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9

It's an octave clef. It's telling you all the notes written are actually down an octave. Since the guitar is already a transposing instrument where everything is transposed down an octave, it's essentially showing you the actual notes being played instead of the implied octave transposition. So for simplicity's sake you can just ignore it and play as you ...


5

Slow it down then. Pachelbel's manuscript has no tempo affixed. With the basso ostinato suggesting a fairly deliberate pace, try somewhere between 72-92 bpm. If the shorter notes start blurring, slow the tempo down a bit; if they are dragging a bit, speed it up. In general, the tempi specified for a given piece (when specified) are suggestions anyway. ...


4

This could be written as an alternation of two additive meters: 9 + 4 / 8 and 9 + 2 / 8, where the 9 quavers are naturally subdivided in 3+3+3, so no need for triplets. You could also write the two additive meters as 3+3+3+2+2 / 8 and 3+3+3+2 / 8, but this might be an overkill.


3

Yes, indeed. The time signature together with an understanding of the musical style of the period in which the music was written tell you what the rhythm is and what the accents are supposed to be in general. Specific notes in specific measures might be written in such a way as to over-ride the default pattern. For example, in classical music in general, in ...


2

It literally just means create a piece of music where the time signature alternates between 7/8, 3/4, and 13/16 in that order. There's nothing more to it. Here's a 12 bar score template to give you a better idea of what he means: As you can see, there are 4 complete 7/8, 3/4, and 13/16 measures. Most likely you would want them together to make one ...


2

As Patrx2 notes, JP did not indicate a tempo. There are reasons that suggest that this piece was played at a moderately fast tempo at the time it was written - say 100-120 BPM, where a beat in this case is a quarter note. However, when played on strings (violins and bass), modern tastes place this piece firmly in a lento (slow) tempo; say 56-64 BPM. ...


2

These time signatures are very interesting in nature and have a very specific purpose just like most things in music. A measure of (3/5)/4 would mean each measure contains 3/5 of a quarter note or 3 eighth note quintuplets. A simpler example is 2(1/2)/4 where where would be 2 and a half quarter notes or 5 eighth notes. As Matthew Read pointed out in the ...


2

To answer the second question, you can use the "voices" feature of GP6 : You can have 4 voices. Each voice has it's own "bar duration count" which is independent from the other. To change the current voice, use the "1", "2", "3" and "4" buttons. When you'll add a note, it will be added to the currently selected voice. The notes from the other voices are ...


1

Adding to Dom's excellent answer, the tails on the dots are the clue. There's one set of notes with up tails, and one with down tails. Showing two parts to the line. Trouble is, it's a compromise, as it looks like the first note in the bar could be a minim with a tail AND a beam. Of course, this sort of note doesn't get used. It's written like that (and has ...



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