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7

These two diagrams form what mathematicians might call a dual graph, in that they are sort of mirror images of each other. I'll describe this briefly for the benefit of others. In the first image, the nodes represent pitches (well, pitch classes), while in the second image, the nodes represent chords. To construct the second image from the first, place a ...


5

Eggs are one dollar per dozen. But you can have 6 for 50 cents. Same eggs, same price, same deal. The lowest note on the piano, A0, has a wavelength of something over 12m. So can you hear it in a room 6m long? Sure you can. You can even hear it when using headphones - which could be thought of as a "room" measuring only 1cm or so! And you can be ...


5

The thing you need to learn is what notes are in a chord. It doesn't matter how they are placed in a chord; it still is the same. The basic chords are built on thirds. So, take the notes you have and try to put them in order of thirds. We need a Root, a third (major or minor) and a fifth. The fist chord you have is: G-E(bass clef) C-G (treble clef). The ...


4

I think that in this (and most other) contexts the broad definition of the tritone makes sense, which says that a tritone is an interval spanned by six semi-tones. So with this definition both augmented fourth and diminished fifth qualify as a tritone. Whether that note in the blues scale is written as a #4 or a b5 usually depends on the direction of the ...


3

You only need 1 cycle to actually state the pitch, so minimum 1/440s - it would take a human much longer to recognise that pitch, perhaps with a good ear a 1/100s, but a computer, given a pure sine wave, could get it in one cycle [or technically half that, as the 2nd half is a mirror of the 1st]. …or, as has been mentioned in comments, shorter than that if ...


3

To be 100% exact to the name 'tritone', it would be #4. Because, if we ascend 3 tones from the root, we have #4, and not b5. The three tones would be C-D, D-E, E-F#. Although, from what I have understood, it depends on the progression. Usually, the #4/b5 tritone would descend a semitone. For instance, a common progression would be Gb7-F (maj7 or 7). Since ...


2

The Jazz Theory Book by Mark Levine has some of what you are looking for.


2

Maria, from West Side Story, uses exactly that for the first line.(Not sure if it's that key, but, hey) The underlying harmony is root, the first note is also root, and the tritone is the second , leading to 5th on the 3rd note.. It sounds like it may modulate, as Matt says, but it doesn't. The fact that the triton is a semitone from the target is good, as ...


2

A little context would help: a few more measures on either side, the name of the composer/era, etc. However, as a general rule, when the melody is in the bass like this the harmonic analysis focuses on the upper notes, and bass-melodic non-chord tones are identified in relation to them. For example, beat 2 of the first measure and beat 1 of the second look ...


2

Yes, it still makes 220 complete oscillations in one half second. As long as the number of oscillations is significantly greater than 1, you'll still hear the pitch. You'll only need to worry about these kinds of effects when the durations of the notes get down below the order of 1/100ths of a second (maybe order of 10ths of a second for bass notes).


1

It's a very distinct and verbose way to name 7th chords that is derived from classic theory. I'm not sure if it has a name or even needs a name as there's always more then one way to name chords for example some people use Co7 to represent a fully diminished chord and some people use Cm6b5 to denote the same chord and call it that. I'll refer to it as 7th ...


1

I don't know if the major-minor thing has a name, but the idea is to dissociate the actual intervals from the tonal function. Calling a chord a "major minor seventh" is simply describing the chord without any context, and calling a chord a "dominant" chord is describing a relationship with the tonic. In the kind of Classical music that is typically used to ...


1

The whole POINT of a tritone is its ambiguity! But, in a system of harmonic analysis built on the "pile of thirds" model, I can see why a modified 5th is preferred to a modified 4th. I find insistence that the indisputably aurally flattened b10 must be labelled #9 rather harder to take!


1

Matt L.'s answer is an excellent one. If you are asking "what should I call it, and when should I call it that?" here's my experience. In heptatonic (7 note scales) each number gets used once, you always call it a #4 if its the fourth note in the scale, e.g. in Lydian, or for a minor example, in the 4th mode of harmonic minor (essentially Dorian with a ...


1

I've never seen before the sort of Tonnetz you've provided with your second example! The first Tonnetz, however, is the kind I've encountered most often. My immediate impression is that the first is much more navigable. The intervallic relationships are easily apparent: bottom-left to top-right are minor thirds, top-left to bottom-right are major thirds, ...


1

They ask you the... 1) Root (First / Bottom note of the chord.) 2) Position / Inversion (Which note of the chord is on the bottom of the given chord.) 3) Type (Major / minor / Augmented / Diminished.) 4) and the Roman Numeral that indicates the chord. So lets take them in turn. 1) is self explanatory the note that the chord is based on C/E/G ie C ...


1

Counterpoint is the compositional use and study of musical lines sounding at the same time. A musical line is not the same thing as a "part." For example, a cello part can contain three or more musical lines, all of which are written on one staff. To begin with a solid foundation, then, any study of counterpoint should focus on what a musical line is and how ...


1

I feel that the answers above are missing some important points. I've been a jazz musician for close to 20 years now, I started in my early teens, studying on weekends at a top conservatory, later went to music school for college, and have worked on and off as a professional musician since. That said, I will never forget the day, when I was 16, when it all ...



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