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This is described somewhat in the answers here: Scale degree naming Basically, scale degrees are typically numbered according to the (parallel) major key, even if you're actually playing in a minor key, or some other mode. Thus in your case, A major would have a G# and an F#, so the bVII and bVI tells us that they have to be lowered (the sharps removed). ...


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If fusion players sound to you like 'not in key' or 'playing random notes', then you're either listening to bad players or you're not yet accustomed to the sounds they use. The latter may also have to do with the development of your musical ear. I suggest to listen to good fusion guitarists (e.g., Alan Holdsworth, John Scofield, Scott Henderson with Tribal ...


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Fusion originated with Miles Davis's "B****** Brew" album. Pat Metheny, Larry Coryell and John Mclaughlin are probably the avatars of fusion jazz, but there are many many other practitioners of the genre, including Martin, Medeski and Wood, Bird Songs of the Mesozoic and the "downtown sound" of Bill Laswell and John Zorn.There are very interesting ideas that ...


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Well, counterpoint is not harmonization. The main difference is that counterpoint has its own melodic and rhythmic identity. If you take a look at, say, Bach's great choral works, you'll find some pieces labelled "Choral" which are mainly a melody with harmonization, and some pieces labelled "Chorus" which are strongly oriented along lines of counterpoint ...


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Independent in rhythm & contour means that the voices may have different rhythms and contour, respectively. For example, if a voice goes up and another goes down, the voices would be moving in opposing motion. Moreover, one voice may be going up, and then down while the other remains going down only. All this means that the voices are independent in ...


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Yes. It means you can distinguish 2 or more different melodies that sound pretty together. This is not the same as melody and accompaniment; in that case there's one melody and one more voices that form a rather static backdrop. That said Independence is to some extent subjective; a counter melody will be perceived as more independent if it has different ...


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It depends entirely on the genre, and that is actually one of the defining characteristics of genre. most pop: probably, and mostly. Sometimes augmented by the occasional secondary dominant. Part of why they are so "easy to hear". But if it's torch-songy pop, probably not because they borrow a lot from the style of standards musical theatre or standards or ...


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No; each are separate. Harmony is vertical and treats tones as singular, sonorous entities. Counterpoint is horizontal, and indicates direction. There is harmony in counterpoint, however, it is treated as incidental with the priority being the emphasis of musical line and direction. Each is separate but equal. You could be a master of voice-leading but ...


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Counterpoint is the study of how to make voices (musical lines) independent. It is not simply just harmony. Harmony comes into play, but if you are working on anything tonal harmony will come into play. The common examples of counterpoint is Bach and Fux, but can be seen a lot in modern music. The most common places you would see counterpoint today is in ...



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