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8

The key thing to remember is that for diatonic scales (major, minor and the modes) each note has a different letter name. In your example F G A A C D E F (ignoring the flats/sharps) has a duplicated letter; thus the 4th note must be a B. One way to lay out a scale is to put the notes in order, e.g. B C D E F G A, and then figure out where the flats/sharps ...


8

A simple answer: One is not better than the other. They serve different purposes according to different musical traditions. Just intonation is pure tuning according to the pure mathematical overtones produced by musical instruments. When an instrument is tuned to just intonation, it is more or less only able to play in one key, and to use limited chords and ...


8

Every note has a pitch, determined by the fundamental frequency of the sound wave that produces it. When you have two different notes, you have two different pitches, caused by two different frequencies. The distance between those pitches is called an interval, and corresponds to the ratio of the note's frequencies. For example, if one note is an octave ...


7

Every scale will have ONE of each letter name - for a full major or full minor. Starting with C major, with no # or b. The circle of fourths (or fifths, depending which way you go) will give a formula. Go up in fourths, and it will add one extra flat each time. thus - F - has Bb (the fourth note of itself). Up another fourth takes it to Bb - with 2 b, the ...


6

What you are looking for are key signatures. A key signature determines which flats/sharps to use on a scale. The flats/sharps that appear, do so in a certain order, not random. So, if you see 1 flat, you have to play B♭, if you see 2 flats, you have to play B♭ and E♭ etc. So, if you begin to read a sheet music and you see 2 flats, then ...


6

This is a tough question. [0,2,6] probably isn't what you're looking for, but I believe is the best way to address it. It's going to sound like an F7(4 2), but is certainly not written that way. It could resolve to E, as F7 can be a tritone substitution for B7 in terms of function. To support this, both D# and F could resolve to E (upward and downward, ...


6

The answer is actually quite simple: it's called a double-diminished triad. Played in first inversion it's usually referred to as Italian augmented sixth chord. As mentioned in other answers, our ears have a tendency to hear it as a dominant seventh sound.


6

They're just extreme versions of enharmonic scales-that is, scales that exist in an identical sounding key but are spelled differently. It simply has to do with the fact that we have to have as many keys as possible to allow correct spellings of chords and whatnot. For example, A# minor is the relative minor of C# major (they share all the same notes). Now, ...


6

It's all about practice and experience. You have to train your ears, you have to know your tools. Producing is not the same as mixing or mastering, some skills overlap but they need mostly different skill sets. There are tools and techniques that will help you judge the frequency balance of a mix. You might eventually not need them at all, though some of ...


6

You might almost say they didn't "work" in terms of sounding good as much as those transitions help make the music sound whimsical. It's not like they fit inside some sacred rules of harmony as much as they broke the rules in a certain way that makes that theme effective in setting the tone for the show. Also the main motive is repeated (more or less) in ...


5

First of all: This will take time! Don't worry or give up too quickly! It is possible to learn - but it will take time! Training your ear like this usually works best with a teacher or someone you can pair up with. This way you can practice together or a teacher can give you advise. Fortunately there are also free tools on the internet to train your ear. ...


5

This selection of five pitches could be a constituent part of a number of scales, although it is not a part of any diatonic scale. As a set of notes itself, it could be referred to by its PC Set name (Forte Number), which in this case is 5-19. This has a prime form of [01367]. (You can find this using a PC Set Calculator, such as this one.) According to this ...


4

A D# chord like this could never occur in any scale degree of a major or minor scale with the #d note as a root so there would be no need to name it with reference to the #d. However this notes could occur together, for example in a B7b5 chord without the root (b). Since music theory doesn't care for something that could only happen outside a harmonic ...


4

As mentioned by Raskolnikov it is indeed just the circle of fifths and nothing else. If you have no sharps and no flats, and you add one sharp, you can say you go from C major to G major. You can also say you go from A minor to E minor. Equivalently, you go from D dorian to A dorian, or from D dorian to D mixolydian, or from A aeolian to A dorian, etc.etc. ...


3

It doesn't quite work like that. The guitar doesn't exactly have a single key that its "in". Instead it has chords that are easier and more difficult to play. Some relatively easy ones (sticking with just major chords) include C, G, D, A, and E, which allows you to play in quite a few different keys. If you were playing in the key of D, you'd likely see a ...


3

Not every set of notes yields a nice, clean chord name just stacking in thirds. Sometimes it is necessary to rearrange the notes to see how they fit better especially since there are no chords that are contain a diminished 3rd. If you rearrange the letters like so: F A _ D#/Eb You get and F7 like others have stated. The full name would be F/D#. If you ...


3

I would interpret this as an F7 chord with the 5 missing. If you respell the D# as Eb, it will make more sense. In my experience I have never encountered a diminished third as a definitive chord voicing.


3

Any chord built from a dominant triad can function like a V7. (Ex. 1 for an incomplete list) Diminished chords, both diminished triads and sevenths, can act as dominants with the root truncated. (Ex. 2) Semi-diminished sevenths (Tristan chords) are generally used as pre-dominants, but can stand in for V M9 with the root truncated. (Ex. 2c) Augmented sixth ...


3

Let's take a look at the successions and see what leaps to the eye. We'll use C major for simplicity's sake. The first one, Ex. 1, has a very nice bass for a cadential progression... in E minor. That's the essential problem with it - B isn't acting as a leading tone, it's acting as if it were a dominant root. Put the C chord in root position, and you've ...


3

Yes. That book, while being very good, is not paced well for beginners. It throws a ton of hard-to-learn stuff at you right away. I'd recommend supplementing it with other books that perhaps have more written out examples to work with as well. I wouldn't say it's good as an only book. The thing about learning is jazz is that I could sit down with a new ...


2

The raised leading note, compared with that in the natural minor, makes the V-I even more convincing. A semitone move is usually better for resolution than a tone.This was the reason that the harmonic and melodic both had a raised leading note.With the melodic, coming down was fine, it followed the natural minor's notes. Going up, though, the gap between ...


2

The capo allows you to play a song in a particular key using chord shapes and formations from a different key. For example if you like to use the open (first position) chords in the key of G major such as G, C, D, Em and Am but want to sing a song in the key of A, you can put a capo on the second fret and play the chords as if you were playing in the key of ...


2

6 | V ^ ^ v ^ ^ | 8 | 1 2 3 4 5 6 | 6/8 compound time can be thought of as duple meter consisting of two beats to the measure, where the dotted quarter note gets the beat. 6/8 is just a notational simplification -- if Carl Orff's time signatures had caught on we might call this time signature 2/q. (a two on top of a dotted quarter note). I consider an ...


2

Hi I started a year ago and was really disappointed with the very poor approach to theory that I found. I got on the internet and watched heaps , lots rocky but some really ace https://www.youtube.com/user/musictheoryguy is a brilliant teacher whose videos are short - anything over 10 minutes probably covers too much when starting. I combined this with Bill ...


2

Jim did an excellent job of describing how to hear intervals and melodies. There are a couple other aspects of music that can really help you to be a better performer and listener, if you get used to looking for them. When I'm transcribing or learning a piece, I try to listen first broadly, then in more detail. How much time I spend listening at each ...


2

When Levine refers to a chord as being "stronger" is can also be read as "more stable", as in harmonically stable. Take the C Major Triad as an example (C, E, G). If you analyze what the intervals are for each inversion (first and second) you can see the following: First inversion; E is root under G and C E,G = m3 E,C = m6 G,C = P4 Second inversion; G is ...


2

In general, when we say 2nd inversion we mean that the 5th of the chord is in the bass. However, the author is treating these slash chords as independent major chords superimposed over a C bass note. These particular chords are the ones in 2nd inversion regardless of the C note in the bass. Moreover, in "close chord position" or "keyboard style" such as in ...


2

It should be mentioned that throughout the whole book there are three occurrences of the statement that triads sound stronger/strongest in second inversion: Ex. 1 Ex. 2 Ex. 3 If you look at the context in each of these cases you'll see that Levine always talks about slash chords. In Ex. 1 he talks about a Gsus4 (actually G9sus4) voiced as a F/G chord, ...


2

It's because of beauty of symmetry (and asymmetry) of musical scale. (WARNING: some math ahead) Take a C major scale, and write it down the intervals between each note in number. So a halftone is 1, whole tone is 2 because it's two times the halftone. C D E F G A B C D E F G A B C 2 2 1 2 2 2 1 2 2 ...


2

In summary, and over-simplifying: The notes on the strongest beats (1st and 3rd beat of the bar in case of 4/4 time) will almost invariably belong to the current chord, not just the current scale. (These are called "pillar notes" in the text referenced below) Most other notes belong to the parent scale of the chord. As long as the strongest beats have ...



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