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6

The key thing to remember is that for diatonic scales (major, minor and the modes) each note has a different letter name. In your example F G A A C D E F (ignoring the flats/sharps) has a duplicated letter; thus the 4th note must be a B. One way to lay out a scale is to put the notes in order, e.g. B C D E F G A, and then figure out where the flats/sharps ...


4

It's all about practice and experience. You have to train your ears, you have to know your tools. Producing is not the same as mixing or mastering, some skills overlap but they need mostly different skill sets. There are tools and techniques that will help you judge the frequency balance of a mix. You might eventually not need them at all, though some of ...


4

Every scale will have ONE of each letter name - for a full major or full minor. Starting with C major, with no # or b. The circle of fourths (or fifths, depending which way you go) will give a formula. Go up in fourths, and it will add one extra flat each time. thus - F - has Bb (the fourth note of itself). Up another fourth takes it to Bb - with 2 b, the ...


4

What you are looking for are key signatures. A key signature determines which flats/sharps to use on a scale. The flats/sharps that appear, do so in a certain order, not random. So, if you see 1 flat, you have to play B♭, if you see 2 flats, you have to play B♭ and E♭ etc. So, if you begin to read a sheet music and you see 2 flats, then ...


2

The raised leading note, compared with that in the natural minor, makes the V-I even more convincing. A semitone move is usually better for resolution than a tone.This was the reason that the harmonic and melodic both had a raised leading note.With the melodic, coming down was fine, it followed the natural minor's notes. Going up, though, the gap between ...


1

The difference in execution is obvious without the sustain(!) (not, as you wrote, the damper) pedal. With the sustain pedal in place, you'd still retain the mechanical difference in execution. Arguably a returning key and a half-returning damper still make a noise but that's a bit of hair-splitting. What isn't, however, is that the arpeggio is rolled and ...



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