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The reason why the circle of fifths progression works better in minor than in major is the higher flexibility of minor, in the sense that more notes are available than in major, without the need for alteration. In minor, all notes from natural, melodic, and harmonic minor are available without leaving the key. This is not the case in major. The consequence ...


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Do notes from non-natural minor scales fit well in the associated major key? They can, depending on context. I wondered if this means that F# and G# would be the "least controversial" notes to add when playing in C major since they come from variants of the associated minor key? i.e. they'd fit quite nicely without sounding too dissonant? ...


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One big chord in question is the 7. In minor, if unaltered, this chord is a subtonic chord, as opposed to its altered version where it is the leading-tone chord. So in C minor, diatonically, the 7 chord (subtonic) is Bb D F, while the leading-tone chord would be B D F. You can hear right away that in the minor mode, the subtonic leads just fine to the ...


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Probably because that elusive dim chord moves towards the V then to i in minor better.Or it sounds better as a m7b5 as a 4 note chord, giving the same effect.In major, it sounds quite weak without the root (a 5 note) which would make it a V7.


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Yes it fits well. It is basically the same scale that starts on different notes with the exception of the leading tone of the Harmonic minor which is raised by a semi tone and in the case of the Melodic minor both the Sub Mediant and the Leading Tone is raised when going up and also then lowered when going down (Natural Minor).


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If the piece starts or ends on the root of the relative minor then it is a good deal that it is written in the minor key. If the Anacrusis is build on the fifth scale degree of the minor key then it is a good bet it is written in the minor key. Also always check whether the leading tone of the minor key is raised or not.


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In a-minor: G# is coming from the dominant of a-minor (E-G#-B). F# is coming from the subdominant of a-minor (D-F#-A). Generally, the scale is fitted to the harmonic progression in accordance with where the scale moves. Because of the dominant chord used when progressing from G to A, G is augmented to G# in the ascending scale of a melodic minor ...


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As you are familiar with solfege, i could suggest another strategy: press a note of your choice (eg. A flat) and take that sound as "do". Then based on what you have learned, find the relative minor key and press the corresponding note. If it sounds "la" then you are correct. In this case, F will sound like "la", so the relative minor key here is F minor. ...


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Ok. A perfect fifth is a fifth (ex: C to G) that is not augmented (half step larger) or diminished (half step smaller). For example, from C to G is a fifth. A fifth is seven half steps between the two notes (a half step is the smallest distance between two notes). As previously stated, the distance from notes C to G is a fifth. -more specifically a perfect ...


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Essentially the same notes as the relative major a minor 3rd above, for instance the same collection of notes for A minor as for C Major. The tonic, subdominant and dominant (A, D and E in A minor) will be referenced frequently at phrase boundaries; you will normally (not always) see accidentals as the melodic seventh is sharped to lead into the tonic (e.g., ...


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The notes C and C# are two different notes just as G and Gb are two different notes. So (going with your example), if you have a tune that contains C, C#, G, and Gb, you would have four different notes.


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This is going into modal territory. There are also 'minor' scales in some of the modes. Obviously the Aeolian, as mentioned, but Dorian and Phrygian also sport that important minor third from the root. The F# mentioned will appear in the C Lydian mode, although it's perceived as a major mode.That F# can also be thought of as a b5 as in blues. Actually, any ...


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You can try to use chords that are common to both keys, and re-interpret their function. For your example (A minor and B minor), the common triads are D, Em, E, and G (note that in minor both the 6th and the 7th scale degree can be either minor or major). Also note that a ii-V progression always leads nicely to the I chord. Examples: || Am | Dm | Em ...


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It seems that culture may come in here. In some countries, the solfege system is thought of as quite important. In France, for example, it's a fixed doh at C, and all the notes are named from this. So there, it would be useful. In England, there's not so much emphasis, so learning dots makes more sense. No doubt, other countries will have their own views, ...


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A good way to a modulation is via a diminished chord. Thus Am - Ao - F#7 - Bm. As the dim contains A and F# (Gb for purists, maybe?), it bridges nicely. Or going bluntly, Am - Bbm - Bm. Or a staccato stop on Am, Then a rest, then straight into Bm. It shouldn't be difficult to re-pitch if that bit's sung.


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Morton Feldman is a major composer in this sort of music. His style was very quite, slow enough to be essentially ametric, and in his later works he become interested in extremes of time - his String Quartet No. 2 is over six hours long. Rothko Chapel is his best-known work. Feldman's does often included some quite strong dissonance, unlike much other ...


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Try listening to works by Vaughan Williams. Some parts of his works are very atmospheric. An example would be "Fantasy on a Theme by Thomas Tallis". It was used in the film "Master and Commander" to give an atmospheric feel to a little boat in a big ocean.


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The old standby is to treat the last link in the chain as a deceptive cadence, i.e., V-vi or V-♭VI. It's an old chestnut, but very effective at breaking the pattern and keep things moving at the same time. Other landings are possible - Bach used ♭II6 to usher in the coda of the fugue of BWV 582. If you're really feeling sneaky, you can break out earlier ...


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The nomenclature discussed by several posts above also applies to Indonesia, so Es = E flat and Cis= C sharp. We call the sharp symbol "kres" and flat symbol "mol", probably derived from Dutch or German ("kruis","molle"). We put a strong emphasis on do - re - mi which is notated with Arabic numbers 1,2,3 etc, and when we learn a new song we will start by ...


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I sometimes go against the circle of fifth if the chords match the notes well. So sometimes i go I -V-II for instance. occasionally, depending on the notes, i could follow on vi with IV and III with IV instead of vi. Not sure if this helps?


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I would suggest Irving Berlin's "Blue Skies" as an example of a cheerful song in a minor key. However, it can also be viewed as an extended musical pun on the term "blue" as used in the linguistic phrase that is the title, an indicator of happy circumstances, contrasted with the term as a style of music. A masterful piece, it served as inspiration for Monk's ...


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It is more like a preferred usage and style than being a rule. You can find cheerful songs in minor and dramatic songs in major especially in Baroque and some classical music derived from folk music. Lots of style elements and personal preferencese like harmonic progression, melody structure, use of intervals (especially minor 2nds and pentatonic modes ...


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Learn how to reharmonize the tune, or passages in the tune, with passing chords, secondary dominants, cadences, etc. Then identify tones in each new chord which you use as target tones in your solos. For each passage in your song, identify the tonic chord. Then learn how to use a solo to establish this chord as the harmony of resolution: approaching it and ...


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Everyone's given some great advice, but here's the thing about solos; they're melodies, and melodies are constructed in a certain way. It's possible to figure out that certain way just by playing, but I found it far more useful to actually understand the principles of melody construction ahead of time. Once I did, my solos improved by leaps and bounds. ...


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One-Finger Soloing It's a very simple technique but I came across this recently. You literally choose one finger on your fretting hand - index most likely - and are only allowed to use this finger. The idea is it breaks your ingrained muscle memory of playing scale patterns. And also, following the scale is now no easier in terms of finger movement than ...


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You have probably got more advice than you can use, so I will be brief. I am coming to the conclusion that no matter what type, style or period, the introduction of half-step, non-scale intervals in melodies makes a difference in the interest that music generates in the listener. The appoggiatura is just one kind of half-step ornamentation, and it has its ...


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Just a brief meta-theoretical note: Rockin' Cowboy's answer above recapitulates a whole line of 19th-ct attempts to derive the basic functions of tonal music from the major triad (which at least one theorist called the "Chord of Nature" because of the way it follows the overtone series). In order to do that, they constructed a dualist system: that is, for ...


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You need to know theory because: Music composition is a craft. You may very well do something intuitively, but that doesn't change the fact that you need to learn the craft. More often people have an intuition for melody and harmony but they rarely have intuition for form, and form essentially is composition. Without form your music is at best sound design ...


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The first thing to note is that to specify a key, you need both a root note and a formula. A root note on its own is not sufficient. A minor and C major contain the same notes, so we can say they are different modes of the same scale. Another way of saying this is that A minor is the relative minor of C major, and C major is the relative major of A minor. ...


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Because in a major key: the tonic must not contain the scale's fourth (iv) tone the subdominant must contain the scale's fourth tone but not the seventh the dominant must contain at least the scale's seventh or both the seventh and fourth


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the third (A) and seventh (Eb) of F7 also correspond to the third (Eb) and seventh (A) of B7, so you are basically substituting B7 for F7 (with some of the tension notes altered on the B7: #4 and b9 which are typical modifications on a dominant 7th).


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Most of the time in classical, but not always - sometimes the half-measure ends up being more important (irregular phrase lengths). Not always in much of classical music. You don't have to look far to find pieces in which the inner voices are absolutely essential, and not just as harmonic filler, but as focal points - just look at some of Mozart's string ...


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It's known as a tritone substitution. In jazz you can substitute any dominant-seventh chord with the one a tritone (b5 or #4) away. This works because of the major-third and minor-seventh which are in every dominant-seventh chord. These make the interval of a tritone, which is exactly half an octave, and so gives exactly the same notes when transposed by a ...


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Listening to music while reading the notation helps a lot improving the perception of rhythm. It also helps having an idea of how the written rhythm is interpreted. Start with the pieces that you know well and move further into more alien ones.


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NOTE: Althogh the question sounds specific, it goes to a lot wider discussion. Consider my answer as notes on the subject. "Melody" sings over "harmony" type instrumental music mostly originates from imitating songs with instruments which already have song forms. Later instrumental music developed more complex structures with respect to the instrumentation ...


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If, as I believe, the question is about how to RECOGNISE a time signature, then you have to do some careful listening. It's not always apparent straight away. The majority of pieces are in 4/4 time, so common, it's called common time. Listen out for an emphasised note in the tune. Often, but not always, the first beat of a new line. Imagine you're about to ...


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Dom's answer is of course correct, but I think there's a misunderstanding as to what is meant by 'pattern'. In Dom's answer, he refers to the interval structure of a scale as 'pattern'. In this sense he is of course right that the patterns of major and minor pentatonic scales are different. However, I believe that Chris refers to patterns on the neck of the ...


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There's two things going on that you need to understand. The pattern for the major and minor scales are different. If you were to play a C major pentatonic scale you would play the notes C, D, E, G, A. If you were playing the C minor pentatonic you would play the notes C, Eb, F, G, Bb. Both are shown below: There are major and minor pentatonic ...


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Interesting idea! It's somewhat 'chicken and egg'. A sequence of 4 or 5 notes may have several chords which will underlie them. Similarly, a sequence of chords may have any number of melodies played over them - ask any jazzer! For some note sequences, there will be one overriding set of chords that will be best fit. Similarly, vice-versa. Some, if not most. ...


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The Way I Would Teach It,. Step 1: Determine the key. Step 2: Determine Cadence points. Step 3: Start at the end and choose chords Step 4: Write a melody for the Bass Step 5: Add the middle voices. THINGS YOU WILL HAVE TO KNOW: The four note chords build on the Dominant and Super Tonic and there proper resolution. Both the cadence and passing six ...


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To answer my own question after edification from the community, the theory behind why the notes of a chord blend well together and the theory behind which chords in a major key are the major chords that work for that key are basically two different theories. A major chord is comprised of a root, a major 3rd (4 semitones or two whole steps above root) and ...


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The way I think of these beginner harmonizing exercises is like Sudoku. You have to try out chords and see what fits. Start with the G major chord and then add another chord. If you see consecutive 5ths or 8ths, remove it and and another one. If you cannot find one that fits, that means the previous chord might need changing.1 Now, something more you need ...


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There are a thousand different ways to harmonize the passage you've shown. In the end, writing music is a lot like writing a persuasive essay: it's less about what you say and more about how you say it. My advice: harmonize it several different ways and see if it makes sense; do a chord for every note - is the harmonic motion too fast? Do the opposite. ...


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Theory is both descriptive, and, to the extent that it gives an accurate description, also a bit prescriptive (but only to that extent). It might be correct to say that theory doesn't provide rules so much as rules-of-thumb. What theory does is provide a set of tested solutions to common problems. If, in a piece written in common practice tonality, you find ...


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As other's have suggested, it is not necessary to know any theory at all to create great musical compositions. Music follows some basic laws of nature that are innate not only to humans, but some studies have even suggested plants can respond in predictable ways to music. Theory is merely an attempt to logically explain why some music sounds good and some ...


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First off, the notion that you can write more freely if you "don't know the rules" is an unfortunate fallacy. When I hear guitar players saying that they eschew learning theory or how to read sheet music because it will "stifle their creativity" I think, "lads, you're trying to run a marathon with a boat anchor strapped to your ankle." Functional harmony ...


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You can use theory to form a framework which underpins your composition. The framework provides a basic structure that guides the composition, but the details of the composition distinguish it from other compositions, even those that use the same framework.


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You said that it's the relationship between the three notes that makes it sound good. So why do you think picking out those notes individually and basing new chords on them is the way to do it? You lose the relationships that the original chord had. In the key of C Major, the I chord is the C Major chord (C-E-G). The iii chord in C Major is E minor ...


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On a practical level, knowing some theory can be useful to a composer in certain circumstances. First is when a composition is not as interesting as the composer would like it to be. He/she would like to evoke something different than whatever the music inspires at that stage of composition. Examining the melody for how it conforms to standard scales, ...


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It's rather like language. Treating the rules as prescriptive allows you to always be generally understood (or compose something non-irritating). You need to understand the rules in order to know when it is OK to break them, even though you could accidentally break them and still make a comprehensible sentence (or pleasing melody) without knowing why. ...



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