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16

A session musician is a "gun for hire". They get hired to put down parts in different studio sessions, hence the name. It is required to quickly learn parts in a lot of different styles and settings; they are likely to encounter more different tunes than most other musicians. In your quote, B major is considered unusual enough that the casual player, or ...


13

This will just be an embellishment of @user15077’s answer. This is the beginning of your piece as you’ve notated it: Here is what it would look like with a more standard approach: As you can see, many of the notes are expressed as tied notes now. For example, the quarter-note D-sharp in the first measure is written as a sixteenth tied to a dotted ...


12

You are missing the fact that you are looking at two different keys. The chord progression (C G Am F) is in the key of C. The chord progression (G D Em C) is in the key of G, which contains F#. The first site you were looking at, shows you alternatives for a C major chord in different keys than C. (Maybe compare the third alternative when you are ...


11

Independent in rhythm & contour means that the voices may have different rhythms and contour, respectively. For example, if a voice goes up and another goes down, the voices would be moving in opposing motion. Moreover, one voice may be going up, and then down while the other remains going down only. All this means that the voices are independent in ...


10

I've used this before and I know there is a ton of documentation for this program. If you scan the documentation you can find out what the results of each event means. This is directly from the documentation: Track, Time, Note_on_c, Channel, Note, Velocity Send a command to play the specified Note (Middle C is defined as Note number 60; all ...


10

This system is the result of the specific historical evolution of Western music notation. The five-line staff was not the first try at writing down the pitches being used in European music. The first systems were just mnemonic, consisting of neumes (squiggles, basically) drawn above the words of a religious text, much like the cantillation symbols that ...


9

Let's just pick the first bar apart which is pretty much a mess. I'll write down the note durations as fractions: 3/8 1/16 1/4 9/16 (bar line after 5/16 of that, the 5/16 written as 1/4~1/16). This does not look as much like "composing" as it looks like "let the notation program break the mess across bars and fix this up in the next measure". If this ...


9

There is a distinct pattern going on in this (known as a sequence) which is actually easier to see in the sheet music for it. I'll include it so it can easily be referenced. Let's look at the bass note in the first measure. The first three notes are just descending in the key (A minor) then jumps up a major 3rd to "lead" to the next note. The upper part ...


8

I am a session musician, and producer. Session musicians are called to come to the studio and play on a music track for songs, demos, advertising music, film scores, etc. There is little or no practice or rehearsal time. Imagine the piano player who was called to play on the music for Bugs Bunny cartoons (with the orchestra, of course). He or she had to be ...


7

Parallel movement in intervals is when two voices (notes) move the same distance( 2nd, 3rd, 4th, ect ) in the same direction. This can be applied to any interval including 7ths. Here is an example of parallel 7ths: As you can see, C to B is a 7th and then both move up a 2nd to D and C respectively which is another 7th creating parallel 7ths because of how ...


6

As MartinK said, this alternative is simply the same chord sequence, modulated to another key. What I'd still like to say: even in a given key, it may be possible to use notes which aren't in the key's standard scale. For instance, it's possible to substitute a D chord in another way into the original sequence: C G D7/F♯ F That would sound quite ...


6

All simile marks basically say the same thing which is play what you just played. The only thing that typically changes from simile to simile is how much you play. With a single simile you would only play one note/chord, but the others take groups of notes or measures. The breakdown of all the similes in your post are as follows: Single - play last notated ...


6

Definitely sounds like a chord sequence in D Minor to me. Particularly because it starts on D Minor, and the A Minor chords at the end have a dominant function, despite not being major. (An A Major chord at the end would create a strong perfect cadence, A - Dm, when it repeats, which I presume it is supposed to...) These chords are all found in D Natural ...


4

This kind of beaming often indicates that that very passage in Violin II has a displaced accent when compared to the other instruments: while they follow the time signature changes, from 2/4 to 3/4 and back to 3/4, the second violin keeps a metric accent likewise to 3/4 throughout all the selected excerpt. The beaming serves to guide the player through the ...


4

These are not the seventh chords of G harmonic minor, but just one possible collection of seventh chords in G minor. As you've noticed, only the V and the VII chord are from harmonic minor. The reason is that these chords (usually) have a dominant function where the leading tone (F#) plays an important role. The other chords are based on the natural minor ...


4

"Impressionist composers should be banned from using water as inspiration. Just way too many notes." - don't shoot the pianist In these circumstances, the composer's manuscript is always a valuable tool to use to determine why a publisher made the decision to do something the way they did. In this case, the manuscript is fortunately available to us ...


4

What you're doing is sometimes called modal interchange, i.e. you 'borrow' chords from other modes with the same tonic. The chords you mentioned when you play in major are taken from the major scale (I and IV), from the parallel minor key (bIII, bVI, bVII), and from the parallel phrygian mode (bII). When you play in minor you just borrow one chord from ...


4

In the history of western music, the 7 notes came first. The twelve arise from adding the necessary notes to play the 7-note scale starting on any note of the 7-note scale. In the key of C major, no sharps or flats are needed. C D E F G A B C When you modulate a fourth to F, you need to add the soft B or B♭. F G A B♭ C D E F And for each ...


4

That term has a lot of definition but basically, they're individual musicians who are contracted to play to a live gig or more commonly, a recording session. Producers, song-writers, soloists usually hire individual musicians for their needs, instead of a whole band. Naturally, they have to be fluent, proficient and versatile if they want to be sessionists ...


3

If you were in C (ie it wasn't a key mixup as noted above), D Maj would be a Major II chord, which could be considered to be a secondary dominant of V. (D is the V of G). This would normally be seen more commonly as II7 with a C natural on top, but if you were playing only triadic harmony, it might be a simple D triad. It's commonmore in standards (ie ...


3

In case I am not too late, here is a great theoretical paper on the exact topic. http://www.academia.edu/2835618/A_Multipitch_Approach_to_Tonic_Identification_in_Indian_Classical_Music I have a smallish program that implements section 2.3 of the paper as a Java program. Sections 2.1 and 2.2 are provided by the author as a Vamp plugin and can be used with ...


3

You have to look at what you have and look at where you are going. Like you said, the A does not naturally exist in C major, however, I think it would be a stretch to say it borrowed from A major since there is such a big jump to the parallel major of the relative minor key especially since the Em doesn't make A seem like a temporary tonic and neither G7 nor ...


3

The I,III don't have their 7th lowered. The scale you are looking at is most likely the G natural minor scale and not the G Harmonic minor scale. The notes that are included in the G natural minor scale are the same that consist the Bb Major scale (Bb, C, D, Eb, F, G, A). The correct thing to say here is that on the V and the VII, some notes are raised. ...


3

To add to Bob's excellent answer - E Phrygian contains the same notes as C major, which contains the same notes as A minor. If this were in E Phrygian, there would be a pull towards E. There isn't. All the chords are from C/Am - apart from the recently changed A, which could, as Bob states, put it into Dm. Not sure where E Phrygian came from, but I feel it's ...


3

Dm C Dm Am C Dm Asus4 Am - I agree with you that it's a nice chord sequence, and I agree with the other answers, that it's in Dm, not E phrygian. it's pulling towards D, not E. (Dm contains a Bb, whereas E phrygian contains the same notes as Am, including a B natural. As there is no B at all in the chords used, I doubt a computer tool like the one you used ...


3

The other answers are pretty good already. Here's a very quick and dirty description of a MIDI file format: A MIDI file may contain up to 65,536 tracks (usually these tracks are intended to play simultaneously). Each track is just a sequence of events. Each event occurs at a specific time (specified as the number of "ticks" since the beginning of the ...


3

This is described somewhat in the answers here: Scale degree naming Basically, scale degrees are typically numbered according to the (parallel) major key, even if you're actually playing in a minor key, or some other mode. Thus in your case, A major would have a G# and an F#, so the bVII and bVI tells us that they have to be lowered (the sharps removed). ...


3

Fusion originated with Miles Davis's "B****** Brew" album. Pat Metheny, Larry Coryell and John Mclaughlin are probably the avatars of fusion jazz, but there are many many other practitioners of the genre, including Martin, Medeski and Wood, Bird Songs of the Mesozoic and the "downtown sound" of Bill Laswell and John Zorn.There are very interesting ideas that ...


3

If fusion players sound to you like 'not in key' or 'playing random notes', then you're either listening to bad players or you're not yet accustomed to the sounds they use. The latter may also have to do with the development of your musical ear. I suggest to listen to good fusion guitarists (e.g., Alan Holdsworth, John Scofield, Scott Henderson with Tribal ...


3

Yes. It means you can distinguish 2 or more different melodies that sound pretty together. This is not the same as melody and accompaniment; in that case there's one melody and one more voices that form a rather static backdrop. That said Independence is to some extent subjective; a counter melody will be perceived as more independent if it has different ...



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