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Melodic Inversion Where the original melody goes up by an interval, the inverted melody goes down by the same interval. Sometimes you do it where you keep the same number of semi-tones (sometimes you do a "diatonic" inversion and just keep the scale degree). It's a technique for taking given melodic content and constructing more, related melodic content. ...


6

One of the central harmonic (and melodic) innovations of early 20th-century music was the conflation of the linear and harmonic dimensions. That is to say, a collection of pitches might just as easily be a motive or a melody as it might be a chord. In the common-practice world the linear, melodic dimension tends to be dominated by whole and half steps while ...


3

You can write a circle of 5th's progression in the Phyrgian mode, but it won't make the progression sound Phyrgian. This site shows you how to build a circle of 5th's progression in any key in any mode, but doesn't really explain what is going on. If you look at the progression for C Phygian you will see: Db - Ab - Eb - Bbm - Fm - Cm - Gdim However, if ...


3

Tempo and Time Signatures really don't have anything to do with each other. A time signature is how you group, count, and accent beats and tempo is how fast the beat is. Changing the tempo as you are doing does not affect the time signature at all. 3/4 or 3/8 or even 3/2 will group the beats in the ONE-two-three pattern you want and as a composer the tempo ...


3

Basic classical theory is fairly easy to get into and uses almost the same exact building block that jazz theory uses. Most jazz theory classes someone would take require a basic music theory class as a prerequisite. There are many sources to get you started in classical theory including MusicTheory.net's lessons which if you can learn and understand them ...


2

Are you familiar with pitch-class set analysis? The pioneering work was done by Allen Forte in his books, The Structure of Atonal Music and The Harmonic Organization of The Rite of Spring. If you can get hold of it, John Rahn's book Basic Atonal Theory presents Forte's ideas and methods in a much more user-friendly manner. The basic idea is to convert ...


1

In short, I would recommend increased exposure, learning to play specific songs by ear, and having a reference book. There are always a few different ways to go about learning a new style. One of the more important things is to listen to that style as much as possible. This will ingrain the feel of the style. You can learn a lot of theory from books but ...


1

As everyone here has already said, the fundamentals are fundamentals. Whether you choose jazz, pop, or hip hop, if you really want to be a better musician and understand music as a language, you must know the fundamentals. "What are the fundamentals?" Well, the Theory 1 class of Hunter music school defines the fundamentals as the following in their ...


1

To understand the theories that are used in jazz, it helps a LOT to first understand the basics, which are contained in what is known as classical theory. In order to appreciate altered chords and scales, it's easier when the original ones are known - the alterations start to make sense then! So start with basics, then branch out once they are known.


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I would probably just be the contrarian here but I do not think there really is such a thing as 'Jazz Theory' as much as there is 'Baroque Theory' or 'Romantic Theory' A proper understanding of the core principles of music theory and history opens the door up to any style you may want to pursue.


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If you are looking for Jazz theory, The Lydian Chromatic Concept by George Russell would be a great starting point. The original came out in the early 1950's and it was extremely influential on players like Miles Davis. It is often credited with being one of the primary inspirations for later movements in jazz, especially modal jazz. Rock, blues, and heavy ...


1

My question is what are common analytic techniques for identifying phrases in music, based on the notes in a score as opposed to an audio recording of a performance? A few points. A phrase ends with a cadence. A cadence is indicated with some sort of point of rest. This is not always done with actual rests but sometimes with longer notes. Phrases ...


1

When I'm looking for phrasing, I like to think of it as "musical resting places." It's really tied to performance, so always bear in mind whether it would sound right if you played a phrase there. Usually phrases are pretty evident, so this answer is focused on times when they aren't. Often, if you can't see the phrases clearly, there's more than one ...



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