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54

NReilingh gave a good general-case answer. I'll give you a specific case just to demonstrate that the concept is useful. First consider a C major chord. C-E-G, right? Then you make it into a minor chord by flattening the third, to get C-E♭-G. So far, so good. Now, consider an A♭ major chord: it's spelled A♭-C-E♭. But what happens when ...


23

B and Cb are different notes. One is a kind of B and the other is a kind of C. Information about harmony is contained both in the note name and any accidental alterations to it — C to any kind of E is a third, and C to any kind of F is a fourth, and those intervals have different meanings, even if they sound "the same". And these pitches are only the same ...


13

It is not necessary to double the root when converting guitar chords to piano chords but it could be done if fits better with the music. But there are important distinctions between the guitar and piano that come into play when considering how to notate chords on sheet music. These distinctions center around (and are affected by) the way chords are played ...


11

It's called the English cadence. It combines 7 and ♭7 simultaneously, and was used up to roughly Purcell's time in the UK. You can find an example at the end of Thomas Tallis's Spem in allum. Here's another example from Tallis (O sacrum convivium):


10

A chord is defined as a set of pitches. If you are really into semantics you could argue that the notes C4, C5 and C6 meet that requirement and could be considered a chord, but to most people it would not be a chord. There are two big reasons for this. The first is whenever someone looks to define a chord, they look at the collection of pitches by the ...


10

I'll focus mainly on the Or why I should not worry about it part of your question. I believe that in bands, the most important thing is to be able to play the songs you want (and compose if you like). I recently played with a pianist that didn't know anything about theory, but could work out pretty much everything with his ear. I don't think I would ...


9

Welcome to the wonderful world of guitar. The guitar is a very versatile and portable instrument that you can enjoy anywhere you like. As you have discovered, fretted (or non fretted) stringed instruments such as guitar, ukulele. mandolin, or even violin, are very different from a keyboard instrument. With a piano, there is only one specific key per ...


9

I've had various bands with members who know differing amounts of theory. Some people knew no theory and others had degrees in music. In the long run, it usually made no difference as those who really knew no theory had a good practical of things. Those who knew the theory could learn songs much faster. In one band, I was able to help by going through fake ...


9

The rules about parallal octaves only apply when writing Bach chorale-type harmony where the aim is rich harmony with no one part "sticking out" disproportionately. Because this is often the first type of harmony we are taught to write, we can fall into the trap of thinking it's the ONLY way of doing it! Orchestration is all about doubling lines, often in ...


6

We wouldn't refer to this as a chord. The idea is that you need three unique notes, which would not include octaves. Some definitions of a chord will allow just two notes but the more commonly accepted definition calls for three. You could, however, imply a chord with octaves alone, which requires context. For example, if you have established a key by ...


5

Yes they are both chords, but how useful they would be alone especially in functional harmony is questionable. The first one C, D, E could actually be viewed as a CAdd9 chord without the fifth as the root implies a perfect 5th pretty strongly. The second one will most likely not be used in any tonal harmony due it's extreme dissonance and will not be given ...


4

Consider an analogy with literature. You can become an author by reading good books, or by studying language and grammar. In reality, you will want some of both. Each is valuable, but in different ways. The latter provides understanding and insight into the first. Music theory is sort of the grammar behind music, and the extent to which it helps you will ...


4

Music is fundamentally made up of intervals, which are ratios of pitches (sound frequencies). The "simpler" the ratio, as in a fraction with smaller numbers, the more consonant the interval. For example: the perfect octave is 2:1, the perfect fifth is 3:2, major third is 5:4, the diminished fourth is 32:25. To produce music, we chain the intervals together, ...


4

I have a similar background, and in my experience, there simply isn't a good transition or analog from piano to guitar. Whereas a child can learn to identify every B-flat on the piano in an afternoon, it takes weeks or months of practice to know the notes on the fretboard. It's an entirely different system. I would like to suggest a few approaches / ideas I ...


4

He's talking about "meter" as number of syllables per line. Hymnals frequently include a "Metrical index" of tunes. A lot will be listed as "Common Meter" or "CM", because so many hymns are 8.6.8.6. Think "There is a green hill far away". There's also "Short Meter", "Long Meter" and a few more. It's purely a syllable count with no thought to stressed ...


4

If you play CEGC, it won't be parallel eighths. It will simply have the octave doubled. In order to have parallel eighths, you have to have the voices move. If you take guitar chords and put them into sheet music for piano, should you double the root ? There isn't any definite answer here. You certainly have to option to easily double the root (C). So, ...


3

Coda means "tail" in Italian. It's a tail-end part of a longer piece. A coda may be used however a composer wishes: to extend a cadence, to recapitulate some material, even to introduce new material.


3

They don't seem to be completely synonymous. Instead, it seems like an asymmetric time signature implies an additive rhythm, but an additive rhythm can exist in a "traditional" time signature. It appears that the word asymmetric is commonly used to describe meter, while additive is used to describe a rhythm. Rhythm and meter are related, but are not the ...


3

The are scale shapes. The help to memorize notes on fretboard. The every scale has multiple positions. The most popular are vertical patterns but there are others This is very popular minor pentatonic scale shape diagram It will be never so easy to play them as it was on keyboard but you will get used to it. The most beneficial thing you can do on guitar ...


3

A secondary dominant won't have all its notes from the original key anyway. Take the secondary dominant from C major. Dominant is G, with all notes belonging to C, but the secondary dominant is D7, with an F#. So, your case - dominant of Dm is A7 ( or if you wanted, Am7), and its dominant will be E7 (or maybe Em7), making the secondary dominant.Generally, ...


3

The "meters" in English-language hymn books describe the words, not the tune. They show not only the number of syllables per line, but also the rhyme scheme (that's what the dots in the meter signify). The rhyme scheme can be relevant for selecting alternative tunes to fit the words. Except for the most common meters (CM, SM, LM), the meter is not a ...


3

In the band I was in most recently, the two members who had the best traditional music theory knowledge were actually the worst at working out songs by ear; sometimes it even seemed that their presuppositions misled them into thinking that a song 'should be' one way, when in fact it was another. (Of course, correctly understood, knowledge shouldn't 'hurt' ...


3

The only time you shouldn't have parallel octaves is when you are voice leading and want two parts to be completely independent. The reason why you wouldn't use it is that it makes two voices that should be independent sound as one. It's used very, very frequently as doubling a line by octave is very effective at making it stand out. For example in Day ...


3

A pianist is very unlikely to want a literal transcription of what a guitarist does. Anyway, guitarists don't spend all their time strumming 6-string chords! The only answer to this is - it depends. The pianist may be playing one, two...up to six notes in the right hand, a bass line in the left. Or he may be playing a melody in the right hand, chords in ...


3

A useful "theory" needs to tell you what you can do with a "chord", not just give it a name. For example the idea of "the chord EFGA" doesn't have much significance, until you put it into a musical context like this when you can understand it either as a dominant 13th, or as two passing notes associated with a dominant 7th - whichever you prefer.


2

beautiful flute song using this scale greetings Erik


2

In rock music it is not uncommon for the root notes of chords to follow a scale, while the chords all are major chords (or distorted fifths, i.e. power chords which have an overtone series much like a major triad). Therefore it can be more meaningful to analyze the harmony of a rock song by considering what scale/mode the root motion implicates. Many of the ...


2

This is a good example of why we shouldn't get hung up on definitions. The word is not the thing, and there's no "correct" definition of what constitutes an instrument and what doesn't, because the world doesn't split up nicely into instruments and non-instruments.


2

Because a circle is the purest periodic shape: Any periodic orthogonal function could form the basis of more complicated, "less pure" sounds (i.e., sounds with many harmonics). See Dave Benson's excellent (and free!) Music: A Mathematical Offering (Cambridge U. Press), ch. 2, "Fourier Theory."


2

You're asking quite an advanced question to which there can be many different answers, all true; the idea is the harmonic context. As the man said, in a scale there is A B C♯ D E F♯ G♯ A. Now clearly that last G♯ couldn't be A♭, because the scale demands that the note before the top A, be a G. But if it's a normal G, the scale doesn't come out right. So we ...



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