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You can find a list of Major Scales in any basic music theory book . Also look on the web for a list of scales .Each scale has a note name.That is the keynote of the scale. A short trick to help you with sharp keys is to look at the last sharp symbol .In the diagram above the four sharps are shown in a red circle. The last sharp is on the D. So go up one ...


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Aggression might be confused for bombast, as you say, when you use certain timbres and textures. But aggression doesn't always have to be 'big' and 'brassy'; it can come in many other forms, it can even be subtle (or passive-aggressive, if you will!). Perhaps you could go the opposite way to thick texture and multiple timbres, why not strip down the ...


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The 'theory' is that chords from parallel major and minor work well together. Nearly all of these chords are from C major/C minor, which bears this out - except - Bm. So, as Laurence states, not EVERY chord HAS to fit in a certain key, it's just that most times, they do.


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You've just learned something important. Not all the chords in a song have to fit into one scale. And it's often pointless to MAKE them fit by inventing a constant string of mini-modulations. Look at how those chords DO fit together. C^, Bm, Bb, Am has a bass line that walks down. That's a strong enough reason for the sequence.


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If I'm understanding the question correctly... generally no, sometimes yes. Generally No Take Debussy's Claire de Lune... The melody is primarily in the right hand, doubled by the same line a third below. If you were asked to analyze this piece and identify the melody, you would single out the top line only (not the doubled thirds). This is because: ...


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You could be talking about HARMONY. Where two or more voices or instruments are often playing the same timing, but different notes.It doesn't even have to be simultaneous notes, listen to some fugues. Yes, often these notes are contained within the chord at that moment, usually a third or a fifth apart. They will blend with each other. African unaccompanied ...


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It's in C Major, and the progression is basic I-V-I-IV-V-I (C-G-C-F-G-C). It's 2/2, because larger note values are easier to read and write. The tempo is fast, and to write in 4/4 would probably mean using 16ths instead if 8ths for most of this.


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Yes, it's called Polyphony (if I understood you correctly this is what you mean). This is when multiple lines of melody are played simultaneously. You can pretty much pick anything by Bach and get a good example of polyphony. Or Rachmaninoff's second sonata... there are numerous more examples. It's actually not that rare. As an example (not for polyphony) ...


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This is a bit difficult to answer, since one person's aggressive might very well be another's bombastic, but see if any of these techniques strike your fancy: Liberal usage of dissonance and/or nonharmonic tones Instead of just rhythmic percussion/brass, try interspersing more ongoing rhythmic lines (or even pure polyrhythms) throughout all of the ...


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Someone asked me to convert and elaborate a comment to an answer, so here goes: I believe that once a level of mastery (being a 'professional', as was termed in the question) is obtained there isn't much thought really, more just expression. To explain, asking someone what they are thinking about when they are talking in a native language would likely ...


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As a guitar player, I learned notes by shapes and positions. The same note can sound in various places on a guitar so guitar players learn to find sweet spots on the guitar where a particular melody can be played without shifting position too much. Which shapes? The standard set of shapes are found in the CAGED system but I found that a little too ...


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Really, the whole thing in overtones. When you hear 440hz you hear 220hz so. But usually you cannot to recognize 220hz because it is quieter.


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Because music is an abstract language, I'm not sure your question can be answered easily or in any of the ways you described. For me, it's a combination of my mental image of the notes on the staff, vague mental image of those notes on the keyboard, and muscle memory of how both images are supposed to sound and feel. I don't know that I consciously think of ...


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Previous to learning scales, for me it was very much hit or miss. Certain notes following each other became familiar, rather like using the same few words in several sentences. When I knew scales, it changed rather. Listening to a piece, a key is established, the sort of scale used is recognised, and the fingers (usually) tend to follow the tune ...


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I've been meaning to make a test program, where one hears two sine waves (no harmonics to give away the octave) and attempts to tune them an octave apart. My vague memory of others having done this is that there is a tendency to make the octaves a bit wide. I'd like to replicate this and see if it is true or not. If it is, there are two things that follow: ...


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It's going to vary, and you have to remember that there are also a lot of pros that learned by listening and copying what they heard on records without learning to read music. Notes can be known "personally" and this includes knowing all the various chords and scales as they relate to them. There may be no names or functions involved--I think of it as a kind ...


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Well, I am not sure but: If you have string like in a guitar or something. and you play it somewhere. The next octave will be for example a meter away and the third octave will be two meters away. That's more figurativ and somehow like that what Stian Yttervik said. And I am sure, you can see something like that if you open up the wing of a grand piano and ...


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This may be an oversimplification, but there are plenty of accurate technical responses to this question already in this post so I'll take a more abstract approach: To my ears, more harmonics means more sonic information. In other words, additional timbre and 'dirt' gives a sound additional characteristics. Further, most sounds (excluding perfect waveform ...


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In addition to the geometrical explanations above, I'll just add this perhaps obvious perhaps accidental fact: women's voices and men's voices tend to be, on the average, about an octave apart. Women and men sing an octave apart in just about every musical culture of the world.


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Awesome question and sadly the significance of it seemed to be missed by a lot of people here. Saying its double the wavelength doesn't explain anything since light at double the wave length looks nothing alike. I've wondered this a lot. Its different to the question "why certain intervals sound better than others". A lot of people are trying for a false ...


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There are 2 sides to this question: a) What is the same in the tones in an octaves, which isn't the same in other intervals? (physics) b) Why are we able to percieve this? (psychology) I'll try to answer the first part of the question: What really is the same are the overtones. Suppose note 1 has a frequency of n then it's overtones are: 2n, 3n, 4n, 5n, ...


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I might be wrong, but I have thought of this myself and explained it to myself like this: https://www.wolframalpha.com/input/?i=plot+%28sin+x+%2B+sin+2x%29%2F2,+sin+x As you can see, a sum of a wave and its double is quite close to the original if you compensate for amplitude. So, singing along in a different octave will sound the same together if you ...


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When you add harmonics to a fundamental sine wave, the periodicity of the result remains the same: whenever the waveform of the fundamental repeats, that of the harmonics repeat as well. There are no beatings or artifacts with a frequency lower than that of the fundamental. That means that you get a tone quality that is as constant as that of the ...


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For male voices (and perhaps sounds produced by other large beasts), the overtones or harmonics can be less attenuated than the fundamental pitch spectrum in certain environments and over certain distances. Human brains have been evolved to hear a male voice as the "same voice" even in these environments where the octave and harmonics becomes much stronger ...


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There are indications of an underlying neurological (and arguably evolutionary) basis for perceiving octaves as equivalent, see for example this discussion. This phenomenon is pretty fundamental in that it is also seen in monkeys and other mammals, but not (apparently) in some songbirds. There has been quite a bit of work on the neurological basis for ...


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It is true that "measure" is used synonymously with "bar" in North America. Christopher Hasty, in Meter as Rhythm (1997) makes a compelling case for ceasing use of "measure" (in short, that he wishes to use the notion of "measure" more flexibly than the usage synonymous with bar, since in the process of making sense of rhythmic activity we use "measures" of ...


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It is, I think, a perfectly clear observation that one note an octave above another note sounds as if it were the same in a certain sense. It's certainly common for people to perceive things that way, but it's not universal. Here's a question from someone who complains that they don't hear things that way, for example! shared harmonics alone can't be ...


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The frequency of a pitch is n. the frequency of a pitch an octave higher is 2n. So, yes the harmonics are going to be very similar, but the first harmonic of the original pitch IS the second pitch in frequency. What you say about an octave and a half (but not exactly, that's a tritone) has caught out several singers in my past, where they pitch on a 4th or ...


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The gist of these answers is correct: try notes from the related key/scale or from notes in and around the chords; practice singing then playing notes into your tuner to make sure you're playing the notes you think you are. Another thing to think about is that melodies played on guitar just don't sound the same as when sung. I'm not sure if it's because ...


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Is changing tempo during the song and back again a common device used on modern popular music? Or is there a good reason to avoid this type thing? It's not common, but there is precedent: "We Do What We Can" by Sheryl Crow (track #10 from her debut album) "Fool in the Rain" by Led Zeppelin I could probably think of a few others, but it's getting ...


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You mention "...showcase a vocal range" -- sometimes it's out of necessity rather than showcasing. Two examples I can think of offhand include: Islands in the Stream as recorded by Dolly Parton and Kenny Rogers. Kenny has the vocal lead for the first verse and chorus (in C major), but then the song modulates two whole tones lower (A♭ major) so that Dolly ...


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A good example of the G/B chord which illustrates why it matters which note is in the bass is the main progression/riff from "Blue on Black" by Kenny Wayne Shepherd. The riff starts on a D chord with the bass note moving briefly down to C and then back to D. The next chord is introduced by a "walk" up the A string, playing the notes A, B, C to finally form ...


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Allen Forte, in The Structure of Atonal Music, lists 220 chords or "prime forms". These include all possible collections of chords of three to twelve notes, where transpositions and inversions are treated as instances of the same chord. Consequently, Forte's pc analysis doesn't distinguish between a major and minor triad, for example. Furthermore, notice ...


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In rock music it is not uncommon for the root notes of chords to follow a scale, while the chords all are major chords (or distorted fifths, i.e. power chords which have an overtone series much like a major triad). Therefore it can be more meaningful to analyze the harmony of a rock song by considering what scale/mode the root motion implicates. Many of the ...


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All chords exist. The real question is: What is the conventional name of these chords? How are chords named? Is this a practical chord? Is this the practical way to name this chord? Depending on your motivations for your "motivation" the question could be re-framed. All possible chords have been classified.. probably many times. Look up Set Theory, and ...


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As with most aspects of music, music theory doesn't offer one single 'correct' way to think of chords. The most commonly-taught way is to start with the triads that are generated from the set of notes in major and minor keys, and then consider other forms as variations on, or substitutions for, those chords. As others have mentioned, there's also an emphasis ...


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Any two or more notes form a chord. The other answers all have valid points, but the term itself is quite simple — even if it's not necessarily useful in most contexts.


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A useful "theory" needs to tell you what you can do with a "chord", not just give it a name. For example the idea of "the chord EFGA" doesn't have much significance, until you put it into a musical context like this when you can understand it either as a dominant 13th, or as two passing notes associated with a dominant 7th - whichever you prefer.


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Chord theory can be approached in two ways: You can try and understand the frequency of each sound (in Hertz) and discover which frequencies are actually harmonious overlaps. This is approaching it from a pure tone / physics side of resonance. You can also approach it in terms of "traditional" theory which is simpler, and closer to what you are getting ...


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Yes they are both chords, but how useful they would be alone especially in functional harmony is questionable. The first one C, D, E could actually be viewed as a CAdd9 chord without the fifth as the root implies a perfect 5th pretty strongly. The second one will most likely not be used in any tonal harmony due it's extreme dissonance and will not be given ...


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This can be done, but not all combinations are always useful. Nicolas Slonimsky's "Thesaurus of Scales and Melodic Patterns" basically does this. He lists lots of combinations indexed by number of notes.


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The opening section of Spanish Dance No 3, by Granados, I think provides a clear example of non-contrapuntal music. Notice how each of the different voices move in the same contour and the same rhythm. It's probably my least favourite of the 12 dances, but it's one you never forget because it is so rigid.


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Counterpoint is the relationship between voices that are harmonically dependent, yet are independent in other aspects like in rhythm and shape. Counterpoint is only really observed in pieces that have multiple independent melodies or in other words polyphonic in nature. The example you are talking about is homophonic or consists of a distinct melody and ...


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Simply put you analyze the score. You need some rudimentary knowledge of non chord notes and the like. Let me give you an example to aid your comprehension. This is an excerpt from the piano piece La Romanesca by Franz Liszt. They key is a minor. In the first bar we have the melody in the right hand and the harmony in the left. The left hand jumps from A ...


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What's to "approach"? Those are the chords. They don't fit any neat system of all being in one scale. It would be ridiculous to invent constant modulations. Lots of music does this. If your system of theory doesn't "allow" it, find a better system!


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First of all, you need to find what scale the song is in (if any). This will be determined by the key signature and if it's a minor scale, there might be some accidentals. After you've found out what scale you are in, you need to see what notes are being played and make out which chord they form. For instance, you might see that the notes being played are ...


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It is convenient to use a treble (G) clef over a bass (F) clef as adding a single leger line in between gives one a pretty good range that is easy to read quickly.


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I would recommend starting with ear training - since as you will discover - hearing intervals, chords, melodic lines, being able to read and write music and understand what you are hearing is the key to it all. This is https://www.iwasdoingallright.com/tools/ear_training/online/ a tool that will help you get started with a daily program Think of music as a ...


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My understanding, and I don't remember where I learned this, is that the early Catholic church at first forbade harmony of any kind, then finally allowed only limited harmony with intervals that the church fathers considered "perfect" in the eyes (ears?) of God. This is why organum uses only perfect intervals.


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What do you mean by "wrong"? When transcribing music for the piano, the goal is to be faithful to the original while ensuring that the transcription is playable and "pianistic", which is a term-of-art that is not very easily definable. It sounds like you're asking about the rules of traditional Bach-style four-part-harmony. (Or really n-part harmony, where ...



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