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7

These are mensural time signatures. Before I explain their general meaning, I would just note that these signatures should not be used without extensive explanation unless you're notating specifically for an early-music group. They are not often taught outside of grad school History of Theory type courses. Mensural music was composed in Europe during ...


6

The only other exception I can think of is something like rubato grace notes that have no count. Here's an example from Chopin's Nocturnes, Op. 27: As for standard music notation, no other notable exceptions really come to mind.


3

A time signature does not affect the duration of any tuple. For example: An 8th note triplet will always take up 1/3 of a quarter note A 16th note triplet will always take up 1/3 of an 8th note A 32nd note triplet will always take up 1/3 of a 16th note An 8th note duplet will always take up 1/2 of a dotted quarter note A 16th note duplet will always take ...


3

From the Wikipedia article on Time Signature: 4/4: Widely used, rock, country, blues, funk, pop 2/2: Marches and musical theater 2/4: Polkas and marches 3/4: Waltzes, minuets, scherzi, country and western ballads, R&B, pop 3/8: Same as above 6/8: Double jigs, polkas, sega, salegy, tarantella, marches, barcarolles, Irish jigs, loures, and some rock ...


2

Do you think specifically about 3/4, or time signatures in general? Pop, rock and metal are almost always 4/4, and rarely change meter, though there can be exceptions (e.g. Iron Maiden - Number of the beast alternates between 4/4 and 6/4, Oingo Boingo little girls - alternates between 4/4 and 2/4). Great exceptions are postrock and avant-garde metal, where ...


2

There is no "rule" that says music must have a fixed and repetitive rhythmic structure, indicated by a time signature, that can be mapped onto "bars" and "beats". If there is no repetitive rhythm at all, there would be no time signature, and bar lines might be used simply as a visual aid to help several performers to find the same place. That is not a modern ...


2

There is a long list of styles of music with particular distinct rhythms and time signatures at the Wikipedia article on Ballroom Dance. That is to say that these are competition styles of dance, but each dance has its own style of music that goes along with it. Here is a partial list from that link Waltz: 3/4 time Tango: 4/4 time Viennese Waltz: 3/4 time ...


2

In the Baroque style period (roughly 1600–1750) the rhythms of a number of folk dances from all across Europe were incorporated into instrumental compositions -- at the same time, what we now know as ballet was being developed in France. There are numerous Baroque dances and rhythms. Many great composers wrote famous instrumental pieces called suites which ...


1

To quote from the competition: those are mensural time signatures. Basically, they are symbols from an earlier time period where notation values tended to be more ambiguous but still more rigid than Gregorian notations. Of the mensural time signatures in use then only the ones for 4/4 and alla breve have survived in modified form. All the others are now ...


1

Here is a long and detailed list of many Bulgarian folk dances and styles of music (going back centuries) which make use of various odd-time signatures like 7/8, 11/16, 5/8, and many others. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bulgarian_dances


1

I read comments in here talking about 5/8 7/8 and 9/8 (with 9, I mean 4+5 and not 3+3+3) as metric structures "developed" and used by some progressive musicians. For somebody trained as a classical Western musician, it may seem so; but actually here in Turkey and throughout the whole Balkan area, including Asia minor (Turkey, Bulgaria, Greece, Albania, ...



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