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12

In practice, off the page, there is no difference to the listener. On the page, or the written music, each measure in 2/2 will hold the equivalent of 2 half notes and each measure in 2/4 will hold the equivalent of 2 quarter notes, which will simply be drawn differently.


6

Practically speaking, there's no difference between writing a piece in 2/2, or writing it in 2/4 and halving all of the note durations. They would sound exactly the same. The difference is largely convention and tradition. Marches and upbeat musical theater numbers are traditionally in cut time, but most other styles of music prefer the quarter note to ...


4

Well, you could write that as (3+3+3+4)/4, indicating a fixed cycle, but time signature can change during a piece as well, in which case you could just indicate the changes. I do believe that such meter is fairly uncommon in popular music, as it leads to a cycle of 13 units. In 20th Century 'Classical' music this kind of things are quite a bit more common, ...


4

In theory, the exact same music could be written in either time signature, either with the notes being half the (written) duration in 2/4 and then played at half the speed (4 eighth notes in 2/4 taking the same amount of time as 4 quarter notes in 4/4 time) OR with identical note durations and twice as many measures of 2/4. In practice, time signatures ...


3

Right after the time signature change you see a natural sign, which would not be necessary for the assumed implicit key signature reset. Key signatures are very important and therefore very explicit. For a change of the key signature typically all existing accidentals are first neutralized and then the new ones added.


3

Tempo and Time Signatures really don't have anything to do with each other. A time signature is how you group, count, and accent beats and tempo is how fast the beat is. Changing the tempo as you are doing does not affect the time signature at all. 3/4 or 3/8 or even 3/2 will group the beats in the ONE-two-three pattern you want and as a composer the tempo ...


3

On a practical level, they are exactly the same in performance. However, 2/2 time is somewhat of a leftover from early music (chant, etc.) that used the open noteheads of what we now call whole and half notes (since they're almost always referenced now to at least 4/4 time where they'd have the temporal value of a whole or half measure). I personally ...


1

2/4 and 2/2 are principally about the same. As a performer however, I tend to have different feelings about them. Starting from the "standard" 4/4 with its alternating strong/weak accents, 2/4 has not-really-alternating strong/strong accents on the half notes while 2/2 feels more like leaving off an accent on the second half note as compared to 4/4. So as ...


1

The only time a key signature changes is when the composer labels it as such. Using the image you provided as an example, the piece would remain in E major, until at some point in the song, the composer states that the piece is to be played in let's say G major. I have taken piano lessons for ten years, and on occasion dabble in composition.



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