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1

In short, I would recommend increased exposure, learning to play specific songs by ear, and having a reference book. There are always a few different ways to go about learning a new style. One of the more important things is to listen to that style as much as possible. This will ingrain the feel of the style. You can learn a lot of theory from books but ...


1

As everyone here has already said, the fundamentals are fundamentals. Whether you choose jazz, pop, or hip hop, if you really want to be a better musician and understand music as a language, you must know the fundamentals. "What are the fundamentals?" Well, the Theory 1 class of Hunter music school defines the fundamentals as the following in their ...


1

To understand the theories that are used in jazz, it helps a LOT to first understand the basics, which are contained in what is known as classical theory. In order to appreciate altered chords and scales, it's easier when the original ones are known - the alterations start to make sense then! So start with basics, then branch out once they are known.


1

You can write a circle of 5th's progression in the Phyrgian mode, but it won't make the progression sound Phyrgian. This site shows you how to build a circle of 5th's progression in any key in any mode, but doesn't really explain what is going on. If you look at the progression for C Phygian you will see: Db - Ab - Eb - Bbm - Fm - Cm - Gdim However, if ...


1

I would probably just be the contrarian here but I do not think there really is such a thing as 'Jazz Theory' as much as there is 'Baroque Theory' or 'Romantic Theory' A proper understanding of the core principles of music theory and history opens the door up to any style you may want to pursue.


3

Basic classical theory is fairly easy to get into and uses almost the same exact building block that jazz theory uses. Most jazz theory classes someone would take require a basic music theory class as a prerequisite. There are many sources to get you started in classical theory including MusicTheory.net's lessons which if you can learn and understand them ...


0

Lets have a review about what exactly those Roman Numerals mean. They Indicate the scale degree on which the chord is build and also what sort of chord we have to do with and also the inversion. The Four Main chord types you will have to do with in your harmony work is... Major (Major Third / Perfect Fifth) minor (Minor Third / Perfect Fifth) Augmented ...


1

If you are looking for Jazz theory, The Lydian Chromatic Concept by George Russell would be a great starting point. The original came out in the early 1950's and it was extremely influential on players like Miles Davis. It is often credited with being one of the primary inspirations for later movements in jazz, especially modal jazz. Rock, blues, and heavy ...


6

One of the central harmonic (and melodic) innovations of early 20th-century music was the conflation of the linear and harmonic dimensions. That is to say, a collection of pitches might just as easily be a motive or a melody as it might be a chord. In the common-practice world the linear, melodic dimension tends to be dominated by whole and half steps while ...


2

Are you familiar with pitch-class set analysis? The pioneering work was done by Allen Forte in his books, The Structure of Atonal Music and The Harmonic Organization of The Rite of Spring. If you can get hold of it, John Rahn's book Basic Atonal Theory presents Forte's ideas and methods in a much more user-friendly manner. The basic idea is to convert ...


9

Melodic Inversion Where the original melody goes up by an interval, the inverted melody goes down by the same interval. Sometimes you do it where you keep the same number of semi-tones (sometimes you do a "diatonic" inversion and just keep the scale degree). It's a technique for taking given melodic content and constructing more, related melodic content. ...


0

Music is structured sound - while it usually has meter, there's no need for music to have time signature or tempo markings to exist. Time signature is just a tool to help everyone involved in the music making process. The best practice is to choose the one that most simplifies your music thoughts. For example: The composer chooses the time signature to ...


0

Dom is absolutely correct on the musical end. My question is more concerned upon technique and common/good practice, thanks though! :) From a best practices standpoint, I would say the 70bpm setting is the correct one. If you are just composing in the software, nothing else, it wouldn't matter. If you want to start syncing to drum machine plugins, ...


3

Tempo and Time Signatures really don't have anything to do with each other. A time signature is how you group, count, and accent beats and tempo is how fast the beat is. Changing the tempo as you are doing does not affect the time signature at all. 3/4 or 3/8 or even 3/2 will group the beats in the ONE-two-three pattern you want and as a composer the tempo ...


0

just a couple of additional comments: To compute a measure of dissonance one should take into account harmonics, i.e. compute all the pairwise contributions to the measureand sum them up (not too hard to do). For chords of more than two pitches you just sum up all the pairwise contributions to the measure, fundamentals and harmonics. Dissonance decreases ...


1

My question is what are common analytic techniques for identifying phrases in music, based on the notes in a score as opposed to an audio recording of a performance? A few points. A phrase ends with a cadence. A cadence is indicated with some sort of point of rest. This is not always done with actual rests but sometimes with longer notes. Phrases ...


1

When I'm looking for phrasing, I like to think of it as "musical resting places." It's really tied to performance, so always bear in mind whether it would sound right if you played a phrase there. Usually phrases are pretty evident, so this answer is focused on times when they aren't. Often, if you can't see the phrases clearly, there's more than one ...


7

I think, Dom, that you would need to do a few things: Truncate the tonic - it will always be root and third. (This kind of truncation wasn't all that unusual in late Renaissance and early Baroque modal polyphony, by the way, even though the Locrian mode itself wasn't used at all.) Borrow procedures from the Phrygian mode, which is the closest in ...


4

A phrase is like a musical sentence. Like a typical sentence there's a pause that signifies the end of a sentance that in a typical sentence is denoted by a period and in music is marked by a cadence. The Wikipedia article you link even states: In common practice phrases are often four bars or measures long culminating in a more or less definite ...


0

Let me give an answer that is from a broader perspective (and supports Tim's response). All western music that you hear, whether it is techno, jazz, or hip hop, is based off of "classical theory" (a.k.a western harmony). Therefore, you will need to know the classical theory fundamentals. However, those fundamentals will naturally be taught first before ...


3

By the time of Bach, most of the old church modes were no longer being used. The Ionian mode stuck around, but in a common-practice context we usually call it "major." The Aeolian mode also stuck around, however it was consistently modified to usually have a raised leading tone, and often have a raise submediant as well. When the 6th and 7th scale degrees ...


1

It's difficult to add to the excellent answers already, but another way to see the modes is in a circular fashion. Can't do it here, but if the 7 notes (Like Dom and JCPedroza, I'll be in C),are written around a circle, the modes in note names will be easily read off as you go round.Keep going clockwise, and each letter name will give the next mode, in order ...


0

As for the sound of the F#dim chord, I would guess that the reason it doesn't sound compatible is that F# is the one note where A Dorian differs from vanilla A Minor. It's not in our "normal" musical system to have only a raised 6th in a minor key, so having a diminished chord build on that note is out of our common experience. My assumption is that this is ...


3

You kind of have a skewed view of what modes actually are. The modes we name are set constructs, not based on if you build on any degree on any scale. The third scale degree is only Phrygian in Ionian(major). The scale built on the third of Aeolian(minor) is Ionian(major). The Phrygian mode does exist in Aeolian mode, but is built off scale degree 5 as ...


3

I am having some confusion is respects to the formal definition of what the various modes are. I know that their defined in relation to their scale, however, i've come to realise this may not be best way to define it. Modes are not defined by how they are related. Modes are defined by their interval pattern, by how they are constructed. There are ...


0

A general principle for bass in most current popular forms of music is that "the bass should play chord tones on strong beats". Strong beats are typically the 1 and 3, and in addition, there is a strong tendency to play the root of the chord on the 1. Doing this is the most straightforward way for the bass to perform it's dual role of harmonic and rhythmic ...


5

There is no "have to" in music. There are common patterns and conventions, but the only rule is, if it sounds good, it is good. it doesn't sound out of place at the time ... and therefore it's OK. I have no idea what the implications of this may be if I was to try and apply EQ, or add certain effects, and so on EQ generally has very little effect ...


-2

You are going to need at least some very minimal piano skills, knowing a few scales, etc. You can find these online.But an electronic dance track should be able to pack the floor with just the bassline and drums. You really should start by focusing in your favorite of these genres and build a library of music. Then you need to start listening to them ...


3

There's no set number of notes outside a specific system — the term "microtonal" is very broad. From Wikipedia: Microtonal music can refer to all music which contains intervals smaller than the conventional contemporary Western semitone. The term usually refers to music containing very small intervals but can include any tuning that differs from ...


1

The main requirement is to represent an arbitrary sound signal (variably changing over time) as a sum of functions that have constant weight over time: sound(t) = A*f1(t) + B*f2(t) + C*f3(t) ... Then A, B, C ... are the sounding notes (1 = forte fortissimo, 0 = not sounding at the moment, with possible intermediate values in between), and it is possible ...


0

I like Darren's beginning very much, converting your question to "Why do we perceive sine waves as pure tones?" When the wave that is traveling through the air reaches the ear drum, the ear drum vibrates. That vibration is transferred to the three little bones in the middle ear. To make a long story short, the next-to-last step in achieving hearing is that ...


6

Sine and cosine are the same, just offset by 90 degree. They form a "quadrature pair": if you add their squares, you get a constant. When you draw a sine wave as a representation of audio, it represents either pressure (compared to neutral) at some "listening" point, or an impulse density. Both together form a quadrature pair again: if you square and add ...


6

I'm just going to answer the question "What about tangent, or other functions", since the rest seems to have been fairly well handled. All sounds that we hear as having a definite pitch or note can be represented by a periodic function. As I wrote in my comment, any repeated shape represents a periodic function. Most periodic functions, both in the real ...


4

As the waves represent sound waves, which travel through a medium (air in this case), the y-axis represents air pressure. Imagine your eardrum in the sea with waves lapping against the side of your head - the water pressure would vary as the waves crash one at a time. If the waves all crash at a consistent frequency (two or more in a regular cycle) then ...


0

As I see 16 measures here, my eyes went on eighth measure fastly. I was looking for cadance half-the-way. You start with Do "C" and the last note is Re "D". This is something you don't want to do as you start writing melodies first. Because it makes a complicated harmonic structure in a hard way for you to have your way out of it through first and ...


0

When you are 19 it is never late for something. If you want to learn music theory and composition you have time until 25-30 after that you still can learn it but your advancing will slow down.


1

Simple answer: 1) Find your places of cadence (a "resting point" within the piece). It looks like bar 8 beat 3 is a good candidate for a cadence. Since your melody falls on E, and since (aside from the unorthodox ending on D at the end) your key is in C major, and since you seem relatively new to harmony, this should be a C major chord or A minor chord; ...


0

I started college two years ago at 23 and despite the age difference between my peers and myself, we are all learning the same material at the same rate. Being 19, from my point of view, puts you ahead of the curve and I would strongly encourage you to get started yourself. So far it seems that you already have an impressive amount of prior experience which ...


0

As I recall, in my studies, we followed certain counterpoint rules as stated by Fuchs or Fuchs.what I meant by species, is at first one writes one line against another, then, progressing to one line against two lines, speaking verttically, as in the Bach Chorales. The species is then, I believe, a bass line, with more than just quarter notes against it, ie 2 ...


7

Absolutely not late at all. Not only is it never late, but you are extremely young. I started learning classical music at the same age as you (I am currently 28), and I now compose and play piano and am starting music school as a hobby (late night after work classes). I did all my theory learning via self study. You can definitely find resources online. ...


0

I believe what the assignment calls for is an excerise in counterpoint, I think 1st species, as I recall. A good textbook re these 'rules'would be a good resource. The previous answers are examples of these.


4

The steps would include. Determining the Key Providing points for Cadences Determining the chords and then there inversions And then finally you write a melody in response to the given notes. Things to note. The proper rules for good melody writing still apply to the bass line you are writing. Try and get the width of the melody an octave. Try to ...


1

First, you need to identify one or two candidate chords -- in a situation like this, you'll probably want to do this for each measure. Try them out on the piano to help you choose between them. For example, when there is a C in the melody, your candidate chords would be C major (I) and A minor (vi). Mostly likely you'll choose C major. Once you've ...


0

Let me get this straight. You think that the way you play the guitar is unique lol. There isn't anything anyone could play on an instrument that hasn't been done billions of times before in tonal music. You are already playing scales whether you like it or not. You think you are playing by ear, but guessing witch notes sound right isn't really playing by ...


0

It looks like the strange Clefs you have provided are the result of a few musical situations which up until relatively recently, were somewhat confusing to formally notate, thus unusual clef suggestions in the late 19th through the early to mid 20th centuries. Essentially, there are a few categories of instruments which transpose, usually down by an octave ...


0

Very interesting diagram. I hadn't ever seen the use of the "C-clef" to mark the pitch C in a space, rather than on a line. However, as @Old John points to in his comment, the Wikipedia page about clefs deals with just such a clef. At the top of the page this clef is first hinted at: Only one clef that references a note in a space rather than on a line ...


0

You have not exactly explained where you found this example: in Gardner Read's book (page 55) there is an example of the upper clef (G clef with funny bracket), which he explains as one form of the clef for a tenor part, meaning G clef 8vb (and not the same as the "tenor clef", which is a C clef). I can't see this particular combination of two staves. On ...


2

My best guess as to the intention of this notation would be that the entire grand staff is being transposed down an octave. As I'm sure you know, the treble clef on its own places C5 on the third space. The C clef used for alto/tenor clef is meant to be centered upon C4, or middle C. So, the fact that a C clef is centered upon the third space of the upper ...


-1

There are three basic functions a chord can have in a song: Tonic Function, Subdominant function, or Dominant Function. They get their functions from their numerical position in a key. Tonic Function (stability) I, III, VI Subdominant Function (contrast) II, IV Dominant Function (tension) V, VII This works in Major or Minor, A III chord and a bIII chord ...


1

2/4 and 2/2 are principally about the same. As a performer however, I tend to have different feelings about them. Starting from the "standard" 4/4 with its alternating strong/weak accents, 2/4 has not-really-alternating strong/strong accents on the half notes while 2/2 feels more like leaving off an accent on the second half note as compared to 4/4. So as ...



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