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13

This will just be an embellishment of @user15077’s answer. This is the beginning of your piece as you’ve notated it: Here is what it would look like with a more standard approach: As you can see, many of the notes are expressed as tied notes now. For example, the quarter-note D-sharp in the first measure is written as a sixteenth tied to a dotted ...


9

Let's just pick the first bar apart which is pretty much a mess. I'll write down the note durations as fractions: 3/8 1/16 1/4 9/16 (bar line after 5/16 of that, the 5/16 written as 1/4~1/16). This does not look as much like "composing" as it looks like "let the notation program break the mess across bars and fix this up in the next measure". If this ...


6

Actually, in terms of fractions, 3/4 is the same as 6/8. But time signatures are not fractions. 3/4 means each bar has 3 notes of 1/4 each. 6/8 means each bar has 6 notes of 1/8 each. And yes, the difference is in the way you count it: In 3/4 you count 1,2,3 and in 6/8 you count up to 6 and the notes are shorter. The accents change as well; 6/8 is an even ...


5

Time signatures look like fractions, but are not really. I grew up on crotchets and quavers, so I'll use those words, but the American/German number-names drop naturally out of the time signatures. 3/4 does not mean "3 divided by 4", it means 3 times 1/4, or 3 beats of a crotchet. So the piece is "in 3". In all traditional notation (Beethoven, Mozart, et ...


4

If you need a two-bar count, the one I'm used to is just a-1, 2, 3, 2, 2, 3 (can also be used for 6/8, depending on tempo) [the first 'a' giving the 'swing, last triplet' pickup if the piece swings, otherwise it's left out.]


2

A simple basic rule, not always followed, is that 4/4 bars can be split in the middle. It does make life easier for the people who have to read the dots, although good sight readers don't have a problem.We're not all GOOD sight readers, though... Shev's point about 4/4 is one that you need to address. In the early stages of writing, it's probably a good idea ...


2

In simple terms, 6/8 is compound !! You are counting a relatively quick 1-2-3-1-2-3, as you say, which can feel like 3/4 or 3/8 - waltz like. However, the second '1' is slightly less emphasised in 6/8, so it's counted ONE-two-three four-five-six. (The four is where your second 'one', or 'bom' is). 6/8, being compound, means that it can simultaneously be ...


2

They are very different. In 3/4 you are playing in threes: [ONE two three] [ONE two three] [ONE two three]. In 6/8 you are playing twos [[ONE two three] [Four five six]] [[ONE two three] [Four five six]] Hard to illustrate but in 6/8 the underlying pattern is 1-2-1-2-1-2 where the 1 occurs on the first quaver and the 2 on the fourth. If you were playing a ...


2

Three 200g cakes weigh the same as six 100g cakes, but if they were put on a plate in front of you, you'd see them as different eating experiences. It's the same with 3/4 versus 6/8. 3/4 feels like three beats in each bar. In 6/8 you feel the pulse of 6 shorter beats to every bar.


1

When the music is a long string of eighth notes, 3/4 is 3 groups of 2; 6/8 is two groups of 3: 3/4: [e e] [e e] [e e] 6/8: [e e e] [e e e] and the first note in each group is (usually) slightly accented relative to the others, and of course ,the first note of the measure is (usually) more strongly accented.


1

Every copy I've seen of Greensleeves notates it in 3/4 time, but if one looks at the word stresses it could probably be notated just as well in 6/8 (with half as many measures) or perhaps 12/8 (with a quarter as many measures) since alternating measures definitely have stronger and weaker word stresses, as do alternating pairs of measures (though to a lesser ...


1

Music theory generally uses only duple and triple, not the quadruple and sextuple that your link mentions. Any meter can be explained in terms of duple or triple along with simple or compound. For example, the "sextuple" meter she mentions is compound duple meter. It works like this. Meter is a combination of strong and weak beats. Two or a multiple ...


1

The distinction between a slow 6/8 meter and a waltz is largely arbitrary. It may be that the melody is intended to have a stronger downbeat on every alternate bar, and that many people perceive it that way, but the same is true for countless waltzes notated in 3/4 as well (mostly those that have even-length numbers of bars in their phrases). The only ...


1

@MatthewRead's answer above hits the nail on the head. There is another reason that 4/4 may be used instead of 2/4 and that's for the ease of reading the notes from the page. For example, in American Oldtime music there is a strong 2/4 feeling to it, but it's easier to read if no note values are below an eighth note or a dotted eighth. So the music is ...



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