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24

Yep, the second one is far better for precisely the reason you say. A general rule is that you shouldn't have dotted-notes that start on an off beat and carry through the next beat. There are exceptions even to this rule, but showing the underlying beat structure of the meter is paramount in the vast majority of situations. Elliott Carter is an example of ...


15

One option if you're primarily interested in representing the individual digits of pi is to use a representation in a base other than 10. For example pi base 12 would have an individual digital for each chromatic note. Here's a website that might help get you started: http://www.virtuescience.com/pi-in-other-bases.html


12

The list above is a great start. I'll add a few names below, but first let me speak to the technical question. There are a few basic techniques that characterize so-called minimalism in music. Not every minimalist or post-minimalist uses all these, and a number of composers who used to be called minimalists have changed style dramatically over the years, but ...


11

There are four types of perfect interval: perfect unison, perfect fourth, perfect fifth, and perfect octave. These can be thought of as belonging to two groups. In the first group, all intervals of a unison or an octave are called perfect because the note is not changed. An octave is twice (or half) the frequency of the first note. The second group ...


11

He is referring to the harmonic minor scale. Each minor scale has three variations: The Natural Minor - the exact notes of the relative major: C Major: CDEFGABC A Minor: ABCDEFGA The Harmonic Minor - Used for harmony in Western Classical, as it better implies a resolution from the V - I, since it involves the leading tone, which has a ...


9

My answer builds on the answer contributed by DR6. Based on your reaction to other very good answers posted here already, your question seems to boil down to: "Why do humans innately feel that certain intervals are consonant". And so much so that they are willing to call them "perfect". Before getting to that question, let's look at why Western culture ...


9

There are a lot of different kinds of Minimalisms, so my first suggestion would be to explore a bunch of different composers with extremely open ears: Philip Glass - Personally, my favorite work is his opera Einstein on the Beach, but his string quartets are also great, and the piano etudes can be a nice introduction. His work tends to still operate within ...


9

I think you're about right. Homophony is the concept of a single 'line' as such, potentially split across several parts, but all moving at the same time - parts mainly follow the same rhythm. Polyphony is when there is multiple melody lines at the same time, interacting with each other. What's important to remember is that there should be a degree of ...


9

The number 10 doesn't necessarily map well to values in traditional musical theory. (For instance, there are 12 chromatic pitches per octave, using conventional divisions of the octave; diatonic scales have seven pitches; note durations are related as powers or negative powers of 2). So, for this reason, the world is your oyster! I guess you can choose any ...


8

F# minor isn't different from any other scale. Natural minor: F# G# A B C# D E F# That's your standard minor scale, with the same key signature as an A Major (which is of course F#'s relative major). Harmonic minor: F# G# A B C# D E# F# The natural minor with the 7th note raised by a half-step (the E becomes an E#, or a natural F). Melodic minor ...


8

A double-sharp would raise a flat note by a tone and a half (three semitones). A double-flat would lower a sharp note by a tone and a half (three semitones). Having said both these things, if you have a piece that is changing a flat note to a double-sharp, or changing a sharp note to a double flat, it is likely that you could use a much better enharmonic ...


8

If you are referring strictly to music written obeying to traditional rhythmic conventions (with rational time signatures and regular/even division), then your second example is more suitable. Please keep in mind that the first example is not wrong, but the second will make sight-reading much easier, as our own expectations when seeing a piece in 4/4 make us ...


8

In my experience, unfortunately, writing melodies is one of the most "magical" parts of writing music. Some melodies just sound great, some just don't. There are, however, a few things to keep in mind that can help you deliberately write a melody for a particular emotion or style and help you understand why a particular melody sounds good. Intervallic and ...


7

"Is there a solid definition of perfect intervals, lying around somewhere I just can't find?" Yes. A "perfect" interval is an interval that is not one of minor, major, diminished, augmented.


7

Since both of them are flat, it is the same interval they would be without flats. So: Bb - Eb would be the same as B - E which is perfect fourth. Bb - Ab would be the same as B - A which is minor 7th. Bb -Db would be the same as B - D which is minor 3rd.


7

I would say that since Music is a hobby for me and I do not plan to play in any kind of band or such learning to sight read isn't really important. It depends on you. I prefer reading normal music sheets rather than tabs or whatever, but this is just me. If you have time and energy to learn how to sight read,it most certainly won't be wasted. but ...


6

The central basis of a multi-tonic system is that the underlying scale or primary note collection is symmetrical, thus allowing several notes within the collection to behave as tonic since they are all approached and left in the same way. In other words: in a C major scale, the tonic has an entirely unique relationship to the other six notes of the scaleā€”at ...


6

Perfect intervals are the ones that don't have two forms: major and minor. C Db D Eb E F F# G Ab A Bb B C root minor major minor major perfect tritone perfect minor major minor major octave 2nd 2nd 3rd 3rd 4th aug/dim 5th 6th 6th 7th 7th ...


6

Lee is right, but there is a simpler way to think of triplets. Typically we break notes up into sets of 2 (or duples). For example, two half notes make a whole note, two quarter notes make a half notes, two eighth notes make a quarter note etc. All a triplet is is putting 3 notes where 2 normally go. So 3 eighth note triplets will always equal a quarter ...


6

I think triplets are always 2/3 of the duration of the 3 notes regardless of the meter indicated by the time signature. So a triplet of quarter notes will take up the space of a half note (or two quarter notes). A triplet of eighth notes will take up the space of a quarter note (or two eighth notes). ...and so on. I pulled up some useful links in ...


6

Two time signatures indicates alternation back and forth between the two. It's just shorthand for writing a new time sig at the start of every bar. The second sig is usually in parentheses, so, for example, 3/4(6/8) would have a bar of 3/4, then a bar of 6/8, then a bar of 3/4, etc. That exact example is from the "America" song from Bernstein's West Side ...


6

Not a stupid question at all! But, yes, only the bass note is taken into account when naming the inversion of a chord. The voicing above this is unimportant. Indeed, the bass note may be doubled, as can any other chord-tones. (Although, this may be inappropriate, if following the rules of specific styles of harmony or counterpoint.) Also, notes above the ...


5

All intervals can be turned upside down.(Called inverted). Thus a C-E as a major third, when played E-C becomes a minor sixth. There is a 'rule of nine'.Minors become majors, majors become minors, augmenteds become diminisheds, etc. The exceptions are the octaves, 4ths and 5ths. (Unison doesn't count !) Those do not change their identities. A 4th of C-F ...


5

A “perfect” interval is one that has nice small integer frequency ratios in Pythagorean tuning. These are traditionally considered the most consonant intervals. P1 = 1:1 P8 = 2:1 P5 = 3:2 P4 = 4:3 Major and minor intervals have more complex ratios: M2 = 9:8 m7 = 16:9 M6 = 27:16 m3 = 32:27 M3 = 81:64 m6 = 128:81 M7 = 243:128 m2 = 256:243 ...


5

The question has already been answered correctly by Lee and Dom, but I would like to add some pictures as clarification... I don't have an example right now from an actual piece, though I'm quite sure I've seen something similar. Anyway, it's not hard to come up with your own examples, so here's one which shouldn't even sound that odd: This should at ...


5

It's called a metric modulation because the time signature changes. In the example that you gave, the song starts in 3/4, and then uses a metric modulation to move to 4/4 time, and including the syncopation it does sound a bit surprising when your ear finally accepts the new downbeat as the "1". The tempo also speeds up considerably as a result. The most ...


5

Yes, you are thinking of the key in a way that's a bit rigid. This is perfectly understandable. When you see a song, you're trying to look at its notes and figure out what key it's in so you can understand it. It almost seems like those out-of-key notes would throw off your calculation and make it harder to figure out. I would say even more important than ...


5

I use a simpler method; counting semitones. A major third has 4 semitones. So using your example I would think of A, then count up four semitones (Bb, B, C, C#) landing on C#. Interval, Semitone Count Unison, 0 Minor Second, 1 Major Second, 2 Minor Third, 3 Major Second, 4 Perfect Fourth, 5 Tritone, 6 Perfect Fifth, 7 Minor Sixth, 8 Major Sixth, 9 Minor ...


5

The answers provided here offer a useful trick, which is to quickly translate into a scale you already know to find the answer. For instance, if you know that C to E is a major third, then it must be the case that Cb to Eb is a major third and also that C# to E# is a major third, too. It's fine to use this trick when it comes in handy, but it sounds like ...


5

Here's a common chart showing how the notes break down: Notice how each row is a full measure in 4/4. The general rule is that a note can span its direct children, or one of its children and one of its nephews. That is, a quarter note can span the 2nd and 3rd eighth notes, but not the 4th and 5th. A dotted note can only borrow from its sibling, not its ...



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