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13

If you mean can one compose a melody using notes that are not defined in any recognized form of musical notation - then the answer is certainly! And if you compose a musical work that uses tones that are not defined in say 12 Tone Equal Temperament or other common tuning or notation system, there is no universally accepted way to transcribe those tones ...


11

It could be argued that any digital recording of the melody in question is a notation of that particular performance: It's something that can be followed to reproduce the original performance. It can be written down (any digital recording is made of bits that can be encoded as ink on paper, if need be). Anyone with the right training and equipment can use ...


10

Sure. Here are some examples of scores by John Cage, Steve Reich, Brian Eno, Krzysztof Penderecki, and Cornelius Cardew - all recognized "mainstream" 20th century composers. http://www.smithsonianmag.com/arts-culture/5-12-examples-of-experimental-music-notation-92223646/?no-ist


8

Studying lullabies? That sounds kind of interesting, actually! The lullaby is typically a soothing song, and it's typically used to help someone fall asleep. Indeed, the German word (Schlaflied) is literally "sleep-song." As such, I think it only makes sense that it would be a slow tempo instead of a fast one, don't you? As for the high tessitura, I can't ...


7

Cm6 is C-Eb-G-A. It's Cminor with an added 6th note. Note that the 6th note is from the major scale and melodic minor ascending scale, not the harmonic or natural minor.


5

Certainly current musical notation is incapable of handling note durations that aren't rational multiples of each other. For instance if you had a melody where one of the long tones was pi times the duration of one of the short tones then there is no way to explicitly notate this (it is possible to get as close an approximation as is desired though).


5

The melodies of Turkish classical, Arabic, and Hindustani have all come to terms with various means of notating their microtonal and non-Western tones and intervals, the Turkish Makams being, probably, one of the best of such systems. Still, all notation is just a guideline. Instruments that play glissandos by sliding on strings or by any other means ...


5

I don't have any examples, but there are melodies (possibly stretching the definition of "music" a bit) composed mostly or solely of "effects", like "a crashing glass", "a gunshot", "a ringing telephone", "a low moan", "the sound of a cat" etc. You could adapt standard notation for it, but a great part of your music would be in the "legend" (which effect ...


5

You could say it's imitation: In music, imitation is the repetition of a melody in a polyphonic texture shortly after its first appearance in a different voice. Wikipedia uses this example from Bartok's Mikrokosmos, which is similar to yours: Also, this example from Bach's Fugue no. 16: The 1st violin imitates the 2nd violin at the start of ...


5

I am unsure of anything that systematically analyzes orchestration. I've worked with the Adler, the Berlioz, and the Rimsky-Korsakov. This is quite a broad question because indeed orchestration is extremely subjective. You can find more systematic approaches in spectralism, for example. It is interesting because often orchestration is judged objectively. I.e....


4

Cm6 is C Eb G A. C minor triad with an added sixth. It's one of the extended chords that doesn't fit into the "pile of thirds" hierarchy, it's not a Cm13 (C Eb G Bb D [F] A) with missing notes! And it's just fine in the key of G. Here's a common, corny even, useage - firmly within a G major tonality.


4

Looking at the site you linked and clicking on each fret to change the pattern, there are actually only 5 (not 9) completely different distinct patterns that repeat. Several are exactly the same notes and some show a slight variation on the same basic "pattern". Allow me to expand on some of the other answers. The basic patterns for the minor ...


4

It's actually a very big difference. C♯11 is easily seen as an a extended chord that contains the notes C♯, E♯, G♯, B, (D♯), and F♯ though typically the 3rd (E♯) is omitted due to the clash with the 11th (F♯). C#4 is ambiguous, but most people looking at it would imply it is a C♯sus4 chord spelled C&...


4

It seems like the answer you are looking for is Tonal Harmony by Stefan Kostka and Dorothy Payne. A simple web search of college level harmony texts turned up more hits on this title than any other. One such page, from a community college, is here: https://www.flccbooknook.com/tonal-harmony-text-only The text on that page includes this description (emphasis ...


4

B# and C are basically the same note. They are called enharmonic tones. In modern musical notation and tuning, an enharmonic equivalent is a note, interval, or key signature that is equivalent to some other note, interval, or key signature but "spelled", or named differently. The one note differs from the other depending on the harmony of the song. ...


4

That image only shows three octaves, even though it shows eight different positions on the guitar where one can play an E. The trick of the diagram is that the E notes that are the same color and are connected in the same line are the same note. They are not in different octaves, but exactly the same. So even though there are eight fret positions where you ...


3

The way I was taught to determine a song's key is fairly straightforward: You list the pitch class (all the known pitches in a melody) and use that to determine the key. In this case, we have a collection of chords instead of a melody, so let's use that. I'm doing this more or less in my head, so please consider this a rough draft and let me know if there ...


3

There is rarely one unique scale (key) that a given set of chords will fit into; usually, at least two scales will fit pretty well. Another way to see this: the difference between two scales can be a single note that is different; but if the distinguishing pitch is never played during the song, then which scale is correct? The answer is, whichever the ...


3

This question is missing a lot of context. It may be that there is no difference, or it may be that the bass line is played on a bass guitar, or there may be the root note of the chord (which may or may not be 'bass') played on any string (although realistically strings 1 to 4 in order to have two other notes of the chord on strings 5 and 6) There is no ...


3

Depending on how the audio file was recorded it may have time deviations from the 100 bpm steady beat you'd need. If it was recorded without a click track, electronic drum, or some other fixed tempo reference, there will surely be jitters that may make it very difficult (or at least demand a lot of work) to perfectly align with a new steady time reference. ...


2

I learned the major and minor pentatonic patterns (which are identical except for which note is the root of the scale) by first learning these five patterns: Then I learned to connect the patterns, first by playing each pattern in sequence up and down the neck and then up and down each string. Then I learned to switch between the patterns starting and ...


2

So if you look carefully at the E Major Pentatonic graph, you will notice that the scales are basically overlapping barred chord forms of E (where the nut itself is a bar for open E chord): E pattern; D pattern; C pattern; A pattern; finally G pattern; repeat. By D pattern, I mean the D chord form barred at the second fret (E major). This is, basically, ...


2

Whether the top line of notes are given or the bass, the concepts of harmonisation stays the same. The melody line tends to be given more when advance harmony questions are asked, as it test the candidate's knowledge on how to approach inversions. Whether you write the bass line or the top line your outside voices have to be written in the style of a melody....


2

Not strictly figured bass or partimenti, but you could take a look at the rules for harmonising Bach chorales, where you are given a chorale melody and fill out the parts for SATB choir, starting with the Bass line. Identify the degree of the scale of each note in the melody Identify cadences (there are cadence 'templates' based on melodic patterns are ...


2

This is a great question! I'm not sure I can help exactly, because I'm not certain what you're looking for exists, but hopefully I can at least give some good information in this area. Regole are model structures of basic musical elements like cadences and sequence. Solfeggi are "style exercises" for a voice and basso continuo. Involature are keyboard ...


2

Is it true? No, it's not true because you used the word 'anything'. As said, it can be called a bass line in general if played by the bass even if this 'line' includes chords. It's referring to the instrument if used this way. A melody on the other hand is a series of notes. Another concept of a bass line is a series of notes in the bass. There is a ...


2

Yes, according to the most common use of such symbols, in popular music and jazz transcriptions, Cm6 would be C minor chord with an added 6th (i.e. a natural A). The figure 6 (written as superscript) can be used to mean a first inversion of a major or minor chord, but that is usually in the context of the so called "roman numeral analisys" of tonal harmony. ...


2

Sounds like you need to check any guitar chord charts, and only consider the bottom 4 strings shown. For some it won't be too satisfactory, as often with open chords, the 6th and sometimes 5th strings are not played (usually because that's where the root should be). The voicings may or may not be to your satisfaction, but the chords are playable straight ...


2

Not really, because notation systems have always evolved to accommodate the music composers are writing. Baroque composers, particularly French ones, came up with all kinds of weird notation, some of it unique to the composer. An example: La Sylva by Forqueray (pg. 37 of this document), written in the 18th century. The information about what the odd ...


2

Very small babies are more sensitive to higher pitched sounds; this is related to how people tend to use high pitched voices/sounds when talkint to them. This is probably related to the tessitura of the lullabies.



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