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9

A bar's duration can be represented using the whole note No, not always! This is the incorrect assumption you're making. A bar's 'duration' depends on the time signature. So, in a standard 4/4 bar, the bar is 4 quarter notes long. (4 * 1/4...see where this is going?) Alternatively, in a 3/2 bar, the bar is 3 half notes long, or 3 * 1/2! So, whilst a ...


7

To find the length in seconds of each beat for any given metronome marking in beats-per-minute (bpm), you would divide 60 (the number of seconds in a minute) by the bpm marking. For instance, if a piece has a metronome marking of crotchet (quarter-note) = 120, each crotchet beat is 0.5 seconds long (60/120). You can follow this simple rule to find the ...


6

A whole note takes up a full measure in 16/16, 8/8, 4/4, and 2/2 time only. A whole note has the value of 4 quarter notes or 2 half notes. Since how common 4/4 time is (it is even also referred to as common time) it makes sense that the notes name line up with the use in 4/4. In 3/2 the whole measure is represented by a dotted whole note (i.e. a whole note ...


4

Each of these can be thought of as a conversion factor. Typically, you're converting everything to or from beats (which are the basic unit of time in music). If you recall "dimensional analysis" from high-school physics, this is a great place to use it! Time signature numerator = beats/bar Time signature denominator = beats/whole-note (i.e. what division ...


4

Another question and answer give answers for any beat type and tempo, but for the examples above, it depends upon which note length beat is 120 bpm. For instance, a crotchet bpm of 120 (as would probably be used in 4/4), will always give a crotchet length of 0.5 seconds, whole-note length of 2 seconds, half-note length of 1 second, and so on. If, on the ...


3

The 7/8 bars here are written so that they are timed a half beat (quaver) short of the 4/4s. Wanting to start with a 'one' count, you could count 1e&a 2e 3e&a 4e&a, giving you all the semis on a syllable each. The reason I've left out &a of 2 is that the phrasing in this case does just that - it's split the bar into 3 and 4, making 7, thus ...


2

It depends. The BPM is telling you the tempo based on a reference. If it is 4/4 then it is most likely this: This pretty much means that there are 120 quarter notes a minute so each quater note would be a half second long. If you wanted to know how many half notes there are in a minute it is just simple math. Since there is two quarter notes in every half ...


1

You'll probably find it easiest to move away from counting every semiquaver (16th) in each bar, and just count quavers (8th). This still helps you count semiquavers, though, as every semiquaver note is either on or off a quaver beat. But, you should feel that your counting and playing both flow better, and feel less rushed, as you are counting half as many ...


1

I would be very careful about assigning specific numbers to tempo names, where the composer did not specify those numbers. In general they don't match up that precisely, and its likely that the composer did not have that specific of a tempo in mind. "Allegro" for example, does not convey a specific range of tempos. It just conveys a brisk or lively mood ...


1

What I have seen from pieces I've played is that they specify that. At the top of the score, there would be a quarter note = 140 or eighth note = 140 or dotted quarter note = 140 or half note = 140 or something. To be honest, I think that in a 6/8 piece it would be odd to have quarter note = 140 it should be dotted quarter or eighth imo. Per the related ...


1

This is very common, even in the most standard pop tunes. You should check if it isn't actually one 4/4 bar plus one 2/4 bar (or the other way around). This latter case occurs most often.



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