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5

tl;dr: You can always guess what notes to play by ear and find what notes sound good, but at the end of the day you are playing in a scale and you should be aware of that. There are some guitarists that don't know scale (or music theory for that matter) and they tend to play by ear. They listen to the progression and try to play something over it and ...


3

You seem to be mistaken in thinking that playing scales means you have to play the same scales as everyone else - you don't. In fact, even playing chords and/or arpeggios is a form of playing scales. A scale is, informally, nothing more than a system of dividing a range of frequencies into discrete steps. So saying you 'refuse' to learn scales is, in a ...


2

I think the most important thing you need is to learn how to dive in your guitar's neck without getting lost. Moving around past a certain speed and without watching where your fingers are requires tons of practice. That practice relies in repeating some pattern over and over and over. You can try 1 million solos, practice them, improve and master them and ...


0

Following Pat Muchmore's answer, that bIII could be construed as coming from the parallel key (of C minor)rather than being found in C major itself.This idea features in some pop songs, and can technically be explained away as such. The first example resolves from a listener's point of view in that the E contains notes that are as close as possible to the ...


2

I agree, these are somewhat dubious designations, but there's a possible justification for looking at them more or less as analyzed in your example, in increasing order of dubiousness. The first example is actually just a deceptive resolution of the secondary dominant, akin to a primary V7 going to vi. V7/vi in C major is an E7 chord that wants to go to A ...


0

You might say these chords do resolve to their respective tonic, but not directly or in a hidden form. C E7 F ≈ Am6/F C I V7/VI vi I C D7 F ≈ G7sus46/F C I V7/V V7 I C C7 (E♭) F G C I V7/IV (passing) IV V I But alternatively, you might just ...


0

A cursory check suggests there's not a lot in English. Wie ist Ihr Deutsch? Volksmusik at wikipedia. "deutsche volksmusik" in google.


0

Amateur singers seem to like to sing in keys around G. If you look at hymn books they are often in keys like F, Gb, G, Ab and A. They are rarely in C. I think that professional or trained singers have developed enough range that they mostly don't care, but the kind of people you find in church of a Sunday morning may not be able to sing high or low notes. ...


0

Perhaps it depends what you call "Music". For example, the rhythm of a train running by has been used/referred to in many tunes and used as inspiration for rhythms, or directly sampled. Let's take it back to a time before anyone had done that... Is the train a musical instrument ? No - until someone starts seeing it as such. So would there be a genre of ...


4

The accidental ♭ does not combine with the ♭ in the key signature to produce a double-flat. Rather, the accidental is redundant. The easiest interpretation rule is that any accidental overrides whatever is in the key signature. The term for such usage is courtesy accidental: Although a barline is nowadays understood to cancel the effect of an ...


4

No it indicates B flat. Usually the flat is cancelling a natural (or sharp) earlier in the measure. Even if it's not cancelling, it has only been included by the editor to improve the readability of the passage.


13

No, it is still a B♭. The flat is just reminding you that the B is flat. This is typically done if the previous measure uses a B that was different then the one in the key signature or if there was a different quality of B used in the measure it is used to cancel out the other quality. In the key D minor, if you were ascending from A to D, a typical melody ...


0

Create a new genre? Every composer and every composition has it own style. 'Genre' is a term which comprise compositions that are similar in style, techniques and instrumentation (and in other attributes). Sometimes it even only means the use of a composition, like video game music (which has no unique style; only the instrumentation was similar in the 8bit ...


13

In popular music, this device is usually called Line Cliché. It is a chromatic line over a static chord creating the illusion of harmonic motion. Line chlichés are most often found in a minor key. The line usually moves near the 7th of the chord. A very common descending line (over a minor triad) is: root -> maj 7th -> min 7th -> maj 6th. This is exactly ...


14

As Bob mentions, this can be described as a descending chromatic bass line. If descending a fourth, from tonic to dominant, this can also be called a "Lament Bass". As a technique, it dates back at least to the early Baroque Era (famously used in Dido's Lament, that character's dying aria from Henry Purcell's Dido and Aeneas, and also in Bach's Crucifixus ...


7

A series of pitches which move down by semitones is a descending chromatic scale. If this line is in the bass you could call it a descending chromatic bassline. If the harmony above this bassline remains unchanged, the resulting chords can be described as a series of inversions. In popular music terminology this is most easily achieved using ...


1

Approach learning from Anthony Wellington's 4 levels of awareness. You can find an article about it here: http://www.playguitarlive.com/the-4-levels-of-awareness-for-musicians/


2

To help you out: I've been figuring out how to make good "EDM" for many years now, and some of the things I've realized about it might be helpful to you. "Normal" music is different than dance music in a number of ways, although they're starting to swap traits in the past few years. 1) Almost all dance music NEVER progresses. What I mean is that there is ...


7

Learning production is like learning any musical instrument in a lot of ways. You first need to practice a lot to become very familiar with your software. The software is your instrument, you need to know it inside and out to become proficient at creating songs. For instruments, daily practice is the fastest way to improve, and the same goes with digital ...


1

The "Cruel but Fair" school of hard knocks would say... Try, try, try again & if at first you don't succeed... try again... [or give up, the choice is yours.] ..& if, after another 10 years, you still get no takers - then either you have a) no talent whatsoever or b) no-one has yet recognised it. It is almost impossible right now to say which that ...


1

They are indeed equivalent, at least in Equal Temperament (which is the most widely used tuning system in western music). You might prefer one over the other depending on how things modulate. If you're going to modulate to the parallel minor, use C#, since C# minor has 4 sharps, whereas Db minor doesn't really exist (it would have 8 flats--one for each ...


-1

All theories are only tools to serve a purpose. Chord theory serves the purposes of systemisation so as to communicate information. There are NO rules in music. One can make any sound and if is pleasant to the performer and his/her audience then throw the rule book into the garbage !


0

JP Doherty has correctly identified the chord. A more mainstreamed naming convention of his answer, however, is DbMsus4+. From my "Understanding Guitar Chords": "Distinguishing between chord quality & interval quality. A symbol specifying chord quality, when necessary, appears directly after the chord name; otherwise the symbol refers to ...


7

To find the length in seconds of each beat for any given metronome marking in beats-per-minute (bpm), you would divide 60 (the number of seconds in a minute) by the bpm marking. For instance, if a piece has a metronome marking of crotchet (quarter-note) = 120, each crotchet beat is 0.5 seconds long (60/120). You can follow this simple rule to find the ...


1

You can learn theory by ear training. Playing songs just by ear and learning them is learning theory by instincts. But you couldn't communicate with anyone what you know verbally. People like Hendrix or James Hetfield from Metallica are known not to have any training but used their ears for composing or improvising music. They gained a huge vocabulary of ...


3

Find an article or book about music theory. When you read about a new concept, put the book down and improvise with the new material you just learned. I'm doing this myself right now. I never actually learned many typical rock or traditional Western harmonies, preferring to use modal chords and exotic modes instead. A few days ago, I realized this was ...


16

If you're looking for a magic number upon which scales are based, take a look at 1.5. That's the ratio of an interval called a pure fifth. It's also called a just fifth; the terms are interchangeable. (They are not necessarily the same as a perfect fifth, however. And if you're wondering why they're called fifths at all, don't get hung up on that just yet. ...


0

It is not difficult. In simple time you have a certain number of regular beats. You can have beats of minims. You can have beats of crotchets. You can have beats of quavers. When a time signature becomes compound its beats become dotted notes. So for instance 3/4 time is simple triple time. 9/8 is compound triple time. You went from three beats of crotchets ...


7

This is an interval of a minor sixth. Nameable chords usually need three notes in order to define them. A single interval can be a component of a number of chords. So, for this reason the naming of this chord would depend upon harmonic context; in other words, which other notes, if any, sound with it. However, the interval of a minor sixth is commonly ...


1

Western music is mostly built around diatonic scales -- made up of 7 notes from the 12 notes you get by dividing an octave into 12 semitones. The "standard" diatonic scale is the major scale, which is is defined as: root note up 2 semitones up 2 semitones up 1 semitone up 2 semitones up 2 semitones up 2 semitones up 1 semitones (reaches 1 octave from the ...


0

Neutral intervals are usually voiced with the major and the minor simultaneously on chromatic instruments that only have semitones (fretted instruments, most valved winds and keyboards without pitch bending). Eg. an A neutral consists of an A, a C half-sharp (it's the quartertone between C and C#, for the notation imagine the # but with only one vertical ...


1

You are correct that Ab minor must contain a Cb, not any form of B (even though Cb and B are "enharmonically equivalent", Cb is the correct spelling here). However, there are contexts in which two different versions (e.g. sharp and natural) of the same base note can sound together. When this occurs, it is called a "chromatic contradiction," or a False ...


15

The reason there are multiple names for notes is that the same note may function differently in different contexts. If you just play a single note with no context, then it could have a multitude of different names. For example if you played the note in between F and G you could call it F# or Gb or more obscurely E## or Abbb. They are all valid names and are ...


0

In Neo-Riemannian theory, this relationship is called a Leading Tone Exchange (often abbreviated "L"), and is one of the three fundamental transformations that can be performed to a chord. The other two are Parallel (P) and Relative (R) which are much better known. If you look at the geometric triangle that a chord makes on a Tonnetz map, these three ...


0

There are a couple of ways to look at it. Usually people look at the theoretical aspects, and talk about how its constructed from the overtone series. There is some truth to this. Once polyphony was invented (multiple voices sounding different parts at once) it was important that the notes we had were tuned largely to consonant intervals, which have a basis ...


0

There are only 351 possible different chords (strictly chord classes). This is considerably less than the 2047 suggested above because some chords are inversions of others. Fore example C6 has the same notes as Am7. So if you want to know how many different chords there are (counting all As for example as the same note) there are 19 with 3 notes 43 with 4 ...


4

Why are there seven principal notes? The short answer is: We don't know. Some music traditions (Western, Middle Eastern, Indian...) prefer heptatonic (seven-note) scales. We are not sure if these traditions are connected or not. There are attempts to explain the major scale based on harmonics but they can't explain other heptatonic scales used by these ...



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