Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

5

Harmony refers to the "vertical" relationship between simultaneous pitches in a musical texture (usually, but not always, chords - see below for the exception). However, it also refers to the "horizontal" relationships between successive vertical relationships of pitches; it's probably easiest to think of these as chord progressions. The exception, mentioned ...


5

Harmony supports the melody. Polyphony is when there is more than one independent melody. The basic idea is that in polyphony is that each melody can stand on its own independent of the other melody. Common examples of this are rounds, fuges, and counterpoint. In the case of harmony, everything supports the melody. Their may be secondary melodies or the ...


4

A good starting point is to write out all the notes in the chords you're playing (although if there are more than a few this might be harder). Usually (but not always), these chords are likely to be linked in some way harmonically, and so you may notice that all the notes are within one or more familiar modes or scales. For instance, the notes in the chords ...


4

There is an interesting irony here, because the song Lee linked to ("Taro") doesn't do any of the things that one would immediately think of as concluding: it doesn't actually bring the rhythm to a stop, nor does it end on the tonic chord. Instead it fades out on a repeating, open-ended cycle of simple diatonic chords (ii - I - vi - V). I would guess that ...


4

Without getting into an entire lecture, here are some things you can do to make someone feel as though a piece of music is being concluded: Go to an extreme (pitch, dynamics, tempo, instrumentation) either to the most/high/loud or the soft/slow/low end for example. Typically rhythmic, harmonic, and melodic motion slow down. If there are motives or ...


2

Some more tips from Jazzology: Here are some notes that can be added to a chord to give a more 'jazzy' sound. Major triad: add 6th and 9th add M7 and 13 add #11 to either of the above for extra dissonance Minor 7th (works as ii): add 9 add 11 and/or 13 above the 9th for extra dissonance Minor triad (works as i): add 6 and 9 add M7 add 9 and/or 13 ...


2

I would recommend a I64 V I cadence, with the bass going "so so do." For example in C major: with a ritardando. I see jjmusicnotes recommended cadences, and this one is the most common.


1

Another way to look at it, apart from Bob's as usual, good answer, is to consider that E,D and A are all the major chords found in A major. If you were to solo over a piece in A maj., you'd use A maj. notes. O.k., you'd centre more on A, but probably on, say, E, you'd centre more on E. So the A maj. scale notes will still work, very similarly to how you ...


1

Well, the reductive answer is that there's nothing special about it and that the only thing that makes a leading tone "want" to resolve to the tonic is hundreds of years of musical convention, since this tendency exists in a Western scale but not necessarily in other scales. The tuning of the Western scale has changed a lot over the course of those hundreds ...


1

You may want to explore my collection of chords and supporting information. What makes this uncommon (unique?) is the fact that this collection of guitar chords illustrates and functionally identifies the component chord voices, rather than just indicating a marker to "put your finger here". This collection is almost completely comprised of movable chords -- ...


1

The ear training is important. Additionally, one thing nobody mentions which is very important, is to learn how harmonize and reharmonize those passages - how to fit chords and substitute chords to the melody - and then to improvise using those chord tones. There is also such a thing in music known as avoid tones, which is a fancy way of saying "tones that ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible