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14

The pentatonic scale is a great vehicle for moving outside. It has a very clear structure and sound which the listener is familiar with. Due to its simplicity and familiarity, you can get away with playing it, even if it does not fit the harmony in a traditional sense. The first thing I experimented with when I got into playing outside was "side-stepping", ...


10

This type of progression is called an Omnibus Progression. It is a variation on the lament bass which is a figure where bass moves by a 4th connecting all chromatic notes in between. The Omnibus Progression most notably features a chromatically-descending bassline that traverses an octave. Additionally, the progression may also support a chromatically ...


9

I actually studied music composition and computer science myself. Great combo! It sounds like what you are really looking for is a formal music composition program, so, first of all, I would say that if this is something that really interests you, and you have the time and the means, you should look into trying to study music through your school, either by ...


8

Short answer: It doesn't have to start or end with anything. The last note ending on a G might end up feeling more resolved, but you can use any note you'd like to end on that you feel sounds like it meets what you want to accomplish the solo. If I know another musician is taking a solo right after me, sometimes I'll deliberately end on the 5th (in this case ...


8

This is going to sound rather trite, but… Put the gear away & write a song on the piano. You're suffering from a modern dilemma - Instant Gratification Syndrome. If it doesn't immediately make your music for you, you get bored. You have the gear, you want it to 'do something for you'. It's not going to happen. …alternatively - find a noise, any ...


8

Theoretically, yes there are five modes that can be derived from the major pentatonic scale and they would be named the same way the other modes contained in the major scale. Let's look at the relative modes instead of parallel as it is slightly easier to see the patter. The C major pentatonic scale consists of the following notes: C, D, E, G, A ...


7

A difficult one to answer. Let's say that it was an idea for which the time was right; Schoenberg merely articulated it. Look at most early- to middle period Bartók, and you'll see the same thing happening, ditto early (pre-Neoclassical) Stravinsky, ditto early Hindemith (around Sancta Susanna), definitely ditto Scriabin and Roslavets. Did anyone, ...


7

As long as you play within a G major scale you still are in G major. However it should be noted that starting and ending on a G will have the effect of making the G feel like the home note (known as a tonic) which is what you want if you are playing in G major. It's not a bad thing to end on a different note and it can have interesting effects. On thing you ...


7

It isn't entirely clear from your question whether you're fluent in reading Western music notation and if you're conversant in the (relatively) standardized vocabulary for Western harmony and melody. If not, a first place to begin investigation might be Joseph Straus's Elements of Music. It begins with how to read notes, then moves on to keys, scales, meter, ...


7

Whilst on a major scale ,borrowing chords from the minor scale with the same name is common (and vice versa). Really common to be honest. Some of the most common borrowed chords are the V (dominant), IVm and bVI. Now for your progression. Since you said you were on C major, we have: Cm (borrowed) G (V) Dm (II) Am (VI) Or if we are on A natural minor, we ...


7

It's a key change: it changes from E minor to C# phrygian without preparing the listener. That's probably why the beginning of the solo sounds dissonant to you, i.e. dissonant in relation to what came before. Unexpected (i.e. unprepared) key changes will always have such an effect. The more notes change from one key to the other, the stronger the effect ...


6

For me, the most important tool when it comes to the outside concept is the Jazz Minor scale. The jazz minor scale is essentially the ascending melodic minor scale. (In the classical world, this scale is different depending on whether you are ascending or descending the scale, but in a jazz context it remains the same. Study the jazz minor scale in all ...


6

Yes they do because they are the key signature of a piece. The key signature tells you what key you are in and what notes to expect. Since you are in the key of E major, you will most likely use the notes E, F#, G#, A, B, C#, D# which the four sharps represent. Those are the notes you should use unless a different accidental is applied to a note.


5

Just to add to Patrx2 answer there are a total of four types of motion in counterpoint. They are: oblique - one note moves while the other doesn't contrary - the notes move in the opposite direction similar - the notes move in the same direction, but different intervals (i.e. one moves a 2nd and the other moves a 3rd) parallel - the notes move in the same ...


5

No. If the notes don't move, they aren't parallel octaves. Repeated notes act very much like tied notes. If you had moved both Es down to their respective neighbouring Ds, leaving the tenor and soprano static, that would be an example of parallel octaves.


5

A very traditional way would be to pivot from a Neapolitan sixth chord (bII6) in your first key to V6 in your second key. For instance, in C major, you'd have a first inversion Db major (this is your Neapolitan) which becomes the dominant of Gb, and resolves to Gb, modulating a tritone. If this is too abrupt for you, you may want to smooth out this ...


5

I think there are some assumptions in your question that are false. First: Quartal harmony emerges and starts getting used extensively in Western music in the late-19th-, early-20th century. At the same time, many composers were also exploring different ideas about how chords can connect, including chord planing, which involves holding the same chord ...


5

Dom's answer correctly explains what the modes of the pentatonic scale are and how they are (not) used. Since this might give the impression that the pentatonic scale is almost exclusively useful if used as either major or minor pentatonic scale, I would like to add one important application of the pentatonic scale where it is used over a chord whose tonic ...


4

Unfortunately, the tools are not the key. E.g. Venetian Snares started out with a couple of ghettoblasters and low grade samplers. The first instruments of most musicians were low budget. Just cause you buy the best art equipment available, does not mean that you can paint. That's not to say all is lost for you, I can't possibly know that. But one must ...


4

but is reading the bass clef necessary? Rhythm seems rather useless also. Cough, cough. In baroque times, accompaniment was written down by writing down the bass line and rhythm and putting numbers for the type of chord/harmony to be played above the bass line. While the numbers are gone these days and replaced by explicitly writing out the right hand, ...


4

This is a good example of a non-dominant diminished chord with a diatonic function (i.e. resolving to a diatonic chord). Note that often diminished chords function as dominants. This is the case when the root of the diminished chord is the leading tone to the root of the diatonic resolution chord. However, in your example this is not the case because then ...


4

Overtones are the notes found when you play natural harmonics.Sometimes called upper partials. I've grouped these names together, but they're not strictly synonyms. Using a guitar (or bass) string, open gives note. Let's call it the root. The first harmonic, half way along it is an octave above the root. Next, at 1/3 comes a fifth. The next, at 1/4 is ...


4

One simple technique for playing outside is to play around on the pentatonic scale based on the extension of V chord you are playing. Since most outside/extensions/alterations happen on the V to create a stronger resolution to the I, it "sounds" right to go outside on the V rather than the ii or I. So, if I were playing a ii-V-I in C, I would add an ...


4

Assuming that your teacher isn't terrible, she probably isn't giving you 'randoms' - she's probably trying to go through a progression of work that builds up your technique, and she's naturally reluctant for you to jump ahead and learn bad habits. Having said that, there's everything to gain in music by not having just one perspective, so if you are itching ...


4

One really good way to practice is to play only two or four bars at a time and master them in progression instead of stumbling through the whole song repeatedly. Even though it is much less interesting when practicing, this method gives you opportunity to learn what mistakes you are making and correct them before muscle memory takes place and becomes much ...


4

You probably don't mean playing more efficiently or effectively. You mean practising more effectively. That has a more rigorous meaning: learning skills faster, without learning anti-skills (bad habits: "practice makes perfect" is not as true as "practice makes permanent"). The number of skills is enormous: steady tempo, accurate leaping to a note, ...


4

I'm not sure that parallel motion is invariable - I think back to a lot of middle period Bartók (although he almost invariably spices the harmony with augmented fourths) - but I think in situations such as the examples you have given here, the colour, the sonority of fourths is a consideration. These are essentially melodic gestures that are coloured by the ...


4

Some notes sound good together. This is an example of what we call consonance. Some notes do not sound good together. We call that dissonance. In simple terms, certain notes blend well together because of the way the sonic frequencies merge together and complement one another. Our brains will instinctively have a desire to gravitate towards complementary ...


3

A composer differentiates between 12/8 and 6/8 depending on phrase-lengths / structures. If a structure repeats a certain number of beats less than 12/8, the time signature should be reduced to fit the song appropriately. Yes, you are correct - in 3/4 you would have 3 quarter notes, in 6/8 you would have 2 dotted quarter notes. I actually don't believe ...


3

Maybe because Gdim7 is the same thing as C♯dim7? That means that, between the C♯m7 and the F♯m7, two notes are going to be held from the first chord, mainly C♯ and E, and there is going to be descending chromatic motion in parallel minor thirds between G♯ and B in the C♯m7, and F♯ and A in the F♯m7, because the remaining two notes of the C♯dim 7 are G and ...



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