Hot answers tagged

6

It's not clear what your goals and requirements are for this information system -- and that has a huge bearing on the answer. If, for example, your software is trying to analyze the harmony inside of a single piece, then yes, symphonies definitely will modulate (change keys) all over the place, as Wheat Williams describes in his excellent answer. And this ...


6

Every symphony ever written has more than one key -- usually several different keys. A symphony may have the name of a certain key in its title, but this only refers to the main key that occurs throughout its structure. Each symphony will have many changes to different keys. Each symphony will tend to be unique in how it uses multiple keys. Different ...


4

These are the 7 chords formed using the notes from the D major scale (D, E, F#, G, A, B, C#). So, yes, the answer is that the progression is in D major


3

If I'm not mistaken, both of the books have some stuff in common, but the theory is book is focusing solely on theory (duh), whereas the piano book focuses on the piano. The theory book has some stuff about the piano and vice versa, but both have stuff the other book doesn't. I would suggest that if you have the money (they cost around 30-40$ on Amazon), you ...


3

C/B could be called an Eminor chord with a minor 6th in second inversion; it's the same thing. It really depends on where you want to go with harmony. Both are valid and both are commonly used, so I cannot decide for sure which one to choose. Both C - C/B - Am7 and Am7/C, Am7/B, Am7 seem correct in a chord progression. I would suggest to look at the melody ...


2

This is a typical example of a modal keyboard piece from the late 16th or early 17th century. Mode in polyphonic music (as distinguished from mode in plainchant) is a complicated topic that is being actively researched by musicologists and is still the subject of scholarly debate. It is a different way of thinking about music that just can't be compared ...


2

Pedrell's edition is here. Yes, you can call this the 4th tone. Note the points of imitation on B and E; notice that the dux and comes of the opening point emphasise C & F respectively before falling back to the final. Subsequent points (such as at the start of page 2) have similar incipits. Note also that IV (A major) does not appear in cadences, ...


2

It's not a standard usage. There are 12 keys (or a few more due to treating C# and Db as different.) Keys have two modes, major and minor. Other tonal organizations are possible but the usual (CPP) terminology isn't used in their descriptions. The term "key" is not synonymous with scale. Scale (from the Italian for "ladder") is a collection of notes taken ...


2

There are several correct answers, but the best is clearly C C/B Amin7. Points other answer missed: Second inversion chords are fairly unusual, and mostly used in cadences. They are particularly "weak", and there's no functional reason to call your second chord an Emin7/B. What is the chord doing? That's the entire question here and why we have the topic ...


1

Many (perhaps even most) chords played on guitar could be correctly identified (by itself) as more than one chord! The most appropriate name to use in a given context depends on - the context. Chords in a song don't appear by themselves. They appear as part of the entire song. Things to consider when choosing which of several possible names to call a ...


1

Em6 is actually confusing, as it's an Em chord, but the 6th bit is a major 6th - C#. So it can't be that anyway. Best call the sequence C, Am7/B, Am7. That way, musos would see the transition between C and Am7 with an altered Am7 chord sandwiched between. Trying to name a chord from its 'root' note is not going to help. Yes, it could be a B something, but ...


1

This is actually not a simple question, but neither do the answers give an accurate picture of historical practice during the common practice period. The Beethoven Fifth is a good example: we regard it as a "C-minor symphony" because its first movement is in C minor. Within that movement, C minor is, as we often say, the tonal center: it's the key to which ...


1

A composition like "Symphony in C minor" refers to a key in the piece, with which key the composition starts and with which it ends. There is a certain number of notes and chords in that key, so if a whole composition was built only on that key, it would sound repetitive. That's why during the composition changes keys. Usually it's more than one, but it ...


1

I believe those that say it begins with using the 3:2 ratio are correct. Schoenberg is also correct, but a 7-note system already existed before the major scale was recognized, so his explanation starts in the "middle", so to speak. We call the 3:2 frequency ratio the frequency ratio for a 5th, but, of course, a scale or mode or system of pitches had to exist ...



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