New answers tagged

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I'm not affiliated to it but in my own opinion the following web page: flamencopolis.com/archives/472 is the most extensive online document I've found as of yet on the issue of compas. It breaks down all of the main time signatures of flamenco palos. Unfortunately it is only available in Spanish, as is the case of many of the best ressources on flamenco. I ...


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If it works in your song then it is acceptable. If it's there for the sake of being there, it's probably a bad idea.


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Really, to create your song all you need is a notepad, pen and the recorded on your phone to get the melodies down. Ideally though you would want an acoustic guitar or a piano. The difficult thing for a lot of people to get their head around is the difference between a song, and a recording of a song. You will find many people telling you about beats and ...


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A chord is a collection of tones played together. A guitar is just a collection of strings that can be tuned to anything. "Standard tuning" as far as I have been able to tell in my research, has no basis as being superior or inferior to any possible tuning. By tuning a guitar to notes that all sound harmonious together, one is creating what is typically ...


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In terms of electronic music, the term "pitch bend" is probably the most common, easily understood, and appropriate term for both cases. In a more classical/formal context, the musical term for this kind of continuous variation in pitch is portamento, which applies whether it is fast (as in your examples) or slow. This term applies to all musical ...


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The whole passage is essentially a linear elaboration of V♭9. Let's "de-broken-chord" it: it fairly leaps to the eye what Beethoven is doing here when you see the voices. Note that we're getting a big A♭-G appoggiatura in the top voice, but the inner voices are marching up and down in minor thirds between the chord tones of the dominant (marked "+") in ...


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The best way to look at it is as you stated as the C♯ and E as non harmonic tones leading to the D and the F respectively. It could be looked at as a variation of a Neapolitan 6th where the 3rd is minor instead of major that goes to the iio instead of V especially since if you look at it as different enharmonic equivalents of D♭, F♭, and ...


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First off a power chord is a modern name for something that has been around forever in music which is the perfect 5th specifically parallel fifths when used in succession. There is nothing special about the use of them in modern music or classical music and in fact when the melody is introduced the full chord is typically shown in the harmony regardless of ...


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I think this is an error in the score. If I say that, it's because Thcaikovsky, in a letter to Jugensern (the editor of the score you are working on), say that few mistakes are still present in the score. I found this on the internet: Tchaikovsky gave a detailed account of his reworking of his First Symphony, and publication of the full score, in a ...


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I have come across the word "sonority" as an expressive instruction on flute music by French composers such as Phillip Gaubert. How does a word used to describe chordal harmonics translate to playing notes on a single note instrument like the flute? I teach private lessons and I have a hard time explaining a word like this that doesn't have an ...


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Short answer: yes and no. No, it's not at all a standard usage. There are no augmented and diminished key signatures. Yes, you can do whatever you want. Microtones, even... it's all cool. So if you have a need for this, you certainly can do it. Some scales will fit these chords better. I don't quite follow your augmented scale idea... it would make more ...


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The C clefs originated from the clefs used to notate ancient Gregorian chants. The C - shaped thing at the beginning of each barline showed where C was in the staff, and is also why the weird things we have today are called "C" clefs. The clef show here would have been the predecessor to the C Baritone Clef (which is almost never used nowadays). The "C" ...


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There are several correct answers, but the best is clearly C C/B Amin7. Points other answer missed: Second inversion chords are fairly unusual, and mostly used in cadences. They are particularly "weak", and there's no functional reason to call your second chord an Emin7/B. What is the chord doing? That's the entire question here and why we have the topic ...


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Many (perhaps even most) chords played on guitar could be correctly identified (by itself) as more than one chord! The most appropriate name to use in a given context depends on - the context. Chords in a song don't appear by themselves. They appear as part of the entire song. Things to consider when choosing which of several possible names to call a ...


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"C diminished" could be Locrian C (C Db Eb F Gb Ab Bb) which has a lowered 5th (probably tricky to use, on account of <C Eb Gb> being dissonant) and lowered 2nd scale degree (easier to handle, see the Neapolitan chord for common uses, or consider the Db as borrowed from the subdominant Aeolian F) as compared to the Aeolian C mode (C D Eb F G Ab Bb ...


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It's not a standard usage. There are 12 keys (or a few more due to treating C# and Db as different.) Keys have two modes, major and minor. Other tonal organizations are possible but the usual (CPP) terminology isn't used in their descriptions. The term "key" is not synonymous with scale. Scale (from the Italian for "ladder") is a collection of notes taken ...


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C/B could be called an Eminor chord with a minor 6th in second inversion; it's the same thing. It really depends on where you want to go with harmony. Both are valid and both are commonly used, so I cannot decide for sure which one to choose. Both C - C/B - Am7 and Am7/C, Am7/B, Am7 seem correct in a chord progression. I would suggest to look at the melody ...


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Em6 is actually confusing, as it's an Em chord, but the 6th bit is a major 6th - C#. So it can't be that anyway. Best call the sequence C, Am7/B, Am7. That way, musos would see the transition between C and Am7 with an altered Am7 chord sandwiched between. Trying to name a chord from its 'root' note is not going to help. Yes, it could be a B something, but ...


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This is a typical example of a modal keyboard piece from the late 16th or early 17th century. Mode in polyphonic music (as distinguished from mode in plainchant) is a complicated topic that is being actively researched by musicologists and is still the subject of scholarly debate. It is a different way of thinking about music that just can't be compared ...


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Good luck with your software. Your list is rather incomplete, as it only lists majors and minors. (I'm not sure how much this matters but you should definitely be aware of this limitation.) On the other hand you seem to be aware that B# major for example is essentially never used as it needs five double sharps. Most "black note" keys use whichever of ...


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Musique Concrete is a whole genre that no concept of key.


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I recall one based on ascending and descending the chromatic scale. Having only heard it and never seen the sheet music I can't say what note it started on. Let's just say the music was different. Incidentally, there were no chords in the piece at all.


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This is actually not a simple question, but neither do the answers give an accurate picture of historical practice during the common practice period. The Beethoven Fifth is a good example: we regard it as a "C-minor symphony" because its first movement is in C minor. Within that movement, C minor is, as we often say, the tonal center: it's the key to which ...


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If I'm not mistaken, both of the books have some stuff in common, but the theory is book is focusing solely on theory (duh), whereas the piano book focuses on the piano. The theory book has some stuff about the piano and vice versa, but both have stuff the other book doesn't. I would suggest that if you have the money (they cost around 30-40$ on Amazon), you ...


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I believe those that say it begins with using the 3:2 ratio are correct. Schoenberg is also correct, but a 7-note system already existed before the major scale was recognized, so his explanation starts in the "middle", so to speak. We call the 3:2 frequency ratio the frequency ratio for a 5th, but, of course, a scale or mode or system of pitches had to exist ...


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If you know the basics of reading music, you could probably get a score of any piece written before 1900 from the IMSLP and quickly page through it looking for key changes. For example, if you scan the score for Beethoven's Fifth, the first movement is in C minor, the second movement is in A-flat major, the third movement has sections in both C major and C ...


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It's not clear what your goals and requirements are for this information system -- and that has a huge bearing on the answer. If, for example, your software is trying to analyze the harmony inside of a single piece, then yes, symphonies definitely will modulate (change keys) all over the place, as Wheat Williams describes in his excellent answer. And this ...


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If a symphony has the key "C Minor", can it also have another key? I think the misconception you are having is that certain instruments are transposing by their nature. The Bb clarinet for instance when it plays a C what you are actually hearing is a Bb. So if the strings play in C major, the Bb clarinet would have its score written in D Major. This is ...


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These are the 7 chords formed using the notes from the D major scale (D, E, F#, G, A, B, C#). So, yes, the answer is that the progression is in D major


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Every symphony ever written has more than one key -- usually several different keys. A symphony may have the name of a certain key in its title, but this only refers to the main key that occurs throughout its structure. Each symphony will have many changes to different keys. Each symphony will tend to be unique in how it uses multiple keys. Different ...


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A composition like "Symphony in C minor" refers to a key in the piece, with which key the composition starts and with which it ends. There is a certain number of notes and chords in that key, so if a whole composition was built only on that key, it would sound repetitive. That's why during the composition changes keys. Usually it's more than one, but it ...


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Pedrell's edition is here. Yes, you can call this the 4th tone. Note the points of imitation on B and E; notice that the dux and comes of the opening point emphasise C & F respectively before falling back to the final. Subsequent points (such as at the start of page 2) have similar incipits. Note also that IV (A major) does not appear in cadences, ...


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These all just look like a minor which modulates to the sub dominant key (d minor ). This is further emphasised in the manner in which the c# and g# resolve to the d and a respectively. Also this seems to me to be a baroque transcription of a piece that very well may have had its existence rooted in the renaissance. There seems to be a distinct minor ...


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As a supplement to Tekkerue's excellent answer, there are situations where it's very useful to know multiple voicings, specifically different inversions of the same chord for creating moving basslines. Being able to change shape without changing the chord makes more of the fretboard usable for extending the range of the bassline as a separate voice.


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These are called "power chords". He's only playing three strings, so while it looks like he's playing a barre chord, the first finger is actually muting the bottom strings and not pressing down on them. Here's a good explanation of power chords and how to play them, the next video in the series shows how to move them around to play different chords. ...


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These are usually referred to as "A-shape" barre chords -- it's the same note interval arrangement as when playing an open A chord, albeit with muting the high-e string. When you use the "double bar" technique there is no easy way to get a chord tone on the 1st string so you just mute it instead. Some people fret the fourth,third and second strings with ...


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Just to add AlephZero's answer the ii6 chord is the standard for the perfect cadence because it makes the big sense if you look at the bass line. If you have the Cadential 6/4 progression you could have ii6-I6/4-V-I. That tonic chord in second inversion is just a decoration of the dominant chord. If you look at the very important bass line you now have for ...


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This may or may not help but what you're suggesting sounds similar to how I learned the violin. Did you get to the Tonalization exercise yet? I believe I learned music theory (or started to) in group classes with games. If your student doesn't have that opportunity perhaps you should look into having a theory section of the lesson. You could teach your ...


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There is no correct answer as to which chord you "should" play because you can use whichever chord you think sounds best in a given situation. What you're describing is essentially changing the voicing or the way the chord sounds without changing the chord. There are many, many ways to play the same chord but each one has its own unique sound. Here are just ...


1

JUST with reference to Steve's post which is highly informative. A g2 chord would not contain the major third hence it would like G,A,D. THE G A B D CHORD is G add second or G add ninth, YOU don't need to worry about the octave the A is in; what determines its character as an add ninth is the fact that the dominant seventh has not been included. THE same is ...


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THE difference between 2nd and 9th or add ninth is not really the octave you play the extended notes in; the same with 4th and 11th. It is simply whether you include the dominant seventh or not. Generally speaking it makes sense to stack extended chords in their original positions but take the c9 chord-c e g bflat d. NOW try this inversion which is kinda a g ...


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Whether you move up or down, the progression will sound the same. Which way you choose purely depends on the song. There are times were the composer (or some other musician) will specifically ask you to move a certain way; if not, try both of the ways yourself and see what fits best. If the melody moves up, it might sound nice to move along with it. It will ...


5

Yes they are all the same chord progression. When just given the Roman numeral analysis or chord symbols of the progression, the exact voicings do not matter nor does what octave you play them in. However it should be noted that what voicings you use, what octave you play in, and how much you move from one chord to another affect how what you play sounds. ...


2

No a chord does not come with its own key change. What it does come with is its own set of notes that will define the chord regardless of what key you are in. A Bb7 will always be spelled Bb-D-F-Ab. Assuming those naturals are suppose to be there they could be curtosy accidentals there to remind you the A is natural even though the overall harmony at that ...


1

Tried listening to several recordings, and the only one I caught actually went to Gb/F# instead of A ! Making the chord closer to Bb7 aug 5. Might be worth while doing the same. Answering your lead question - a chord does not imply a change of key sig. In this case, if it did, there would need to be an Eb as well in the key sig. to get to Ab, thus stating 3 ...


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Baroque music was all about expressiveness, and the rhythm was not necessarily meant to be held as strictly as the Renaissance tactus. Wheat Williams has mentioned historically informed performance, and as he says, these things are debated academically. But there is some good indication that Baroque composers did think of slowing down at the end of pieces. ...


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Wheat Williams covered the basics of historically-informed-performance quite well. I want to add that unmeasured preludes (not uncommon in Baroque music) indicate that Baroque composers did have a concept of give-and-take in regards to tempo. (You can look at examples of preludes here or here to see what the music looked like.) So, while the purists may ...


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"Historically informed" practitioners will tell you all kinds of stuff overgeneralized from a narrow modern point of view. For example, that dynamics in keyboards are a modern invention. Clavichords were perfectly capable of nuanced dynamic play, and larger instruments like harpsichords had several manuals and registration possibilities in order to allow ...


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Questions like this cause endless debate among scholars. The basic fact is that sheet music from the Baroque era tends to have a great deal less detail and specificity about interpretive matters than sheet music written in later eras. Bowing directions for strings are never given; the only dynamic markings used are often just "p" and "f", and there are no ...


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I wish I could point you to some scientific studies; I cannot. But I can speak on the basis of a lifetime of my being a semi-professional traditional choral singer and soloist who has a university music school degree in singing. I have extensive experience with a cappella choral singing, with singing accompanied by piano and organ and orchestra, and even ...



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