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40

NReilingh gave a good general-case answer. I'll give you a specific case just to demonstrate that the concept is useful. First consider a C major chord. C-E-G, right? Then you make it into a minor chord by flattening the third, to get C-E♭-G. So far, so good. Now, consider an A♭ major chord: it's spelled A♭-C-E♭. But what happens when ...


17

There are note values not notateable without ties. For example: A note the length of a crotchet (quarter note) + a semiquaver (sixteenth note) would need to be written with a tie, as there's no notation which says "add a quarter of the length of the note to its duration". We've got "add half" (dotted notes) and "add three quarters" (double dotted notes), ...


17

C sharp major has seven sharps, D flat major has five flats. Out of the box, the latter is preferable. The former may be more appropriate when there is more material requiring "flattening" the key signature than otherwise. Now major is a rather sharp mode, so it's not quite unlikely. For example, a "proper" fully diminuished chord in C sharp features ...


17

B and Cb are different notes. One is a kind of B and the other is a kind of C. Information about harmony is contained both in the note name and any accidental alterations to it — C to any kind of E is a third, and C to any kind of F is a fourth, and those intervals have different meanings, even if they sound "the same". And these pitches are only the same ...


14

It certainly holds some truth, irrespective of tuning system, in this sense: modulating to a key with more sharps evokes a “bright” sensation; modulating to more flat evokes a “dark” sensation. This is somewhat tangible: raising accidentals are likely to be perceived as “uplifting”. (Except when they're not; perception is ...


10

Yes indeed there is a key of C Sharp Major (C# Major). But the key of C Sharp Major is the “enharmonic equivalent” of the key of D Flat Major. What that means is that all of the notes in the C sharp major scale sound pretty much exactly the same (to the human ear) as all the notes in the D Flat major scale – only they are notated (written) differently. ...


9

The way that the Melodic Minor scale is presented to students (Melodic Minor when ascending, Natural Minor when descending, see ex. 1) is merely a teaching tradition. This tradition is an incomplete definition of how the great composers employed the Melodic Minor Scale in their melodies. The apparent purpose is to allow the student to demonstrate mastery of ...


9

As topo morto already commented, it doesn't really make sense to consider pop as just an evolution of classical music. It has lots of influences from folk, blues, jazz that don't really make sense from a classical-harmony perspective. To a large degree, you might also just sum pop up as “relax, focus on keeping the melody simple&catchy and then ...


8

It may have made a subtle difference in the days before ET but since then, F# = Gb, for example, so how can two identical sounding keys portray different emotions, or indeed sound different? I'm guessing that before ET F# and Gb did sound slightly different, and possibly playing them back to back could give a perception of 'bright and dark'. Having said ...


8

My goodness. This is a large topic. Also, though perhaps unintentional, there appears to be some hubris underlying your question. Before I continue to my answer, I want to address three points in your question: 1.) Regarding "quasi-tonalism" - extended tertian harmonies and the evolution into the 2nd Viennese School, Neo-Classicism (Prokofiev) and ...


6

Yes they are necessary there definitely are note values that cannot be written with mere dots. The one that comes to mind is when you are in 6/8 time and there was a Anacrusis (Upbeat) of a mere quaver. For you to end the piece or phrase you would have to write a dotted crotchet and a Crotchet as one note. There is no way to write this note value without ...


6

MuseScore certainly lets you enter notes and chords then hear what they sound like. I'd warn you, however, that studying music theory divorced from practical experience of PLAYING the sort of music being studied is going to lead you into a web of miscomprehensions and dead ends. Take lessons on playing an instrument. PLAY music. Let the theory follow.


5

As an example (this is fairly common) below is an excerpt from a Bagatelle in C minor by Beethoven (imslp link). Notice the F and C (!!) are sharpened. Also notice As and Es are natural. So what's happening here is that Beethoven is going outside the key for a bit, probably using borrowed chords (I'm not as fast an analyzer as I should be). Why does he ...


5

I would rely on Christoph Wolff's excellent Johann Sebastian Bach. The Learned Musician (published 2001), which features an entire chapter about Bach's great interest for previous and contemporary composers, and also his Bach: Essays on his Life and Works. You should probably focus on the German "fathers" of Bach's keyboard style (other Bachs, Pachelbel ...


5

If that is what you want to do, you wouldn't use standard notation at all. It's ok to use other forms of representing music like graphic notation or even make your own when it doesn't fit in the system. You could theoretically represent it in standard notation, but I would be very hard to comprehend and write. The way to represent it on standard notation ...


5

Your question is vague, but I think you mean why is the chord C marked while the tab shows E - top string open. The chord C is the accompaniment, and is the correct chord to strum while the tune is being played, at that point. The TUNE itself goes E-E-E, which happens to be the 3rd of the underlying chord, C. This is commonplace with tunes, that the note ...


5

The reason for the difference in ascending and descending comes down to how people composed in minor keys during the common practice period of music. To fully grasp the concept, you have to not only look at the melodic minor scale, but all three flavors of the minor scale which are the natural, the harmonic, and the melodic. Obviously the natural minor is ...


4

There are no chords that has a diminished second as part of the chord for the obvious reason that the enharmonic equivalent of it would be a perfect unison which is already part of every chord. If you do come across one, just view it as a unison instead of a second as that's almost surely how it's being used.


4

I agree, that makes no sense. It's all relative. If keys have "flavors", it's only because of (lack of) familiarity borne of our tendency to play in only a handful of keys. Keys may be all the same, relative, to our ear, but certainly not to the way they lay on a fingerboard.


4

If ... we're talking in an equal temperament context, and There aren't any other tuning oddities (stretch tuning, etc.) and we're assuming a relative sense of hearing (no absolute sense of pitch or key) ...then pretty much by definition, there's no fundamental, general distinction that can be drawn between flat keys and sharp keys. After all, if we go ...


4

No, at least with not with twelve-tone equal temperament (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Equal_temperament). I.e. with Piano Music, you will not hear a difference. However with some instruments and vocal music, one cannot assume perfect twelve-tone pitch. Nevertheless I highly doubt, that a listener could tell apart F major (one "flat") from E# major ...


4

I'll borrow the arpeggio definition from wikipedia: An arpeggio (Italian: [arˈpeddʒo]) is a musical technique where notes in a chord are played or sung in sequence, one after the other, rather than ringing out simultaneously. So, let's say you have the C major chord, which consists of the notes C-E-G. If you play these 3 notes together, they will form ...


4

Is it just a matter of chance that we note music as we do? One of the ideas put forward by A generative theory of tonal music is that "the events of a piece are related to a regular alternation of strong and weak beats at a number of hierarchical levels" - I believe the suggestion is that this is something fundamental to the human experience of music, ...


4

One point of view is given by Peter van der Merwe in a couple of interesting books. "Origins of the Popular Style: The Antecedents of Twentieth-Century Popular Music" and "Roots of the Classical: the Popular Origins of Western Music." Another interesting book is Alec Wilder's "American Popular Song" but it only covers the period up to about 1950. ...


4

It's because you can start/continue the the pattern on any of the notes of the pentatonic scale. The collection of notes you have will always be the same, but the exact pattern of the scale will be different. Let's look at the E minor pentatonic scale to start with. In the E minor penatonic scale you have the following notes with the following intervals: ...


4

A pragmatic answer: if there is a way to notate that repeats are to be played on D.C. or D.S., it is not well known. I'm not saying there is no such standard, only that it is not widespread. The best you can do is to write it out: "D.S. with repeats", or "D.S con repetizione" if you prefer italian.


4

Consider an analogy with literature. You can become an author by reading good books, or by studying language and grammar. In reality, you will want some of both. Each is valuable, but in different ways. The latter provides understanding and insight into the first. Music theory is sort of the grammar behind music, and the extent to which it helps you will ...


4

Welcome to the wonderful world of guitar. The guitar is a very versatile and portable instrument that you can enjoy anywhere you like. As you have discovered, fretted (or non fretted) stringed instruments such as guitar, ukulele. mandolin, or even violin, are very different from a keyboard instrument. With a piano, there is only one specific key per ...


3

Strictly speaking an arpeggio is played in strict note order like a scale, but more informally people use it to describe playing a chord in a broken order rather than all at once. With guitar you can hold a chord and play the notes(strings) in any order and it should sound reasonably ok. All the notes will harmonise. You want to allow the strings to carry ...


3

You can definitely encounter things like this for a variety of reasons. One place you would frequently see this is within a key such as D minor (1 flat); in common practice theory, the seventh degree is altered (when needed) to create a leading tone and within D minor, this would be C#. Other chromatic activity will also be best spelled out through #s even ...



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