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7

Depending on how you are using it, pedal point/tone or drone may be the right terms for it. A pedal point is typically a sustained bass note where the melody changes over it, but it can also be a repeated note between itself and other notes as shown in the example below similar to what you describe. A drone is very similar in nature, however it is more ...


7

If you have 4/2 (for same BPM)the half note duration is now equal to 0.5 seconds? Yes. The bottom number indicates the reference symbol used to measure the unit pulse. Therefore, half-notes are played at 120bpm. As others have suggested, almost zero musicians think of notes as durations of fractions of a second. If that is so the lower number in ...


6

You are right that a chord without a root can usually be interpreted as a different chord, and without any context, nobody can tell which chord is meant. So it is mainly the musical context that identifies the chord. Take as an example a part of a simple blues progression in C: | G7 | F7 | C7 | C7 | If in this progression you replaced the C7 chord by an ...


5

This is just an expansion of BlakeTM's answer, included because StackExchange communities typically discourage answering a question (or in this case, a comment) by referring to a link and nothing more. Links sometimes die and we hope for the answers here to live on. That being said, Leinberger lists the following types of modulation: Diatonic Common ...


5

It is pretty much context-dependent, although different people have different (often-strong) opinions on this. Apparently your director falls into the latter group. The style of the music will indicate more traditionally how it might be expected to be played, but ultimately it is still up to the performer's interpretation (in this case - your conductor). ...


5

If I understand Pat's answer he seems to be saying that composers of the era were not consciously writing music that obeyed these principles. So am I to take it that at no point was a composer thinking "Ok, so this is the fundamental voice-leading note here, and these other notes are not, and this fundamental note connects to this fundamental ...


5

As some of the other answers have eluded to, there are two basic problems with your question: The first is the question of how you generalize a "tritone" in a non-12-TET based system. One possibility is to interpret it literally as three whole tones (which then begs the question as to how you define a whole tone in a non 12-tone system). Another ...


5

The beam fragments drawn through stems mean that each of the 8th notes should be divided into two 16th notes. This has nothing to do with the 5/8 time, it's simply a shorthand notation to save writing a lot of note heads, particularly for dense tremolos.


5

Look what the score is doing: you have an oscillation rising from F♯ in the initial RH part, moving up to C♯, but artfully dodging A♯. At the same time, you have an accompaniment that consists largely of the fifth D-A alternating with the auxiliary notes E-G. The entire section is acting like an elaboration of a D major chord in a kind of quasi-Lydian ...


5

The lower number ties the beat length to a particular musical symbol. N/2 indicates so many minims (half notes) to the bar, N/4 = so many crotchets (quarter notes), N/8 = so many quavers (eighth notes). One reason for using a particular note length versus another is purely for convenient notation. e.g in compound time signatures like 6/8, 9/8, etc groups of ...


5

This first part applies to all the string instruments, not just the guitar. Most people that play guitar/bass/double bass etc learn the certain shapes that each scales consist of. This has a great benefit: you can easily transpose to any other key. For instance, if you know the shape for a major scale, and you practice it in C major, you can easily go to ...


5

Would this fall into the boundaries of harmony? The answer is simple and it's yes. There are many kinds of harmony. The blues harmony is different than the jazz which is different than the classical etc.


4

The mainstay chords for most standard pop songs are I, IV and V. The minors are sometimes used - ii, iii and vi. The 7th chord, a dim., isn't put into a lot of songs. All these start as triads, and can have extra notes played with those 3. The most common is a 7th, although 9ths, sus 2 and 4, and 6ths work well. Alongside those are chords from the parallel ...


4

Each mode has a different sound. They have some specific notes that add the color in each of them. Ionian mode is like the major scale Dorian mode is like the natural minor scale, with a major sixth. Phrygian mode is like the natural minor scale, with b2. Lydian mode is like the major scale, with #4. Myxolydian mode is like the major scale, with b7. ...


4

While mathematically it indeed seems that way, 4/4 and 2/2 are not the same thing, just like 3/4 and 6/8 aren't. Technically, you can perfectly write a 4/4 piece down using a 2/2 time signature, but there are different nuances to each of these time signatures, which make them quite an important bit of information. I suggest you read the answer to this ...


4

From my experience, seeing what other composers do, by analyzing their songs will help you with your music. I mean you can write a book, but if you read another book, you'll see what other authors are doing Dmin/C and Dmin7/C are pretty much the same. Technically, yes you have to mention the 7, but since the 7th is C and it's on the bass, it's shown on ...


4

I'm going to give a very cursory simplification for the answer because asking about Lydian Chromatic theory is just like asking about Set Theory or Serialism. Lydian Chromatic Concept Theory basically asserts that the lydian scale is more closely aligned to the natural, universal properties of sound than the conventional major scale. It explains and ...


3

This is a music theory question: in theory, what is the difference between time signatures? Some signatures are only pedantically different: essentially they are the same. But rhythm is based in emphasis, and that is what decides the signature. Think this way - Each measure, we will typically have 2, 3, or 4 beats. If we had 1 beat per measure, it wouldn't ...


3

That's an old style crotchet (quarter note) rest before the minim (half note) chord. It's in the alto voice (as is the chord), which is why it's lower than the centre of the stave - you'll note the measure rest for the descant on the top line.


3

Ah, vous dirai-je, Maman? It's essentially ternary. The first 4-bar phrase starts and ends on the tonic; the repeated 2-bar phrases are pretty much elaborating the dominant; and the last 4-bar phrase performs a slightly varied reprise of the first. The very clear tonal scheme and the equally clear thematic divisions enforce this reading. The repetition of ...


3

Check out the Frank Mantooth book Voicings for Jazz keyboard. He gives some excellent worked examples, and the section on fractional dominant chords is an eye opener. That chapter alone lets you voice II-V-I progressions with gorgeous voicings for the V chord. Use this book to spell chords so they don't sound triadic and twee - but instead sound quartal and ...


3

A chord progression specifies a series of chords, and when they are played: | C | C | C | C | F | F | C | C | G | F | C | C | A chord progression doesn't tell you how to play the chords, only what they are and when they change. It doesn't tell you want instrument to use, what inversion of the chord to use, what rhythm or strum pattern, whether to play ...


3

you can rank modes in order of most sharpened to most flattened (or brightest to darkest or most major to most minor). This create a series that follows the circle of fourths. ie: Mode Name -> Difference from Major Scale F Lydian -> 4th is sharpened C Ionian -> nothing sharpened or flattened; this is the major scale G Mixolydian -> flat 7 D Dorian -> ...


3

Conveniently, guitars are set up so major scales can be played using all four fingers on four consecutive frets, to play two octaves. Minor scales can be played similarly, with only one slip down a fret on the 3rd string. All this assumes you start on the bottom string, and work up to the same fret on the top. The obvious (ubiquitous?) scales that work well ...


3

As Wheat Williams indicated, context is everything. Oscillating between E and E-flat is notationally awkward. In the absence of other compelling influences, I would notate this as D-sharp. Similarly, Oscillating between D and D-sharp is awkward; in that context I would notate as E-flat. In the context of a major or minor scale, you should notate in a ...


3

I have no idea what Bartok was thinking when he wrote this, but one way to create something similar would be: 1. Start with a "big idea". In this case, "hey, what happens if the left hand plays the white keys and the right hand the black keys". (OK, that's not quite accurate because the right hand plays the white key B, but you get the idea). 2. Figure out ...


3

Wikipedia has a nice explanation for what a cadence is: A harmonic cadence is a progression of (at least) two chords that concludes a phrase, section, or piece of music. There have to be at least two chords to create a cadence. But in your example Imaj7-I, there is only one chord. Just because you remove the major 7th, the chord doesn't change; it's ...


3

I think the confusion here is mixing two different conventions. The notion of "BPM" arose from tempo indications in MIDI sequencing, in music genres where staff notation isn't used at all, or is not very important. If you want to relate MIDI tempo to staff notation, the standard (defined in the Standard Midi File Format specification) is that "beat" = ...


3

Well every arpeggio is a broken chord, but not every broken chord is an arpeggio. A broken chord is just as it sounds: a chord that is broken up in some way, shape, or form where you are not playing the the full chord at once. An arpeggio is a specific way of playing a broken chord that has a defined texture to it. While the definition is not a very ...


3

To add what Shevliaskovic has posted it also aids in the speed of learning pieces. If you ever wanted to have an musical eidetic memory you can start to learn such a skill by becoming proficient in score analysis. When you see one of the great pianist for instance play a long concert it sometimes look like they are staring into the distance while playing. ...



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