gb or more obscurely E## or Abbb. They are all valid names and are ...


14

As Bob mentions, this can be described as a descending chromatic bass line. If descending a fourth, from tonic to dominant, this can also be called a "Lament Bass". As a technique, it dates back at least to the early Baroque Era (famously used in Dido's Lament, that character's dying aria from Henry Purcell's Dido and Aeneas, and also in Bach's Crucifixus ...


13

No, it is still a B♭. The flat is just reminding you that the B is flat. This is typically done if the previous measure uses a B that was different then the one in the key signature or if there was a different quality of B used in the measure it is used to cancel out the other quality. In the key D minor, if you were ascending from A to D, a typical melody ...


13

In popular music, this device is usually called Line Cliché. It is a chromatic line over a static chord creating the illusion of harmonic motion. Line chlichés are most often found in a minor key. The line usually moves near the 7th of the chord. A very common descending line (over a minor triad) is: root -> maj 7th -> min 7th -> maj 6th. This is exactly ...


8

Just to be cautious in case someone is misled by the sharp on the G to think the F should be sharp, and also to be sure it is not confused with the melodic minor, which has an F# on the way up.


7

To find the length in seconds of each beat for any given metronome marking in beats-per-minute (bpm), you would divide 60 (the number of seconds in a minute) by the bpm marking. For instance, if a piece has a metronome marking of crotchet (quarter-note) = 120, each crotchet beat is 0.5 seconds long (60/120). You can follow this simple rule to find the ...


7

Learning production is like learning any musical instrument in a lot of ways. You first need to practice a lot to become very familiar with your software. The software is your instrument, you need to know it inside and out to become proficient at creating songs. For instruments, daily practice is the fastest way to improve, and the same goes with digital ...


7

This is an interval of a minor sixth. Nameable chords usually need three notes in order to define them. A single interval can be a component of a number of chords. So, for this reason the naming of this chord would depend upon harmonic context; in other words, which other notes, if any, sound with it. However, the interval of a minor sixth is commonly ...


7

A series of pitches which move down by semitones is a descending chromatic scale. If this line is in the bass you could call it a descending chromatic bassline. If the harmony above this bassline remains unchanged, the resulting chords can be described as a series of inversions. In popular music terminology this is most easily achieved using ...


4

The accidental ♭ does not combine with the ♭ in the key signature to produce a double-flat. Rather, the accidental is redundant. The easiest interpretation rule is that any accidental overrides whatever is in the key signature. The term for such usage is courtesy accidental: Although a barline is nowadays understood to cancel the effect of an ...


4

No it indicates B flat. Usually the flat is cancelling a natural (or sharp) earlier in the measure. Even if it's not cancelling, it has only been included by the editor to improve the readability of the passage.


4

Why are there seven principal notes? The short answer is: We don't know. Some music traditions (Western, Middle Eastern, Indian...) prefer heptatonic (seven-note) scales. We are not sure if these traditions are connected or not. There are attempts to explain the major scale based on harmonics but they can't explain other heptatonic scales used by these ...


3

Find an article or book about music theory. When you read about a new concept, put the book down and improvise with the new material you just learned. I'm doing this myself right now. I never actually learned many typical rock or traditional Western harmonies, preferring to use modal chords and exotic modes instead. A few days ago, I realized this was ...


2

To help you out: I've been figuring out how to make good "EDM" for many years now, and some of the things I've realized about it might be helpful to you. "Normal" music is different than dance music in a number of ways, although they're starting to swap traits in the past few years. 1) Almost all dance music NEVER progresses. What I mean is that there is ...


2

A simple rule for major scales is that each letter name must be used once, and once only (until you repeat and start again !). Another rule is that the interval between successive notes of the scale must be Tone - Tone - Semitone - Tone - Tone - Tone - Semitone. Using this rule, the notes of a C major scale are C D E F G A B C This is because there are ...


2

There is probably a natural sign given to the F to further emphasize that this is a harmonic minor scale instead of a melodic minor scale. The image from Matt's question is from a wiki page. In common musical notation, an F normally won't be labelled in the key of A minor.


1

The "Cruel but Fair" school of hard knocks would say... Try, try, try again & if at first you don't succeed... try again... [or give up, the choice is yours.] ..& if, after another 10 years, you still get no takers - then either you have a) no talent whatsoever or b) no-one has yet recognised it. It is almost impossible right now to say which that ...


1

Approach learning from Anthony Wellington's 4 levels of awareness. You can find an article about it here: http://www.playguitarlive.com/the-4-levels-of-awareness-for-musicians/


1

You can learn theory by ear training. Playing songs just by ear and learning them is learning theory by instincts. But you couldn't communicate with anyone what you know verbally. People like Hendrix or James Hetfield from Metallica are known not to have any training but used their ears for composing or improvising music. They gained a huge vocabulary of ...


1

Western music is mostly built around diatonic scales -- made up of 7 notes from the 12 notes you get by dividing an octave into 12 semitones. The "standard" diatonic scale is the major scale, which is is defined as: root note up 2 semitones up 2 semitones up 1 semitone up 2 semitones up 2 semitones up 2 semitones up 1 semitones (reaches 1 octave from the ...


1

I would say that this distinction is made to separate it from the Melodic Minor scale. In the other chords with an F, it being natural is spelled out in the chord symbol (B dim would have an F by definition, same with the D minor). For the F chord, the chord symbol would not necessarily provide the distinction. I think that it was entirely unnecessary to ...


1

If that F natural is so important to not be confused with F#, which would appear in melodic minor, why hasn't it been notated into the top line, second and fourth chords? It's not necessary, but someone's being helpful - just like in a lot of music, where an accidental is put in a bar, then it's cancelled, i.e. with a natural in the next bar - the barline ...


1

They are indeed equivalent, at least in Equal Temperament (which is the most widely used tuning system in western music). You might prefer one over the other depending on how things modulate. If you're going to modulate to the parallel minor, use C#, since C# minor has 4 sharps, whereas Db minor doesn't really exist (it would have 8 flats--one for each ...


1

You are correct that Ab minor must contain a Cb, not any form of B (even though Cb and B are "enharmonically equivalent", Cb is the correct spelling here). However, there are contexts in which two different versions (e.g. sharp and natural) of the same base note can sound together. When this occurs, it is called a "chromatic contradiction," or a False ...



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