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14

Technically speaking, you can't ever say for certain until you see the original score (if there even is one) as determined by the composer; a piece could literally be written in an infinite number of time signatures. As such, we have to make these decisions based on a knowledge of prior practice and on what makes the most practical sense. So, let's look at ...


8

I'd put it in 6/8, due to the triplets feel, but the phrasing kind of repeats every two bars, thus two lots of 3/8, making 6/8. Why /8? Well, it's fairly quick, so I'd write it as quavers instead of crotchets. There is a recent question on that subject - quavers to play give the feeling that they are quicker - I know it depends on the tempo mark, but ...


7

Think of modes as the scale starting off at different notes. So, yes there are modes both for the harmonic and melodic minor scales. In jazz, the melodic minor scale isn't the same as the classical one. It is the same while ascending and descending. So, the C melodic minor scale would be C D Eb F G A B C. here are the melodic minor modes: The harmonic ...


6

Triple flats and sharps do exist. They are extremely rare (never seen one in a piece myself), but theoretically you can use them. My guess is that the answer would be B triple flat or F triple sharp. Here is an example I found with a triple sharp: I found it on this website, where you can read some stuff about triple accidentals. And another example ...


6

The dots indicate the notes that are in the C major scale. The red ones are C. The "patterns" are places where you can easily reach all of the notes of the scale. For example, in Pattern 4, you place your index finger on the 7th fret, and then you can play a C major scale 2 octaves (plus an extra note on top and bottom) just with your 4 fingers, without ...


5

What I mean by that is that, I can always play this bar faster by adding a notation like pianissimo or a fortissimo above the bar. Almost. Pianissimo and fortissimo are dynamics. They relate to the loudness (also called "intensity") of the music. But there are other words to use for speed. You could simply write "faster" or "slower." There are all kinds of ...


5

No textbook is flawless. Even ignoring the occasional typo, every student is different and learns in a different way, so the best textbook for one student might be just "eh" for another. (And don't even get me started on cost...) I've worked extensively with both the Laitz and Clendinning/Marvin textbooks, and I can enthusiastically recommend both. They ...


5

The only difference in a major scale and its relative minor, is the tonic center. When you solo on C major scale, you play with the C as your tonic. If you change that, to A (with the A natural minor scale), you will focus on another note and the whole outcome will sound different. Another way to see what difference the change in the tonic makes are modes....


4

The books I've seen suggest that when you solo over a dominant seventh chord, try playing a half-whole diminished scale. The reason this works is that the scale contains all the notes of the dominant seventh chord. Here's the half-whole scale starting on C together with the C7 chord: H-W dim scale: C C# D# E F# G A A# C C7 chord: C E G Bb ...


4

Start off by finding some tabs (or sheet music, if you can read that) that will teach you the three octatonic (=diminished) scales. Or, you can just figure them out for yourself; it's pretty easy! There are only three of them, and they all alternate half-steps and whole-steps. So pick a pitch--any pitch!--and: Start alternating half and whole steps. After ...


4

My understanding so far has been that 4/8 is faster because it is probably assumed that a crotchet is conventionally always at 80 tempo (unless mentioned) and hence a semi-crotchet is played at 40 tempo as convention and hence the bar is played much faster. Your conclusion is faulty. It is a widely held misconception in music. There is no inherent ...


3

Strictly speaking, the notes of E natural minor are: E F# G A B C D E. So, if you want to use notes only from that scale, the chord would be B D F#. But in almost all the genres of music (even pop), it is really really common to borrow chords from other scales. In your example, you could borrow the dominant ( V ) chord from the E major scale (or the E ...


3

I have been playing guitar for more than 10 years, and the only book I ever needed was this one, which I was recommended by many people on the Ultimate-Guitar.com forum. https://www.amazon.com/Jazz-Theory-Book-Mark-Levine/dp/1883217040/ You can read the first few chapters for free on the Amazon website. It's not just for playing jazz, but covers all the ...


3

First of there isn't an "official" augmented scale. What people typically call the augmented scale is actually a scale known as the Lydian Augmented scale which is a mode of the ascending melodic minor scale that starts on the third scale degree and in C looks like this: C D E F♯ G♯ A B C There are two different types of diminished scales that are ...


3

This addresses how to get the note name for the root. The key think is to think about the problem in terms of the circle of fifths. Setup an array of note names like this: F C G D A E B 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 Note that the intervals for the movement of the root are given by P5=+1 P4=-1 M2=+2 m7=-2 M6=+3 m3=-3 M3=+4 m6=-6 aug4=+6 dim5=-6 note ...


2

All 9th chords imply the inclusion of a flat seventh. This includes sharp and flat 9th chords (#9 and b9). However, there is a good reason why the 7 would usually be included in sharp and flat 9th chord names. It is because it may be unclear whether the sharp or flat symbol is "attached" to the 9 or the letter name of the chord. A couple of examples will ...


2

It's a mistake in the book!! I just got an email back from RSL, the question is on the use of sharps/flats and double sharps/flats. 8va/vb notation was not supposed to be tested in this question and triple sharps/flats are outside of the syllabus. I've been informed that future versions of the book will now show an A rather than an Ab. Phew!


2

Is it perhaps a mistake in the clef? If that was a treble clef then you would be looking at an F flat which does have two enharmonic equivalents


2

Your use of the word 'meticulous' reminded me of my first theory teacher relating this stern instruction in best school marm fashion: You may break any of these hallowed rules of musical composition only after you are totally familiar with all of them, because by then you will know enough to strictly contain yourself until you thoroughly understand WHY these ...


2

The leading note is the seventh degree of the major - and minor - when that note is one semitone below the l, tonic, or root.It's called leading as it suggests a tendency to rise to the tonic next. However, it loses that propensity when it's lowered, as in some minors, and subsequently gets called the 'flattened leading note'. If you're wondering which one ...


2

The term "leading tone" is equivalent to "scale degree seven of the major key." This doesn't mean that it's only found in a major key, just that it's the same pitch as the pitch that is scale degree seven of the major key. It is always a diatonic half step below tonic. In E minor, the leading tone is D-sharp. Meanwhile, scale degree seven of the natural ...


2

In summary, is it right to say that If I set the tempo of crotchet = 80 for my first bar semi-crotchet = 80 for my second bar. Is it equivalent to saying 2 4/4 bars instead of 4/4 and 4/8 right? In general, if two time signatures have the same denominator (the bottom number), that means that the "beats" corresponding to the bottom number are at ...


2

The resolution to vi (E7 => Am in the key of C) is the most obvious one. It represents a tonicization of the relative minor key (A minor in the key of C). A very common alternative would be the resolution to IV, as pointed out by you and in ttw's answer. This is a deceptive cadence, where a dominant seventh chord does not resolve to its related tonic chord, ...


2

Matt Putnam offered an excellent answer but based on some of the comments a more complete explanation might be helpful for those who still are not sure how scale patterns can be useful for a guitarist. TLDR - skip to summary. The guitar and similar fretted instruments give the player options for multiple places on different strings and frets to play any ...


2

In terms of the physical acoustics a good reference point to start at is to consider a very long (effectively infinite) chain of pressure pulses/waves of fixed shape that repeat identically at some fixed repetition interval. In terms of the spectral content, this means that there are a set of narrow spectral peaks all at integer multiples of the fundamental ...


2

Mary, As a guitarist and song writer, myself, I know what you want. I spent almost 10,000 hours on the guitar and on the serious study of music to get to the point that I could begin to write music. It does not come easy. It takes time, maybe less for you, maybe more. Sure, I hear there are musical programs that will write for you. Never tried them. But, ...


2

It's a little unclear to me what you are trying to do with this, but here are some thoughts: Pretty much any audio property can be used to control this system granted you have the ability to analyze the input and know how to map it to the control value. If you do not want/need the input filtered out, you could use a glockenspiel, for example, which will ...


2

You can pretty much do all the things that are used in digital communications (theory and practice). For examples: Code by pitch , aka the tune. Code by rhythm, i.e. half, quarter, eighth, etc. notes act as Lev-Zimpel compressed data bits. Code by meter - which is closer to FM broadcast, sort of, in that you're sending information over the speed rather than ...


2

Your question is a good one, but I think you can go about it in a slightly different way and end up with much more meaningful results. If we acontextually (that is, away from the music itself) try to compile a list of various musical traits, it will never be complete and it will never be specific enough. So instead of trying to list musical traits and then ...


1

Every scale has modes. As you shift what note in the pattern you start on, you come up with a different pattern that is related to the original scale pattern. The names of the modes however, are not named the same way as the diatonic modes. The names of the modes are not based off scale degrees, but how the notes look compared to the scales/modes of the ...



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