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20

On some types of whistle if you blow really hard you can get the second harmonic, sounding one octave higher than the fundamental. A recorder is essentially a whistle with the length of the resonating chamber controlled by the fingers, and you can very easily overblow an octave. Brass instruments more easily play their overtones because you're in direct ...


12

In practice, off the page, there is no difference to the listener. On the page, or the written music, each measure in 2/2 will hold the equivalent of 2 half notes and each measure in 2/4 will hold the equivalent of 2 quarter notes, which will simply be drawn differently.


11

The reason that you can get multiple notes from a bugle is that you can vary your embouchure. If you tighten your mouth, and blow harder, you'll get a higher note because your lips move faster. The bugle is essentially an amplifier of the sound that you make with your lips. It can only amplify frequencies that it resonates to, which is why the bugle has a ...


9

Melodic Inversion Where the original melody goes up by an interval, the inverted melody goes down by the same interval. Sometimes you do it where you keep the same number of semi-tones (sometimes you do a "diatonic" inversion and just keep the scale degree). It's a technique for taking given melodic content and constructing more, related melodic content. ...


7

I think, Dom, that you would need to do a few things: Truncate the tonic - it will always be root and third. (This kind of truncation wasn't all that unusual in late Renaissance and early Baroque modal polyphony, by the way, even though the Locrian mode itself wasn't used at all.) Borrow procedures from the Phrygian mode, which is the closest in ...


7

Absolutely not late at all. Not only is it never late, but you are extremely young. I started learning classical music at the same age as you (I am currently 28), and I now compose and play piano and am starting music school as a hobby (late night after work classes). I did all my theory learning via self study. You can definitely find resources online. ...


7

As pointed out in a comment by Matthew Read, this is for sure a translation error. The author as well as the translator are both Spanish speakers (from Argentina and Mexico, respectively). Subtonic is of course correct, but sensitive is a mistranslation from the Spanish sensible for leading tone.


6

Practically speaking, there's no difference between writing a piece in 2/2, or writing it in 2/4 and halving all of the note durations. They would sound exactly the same. The difference is largely convention and tradition. Marches and upbeat musical theater numbers are traditionally in cut time, but most other styles of music prefer the quarter note to ...


6

Sine and cosine are the same, just offset by 90 degree. They form a "quadrature pair": if you add their squares, you get a constant. When you draw a sine wave as a representation of audio, it represents either pressure (compared to neutral) at some "listening" point, or an impulse density. Both together form a quadrature pair again: if you square and add ...


6

I'm just going to answer the question "What about tangent, or other functions", since the rest seems to have been fairly well handled. All sounds that we hear as having a definite pitch or note can be represented by a periodic function. As I wrote in my comment, any repeated shape represents a periodic function. Most periodic functions, both in the real ...


6

One of the central harmonic (and melodic) innovations of early 20th-century music was the conflation of the linear and harmonic dimensions. That is to say, a collection of pitches might just as easily be a motive or a melody as it might be a chord. In the common-practice world the linear, melodic dimension tends to be dominated by whole and half steps while ...


6

Summary A whistle with a much smaller resonating chamber has only a very small set of frequencies it resonates at. A bugle, much longer with a horn on one end, resonates at many frequencies. Both start with broadband noise, but the whistle can only resonate at one frequency, while the bugle can resonate at several. Therefore the bugler can adjust the ...


5

There is no "have to" in music. There are common patterns and conventions, but the only rule is, if it sounds good, it is good. it doesn't sound out of place at the time ... and therefore it's OK. I have no idea what the implications of this may be if I was to try and apply EQ, or add certain effects, and so on EQ generally has very little effect ...


4

As the waves represent sound waves, which travel through a medium (air in this case), the y-axis represents air pressure. Imagine your eardrum in the sea with waves lapping against the side of your head - the water pressure would vary as the waves crash one at a time. If the waves all crash at a consistent frequency (two or more in a regular cycle) then ...


4

The steps would include. Determining the Key Providing points for Cadences Determining the chords and then there inversions And then finally you write a melody in response to the given notes. Things to note. The proper rules for good melody writing still apply to the bass line you are writing. Try and get the width of the melody an octave. Try to ...


4

In theory, the exact same music could be written in either time signature, either with the notes being half the (written) duration in 2/4 and then played at half the speed (4 eighth notes in 2/4 taking the same amount of time as 4 quarter notes in 4/4 time) OR with identical note durations and twice as many measures of 2/4. In practice, time signatures ...


4

Subdominant and dominant are tonal music terms, they may or may not make sense in a modal context. In tonal music (like common practice era classical music) you are hard pressed to find an Em functioning as dominant for Am. E is used almost exclusively. Today's popular music has more modal roots. A (non-raised) seventh degree major chord (G in Am) is a very ...


4

A phrase is like a musical sentence. Like a typical sentence there's a pause that signifies the end of a sentance that in a typical sentence is denoted by a period and in music is marked by a cadence. The Wikipedia article you link even states: In common practice phrases are often four bars or measures long culminating in a more or less definite ...


4

Basic classical theory is fairly easy to get into and uses almost the same exact building block that jazz theory uses. Most jazz theory classes someone would take require a basic music theory class as a prerequisite. There are many sources to get you started in classical theory including MusicTheory.net's lessons which if you can learn and understand them ...


4

You can write a circle of 5th's progression in the Phyrgian mode, but it won't make the progression sound Phyrgian. This site shows you how to build a circle of 5th's progression in any key in any mode, but doesn't really explain what is going on. If you look at the progression for C Phygian you will see: Db - Ab - Eb - Bbm - Fm - Cm - Gdim However, if ...


4

As a point of information, the three-hole tabor pipe, used in combination with a small drum as a 'pipe and tabor', uses the harmonic series of the pipe to produce 1 and a half octaves and theoretically more starting on the octave harmonic (the fundamental is rarely used). The Galician Txistu is basically the same instrument. You can reproduce the same ...


3

On a practical level, they are exactly the same in performance. However, 2/2 time is somewhat of a leftover from early music (chant, etc.) that used the open noteheads of what we now call whole and half notes (since they're almost always referenced now to at least 4/4 time where they'd have the temporal value of a whole or half measure). I personally ...


3

Tempo and Time Signatures really don't have anything to do with each other. A time signature is how you group, count, and accent beats and tempo is how fast the beat is. Changing the tempo as you are doing does not affect the time signature at all. 3/4 or 3/8 or even 3/2 will group the beats in the ONE-two-three pattern you want and as a composer the tempo ...


3

You kind of have a skewed view of what modes actually are. The modes we name are set constructs, not based on if you build on any degree on any scale. The third scale degree is only Phrygian in Ionian(major). The scale built on the third of Aeolian(minor) is Ionian(major). The Phrygian mode does exist in Aeolian mode, but is built off scale degree 5 as ...


3

I am having some confusion is respects to the formal definition of what the various modes are. I know that their defined in relation to their scale, however, i've come to realise this may not be best way to define it. Modes are not defined by how they are related. Modes are defined by their interval pattern, by how they are constructed. There are ...


3

There's no set number of notes outside a specific system — the term "microtonal" is very broad. From Wikipedia: Microtonal music can refer to all music which contains intervals smaller than the conventional contemporary Western semitone. The term usually refers to music containing very small intervals but can include any tuning that differs from ...


3

By the time of Bach, most of the old church modes were no longer being used. The Ionian mode stuck around, but in a common-practice context we usually call it "major." The Aeolian mode also stuck around, however it was consistently modified to usually have a raised leading tone, and often have a raise submediant as well. When the 6th and 7th scale degrees ...


2

Maybe it comes down to the Human predilection to label everything. In, say, Cmaj., all the white notes( aka keys) on a keyboard can be used; n Amin., the same. They're the diatonic notes. So if a melody is only using those white notes, any chords produced from their combinations will fit the melody at some point. When the melody seems to gravitate more ...


2

My best guess as to the intention of this notation would be that the entire grand staff is being transposed down an octave. As I'm sure you know, the treble clef on its own places C5 on the third space. The C clef used for alto/tenor clef is meant to be centered upon C4, or middle C. So, the fact that a C clef is centered upon the third space of the upper ...


2

Are you familiar with pitch-class set analysis? The pioneering work was done by Allen Forte in his books, The Structure of Atonal Music and The Harmonic Organization of The Rite of Spring. If you can get hold of it, John Rahn's book Basic Atonal Theory presents Forte's ideas and methods in a much more user-friendly manner. The basic idea is to convert ...



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