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Sometimes when you have F# in the key signature, it's better to use E♯ so you don't have to go through the trouble of making F natural and then making it sharp after again. Same with C♭.


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One way of thinking about it is to avoid the equal temperament trap and assuming things like G#=A♭. This is not the case. The theory side of it is based on harmonic context in which you can not have 2 of the "same" note (e.g. D♭ and D#) in one scale. For instance, the A♭m (aeolian) scale goes as such: A♭, B♭, C♭, D♭, E♭, F♭, G♭, A♭. You cannot have B♭ and B ...


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I have a similar background, and in my experience, there simply isn't a good transition or analog from piano to guitar. Whereas a child can learn to identify every B-flat on the piano in an afternoon, it takes weeks or months of practice to know the notes on the fretboard. It's an entirely different system. I would like to suggest a few approaches / ideas I ...


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If you only think about the fixed frequency instruments, just intonation is not good for the instrument construction, there is good examples for the guitar above. There will be technical difficulties with a piano and other instruments too. But for continuous variation pitch instruments, the just intonation will have more natural sounding. There is a good ...


1

The are scale shapes. The help to memorize notes on fretboard. The every scale has multiple positions. The most popular are vertical patterns but there are others This is very popular minor pentatonic scale shape diagram It will be never so easy to play them as it was on keyboard but you will get used to it. The most beneficial thing you can do on guitar ...


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You could put black and white stickers on each fret under each string, but it would ruin the guitar's aesthetics a bit. I would suggest memorising the notes on the low E and A strings up to the 12th fret and their relation to the dot markers. By knowing the notes on the E string, you can know the notes on the D string, the note two frets further along the ...


5

Welcome to the wonderful world of guitar. The guitar is a very versatile and portable instrument that you can enjoy anywhere you like. As you have discovered, fretted (or non fretted) stringed instruments such as guitar, ukulele. mandolin, or even violin, are very different from a keyboard instrument. With a piano, there is only one specific key per ...


2

Music is fundamentally made up of intervals, which are ratios of pitches (sound frequencies). The "simpler" the ratio, as in a fraction with smaller numbers, the more consonant the interval. For example: the perfect octave is 2:1, the perfect fifth is 3:2, major third is 5:4, the diminished fourth is 32:25. To produce music, we chain the intervals together, ...


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You're asking quite an advanced question to which there can be many different answers, all true; the idea is the harmonic context. As the man said, in a scale there is A B C♯ D E F♯ G♯ A. Now clearly that last G♯ couldn't be A♭, because the scale demands that the note before the top A, be a G. But if it's a normal G, the scale doesn't come out right. So we ...


42

NReilingh gave a good general-case answer. I'll give you a specific case just to demonstrate that the concept is useful. First consider a C major chord. C-E-G, right? Then you make it into a minor chord by flattening the third, to get C-E♭-G. So far, so good. Now, consider an A♭ major chord: it's spelled A♭-C-E♭. But what happens when ...


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B and Cb are different notes. One is a kind of B and the other is a kind of C. Information about harmony is contained both in the note name and any accidental alterations to it — C to any kind of E is a third, and C to any kind of F is a fourth, and those intervals have different meanings, even if they sound "the same". And these pitches are only the same ...


1

If all you're given is chords, then you don't really have enough information to go on to answer that question. It's up to you to pick the chord inversions/voicings and decide how high or low to play them, and so on. One simple way to play that Dm, for example, might be to play D4-F4-A5 in the right hand and D3 in the left hand. The C would be C4-E4-G4 ...


1

Yes the bass is generally played with the left hand on the keyboard, when played with 2 hands. I think your question is very general because these rules can always be broken, i.e,. the chords can be played in the right hand and the melody played with the left, but allow me to clarify something. The bass isn't necessesarily dependent on the hand you play it ...


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When transcribing, it's easier to understand WHAT'S happening, after a muso has actually produced something. When looking at the theory behind it, this will explain WHY and HOW it works. As said previously, you need both to make your playing a success. Merely doing the first, you will be able to play copycat phrases all day long, without actually knowing ...


4

Consider an analogy with literature. You can become an author by reading good books, or by studying language and grammar. In reality, you will want some of both. Each is valuable, but in different ways. The latter provides understanding and insight into the first. Music theory is sort of the grammar behind music, and the extent to which it helps you will ...


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The two go hand in hand. As you transcribe, you'll see that certain patterns apply (like the ii V I turn-around). IMO, you don't need as much theory as you think... I was focused on learning modes and chord substitution but have gotten much more from transcribing and practicing the language. But like you said, transcribing is more important.. you can ...


0

Generally, human beings think in patterns. All music is is a specific set of frequencies in a particular pattern, and so when we can associate a phrase or thing that we want to remember with a pattern, we associate this thing with a musical phrase. This pattern becomes psychologically linked to this object/entity, and so we therefore remember the entity ...


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This is a good example of why we shouldn't get hung up on definitions. The word is not the thing, and there's no "correct" definition of what constitutes an instrument and what doesn't, because the world doesn't split up nicely into instruments and non-instruments.


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You can buy lectures from Prof. Robert Greenberg he has a whole course on the life, history, and work of Bach. Prof. Greenberg teaches in Berkeley. You can get the courses on the Great courses website


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Just a side note (too long for a comment), in Jazz there are the so called Symmetrical Diminished scales. These are octatonic scales that play well over diminished chords, and that are built from two groups of 4 notes, each group with a similar shape. There are two of these scales: half-whole mode -- 1st group = [1 b2 #2 3] - 2nd group = [#4 5 6 ...


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beautiful flute song using this scale greetings Erik


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The Bach Network UK site has knowledgeable articles on Bach. This one is a nice introductory reading. The subject of your essay is especially difficult because Bach was not an innovator. In addition, music theory at that time was not as clear and usable as it is today. Theoretical books about counterpoint, such as Fux's Gradus ad Parnassum (1725), were ...


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There is a jazz scale theory, coming mainly from the modal period, with contributions from the jazz theorist George Russell, that approaches improvisation by viewing "every chord as having one or more scales that can be played over it" (www.jazzstandards.com/theory/modal-jazz.htm). Here's a possible chords-scales correspondence (this chart is my attempt at ...


2

I'm a student at a fine arts school majoring in music, and from personal experience, as the first person said, learning to play should be the primary goal. Learning the actual music theory will be tenfold harder without the foundation of actually playing. This being said, I suggest you go buy a cheap little keyboard and a method book to go with it (Hal ...


5

I would rely on Christoph Wolff's excellent Johann Sebastian Bach. The Learned Musician (published 2001), which features an entire chapter about Bach's great interest for previous and contemporary composers, and also his Bach: Essays on his Life and Works. You should probably focus on the German "fathers" of Bach's keyboard style (other Bachs, Pachelbel ...


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MuseScore certainly lets you enter notes and chords then hear what they sound like. I'd warn you, however, that studying music theory divorced from practical experience of PLAYING the sort of music being studied is going to lead you into a web of miscomprehensions and dead ends. Take lessons on playing an instrument. PLAY music. Let the theory follow.


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I would say that MuseScore can be a great tool to exercise some of the learning you do. I'm not aware of any tutorials that explicitly use MuseScore to teach theory. However, with MuseScore, you can construct chords AND there is a built-in, visual keyboard that can be used to input notes. You might try going to MusicTheory.net to start learning theory. ...


1

First you should start with what key you want your music to be in - maybe a major key if your song is a Pop song. Then, you need to work out how many beats in a bar your music is going to have: 4/4, 3/4, 8/8? Now, to compose the melody of your music, imagine how you want your music to be. I can't help you with your melody, because you are the only one who ...


0

Once we comprehend the tune as intended by the composer, our brain has already identified the tonic. Without identifying the tonic, the same tune will sound very different. So, the question about identifying the tonic becomes that of locating the tonic inside your brain, which has made you recognize the tune that it actually is. If you are already a ...


0

Some good suggestions in other answers, I'd suggest in addtion that you take an online course, as there are quite quite good ones and freely available on MOOC plataforms such as Coursera and edx. For your situation the course Developing Your Musicianship (from Berklee college), available in both plataforms, seems a particularly suited starting point.


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I appreciate that you're interested in learning an instrument. Well, choose an instrument that you wish to play, I feel it might be little easier for you to find books on how to play that instrument after you find that out. If you want to learn basics of music, this website http://www.musictheory.net/ would be really helpful as the lessons are taught with ...


1

I fear that your question is so broad that it might well be put on hold, or you might be asked to make your question a bit narrower, but have a possible recommendation: Hindemith's book - "Elementary Training for Musicians" would certainly enable you learn all the basics of music, such as rhythm, notation, scales etc. It is a tough book to work through, ...


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A pragmatic answer: if there is a way to notate that repeats are to be played on D.C. or D.S., it is not well known. I'm not saying there is no such standard, only that it is not widespread. The best you can do is to write it out: "D.S. with repeats", or "D.S con repetizione" if you prefer italian.


3

From my perspective, which is less theory and more practice, I would always try and approach this chords first. Listen to the rhythm guitarist. On the run up to the solo and then all the way through the solo, the rhythm guitarist (or keyboard or whatever) will be providing you with all the chords so you don't need to guess what the soloist is playing from. ...


1

The notes that seem to have 2 different names are actually 2 different notes. If you are only looking for note names then you should be fine - follow the advise of these commentators and you will automatically get the correct sharps or flats for your key signature. But if you are coding music to be played in precise harmony (for example on Supercollider) ...


0

My teacher recommended Edly's Music Theory for Practical People. I've just started it. I find very readable and appropriate for a complete beginner. It has worksheets to complete in addition to explanations.


1

Thanks to the comment by alephzero, we can figure the whole thing out easily. The notation rules are that any expression, technique, or instruction text starts in the music where the start of the above appears. This is also how notation software works. If you were to start execution at the end of the instruction then the position in the music would depend ...


0

It is usual to be told that learning guitar initially involves learning lots of chord and scale shapes. You can buy books called "1500 chords you must learn", and so on. This can be a distraction, and for me, it makes the guitar seem more complicated than it really is. I prefer to just remember two basic, fundamental shapes - I'll call them "north-east", ...


0

There are theoretical reasons why this occurs that are not conditioned responses. The overtone series if the fundamental expression of "music". That is, the overtone series is a natural occurrence due to the way the universe is designed. I won't get into the why's here but basically it is physics. I can explain more if need be. The overtone series of the ...


0

This can be answered fairly simply. The inversion of a doubly augmented seventh is a doubly diminished second. A doubly diminished second is -1 semitone, so it's more than "OK" that the (nominally) "lower" pitch is higher; it follows naturally from the definition. If you descend by -1 semitones, you go up in pitch.


2

You are dealing with extremes of intervals so the result may not be straightforward and I can almost guarantee you will never see anything like that in practice. In general doubly diminished and augmented intervals are only seen in 4ths and 5ths due to them being perfect and are extremely rare in practical music as seen in and explained this question. In ...


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This is a little imprecise but a general rule of thumb is you start from the bar line nearest to the marking and continue either to another dynamic marking or the next double bar line or end-repeat bar line. This seems to be what most other musicians do subconsciously and you don't really lose anything.


1

A crescendo applies until contradiction, either up to a decrescendo (then it remains unclear, which level to achieve) or to an absolute volume indication. If I see correctly, in the bar below yours marked with (1) the seems to be a piano marking directly beneath the octave transposition. Assuming, that (due to the metronome marking in the upper left) there ...


1

The crescendo starts where the word "cresc." is. It SHOULD lead to an explicit dynamic, and unless very short should be extended with a dotted line to indicate the extent. The composer here is being rather imprecise in indicating what he wants.


2

The Taktteil is determined by the time signature, and it is the basic subdivision of the measure. E.g., in 4/4 time there are four Taktteile (each of which is a quarter note), and in 6/8 there are six Taktteile (each of which is an eighth note). The term Taktglied is archaic. Note that the link is from Grimm's dictionary, which appeared in the 1850s. The ...


0

There are more, except that when you reach the octave copy higher up the neck, it becomes the same as those lower. The clue's in 'pentatonic'. With five notes to play with, so to speak, by the time we get to the sixth, we're back at the beginning again. There are really only two SCALES here. The minor pent., starting for the sake of argument on the open ...


1

Cresc., or crescendo, means getting gradually louder than it has been. It starts where your 2 is. It'll continue getting louder until there's another sign, maybe an f or ff, at which point, the volume will level out until another sign is shown. It's shown in the bar marked 1, in anticipation for the start of the next bar, although with a gradual cresc. it ...


3

I did not find Taktglieder in any of my German musical references, so I have resort to native language knowledge and some assumptions: Takt (measure) is a sort of time unit. Taktteile (parts of measure) is a fragment of that unit Taktglieder (members of measure) are the notes, which populate the [partial] time unit. These meaning of members as denoting the ...


0

I believe that "members of the measure" is a part of a musical phrase (So the parts you get when dividing a phrase) and "parts of the measure" are the notes, bars and rests.


0

The first shape of the (minor) pentatonic scale always starts on the root note of the scale on the low E string. So if you are improvising in E minor pentatonic, then the first shape would start on the open E string (As you probably know). The intervals of the pentatonic scale are different between every note: m3, M2, M2, m3, M2. The intervals in each ...



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