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0

For a great explanation of modes, google "Bernstein what is a mode" and watch his very entertaining explanation. It's nearly 50 years old (he starts singing that great "new" hit "My Baby Does the Hanky Panky" as an example of Lydian mode), but just as entertaining and informative now as it was then. That's how I learned modes back when I was 10.


3

You're very unlikely to find any sort of polyphonic tonal music that has zero parallel motion. The rules of counterpoint proscribe the use of parallel 5ths and octaves, but not any other intervals (4ths are somewhat frowned upon), so avoiding parallel motion entirely wouldn't be an intent on the part of a composer. The reason that 5ths and 8ths are ...


1

I assume you mean harmonies which follow each other (ie, the harmony note goes up & down with the lead vocal) ? (ie not literally parallel .. the interval changes as the notes move about). If so .. Simon and Garfunkel's 'The sound of silence' has a great line - the one which goes "People talking without speaking" - One voice is singing a melody while ...


2

Minor pentationic and Dorian are fairly popular in funk. Experiment with Dorian, it's one scale you must learn if you're into funk.


7

Well, yes, when listening to pop and rock music, it can seem like much of the vocal harmonisation moves in parallel motion (often in thirds and sixths), but there are plenty of examples of different motion out there, if you listen out for them. I've always thought that The Beatles used some subtly interesting vocal harmonies. Below are the first 8 bars of ...


0

If you are talking about improvisation, every jazz musician must get to know how to get the phrases. Everybody is different. You should know what jazz types are you. Swing, ska, blues-jazz, fusion, rock-jazz, etc, you can choose more than one, so it'll make you unique. Then you choose your favorite artists. Perhaps if you chose blues-jazz, you can pick Jimi ...


1

If you're looking for complete absence of parallel motion, I guess that would be very rare. But if you're looking for examples that have substantial amount of oblique and contrary motion, or "echo" effects, then there are examples: Mamas & the Papas, California dreaming: ...


4

While is very tempting to approach improvisation focusing on phrases and licks, your solo may sound very awkward if you play unrelated chunk of melodies/ideas without thinking about beginning/development/ending. One aspect I love - and judge to be very important - about jazz improvisation are 'motifs', and you can't really apply that to a single phrase. ...


3

No. 2. C blues. Really, that's all I wanted to say.


0

The buzzword your question dances around is voice leading. Look that up in your textbooks. The literal answer to your question is "there may be no relationship at all." For example, Bach's "Goldberg" variations include a few dozen instances of the same chord progressions (rhythm chords), each with wildly different melodies.


3

I am not sure if they include all of the features you require. But the java jmusic library is quite extensive, I think that would be your best shot. Otherwise other options would be JFugue, music21 (python) or the visual programming language CSound, from ircam, also very extensive.


2

I think Overtone has what you're looking for and more. It's a Clojure library that acts as a powerful front-end to SuperCollider. It may take a while to learn how to use it (especially if you're new to Clojure), but once you do, it's quite powerful and flexible. You can do things like define a melody as a sequence of scale intervals, and then combine that ...


4

You know what you should do is learn jazz tunes. Learn the heads on the standards then worry about improvisation. It is limitless what can be done in the Jazz world but you have to know fundamentals. Your second post is too general, so I am assuming you need to learn standards and listen to a lot of Miles and look at transcriptions of his playing. Start ...


4

Getting into tracker software might another approach. You could consider the tracker score notation the programming language, and the tracker player the complier/interpreter. There are plenty of music modules (songs) you can load and play with. These are shared all the time. You can use tracker software out of the box to edit your 'input music' (E.g. ...


0

If you looked at the scale/mode notes as a circle rather than linear, it may make more sense to you. I can't draw it here, but the CYCLE of notes will be more accurate as music goes round instead of along. By this, I mean go round your circle, starting at, say, C, and the notes are in Ionian. Start at D and you've got D Dorian. Start at E - I hope you ...


3

This is not right. The modes of the major scale each have 7 notes; instead you have listed both scales as having all 12 possible pitches, but just starting on different notes. You have listed a chromatic scale on C and a chromatic scale on D. Also, the way you describe a number of the intervals is not correct: for instance C-F# is a 4# (in your notation). ...


2

Scale degrees are always made from the notes in the scale so you have a lot of unnecessary notes in your example above. It should look like this. C Ionian: C D E F G A B C 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 1 D Dorian: D E F G A B C D 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 1 They have the same scale degrees because each scale has 7 notes in it, but the distance between the scale degrees may vary ...


5

I've been searching online, talking with musicians about this, and here are some techniques I retained, with some interrogations : Get out of scales from time to time Totally off-scale, no limit (really?) Play a riff and play it elsewhere For instance and play it off one half-tone higher, and then come back / play it a half-tone higher again Ascend and ...


3

One can consider Lilypond to fit in this mold: although it is more focused on typesetting music, it can output a MIDI representation of the score. However, I find that, in terms of basic usage, it is not easy to achieve expressive effects in the midi output. In addition, it has no real-time capabilities. I mention it primarily since it may provide ideas ...


2

Édouard mentions OpenMusic, somewhat similar, and descendant of PatchWork is PWGL (http://www2.siba.fi/PWGL/). Looking at what you need from a language it might be useful especially 'constrains' part of PWGL. Learning curve is steep (LISP) but well worth your time. Some great external libraries for rhythm manipulation too. good luck


3

Besides Haskore which is already mentioned in the paper you refer to and the ones mentioned by other, there is "supercollider" and "pure data". I absolutely understand you question. I've been looking for such a high-level thing myself. Here are my personal thoughts on this: I haven't found anything good and came to the conclusion, that there are no ...


1

It sounds as if you're trying to plunge into ``real'' music headfirst. You might want to begin with easier pieces instead, designed for beginners to practice. There is plenty of free sheet music for entry level on the web. I myself find Carl Czerny's practical method really helpful in the sense that it is both manageable and challenging for a beginner. Ans ...


3

You may be interested in the CHucK programming language. https://www.coursera.org/course/chuck101


0

"Mood For A Day" is an acoustic solo guitar piece by Steve Howe on the Yes album Fragile. It is in B (harmonic) minor. It requires finger-style picking. This piece was my segue to Segovia; it is what I auditioned for my classical guitar teacher, although my performance was not as fluid as the original.


3

Give a try to OpenMusic, a visual programming language for symbolic music. It’s a bit frightening at first, but the tutorial should get you going pretty quick.


4

See this SO question. I'm not sure if this is exactly what you need, but it might help. Because I'm just linking another question, I'd normally put this as a comment. However I don't have commenting permissions on this site (yet).


0

I think it goes a bit stranger than a notion "of what chords you can use" and still be in a particular key, although of course that is an indicator. Eg Brown Sugar by the Rolling Stones starts in G. Then the main riff begins on a Cmaj .. next chord is an Ebmaj which doens't fit CMaj at all, and the sung notes are generally in line with a Cminor, yet I ...


2

I agree with Bob, Looks to me when I zoom in like it's a trill, but something's gone wrong in printing and it's placed the symbol too low. This is a fairly common problem that comes up when people are using the music writing software Sibelius, at least in my experience!


9

Just looks like a trill to me. (Pretty certain that's a "t" not an "f".) The problem is, it clashes with the note. It should be above the stave.


1

If you have two vibrating strings you can produce a consonant musical interval between them if their vibrating lengths form certain integer ratios, like 3:2. It's appealing to scale this idea up to solar system size - to assume that 'consonant' systems like the planets also exhibit integer ratios in their properties. It's actually wrong though - planetary ...


1

I found Howard Goodall's 'Big Bangs: Five Musical Revolutions' fascinating, especially the chapter on the development of musical notation. It's his choice of the five most important musical developments of the last thousand years.


2

As Jj has said, It's quite a broad topic. I've spent years reading this and that to try and understand the history of music. In General One book I feel was really great is Stephen Fry's 'Incomplete & Utter History of Classical Music'. What's great about is that it takes you all the way from the earliest known instruments all the way through bach, ...


2

So, you just want a detailed book about everything, but one that isn't too large? Most of your questions can be addressed simply by reading a history book. Of them, I believe that the Norton Anthology of Western Music is one of the best documents out there on this topic. Keep in mind that if you want to cover everything in one source, then your knowledge ...


1

I hadn't really thought about the "engraving" standard, but in the diatonic tonal world, there are two answers: In equal temperament there are 24 "keys", if by key you mean tonal structure based on some transposition of the major or minor scale. In non-equal temperament, especially in pure just intonation, there are no enharmonic equivalents (Gb ≠ F#), ...


0

If you use equal temperament there will be 12 major keys and 12 minor keys, or 24 all together, as others have said on here. If you use unequal temperament there will be a lot more, since C♯ and D♭ etc. will be different notes (C♯ will be slightly higher than D♭).


0

The best resource may very well be a well educated teacher. One that can play you melody and harmony exercises for you so that you can hear what works and what does not would be especially useful. Try getting one with a Licentiate and/or Diploma in theory. Also post grad work in theory from a good music school is a great qualification.


1

What kind of questions does theory of music try to answer? It is simple Music Theory investigates the phenomena of what makes good music. It really is that simple. Music Theorist realized in some point in the past that certain chord progressions worked well together and eventually this realization became widespread and it became a rule. The thing is ...


-4

It is worth noting that there is no such scale as G# Major / A# Major and so on. The only Major scales that start on a note with a sharp is F# Major and C# Major. When asked "How many major and minor musical keys are there?", what is the generally accepted correct answer? The answer should be one Major and Minor scale for each note in an octave. ...


2

I think the 'classical' approach is much more 'proper', as in in dots the t-s and crosses the i-s. Attention to the written detail is very important. Take any music played in a 'classical' exam. Every note must be given its exact timing, dynamics need to be followed, etc. Whilst there certainly is nothing wrong with this concept, it makes each performance of ...


3

Instead of trying to cover up timing errors with extra notes, you may be better off stopping, listening, and re-starting. In those extra notes, you're just as likely to get out of time again. 4/4, 3/4, 6/8 will all come down, in the end, to being capable of providing this 'passage', but it's like a pill to cover up the symptoms - it doesn't solve the problem ...


11

I would say personally that it's mostly a matter of the music being taught. The main exception to that is voice; all you have to do is listen to, say, Pavarotti and Frank Sinatra to tell the difference. They are obviously each going after a very different sound. Operatic singing doesn't use a microphone and emphasizes natural volume. The sound is ...


4

I think I know what you're getting at. First, a "musical passage" is just any group of notes that are organized into a single idea. It doesn't have anything to do with being on the beat or not. However... If you've lost the beat, you can stop playing, get back onto the beat, and start back in again while everyone snickers at you. Or, you can play a ...


0

Theoretically if you master this roll, there should be no difference between the two versions you mention, so it's of course good to practice both versions. However, as others already have indicated there are other considerations. I'll add another: from what I know, this exercise, among others similar, is also an introduction to playing tremolo with double ...


0

One way of looking at it would be this: There are 12 different pitches in relative pitch, so a major and minor for each of these means there are 24 keys. However, each of these (apart from C and Am) is in a sharp or flat key, so there is an enharmonic key for each of these with the opposite, either flats or sharps. As for C and Am, these are not either sharp ...


5

At this stage, it's learning how to control the bounce of the stick - the second hit comes straight after the first, same hand, but after a bounce. Doing it this way also frees up the right hand after the roll, to maybe hit a crash. Alternating puts the last hit with right hand, so cuts down on time to reach a cymbal. However, every roll or fill you learn ...


0

That depends on what you mean with "different tune". It will sound different for sure, which you probably have noticed, and it will not be the intended exercise.


5

Do Re Mi and so forth are generally "movable". In the key of G, G is "Do" and B is "Mi". The tonic of the key is "Do". Solfege is usually sung this way, with Do as the key note. This is the "Movable Do" system. If you transposed the song "Do Re Mi" (from The Sound of Music) to any other key it would still be "Do Re Mi". In some languages, French for ...


19

The key change you are describing is known as a Chromatic Mediant Relationship. This type of modulation rose to prominence in the Romantic Period and has been used by composers and musicians ever since. Chromatic Mediant Relationships are ones in which the roots or tonal centers of the keys are a non-diatonic 3rd apart. If diatonic (within the key), it ...



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