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15

It's known as a tritone substitution. In jazz you can substitute any dominant-seventh chord with the one a tritone (b5 or #4) away. This works because of the major-third and minor-seventh which are in every dominant-seventh chord. These make the interval of a tritone, which is exactly half an octave, and so gives exactly the same notes when transposed by a ...


10

You’re not parsing your sentence right. You should understand “An eighth note at [quarter equals 120] is 0.25 seconds long.” “A quarter = 120” is a tempo indication meaning “you should play 120 quarters per minute”, i.e. a quarter last half a second. An eighth note thus lasts half that, that is 1/4 second.


9

Yes, it's the 5th mode of melodic minor, and it's usually called Mixolydian b6 or Mixolydian b13. Other names for this scale, in my opinion slightly less fortunate, are Aeolian Dominant or Hindu scale. You can find even a few more obscure names for it in the article linked above. However, in a jazz context I've only come across the name Mixolydian b6 (or ...


9

It's rather like language. Treating the rules as prescriptive allows you to always be generally understood (or compose something non-irritating). You need to understand the rules in order to know when it is OK to break them, even though you could accidentally break them and still make a comprehensible sentence (or pleasing melody) without knowing why. ...


9

On a practical level, knowing some theory can be useful to a composer in certain circumstances. First is when a composition is not as interesting as the composer would like it to be. He/she would like to evoke something different than whatever the music inspires at that stage of composition. Examining the melody for how it conforms to standard scales, ...


8

Use flats. In fact, write the bass of the 3rd chord as D♭. You're not only running parallel second inversion diminished chords downwards, you're doing so in a key that already uses flats in the key signature. I'd even be tempted to write the soprano and bass of the second chord as C♭ and E♭♭ respectively, but leaving them be might be a little easier to read. ...


8

Actually, a major chord is formed by using a root, a major third and a perfect fifth. Doesn't necessarily have to be the 1,3 and 5 of the scale. Let's take the C major scale and see for which root notes we have the major third and the perfect fifth: C; the third is E (major third), the fifth is G (perfect) -> Major Chord (I) D; the third is F (minor) E; ...


6

If we use 'em, it's because they seem necessary to us. It might be that we need an irregular effect for expressive purposes; it might be that if we don't group the notes just so, the lines won't line up properly together rhythmically; it might be that we need them to avoid arriving at a definite downbeat until exactly the right time, and that irregular ...


6

It's called scientific pitch notation. Here's an explanation of it: Scientific pitch notation (also known as American Standard Pitch Notation) is one of several methods that name the notes of the standard Western chromatic scale by combining a letter name, accidentals, and a number identifying the pitch's octave. The definition of scientific ...


6

An interval is just the distance between two notes. The name perfect 5th comes from the idea of a scale. For example the C major scale consists of the following notes: C D E F G A B The 5th note of the scale is G hence the 5th of the C major scale is G. The interval is perfect because if we flip the interval we would get a 4th which exist in the G major ...


5

Technically yes, but you would almost never see B♯♯ as B♯♯ is an enharmonic equivalent to C♯ which makes much more senses in most cases. Likewise I've never seen more than 3 accidentals applied to a note so a quadrupled sharped F you would never see. Going back to C♯, the equivalent interval would be G♯♯ or Gx better known as A. So yes B♯♯ to F♯♯♯♯ is an ...


5

First off, the notion that you can write more freely if you "don't know the rules" is an unfortunate fallacy. When I hear guitar players saying that they eschew learning theory or how to read sheet music because it will "stifle their creativity" I think, "lads, you're trying to run a marathon with a boat anchor strapped to your ankle." Functional harmony ...


5

Dom's answer is of course correct, but I think there's a misunderstanding as to what is meant by 'pattern'. In Dom's answer, he refers to the interval structure of a scale as 'pattern'. In this sense he is of course right that the patterns of major and minor pentatonic scales are different. However, I believe that Chris refers to patterns on the neck of the ...


5

The first thing to note is that to specify a key, you need both a root note and a formula. A root note on its own is not sufficient. A minor and C major contain the same notes, so we can say they are different modes of the same scale. Another way of saying this is that A minor is the relative minor of C major, and C major is the relative major of A minor. ...


4

First of all, I do not think that there are keys that "do not work well together". There are just better or worse ways to make a transition from one key to another. Obviously, there are keys that are very remote from each other, but nevertheless, a good composer will be able to make a convincing transition. Of course, certain key changes occur much more ...


4

It depends how you want to look at. Practically if you told someone to play a Cadd#9, they would understand to play the notes C, D#, E, and G. However from a theoretical standpoint, most likely the name would not properly show function as technically there are two thirds in the chord (D# is an enharmonic equivalent to Eb). I have seen this chord come up ...


4

The chords available to you in a given key are the same no matter what mode you choose. This is because you're still constructing the chords from the same set of 7 notes. For example, in C major, you have CDEFGAB, and no sharps or flats. That means that (ignoring "fancier" chords"), the chord on C is CEG = C major, the chord on D is DFA = D minor, and so ...


4

The problem with the definitions you dug up is that they refer to different things. The usual meaning of "perfect fifth" is in contrast to a "tempered fifth". In relation to a guitar, a perfect fifth is the interval you get between the first harmonic (over fret 12) and the second harmonic (over fret 7). When tuning, the most pleasing interval between most ...


4

The simple answer is that the altered version of a note is considered a different note than the unaltered version. In other words, yes, a C and C# are considered two different notes. To be clear though, the term note actually has three distinct, albeit related meanings in music. First, the term note can be synonymous with pitch, which appears to be ...


4

In math, you are supposed to know 1+1 = 2. You do not need to know math in a formal way to know when you have two apples. As math becomes more technical, common knowledge is less equivalent, even while it is still relevant (What is the thrust required to leave the surface of the planet, or what is the compound interest of your account over the next 6 years?) ...


4

There's two things going on that you need to understand. The pattern for the major and minor scales are different. If you were to play a C major pentatonic scale you would play the notes C, D, E, G, A. If you were playing the C minor pentatonic you would play the notes C, Eb, F, G, Bb. Both are shown below: There are major and minor pentatonic ...


4

You can try to use chords that are common to both keys, and re-interpret their function. For your example (A minor and B minor), the common triads are D, Em, E, and G (note that in minor both the 6th and the 7th scale degree can be either minor or major). Also note that a ii-V progression always leads nicely to the I chord. Examples: || Am | Dm | Em ...


4

iTunes and other music retailers require albums, not songs, to be marked explicit. Therefore, every tune on the album is marked explicit whether it is or not.


3

There are a couple things I consider when choosing time signatures. I don't write music quite like this but I can see a few reasons why something like this might take place. Generally speaking, it is easier to maintain a tempo than to switch. So when a composer is going from one time signature to another, it is easiest to maintain the tempo and use ...


3

The most standard convention I know of is to change the vowel to "i" for sharping and "e" for flatting. The exception is when flatting "re", in which case you go to "ra".


3

The closest term for what you are referring to is subdivisions as the beat is divided in into smaller parts. The term subdivision is always used when talking about note values less than the beat: For example on the Wikipedia article for Counting Music states: Triple meter, such as 3/4, is often counted 1 2 3, while compound meter, such as 6/8, is ...


3

If I may offer a different analysis of the excerpt in question, it appears to me that the progression moves as thus: I6/3 - ii - V6/5 - I Intermediary arpeggiations are upper-tertian embellishment that essentially just serves as smooth harmonic leading between chords. This is a very common progression for the period and a very common progression for JS ...


3

The different modes derived from any particular scale will contain the same notes. This means that while staying in the key, you will have the same chords available to you. The main difference between being in one mode vs. another is what we treat as tonic, or home base as I like to refer to it for those that don't know the term tonic. This means that the ...


3

Morton Feldman is a major composer in this sort of music. His style was very quite, slow enough to be essentially ametric, and in his later works he become interested in extremes of time - his String Quartet No. 2 is over six hours long. Rothko Chapel is his best-known work. Feldman's does often included some quite strong dissonance, unlike much other ...


3

All a piece being in C major tells you is: The home note (tonic) of a piece of music What harmony and set of notes to expect A piece being in C major does not tell you: The time signature The form of a piece The length of a piece The melody itself The overall feel The instrumentation of a piece The overall harmony of a piece (chord progression) The ...



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