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53

NReilingh gave a good general-case answer. I'll give you a specific case just to demonstrate that the concept is useful. First consider a C major chord. C-E-G, right? Then you make it into a minor chord by flattening the third, to get C-E♭-G. So far, so good. Now, consider an A♭ major chord: it's spelled A♭-C-E♭. But what happens when ...


22

B and Cb are different notes. One is a kind of B and the other is a kind of C. Information about harmony is contained both in the note name and any accidental alterations to it — C to any kind of E is a third, and C to any kind of F is a fourth, and those intervals have different meanings, even if they sound "the same". And these pitches are only the same ...


7

Welcome to the wonderful world of guitar. The guitar is a very versatile and portable instrument that you can enjoy anywhere you like. As you have discovered, fretted (or non fretted) stringed instruments such as guitar, ukulele. mandolin, or even violin, are very different from a keyboard instrument. With a piano, there is only one specific key per ...


4

I have a similar background, and in my experience, there simply isn't a good transition or analog from piano to guitar. Whereas a child can learn to identify every B-flat on the piano in an afternoon, it takes weeks or months of practice to know the notes on the fretboard. It's an entirely different system. I would like to suggest a few approaches / ideas I ...


4

He's talking about "meter" as number of syllables per line. Hymnals frequently include a "Metrical index" of tunes. A lot will be listed as "Common Meter" or "CM", because so many hymns are 8.6.8.6. Think "There is a green hill far away". There's also "Short Meter", "Long Meter" and a few more. It's purely a syllable count with no thought to stressed ...


3

The "meters" in English-language hymn books describe the words, not the tune. They show not only the number of syllables per line, but also the rhyme scheme (that's what the dots in the meter signify). The rhyme scheme can be relevant for selecting alternative tunes to fit the words. Except for the most common meters (CM, SM, LM), the meter is not a ...


3

They don't seem to be completely synonymous. Instead, it seems like an asymmetric time signature implies an additive rhythm, but an additive rhythm can exist in a "traditional" time signature. It appears that the word asymmetric is commonly used to describe meter, while additive is used to describe a rhythm. Rhythm and meter are related, but are not the ...


3

A secondary dominant won't have all its notes from the original key anyway. Take the secondary dominant from C major. Dominant is G, with all notes belonging to C, but the secondary dominant is D7, with an F#. So, your case - dominant of Dm is A7 ( or if you wanted, Am7), and its dominant will be E7 (or maybe Em7), making the secondary dominant.Generally, ...


3

Music is fundamentally made up of intervals, which are ratios of pitches (sound frequencies). The "simpler" the ratio, as in a fraction with smaller numbers, the more consonant the interval. For example: the perfect octave is 2:1, the perfect fifth is 3:2, major third is 5:4, the diminished fourth is 32:25. To produce music, we chain the intervals together, ...


2

The are scale shapes. The help to memorize notes on fretboard. The every scale has multiple positions. The most popular are vertical patterns but there are others This is very popular minor pentatonic scale shape diagram It will be never so easy to play them as it was on keyboard but you will get used to it. The most beneficial thing you can do on guitar ...


2

G-flat minor is, as you note, a terribly awkward key, since its relative major is B-double-flat. That is, the third scale degree is enharmonically equivalent to A, but it's actually B-double-flat. That has nine flats in its key signature (or, actually, five flats and two double flats). F-sharp minor has the rather more normal relative major of A major, ...


2

I'd recommend taking a step-by-step approach: Figure out what the notes are. You can't know what chord it is without knowing what notes there are. From top to bottom, the notes are: G♯, E, C♯ (twice) Figure out what chord it is. You can't know what the chord inversion is without knowing what chord it is. There's only one way to arrange the ...


2

Coda means "tail" in Italian. It's a tail-end part of a longer piece. A coda may be used however a composer wishes: to extend a cadence, to recapitulate some material, even to introduce new material.


2

You would get an A7 chord, because you would build the secondary dominant chord based on the harmonic minor scale. The point of a secondary dominant chord is to make the chord you are basing it off feel like tonic, and this would be achieved by using the harmonic minor scale. This site would probably be helpful to better understanding ...


2

In common practice four part harmony the bass note dictates the inversion. So, first identify the chord by the notes that make it: C#-E-G# --> that's C# min, or iii in A Maj. So C# is the root of this chord, and it's in the bass, so it's a root chord. If E was in the bass, it would be 1st inversion (C#6); if G# was in the bass it would be 2nd inversion ...


2

Absolutely. I taught myself to play guitar when I was 15, and I didn't even own a guitar :) I drew a fretboard on some cardboard so I could practice chord fingerings. When our daughter wanted to learn guitar, she asked us for some lessons. We said no, on the reasonable basis that we both know how to play guitar. Eventually the need in her to play guitar ...


2

Of course you can. I have taught myself to play drums and guitar. Teachers are nice because they have perspective that you don't, and can save you a lot of energy in the mistakes that young players will make. Keep on keepin' on. If you do decide to take a lesson or some, you will have your own perspective of what you have learned to bring to the table.


2

Everyone is different in terms of motivation, natural ability, physical anatomy, and ability to assimilate information based on various learning mediums. So I can't definitively say how well you will do learning to play guitar in the absence of a teacher who can assess and evaluate your current skill level and show you how to get from where you are today to ...


1

You can definitely teach yourself, especially with the range of tutorials on YouTube etc. That said, the value of a teacher is inestimable at various stages: in early learning, a teacher will ensure you don't pick up bad habits later to get past blocks to your progression even later to add skills from other disciplines at any time to add theory and ...


1

A secondary dominant is used to tonicize the chord you are moving to, ie, to make the chord of resolution feel like the I/i chord. This is accomplished through creating a dominant chord a fifth above the chord of resolution; the old V-I(i) resolution. In the vast majority of situations, this action requires altering a/some scale degree(s). This is ...


1

The architecture of Sonata Form is Theme 1 (in the tonic key), Theme 2 (in a contrasting key), Development (mess around freely with themes A and B), Theme A (tonic key), Theme 2 (modified to be also in the tonic key. There may also be an introduction, for which the technical name is "Introduction" :-) And maybe a tailpiece, wrapping up the whole piece, for ...


1

TL;DR: It's just better to write since F♯-minor has a lot less signs to write than G♭-minor. The original tonality you listed was G♭-major; it has six ♭s. "Converting" major tonality to same-named minor one requires to flatten it triply: add three ♭, or remove three ♯s. (Of course, you should use circle of fifths; this is a ...


1

An inversion is just determined by what note of the chord is in the bass. Root position has the root in the bass, first inversion has the third in the bass, second has the fifth in the bass, and third has the 7th in the bass. Once you know what chord you are looking at, you know what the root, third, and fifth is. I'm not going to give you the answer to ...


1

You're asking quite an advanced question to which there can be many different answers, all true; the idea is the harmonic context. As the man said, in a scale there is A B C♯ D E F♯ G♯ A. Now clearly that last G♯ couldn't be A♭, because the scale demands that the note before the top A, be a G. But if it's a normal G, the scale doesn't come out right. So we ...


1

If all you're given is chords, then you don't really have enough information to go on to answer that question. It's up to you to pick the chord inversions/voicings and decide how high or low to play them, and so on. One simple way to play that Dm, for example, might be to play D4-F4-A5 in the right hand and D3 in the left hand. The C would be C4-E4-G4 ...


1

Yes the bass is generally played with the left hand on the keyboard, when played with 2 hands. I think your question is very general because these rules can always be broken, i.e,. the chords can be played in the right hand and the melody played with the left, but allow me to clarify something. The bass isn't necessesarily dependent on the hand you play it ...


1

If you only think about the fixed frequency instruments, just intonation is not good for the instrument construction, there is good examples for the guitar above. There will be technical difficulties with a piano and other instruments too. But for continuous variation pitch instruments, the just intonation will have more natural sounding. There is a good ...



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