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6

You can (theoretically) read a score without bar lines, and indeed bars (or measures) and bar lines, in the sense that we use today, are a relatively new invention, from the mid of 17th century. Before that, "bar" lines were not used at all, or were used only to visually divide a piece into sections or phrases. In fact if we go all the way back to Gregorian ...


5

Probably. But it can get a bit silly. All these bars sound the same, but you wouldn't want to continue this sort of notation for too long!


2

Here's a little test of your ability to read music without a time signature. This is the theme from a piece by a very well known composer - note, I transposed it into a different key because the original key might frighten some people. Which is the correct version - 3/4 time or 4/4? (I'll add a link to the original after a day or so, to give the OP time to ...


2

It can be interpreted not as 59/48, but as 5/4+9/8 (i.e. 19/8). Sometimes composers use two meters to express the "alternation" (1st beat has 1st time signature, 2nd has 2nd, 3rd has 1st again, 4th has 2nd etc.). These meters are usually written next to each other, without any space or plus sign (which creates such confusion). So I advise you to count actual ...


1

No! it's possible to sort of translate 2/2 into 4/4, but even then there will be a subtle change in emphasis of certain notes, depending where they are in a bar. It's certainly not possible to tranlate 3/4 into 6/8, even though they both contain the equivalent of 3 crotchets/6 quavers. 12/8 is often written as 4/4, with a note at the top explaining the feel, ...


1

You'd have to take a look at the actual music to be sure. As a hunch, 59 is 32+27, two numbers with musically useful small factors. If we only want actual divisors of 48, it may be 48+8+3 or 24+16+16+3. Not particularly more desirable. So really go hunt for more information in the music. How would a drummer work it? Like Joe Morello did in the David ...



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