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7

Major and minor chords are both triads: a root note, a third, and a fifth. Major chords have a major third, four semitones above the root. Minor chords have a minor third, three semitones above the root. The fifth is usually a perfect fifth, seven semitones above the root. However, a chord with a minor third may have a diminished fifth (only three ...


5

Ritardando, ritenuto, rubato, ritenendo, rallentando are all terms for approximately the same musical idea. A slowing down, for dramatic purposes, before regaining the original tempo, or sometimes changing to another. A chance for the orchestra to get its breath back, and the audience to relax for a moment. It doesn't necessarily have to come to a grinding ...


3

Here are a few things that jazz players play over a dominant chord and give a 'jazzy' sound Let's say the chord that is being played is G7. What you can play is: G#o Arpeggio (G# is b9 of G7, so that note can also be added in the chord) G# auxiliary diminished scale If the chord is G7#5, you can play the whole tone scale. If the chord is G7(alt) (which ...


2

Try this: http://monoskop.org/File:Russell_George_Lydian_Chromatic_Concept_of_Tonal_Organization_4th_ed.pdf I can't download it at work, but it probably has what you're looking for. If it does, let me know and I'll tell you how I found it.


2

Generally, you analyse music based on the key it is currently in, however there are cases where you can analyse in 2 keys at once(Specifically when modulating). Say for Example you were in the key of C and modulated to G like so. the chords could be comething like C e am C | G e am C7 |G(now in the key of G) In the 1st bar, you're clearly in C, but for ...


1

I agree with Alexander, and I think it also depends on how long you're in a different key. Full phrases and sections should likely be analyzed in their new key, but one or two borrowed chords can remain the the original key. To use Alexander's example, the C7 chord could be labeled as V7 of V (V7/V). I'm also assuming you're speaking of classical music. ...


1

A major chord has a Major third and a perfect fifth. A minor chord has a minor third and a perfect fifth. You need to know your scales for it to make sense but I will try and demonstrate with an example anyway. A perfect interval means that the note fits into both the Major and the Minor scale of the root note. So for Instance if you have the interval F-C ...



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