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1

Counterpoint is the compositional use and study of musical lines sounding at the same time. A musical line is not the same thing as a "part." For example, a cello part can contain three or more musical lines, all of which are written on one staff. To begin with a solid foundation, then, any study of counterpoint should focus on what a musical line is and how ...


1

It's a very distinct and verbose way to name 7th chords that is derived from classic theory. I'm not sure if it has a name or even needs a name as there's always more then one way to name chords for example some people use Co7 to represent a fully diminished chord and some people use Cm6b5 to denote the same chord and call it that. I'll refer to it as 7th ...


1

I don't know if the major-minor thing has a name, but the idea is to dissociate the actual intervals from the tonal function. Calling a chord a "major minor seventh" is simply describing the chord without any context, and calling a chord a "dominant" chord is describing a relationship with the tonic. In the kind of Classical music that is typically used to ...


2

A little context would help: a few more measures on either side, the name of the composer/era, etc. However, as a general rule, when the melody is in the bass like this the harmonic analysis focuses on the upper notes, and bass-melodic non-chord tones are identified in relation to them. For example, beat 2 of the first measure and beat 1 of the second look ...


2

Yes, it still makes 220 complete oscillations in one half second. As long as the number of oscillations is significantly greater than 1, you'll still hear the pitch. You'll only need to worry about these kinds of effects when the durations of the notes get down below the order of 1/100ths of a second (maybe order of 10ths of a second for bass notes).


3

You only need 1 cycle to actually state the pitch, so minimum 1/440s - it would take a human much longer to recognise that pitch, perhaps with a good ear a 1/100s, but a computer, given a pure sine wave, could get it in one cycle [or technically half that, as the 2nd half is a mirror of the 1st]. …or, as has been mentioned in comments, shorter than that if ...


5

Eggs are one dollar per dozen. But you can have 6 for 50 cents. Same eggs, same price, same deal. The lowest note on the piano, A0, has a wavelength of something over 12m. So can you hear it in a room 6m long? Sure you can. You can even hear it when using headphones - which could be thought of as a "room" measuring only 1cm or so! And you can be ...


0

Tim's answer is a great explanation, looked at from the perspective of the melody. Depending on how you learn and understand music it will be easier for some people to see it from the perspective of the chords. This will expand on the correct observations of Michael and Bananach. I use uppercase roman numerals, remember minus (-) means minor. We have 5 ...


1

The whole POINT of a tritone is its ambiguity! But, in a system of harmonic analysis built on the "pile of thirds" model, I can see why a modified 5th is preferred to a modified 4th. I find insistence that the indisputably aurally flattened b10 must be labelled #9 rather harder to take!


1

Matt L.'s answer is an excellent one. If you are asking "what should I call it, and when should I call it that?" here's my experience. In heptatonic (7 note scales) each number gets used once, you always call it a #4 if its the fourth note in the scale, e.g. in Lydian, or for a minor example, in the 4th mode of harmonic minor (essentially Dorian with a ...


4

I think that in this (and most other) contexts the broad definition of the tritone makes sense, which says that a tritone is an interval spanned by six semi-tones. So with this definition both augmented fourth and diminished fifth qualify as a tritone. Whether that note in the blues scale is written as a #4 or a b5 usually depends on the direction of the ...


3

To be 100% exact to the name 'tritone', it would be #4. Because, if we ascend 3 tones from the root, we have #4, and not b5. The three tones would be C-D, D-E, E-F#. Although, from what I have understood, it depends on the progression. Usually, the #4/b5 tritone would descend a semitone. For instance, a common progression would be Gb7-F (maj7 or 7). Since ...


0

Riffs and melodies moving quickly from #4 to 5 comprise a huge part of blues and jazz. You'll be hard pressed to find music from those genres that doesn't make ample us of that melodic transition - #4 is one of the traditonal blue notes. - that's a tritone from the root moving towards the 5 - a building block of the blues. So the answer is Yes.


-1

I think Answer #1 is more complex than the question asked. The direct answer is that no, A# and Bb are not the exact same notes. Though they are close, A# is slightly higher in pitch than Bb. It is possible to play both of these notes at their correct frequencies on some instruments, such as a violin or a singing voice, because the player can control the ...


2

Maria, from West Side Story, uses exactly that for the first line.(Not sure if it's that key, but, hey) The underlying harmony is root, the first note is also root, and the tritone is the second , leading to 5th on the 3rd note.. It sounds like it may modulate, as Matt says, but it doesn't. The fact that the triton is a semitone from the target is good, as ...


2

The Jazz Theory Book by Mark Levine has some of what you are looking for.


7

These two diagrams form what mathematicians might call a dual graph, in that they are sort of mirror images of each other. I'll describe this briefly for the benefit of others. In the first image, the nodes represent pitches (well, pitch classes), while in the second image, the nodes represent chords. To construct the second image from the first, place a ...


1

I've never seen before the sort of Tonnetz you've provided with your second example! The first Tonnetz, however, is the kind I've encountered most often. My immediate impression is that the first is much more navigable. The intervallic relationships are easily apparent: bottom-left to top-right are minor thirds, top-left to bottom-right are major thirds, ...


1

They ask you the... 1) Root (First / Bottom note of the chord.) 2) Position / Inversion (Which note of the chord is on the bottom of the given chord.) 3) Type (Major / minor / Augmented / Diminished.) 4) and the Roman Numeral that indicates the chord. So lets take them in turn. 1) is self explanatory the note that the chord is based on C/E/G ie C ...


1

I feel that the answers above are missing some important points. I've been a jazz musician for close to 20 years now, I started in my early teens, studying on weekends at a top conservatory, later went to music school for college, and have worked on and off as a professional musician since. That said, I will never forget the day, when I was 16, when it all ...


5

The thing you need to learn is what notes are in a chord. It doesn't matter how they are placed in a chord; it still is the same. The basic chords are built on thirds. So, take the notes you have and try to put them in order of thirds. We need a Root, a third (major or minor) and a fifth. The fist chord you have is: G-E(bass clef) C-G (treble clef). The ...


-5

Basic chord theory: Chords are made of three notes, being the root, third and fifth of the scale. First example is a C Major chord, so the notes for that are the root, C; the major third, E; and the perfect fifth, G. If we were talking a C Minor chord, the notes would be C, E♭ and G. In this case, the lowest note, the one on the bass clef, is G, and thus ...


0

A scale starts on a note which may or may not be the first note you play so to imply that playing in Dm is so complicated isn't fair,start first with your corresponding Maj key which is three half steps above your minor key so in this case it would be F Maj as 1 when you do it you start on Dm forget that it's minor, just your pattern will be whole half whole ...


0

Well, @GregJackson missed your point. I believe your point is that you've heard people claim that changing the instrumentation can have a big change in the overall effect of a piece, but you yourself have not experienced this. Perhaps you're thinking that those of us who have experienced it are just imagining it, or perhaps you're curious how to have this ...


5

This will be a G7b9 chord. Where the 9th is flattened from A to Ab. So, the whole chord has pitches G B D F Ab Although the "-" sign is sometimes used to denote a minor chord (a chord with a minor 3rd), it can also be used to denote a minor, flattened or diminished interval in a chord. For example -5 for b5, or in this case -9 for b9.


1

As Bob Broadley mentioned in the link you've provided, firmly establishing a modulation usually involves a combination of introducing accidentals foreign to the home key and cadences on the tonic chord of that new key. At it's bridge, this song begins each bar with B-major's relative minor, G#-minor, on the downbeat. This tends to provide the listener with ...


0

If I were you I would buy many different books on Music Theory for guitar and consider maybe even taking lessons for a few weeks or months (however long it takes). It doesn't take long to learn the basics and the basics alone will really spark your creativity and curiosity once you understand them. Books on harmony, scales, and even some chord books that ...


0

To complement all the answers here, some chord progressions adhere to the primary scale, some don't. There is another way to frame perception of your concern, which is to see the melody as the primary song component, and then fill out chords around that, as additionally suits the chord progression. Moreover, this is more inclined to work if you see your own ...


1

You don't have to learn Music Theory formally to know how it works just like you learn to speak somewhat fluently before ever going to school to learn English. Just because you learned how to speak basic English without any schooling doesn't mean that you aren't still using the alphabet. Its the same with Music Theory. Humans didn't invent scales, modes, and ...


0

A basic comprehensive reading on classical theory would greatly benefit your improv and understanding of how melody relates to harmony. Specifically regarding your question, this link will greatly help you: Wikipedia nonharmonic tones. Check out Suspension. The benefits are immense from a basic fundamental knowledge of classical theory. I can't stress ...


0

It sounds like what you want to do is play some of the melody notes (what the singer is singing) by picking them out of the chord you are playing - or while staying close to the chord so you can play the melody over the chord and keep the rhythm going at the same time. I play the notes of what the singer sings while strumming part of the current ...


0

On a 12 bars blues in A, you can play A minor pentatonic or blues scale trough the whloe blues, once you are confident with that you can play A major blues scale(same notes as F#minor blues scale) over the I7 chord and and A minor blues scale over IV7 and V7 chords is a great way to start geting more sounds into the blues. After you can switch between those ...


1

It somehow seems to me you're asking if you can play the same scale over all chords from a given song, which would be : mostly. Usually a song or a song part will be in a given key (so a single scale should fit), but it will slightly change one chord to add color. Off the top of my mind I'd say the change from C to C minor in Radiohead's Creep or the ...


0

What Fergus said is true if you start a diminished arpegio from any chord tone but the root. Lets say you are playing over A7 (A C# E G) If you start a diminished chord over the 3th, C# you get C# E G A# over the 5th, E you get E G A# C# over the 7th, G you get G A# C# E All the above had the same chord tones as a rootless A7 b9 But if you start a ...


1

I agree to @ToddWilcox: The simpson theme broke all "sacred" rules, plus, it seems that the composer WANTED to create a LYDIAN theme. Since the lydian mode is rather unusual for untrained ears, he repeated the theme in multiple keys in order to fix the lydian sound. And by the way: If you see Db as the subV of G (Db is a tritonus below G), then in fact ...


1

This had me wondering, there must be some way to do an analysis where the songs can generate some graph, and we can compare the graphs. Is my thought valid? Sure. You can graph the songs' pitches (Y-axis) over time (X-axis) to compare them. That's what a score is. A musical score is a peculiar sort of notation for graphing pitch over time for the ...


6

You might almost say they didn't "work" in terms of sounding good as much as those transitions help make the music sound whimsical. It's not like they fit inside some sacred rules of harmony as much as they broke the rules in a certain way that makes that theme effective in setting the tone for the show. Also the main motive is repeated (more or less) in ...


0

The big thing here is to understand that you can use any notes you want as long as you do it in a way that will strengthen or weaken your tonality of any given key. There are no set "rules", but understand that by introducing non-diatonic notes, it will have an effect on the tonality of your piece/phrase/bar or on how you are modulating to a new key. EDIT: ...


0

off drpylon's A#m example: Without this "strange" enharmonic notation, the chord built on the 4th degree would be notated as: natural F, G#, natural C. Looking at this on a score would not look right; I read somewhere that the one of the purposes of enharmonic notation is to allow the writer (and reader) the ability to visually see what appears to be a ...


0

These scales logically exist but, you're right, it's hard to imagine a circumstance where we'd need them! Occasionally it's appropriate to use a scale outside the scope of key-signatures (they only go as far as 7 sharps or 7 flats, we don't use double sharps or flats in key-signatures). G# major is not ridiculous.


0

Understanding these more complex kinds of musical phenomena depends ultimately on one's own interpretation. The analysis in the first link you've provided calls Bb the tonic chord during the entirety of the chromatic neighbor motion in question. My view of this passage, however, is that Eb is in fact functioning as a local tonic, with Bb as its dominant. ...


1

Regarding key signatures, you'd be hard pressed to find a musical work which has a key signature in either of those keys you've mentioned. The screenshot of your examples are even without any key signature; it's difficult for a staff to accommodate that that many accidentals and they were likely never intended to be able to encompass every possible key ...


1

Etymology, Math, and Acoustics These two terms can mean different things depending on who you talk to, especially since they are not discussed nearly as thoroughly in music theory teachings. Naturally, this makes the terminology more vague and less agreed upon. You probably have a good sense of them already, though. On a basic level, just intonation is when ...


8

Every note has a pitch, determined by the fundamental frequency of the sound wave that produces it. When you have two different notes, you have two different pitches, caused by two different frequencies. The distance between those pitches is called an interval, and corresponds to the ratio of the note's frequencies. For example, if one note is an octave ...


3

Yes. That book, while being very good, is not paced well for beginners. It throws a ton of hard-to-learn stuff at you right away. I'd recommend supplementing it with other books that perhaps have more written out examples to work with as well. I wouldn't say it's good as an only book. The thing about learning is jazz is that I could sit down with a new ...


1

If you want really clear as a bell, non-muddled tones, you want just intonation. We hear music in intervals. Just intonation is Pythagorean intervals, expressed as ratios. What we call the perfect fifth interval, 7 semitones, is a 3:2 frequency ratio. If you play it along with your root note, it will coincide in perfect clear harmony. However Pythagorean ...


8

A simple answer: One is not better than the other. They serve different purposes according to different musical traditions. Just intonation is pure tuning according to the pure mathematical overtones produced by musical instruments. When an instrument is tuned to just intonation, it is more or less only able to play in one key, and to use limited chords and ...


1

Short answer: In counterpoint, the harmony is created through melodies played simultaneously by different voices. Long answer: In a modern song, you'll probably find a single melody line played over a guitar strumming the appropriate chords for the harmony. When this is the case, the harmony and melody are broken into two separate functions. One person is ...



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