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Your question is beautiful and I think there will be more science and research behind it thanks to the advent of the Spectrogram (where you can visualize all the frequencies engaged for a particular sound). Timbre and harmonic invokation are synonymous to me because when you trigger a string on a guitar or piano, or engage a flute's resonant chamber, you ...


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Generally speaking, you should sing with the same technique in a lower octave as you do in a higher octave. But the natural tendency is to tighten up as you go higher, in part because you may feel that you’re going to hit the top of your range. If you sing with an airy sound, generally speaking that should be because you intend to sing with an airy sound as ...


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Additional to the answer from topo morto I'd like to mention the book “Tuning, Timbre, Spectrum, Scale” from W. Sethares [1]. Beside others, it describes the construction of scales and tone systems for timbres with inharmonic spectra. Even though it is mainly a place theoretic approach I don't see any reason why it shouldn't work also with a theory based on ...


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The most commonly-quoted theory on how the timbre of a sound affects consonance/dissonance is Helmhotz' proposition that beat frequencies between the individual partials of notes cause dissonance, and the coincidence of partials resulted in consonance. This was later expanded on by Plomp and Levelt's findings (for example, that dissonance is eliminated when ...



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