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5

The only reason not to use a slash is that it implies division. But it's the closest match to standard notation and the symbol there looks even more like division. You're trying to reproduce what standard notation does, so use / That / will be the least of your learners' worries. I'd say the numbers themselves will be more worrisome. Triple meter? Have ...


4

In plain text you can use the vertical bar symbol | (aka pipe) instead of /. It's a very common character, so your keyboard should have an easy way to type it. It would look like this: 4|4. You can check the list of Unicode characters and search for other characters that might be used instead of /, like ⧘ ⦙ ⬍, there's a lot of them (some have mathematical ...


2

It looks like they first came up with lyrics and they stretched out the barline to fit the lyrics in a stylistic way. Messing around with the meter is a term that I heard more than once in the studio lingo hence I think that's what they did. The key point is that the time signature is required to put things down. The band members might have internal ...


2

This could be a compound tempo. Assuming the last bars are correctly written (see my question in comment) than for the first line you would have: 6/8+1/4 | 9/8 | 6/8+1/4 | 6/8, and for the second line you would have: 6/8+1/4 | 9/8 | 6/8+1/4 | 3/8+1/4 How to find this from the piece itself? Well you either have a very good sense of rhythm and you can ...


2

"March of the pigs" off of the downward spiral by Nine Inch Nails flips between 3 bars of 7/8 and one bar of 4/4 during the verses. The choruses are in 4/4, as are the end of the choruses, but the ends have a complete change of feel. "La Mer" off of The Fragile by Nine Inch Nails starts out in 3/4, and stays there, but when the drums enter they are in 4/4, ...


1

"x over y" is an expression used in music, and in mathematics. The time signature can be thought mathematically as x * 1 / y, for example, 4 * 1 / 4. I wouldn't worry too much about it looking mathematical, personally, since when used in context it will be correctly understood, and not confusing in a musical context. What are you doing in inline text, ...


1

A nice example is Mother by Pink Floyd. It has 5/4 and 9/8 (both often for exactly one bar), 4/4, 12/8. This song is quite interesting because you hardly hear anything weird about it, until you start actively counting the beats. In my opinion, there are few songs that handle frequent time signature changes so well. Another nice example is the Apocalypse in ...


1

Grouping idea sounds good but to understand the odd time signatures feeling i would like to give you some examples: As we walk with a constant speed we could say that we are walking with a simple 2 beat time signature as in 2/4 or 6/8 or at some points 4/4. Imagine a cripple guy or some one who is shot in leg drags on of his feet on the ground. in this ...


1

Pat Metheny's The First Circle, which starts of with clapping in 22/8, don't get much more odd than that! Incredible piece, I've heard it played by a big band called the Bristol Hornstars, and it's one of the most incredibly intricate pieces I've ever heard.



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