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4

A time signature does not affect the duration of any tuple. For example: An 8th note triplet will always take up 1/3 of a quarter note A 16th note triplet will always take up 1/3 of an 8th note A 32nd note triplet will always take up 1/3 of a 16th note An 8th note duplet will always take up 1/2 of a dotted quarter note A 16th note duplet will always take ...


4

Absolutely! Shepard-Risset tones sound as if they are continuously rising or falling; this is done by continously changing the overtone content of the sounds such that when the central perceived pitch has gone up or down an octave, the same tone an octave below (for ascending) or above (for descending)has faded in, and the same tone an octave above has faded ...


4

A minMaj7 chord doesn't have both a minor and major seventh. It is a minor triad with an added major seventh. For example CmMaj7 (which, as you show, can also be written Cminmaj7) has C Eb G B. I think it is simpler and clearer to write the shorter name for this chord. I'll make a few short observations about the use and theoretical aspects of this chord: ...


3

Yes, moving chromatically within one voice is totally fine. It's actually a secret trick composers use to get choirs to sing atonal / pantonal music. That said, if it's too chromatic, you'll have problems. Typically in choral writing, certain movements are "not allowed" because they are difficult to "hear" in the mind before the person sings. Intervals ...


3

While the typical notes are based on divisions of 2 (i.e. whole, half, quarter, 8th, 16th, ect) using tuples you can have any almost any ratio of notes you can utilize to split up a measure. Here is a layout of notes from whole notes to what you could call 9ths: As you can see all take up a whole measure of 4/4 and dived them equally and you could ...


3

Take a simpler example: what would a time signature of 2/3 mean? If you divide a whole note into three equal parts, in conventional notation you would write that as a triplet of half-notes (= UK minims). But suppose you want the music contain some normal-length half-notes followed by just two notes at the speed of a triplet, and them continue normal-length ...


3

On the face of it - nothing! The notes (or any notes on any music) are relative to each other, not to a particular speed of playing. Unless you are given the b.p.m. there is NO indication of exact speed. On a lot of serious (classical, et at) music, there will be a vague indication in a word at the head, like 'presto', or 'adagio'. Look on a good metronome, ...


3

Communicating in a language that is not your own can be very frustrating! The answer is yes, and they are called combination tones Some examples here when certain pitches are tuned to just intonation (simple integer rations) they can interact and produce other simple ratio notes, ending up with chords that sound like they have more notes in than you are ...


2

You are right. Guitar method books don't teach much traditional music theory. This is because the guitar is not an ideal instrument upon which to learn music theory. Traditional Western music theory, as it is taught in colleges, is based around choral music. You learn to read and analyze choral music, and later to arrange and write your own chord ...


2

Time signature and tempo are not related. E.g., if a piece is written in 4/4 (as in your case) you have no way of knowing how fast you're supposed to play it. In classical music it is common to give tempo indications by Italian words, like Andante, Presto, etc. (see this list). In popular music you would often encounter tempo indications like ♩=120, ...


1

There are many different ways to change the style of a particular piece. Fur Elise is a relatively easy one, because the chords can be heard very easily. As you can see, it switches off from E7 and A all the way until you get to C. Then it goes to G, Am, and E (not shown). For what ever reason, the man in the video opted to go for F major instead of A ...


1

The denominator doesn't have to be a power of 2. From Wikipedia: The lower numeral indicates the note value that represents one beat (the beat unit). The upper numeral indicates how many such beats there are grouped together in a bar. For instance, 2/4 means two quarter-note (crotchet) beats per bar and 3/8 means three eighth-note (quaver) ...


1

You can go to a music shop that is well stocked with sheet music, method books, etc., and ask them to point you to the music theory workbooks section. Pick out Volume 1 of each series (all the major publishing houses have such a series), take them over to a comfortable chair, and choose one that appeals to you. Please don't be put off by the small amount ...


1

Get a teacher. Nice and simple. One with a college degree where he or she did at least four years of theory studies. Ask him or her what kind of melody and harmony work he or she did. If he or she can write fugues and has a good knowledge on counter point then he or she would get you far. Just remember that for every 10 practical teachers there may be one ...


1

All relative scales work the same no matter the scale. For example in the case of major and minor pentatonic scales in your example the C major pentatonic scales and the A minor pentatonic scales contain the sames notes as you can see here: C Major pentatonic: C D E G A A Minor pentatonic: A C D E G The differences is what the tonic (or root) ...


1

The reason a mode sounds different is simple: which note is targeted as the base. which means which note is emphasized more than others. really it's a combination of the base note and the fifth above it. emphasizing these two notes more than the others give a different sort of tonality than a home base of "C and G".


1

One handwaving characteristic of the "root note" is that its frequency is the greatest common divisor of the chord notes. It takes a lot of handwaving since for one thing, with an equal-tempered tuning there is at best an approximate gcd (you have to use some scale with just intontation, and of course the choice of scale influences the result), for another, ...



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