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22

The fact that you are in A minor without G# (or F# and G#) means that you are in A natural minor. What defines a scale as minor or major, is the third of the scale, not the accidentals. If you have A as the root of your scale and the third is a C, then the scale is a minor one. There are 3 different types of minor scales: A harmonic minor (it has G#) A ...


10

It depends on how you arrange the notes in a chord. The answer is yes, but not on all chords. If you play a C major chord with a major 6th, you have: C,E,G,A. This is a major chord. You can rearrange it to create an Am7 chord, if you put the A as the lowest note: A,C,E,G which is a minor 7th chord. So, in your case, you can read your chord as Gm add b13 ...


9

Theoretically, yes there are five modes that can be derived from the major pentatonic scale and they would be named the same way the other modes contained in the major scale. Let's look at the relative modes instead of parallel as it is slightly easier to see the patter. The C major pentatonic scale consists of the following notes: C, D, E, G, A ...


9

The melody of a song, that is being played on top of a chord, can be any of the notes of the chord (but is not limited to those1 !). The part you mentioned has G as a chord. The notes that consist the G chord are G,B,D; you can play any of those notes in the melody and they will sound nice. Τhe order in which they are played doesn't affect the harmony in ...


8

It's a key change: it changes from E minor to C# phrygian without preparing the listener. That's probably why the beginning of the solo sounds dissonant to you, i.e. dissonant in relation to what came before. Unexpected (i.e. unprepared) key changes will always have such an effect. The more notes change from one key to the other, the stronger the effect ...


8

Is changing tempo during the song and back again a common device used on modern popular music? Or is there a good reason to avoid this type thing? No, it is not a device commonly used in popular music. However, this technique is extremely common in other forms of music. There are no good reasons to avoid this technique, band musicians are still ...


6

The key thing to remember is that for diatonic scales (major, minor and the modes) each note has a different letter name. In your example F G A A C D E F (ignoring the flats/sharps) has a duplicated letter; thus the 4th note must be a B. One way to lay out a scale is to put the notes in order, e.g. B C D E F G A, and then figure out where the flats/sharps ...


5

Dom's answer correctly explains what the modes of the pentatonic scale are and how they are (not) used. Since this might give the impression that the pentatonic scale is almost exclusively useful if used as either major or minor pentatonic scale, I would like to add one important application of the pentatonic scale where it is used over a chord whose tonic ...


5

It's not that common, but that's why it can work very well to make your song stand out. Often it's important to prepare the listener's ear for the change. Three great examples are Billy Joel's "Scenes from an Italian Restaurant" Queen's "Bohemian Rhapsody" Lynyrd Skynyrd's "Freebird"


5

The fact that your question already begins by calling the ideas "dogma," makes me doubt that you'll be very amenable to discussion, but in case other people reading this are curious: 1) In comments you claim to have learned this dogma from "the texts." "The texts" say no such thing; in fact, they say no single thing at all. There is a vast collection of ...


5

It's all about practice and experience. You have to train your ears, you have to know your tools. Producing is not the same as mixing or mastering, some skills overlap but they need mostly different skill sets. There are tools and techniques that will help you judge the frequency balance of a mix. You might eventually not need them at all, though some of ...


4

On the face of it, it doesn't make sense. But intervals are taken from the major scale notes. Thus a major 3rd is, say, from C to E. When an interval is made smaller by a semitone, it's called a minor. Thus a minor 3rd is C to Eb. Yes, it happens to be in the minor scale/key as well. This applies to most intervals, but not perfect ones - fifths, for ...


4

You wrote: considering that in the natural scales formulae, they are both one whole step This is the crux of your question. M2 and m2 (major 2nd and minor 2nd) intervals are not both whole steps. Only the M2 is a whole step. The m2 is a half step. Nonetheless, in the diatonic scale, each can represent a step. Step-wise motion includes m2s and M2s, ...


4

The first thing to consider for 13-limit is the octave-reduce thirteenth harmonic, 13/8. It is the first sixth that occurs in the harmonic series and comes in at about 840.53 cents. It's pretty close to being smack dab in the middle of the 12tet minor sixth and major sixth. So, like 11-limit, this limit is going to contain some neutral intervals. In fact, ...


4

It's unusual - listen to a hundred songs and you may well not hear this idea in even one. However, the song is your baby to bring up how you like. Others may or may not like it when it's grown up! When there's one performer - singer/guitarist, maybe, there's no problem, as he knows the acceleration rate. With multiple performers, someone will have to ...


4

The scale that fits over all the chords given is: A B C# D E F# G A Those notes are in the D Major Scale but the intended root is A as repeated at beginning and end of chord progression in other areas of song and starts the song. Therefore it is A Mixolydian.


4

Yes, the are related exactly as you say - offset by two. In fact, every major key has a relative minor and each minor key has its corresponding relative major. For example, if you play only the white keys on a piano starting from C and going up to the next C, that is the C major scale. If you want to play in the relative minor to C major, start from A and ...


4

What you are looking for are key signatures. A key signature determines which flats/sharps to use on a scale. The flats/sharps that appear, do so in a certain order, not random. So, if you see 1 flat, you have to play B♭, if you see 2 flats, you have to play B♭ and E♭ etc. So, if you begin to read a sheet music and you see 2 flats, then ...


4

Every scale will have ONE of each letter name - for a full major or full minor. Starting with C major, with no # or b. The circle of fourths (or fifths, depending which way you go) will give a formula. Go up in fourths, and it will add one extra flat each time. thus - F - has Bb (the fourth note of itself). Up another fourth takes it to Bb - with 2 b, the ...


3

The major intervals 2, 3, 6, and 7 come indeed from the major scale. However, as you noted, the corresponding minor intervals do not come from the (natural) minor scale, because then there wouldn't be any minor 2nd interval. All minor intervals can be obtained from the descending major scale. If we use C major as an example, a minor 2nd is the interval ...


3

The terminology is confusing here, because "major" and "minor" have two different meanings. One meaning is "major and minor scales". The other, which is taken directly from Latin, is that "major" means "big" and "minor" means "small". A "second" means an interval between two successive note-letters in a scale - taking into account any sharps or flats in the ...


3

A major second interval consists of 2 semitones (or as you say a whole step) whereas a minor second interval consists of a semitone. Example of major second is C - D. Example of minor second interval is B - C. " considering that in the natural scales formulae, they are both one whole step ?" this is wrong. Of the second intervals only the major second ...


3

I'll tell you what my ears tell me. I'm referring to the progression that you actually played: Dm A Em Bm I hear this progression not in one key but I hear two tonal centers. The first is A major: iv I. The second is B minor: iv i There are several reasons why this works and why it keeps circling seemingly without end. In both tonal centers it is a ...


3

To understand how chords with 7ths work, you need to know the scale you are using. The chords most commonly used are built on thirds, so if you choose a scale and then a note from that scale, you'll see what chords are maj7 chords, by ascending thirds from the note you chose. * In the major scale, only the I and IV are major chords and have a major 7th. ...


3

While I taught as a TA for a university-level ear training course (we called it Aural Skills), our professor showed us a trick for identifying do (also called the tonic, or key of the song, piece, or excerpt). The trick is to listen to the music, and if it isn't apparant what the key is, choose any pitch that you can hear, and sing downward, stepwise, pitch ...


3

Unless you have perfect pitch, knowing the key of a song by ear is difficult. Even if you have good relative pitch, truly knowing the key without official transcription or your axe can be a bit of a guessing game. Solo guitar music however, if tuned in standard EADGBE, can be a little easier to identify by ear if roots are played on open strings and you're ...


3

Some music stays in a key. It really only uses the 7 notes diatonic to that key. Some music stays in a key for a while, but then modulates to another key. Then it might modulate to another one (that would be literally multiple key changes). Some music has a clear root note (tonic), but uses notes and chords outside of a seven-note scale built on the tonic ...


3

I'm not going to lie, Just Intonation is not my forte, and I hate math, so I'll spare most of the number-talk. From what I've read from a few difference sources (some of which are outline below), there are a few reasons why there is little discussion / application of extended-limit ratios: In Harry Partch's landmark text The Genesis of Music, he simply ...


3

The song definitely has the more an A Mixolydian feel then a D major feel. Both contain similar chord progressions, but there are a few signs showing A Mixolydian is the better way to look at it. First of all, the progression itself centers around A as the tonic. Also note that the dominant chord (E major) is not present in this progression which would very ...


3

When playing in a key, not every single note/chord played needs to be in a key. The analysis you link is as follows: Bb: |B Bb A Bb|B Bb A Bb| | I - | - - | What it mean though is simple. In this section we're perceiving the Bb chord as "tonic"and the B and A chords really don't function in a traditional sense and are more for ornamentation. ...



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