New answers tagged

0

A further approach is to use the simple visual form of each theory tool as classification node (clearly, indexing analagously to Hornbostel-Sachs would be needed, but is trivial). This follows the more or less intuitive labels given to theory tools in many images returned by internet search engines. Clearly, even for the simplest of forms, we can expect ...


0

You'll need to learn the basics of how to read and write music from a book. That shouldn't take too long if you're not trying to do anything too clever. I found with my early attempts at transcribing music that I would get the right notes, but the timing would be completely wrong. I might even discover that the music wasn't in the time signature I thought ...


2

Mary, As a guitarist and song writer, myself, I know what you want. I spent almost 10,000 hours on the guitar and on the serious study of music to get to the point that I could begin to write music. It does not come easy. It takes time, maybe less for you, maybe more. Sure, I hear there are musical programs that will write for you. Never tried them. But, ...


0

You can record yourself singing the song and then analyse it in any pitch correction software e.g Image Line's Newtone or Melodyne.


0

Convert the various frequencies back to pitches (I am unaware of a "frequency set class" or what that would even mean), here in the Standard Tuning(TM), then lookup that pitch set class: % perl -MMusic::Scala -E '$s=Music::Scala->new;say for map { $s->freq2pitch($_) } @ARGV' 440 10000 948 230 25 | while read pitch; do expr $pitch % 12; done 9 3 10 10 ...


2

Matt Putnam offered an excellent answer but based on some of the comments a more complete explanation might be helpful for those who still are not sure how scale patterns can be useful for a guitarist. TLDR - skip to summary. The guitar and similar fretted instruments give the player options for multiple places on different strings and frets to play any ...


1

In terms of the physical acoustics a good reference point to start at is to consider a very long (effectively infinite) chain of pressure pulses/waves of fixed shape that repeat identically at some fixed repetition interval. In terms of the spectral content, this means that there are a set of narrow spectral peaks all at integer multiples of the fundamental ...


2

This addresses how to get the note name for the root. The key think is to think about the problem in terms of the circle of fifths. Setup an array of note names like this: F C G D A E B 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 Note that the intervals for the movement of the root are given by P5=+1 P4=-1 M2=+2 m7=-2 M6=+3 m3=-3 M3=+4 m6=-6 aug4=+6 dim5=-6 note ...


0

Church Modes The modes originated in Christian chant, and you asked for a practical difference, so here is an answer from a chanter's perspective. First, let me regurgitate the theory, then I'll give examples, and my own commentary. Theory Authentic and plagal have the same tonic. Their cadences vary here and there, just like any song, but they always ...


2

The resolution to vi (E7 => Am in the key of C) is the most obvious one. It represents a tonicization of the relative minor key (A minor in the key of C). A very common alternative would be the resolution to IV, as pointed out by you and in ttw's answer. This is a deceptive cadence, where a dominant seventh chord does not resolve to its related tonic chord, ...


0

V7 of vi resolves nicely to vi or vi7 or VI or VI7 or your suggestion of iv or IV.


0

other way to approach scale paterns is tonality: when you use "normal" scales, you structure around one tone and its near frequecis. You have twelve notes, with no deferences among them, but if you go to DIATONIC scales ( scales that alternates semitones and entire tones) you can work giving more importance to some of them and then create PROGRESSION. If you ...


6

The dots indicate the notes that are in the C major scale. The red ones are C. The "patterns" are places where you can easily reach all of the notes of the scale. For example, in Pattern 4, you place your index finger on the 7th fret, and then you can play a C major scale 2 octaves (plus an extra note on top and bottom) just with your 4 fingers, without ...


-1

I only just learned this, but it has to do with how the notes get named out. In a major scale, all notes A-G, no matter sharp or flat, are expected to appear exactly once. So in your case, if we spell out the scales: C# - D# - E# - F# - G# - A# - B# - C# But the problem is that E# doesn't exist, it's F. Same with B#. And if we write it like that... C# - ...


-1

Natural minor is a mode, however I would call the harmonic and melodic minor scales functional variations of natural minor rather than strictly their own modes. In minor harmonies, the seventh scale note is almost always raised, which creates a harmonic minor. Using the harmonic minor scale in melodic settings would create a really ugly augmented second ...


3

My understanding so far has been that 4/8 is faster because it is probably assumed that a crotchet is conventionally always at 80 tempo (unless mentioned) and hence a semi-crotchet is played at 40 tempo as convention and hence the bar is played much faster. Your conclusion is faulty. It is a widely held misconception in music. There is no inherent ...


1

In summary, is it right to say that If I set the tempo of crotchet = 80 for my first bar semi-crotchet = 80 for my second bar. Is it equivalent to saying 2 4/4 bars instead of 4/4 and 4/8 right? In general, if two time signatures have the same denominator (the bottom number), that means that the "beats" corresponding to the bottom number are at ...


5

What I mean by that is that, I can always play this bar faster by adding a notation like pianissimo or a fortissimo above the bar. Almost. Pianissimo and fortissimo are dynamics. They relate to the loudness (also called "intensity") of the music. But there are other words to use for speed. You could simply write "faster" or "slower." There are all kinds of ...


1

Every scale has modes. As you shift what note in the pattern you start on, you come up with a different pattern that is related to the original scale pattern. The names of the modes however, are not named the same way as the diatonic modes. The names of the modes are not based off scale degrees, but how the notes look compared to the scales/modes of the ...


7

Think of modes as the scale starting off at different notes. So, yes there are modes both for the harmonic and melodic minor scales. In jazz, the melodic minor scale isn't the same as the classical one. It is the same while ascending and descending. So, the C melodic minor scale would be C D Eb F G A B C. here are the melodic minor modes: The harmonic ...


0

All diatonic modes are the same scale starting on different notes. While you can think of different modes for each chord, I find that approach to be way too complicated for live performance. Moreover, that approach tends to lead to playing scales rather than creating interesting and catchy melodies. Take the chord tones for each bar as your "strong" notes ...


0

Based on your update, the example you write will have the same number of beats as the original. The three measures of 4/4 (12 beats) of the first example will be converted to four bars of 3/4 (also 12 beats). Thus you're not changing any of the rhythms, you'll just be adjusting a few ties and breaking some note values into two. One way of approaching this ...


0

Have a listen, and a look at Fly Me to the Moon. Written in 3/4, but far more commonly played and sung in 4/4. See how the notes are lengthened in each bar to accomodate the extra beat. Notice that the same word/note stays on beat 1, whichever time sig. is used.The same works in reverse from 4/4 into 3/4, with appropriate shortening of other notes in each ...


2

It's a mistake in the book!! I just got an email back from RSL, the question is on the use of sharps/flats and double sharps/flats. 8va/vb notation was not supposed to be tested in this question and triple sharps/flats are outside of the syllabus. I've been informed that future versions of the book will now show an A rather than an Ab. Phew!


0

This is probably a rephrase of other comments but I have my own interpretation of CPP usage of minor keys. There is one minor key (the idea of natural, harmonic, and melodic minors as separate entities isn't all that important in CPP music.) The 6th and 7th step of the minor scale are mutable. Either or both may be raised and still be considered diatonic; ...


3

Strictly speaking, the notes of E natural minor are: E F# G A B C D E. So, if you want to use notes only from that scale, the chord would be B D F#. But in almost all the genres of music (even pop), it is really really common to borrow chords from other scales. In your example, you could borrow the dominant ( V ) chord from the E major scale (or the E ...


2

The leading note is the seventh degree of the major - and minor - when that note is one semitone below the l, tonic, or root.It's called leading as it suggests a tendency to rise to the tonic next. However, it loses that propensity when it's lowered, as in some minors, and subsequently gets called the 'flattened leading note'. If you're wondering which one ...


2

The term "leading tone" is equivalent to "scale degree seven of the major key." This doesn't mean that it's only found in a major key, just that it's the same pitch as the pitch that is scale degree seven of the major key. It is always a diatonic half step below tonic. In E minor, the leading tone is D-sharp. Meanwhile, scale degree seven of the natural ...


1

Secondary dominants perform a very specific function. They are used to temporarily tonicize whatever the chord is a dominant of. They are not used to modulate as if they were, they just become dominants of the key you modulate to. Let's look at an example using the classic ii7-V7-I in C which is Dm7-G7-Cand a very common use for secondary dominants. In this ...


0

One place where secondary dominants are often used is where the music doesn't want to go straight to the dominant, but sounds like it's going to modulate to that dominant, although in reality it's just going through a 'minimodulation' to come back to the original key. It works particularly well if a melody note is in the root chord, but also in the ...


0

I honestly think that at an absolute beginner level, one of the best places to search for instruction is the internet. I always think that many people underestimate the power of the internet, and often look towards paid instruction, which a lot of the time looks more professional. Don't get me wrong, I don't think that books are a bad idea in any way. I'm ...


0

Start with the "Dummies" book. It's basic, but you NEED the basics. Also obtain sample Music Theory test papers from the ABRSM, and the associated textbooks. When you're absolutely confident you could sail through the Grade 5 test (Grade 8 would be better) you'll know the language, and can think about some more "modern" approaches.


1

Your use of the word 'meticulous' reminded me of my first theory teacher relating this stern instruction in best school marm fashion: You may break any of these hallowed rules of musical composition only after you are totally familiar with all of them, because by then you will know enough to strictly contain yourself until you thoroughly understand WHY these ...


0

As you look for the very beginning basics, I would encourage you to pick up the simple Keys to Music Rudiments book which, when I began teaching, was the go to and I still use for absolute beginners, including adults. It does not presume you have any background to fall back on and there are six accompanying workbooks. When you are through these, which could ...


2

I have been playing guitar for more than 10 years, and the only book I ever needed was this one, which I was recommended by many people on the Ultimate-Guitar.com forum. https://www.amazon.com/Jazz-Theory-Book-Mark-Levine/dp/1883217040/ You can read the first few chapters for free on the Amazon website. It's not just for playing jazz, but covers all the ...


0

A melody is comprised of notes, usually from a particular key. Those notes could and often do, add up to the scale of that key, when put in order, with root first. Thus, in A, there'll be A,B,C#,D,E,F# and G#.So, a tune in A will use those notes in the main.Take any of those notes, and stack the next but one and the next but one to that, and maybe one more, ...


0

I cannot comment on the books you mention, as I have not used them, but I do have some recommendations that might be useful. There is a series of books (published by Schott) and written by Paul Hindemith which would seem to fit the bill. They are incredibly thorough and do start from the very beginnings. The first is Elementary Training for Musicians, ...


5

No textbook is flawless. Even ignoring the occasional typo, every student is different and learns in a different way, so the best textbook for one student might be just "eh" for another. (And don't even get me started on cost...) I've worked extensively with both the Laitz and Clendinning/Marvin textbooks, and I can enthusiastically recommend both. They ...


0

Well let's go step by step 1- I know today we have lots of information available on Internet, but do not make the same mistake as me in the beginning, when you choose a lots of book u can ready none so firstly. Take one book and start reading. It's cool get opinion for other people about books but sometimes they can be wrong or a book that is good for me may ...


0

First ports of call ought to be the examination boards, ABRSM, Trinity, LCM and RSL spring to mind. Their syllabi contain most that you'll need to know and learn. ABRSM goes down the rather classical route, while LCM takes a more modern approach, and maybe puts things in that are not relevant to your needs.You don't need to take the exams, but I recommend ...


1

That is totally a matter of style, given the combination you have there. If you wanted a Spanish guitar sound and kind of dark, use phrygian. If you want a jazzy/blues feeling, use Dorian. However, if you use Dorian with the minor chords toward the beginning of the progression, I would probably give Mixolydian a try on the major chord to maintain the bluesy ...


-3

Well, it seems a hard answer but I will try to do it. I can speak for my own compositions, and my own experiences in harmony devices and scales. I want to split this answer in two: 1) Melody: I have many ways to make a composition. a) Based in a scale: I usually try several scales from differents sources (western traditional scales, Lydian Chromatic ...


2

Is it perhaps a mistake in the clef? If that was a treble clef then you would be looking at an F flat which does have two enharmonic equivalents


0

I'm adding a new answer on account of the updated original question. Here are the only possibilities I can think of: The initial G-sharp is obvious, and it's exactly what you already have. The remaining two G-sharps indicate the exact same pitch, just one with an 8vb (one octave below) marking, the other with a 15mb (two octaves below). If you've covered ...


0

Most natural instruments will produce a tone which contains frequencies that are near-multiples of the tone; for some instruments such as the clarinet most such frequencies will be near odd multiples (3x, 5x, 7x, etc.) while other instruments will produce a mixture of even and odd multiples. For any two frequencies x and y which are present in a signal, ...


1

On the assumption it's not written in treble or bass clef, but C clef instead, and you guessed it was treble, the Ab note would actually be a Bb. This then is enharmonically the same as A#, and also Cbb. That obviates the need for any (dubious in my opinion) bbb or #x. Otherwise, the only notes with 3 enharmonic names are Ax/B/Cb; B#/C/Dbb; Dx/E/Fb; E#/F/...


4

The books I've seen suggest that when you solo over a dominant seventh chord, try playing a half-whole diminished scale. The reason this works is that the scale contains all the notes of the dominant seventh chord. Here's the half-whole scale starting on C together with the C7 chord: H-W dim scale: C C# D# E F# G A A# C C7 chord: C E G Bb ...


6

Triple flats and sharps do exist. They are extremely rare (never seen one in a piece myself), but theoretically you can use them. My guess is that the answer would be B triple flat or F triple sharp. Here is an example I found with a triple sharp: I found it on this website, where you can read some stuff about triple accidentals. And another example ...


1

The question is not crystal clear to me. Do you mean 'does it HAVE to have a seventh in it', or 'why is the seventh actually not in the key'? Richard answered the first, but be aware that by calling a chord just a 9th will incorporate the flattened 7th and an ordinary 9th. As Richard stated, it's because it becomes the dominant chord in the key of its IV. ...



Top 50 recent answers are included