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7

If you have 4/2 (for same BPM)the half note duration is now equal to 0.5 seconds? Yes. The bottom number indicates the reference symbol used to measure the unit pulse. Therefore, half-notes are played at 120bpm. As others have suggested, almost zero musicians think of notes as durations of fractions of a second. If that is so the lower number in ...


5

The lower number ties the beat length to a particular musical symbol. N/2 indicates so many minims (half notes) to the bar, N/4 = so many crotchets (quarter notes), N/8 = so many quavers (eighth notes). One reason for using a particular note length versus another is purely for convenient notation. e.g in compound time signatures like 6/8, 9/8, etc groups of ...


4

While mathematically it indeed seems that way, 4/4 and 2/2 are not the same thing, just like 3/4 and 6/8 aren't. Technically, you can perfectly write a 4/4 piece down using a 2/2 time signature, but there are different nuances to each of these time signatures, which make them quite an important bit of information. I suggest you read the answer to this ...


3

I think the confusion here is mixing two different conventions. The notion of "BPM" arose from tempo indications in MIDI sequencing, in music genres where staff notation isn't used at all, or is not very important. If you want to relate MIDI tempo to staff notation, the standard (defined in the Standard Midi File Format specification) is that "beat" = ...


3

This is a music theory question: in theory, what is the difference between time signatures? Some signatures are only pedantically different: essentially they are the same. But rhythm is based in emphasis, and that is what decides the signature. Think this way - Each measure, we will typically have 2, 3, or 4 beats. If we had 1 beat per measure, it wouldn't ...


2

Yes. This kind of time signature is called Irrational. An irrational time signature is one where the denominator isn't a power of two (like the examples you provided). There has been another similar question here; (1/√π)/√⅔ as a time signature? Where the asker provides a link from Wikipedia that has many compositions in irrational time signatures.


2

The other answers are using terminology which common, but confusing. I think it's better to realize there are two different things here. A whole-bar rest. This is always the same symbol whatever the length of the bar, and it is always positioned horizontally in the middle of the bar. A whole-note rest. This has the same length as a whole-note. and is ...


2

Semibreve (whole note) rests are always used as measure rests, except occasionally for time signatures like 4/2, where a breve rest might be used instead. It's actually pretty simple: you know how many beats are in a given measure, so getting finicky about the actual time interval is a bit of a waste of energy when that voice isn't playing anything anyway. ...


1

A time signature seems unnecessary for what you're describing, unless "moving a note" would invoke "moving all similar notes" where similar means the same note at the same spot in a measure: the concept of measure would require a time signature. If you don't need that concept then you don't need the associated time signature. For tempo... same thing: do you ...


1

This is a very common misconception due to how the notes are named. All notes take up a very specific length of a measure as defined by the time signature. In the most common time signature 4/4, which is also refereed to as common time, a whole note and rest both take the value of 4 quarter notes so it takes up the whole measure in 4/4. The half note and ...


1

Mathematically, yes you can play a waltz in 6/8 instead of 3/4. Musically, it's hard to. The difference between these two times signatures is the strong beats that consist each measure. In a 3/4 measure, we have 1 as the strong beat, whereas 2 and 3 are not strong. In 6/8 measure, we have 1 as strong beat and 4 as slightly strong beat; the other beats ...



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