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12

Technically speaking, you can't ever say for certain until you see the original score (if there even is one) as determined by the composer; a piece could literally be written in an infinite number of time signatures. As such, we have to make these decisions based on a knowledge of prior practice and on what makes the most practical sense. So, let's look at ...


6

I'd put it in 6/8, due to the triplets feel, but the phrasing kind of repeats every two bars, thus two lots of 3/8, making 6/8. Why /8? Well, it's fairly quick, so I'd write it as quavers instead of crotchets. There is a recent question on that subject - quavers to play give the feeling that they are quicker - I know it depends on the tempo mark, but ...


1

It's not so unusual to have time signature changes back and forth in several different kinds of music, and writing in the time signature at the beginnin of a new measure when it changes is the only way I've ever seen it notated. For example, both The Ocean by Led Zeppelin and March of Pigs by Nine Inch Nails go back and forth between 7/8 and 4/4 and are ...


1

It sounds as if you have conceived a song that doesn't fit the standard pop song format of 8 or 16 bar sections, with the same bar length throughout. That's fine. Plenty of songs don't. Stop trying to force your song into a rigid structure and find out just what it DOES do. Maybe there are 7, 9 or 13-bar sections. Maybe some bars have 4 beats, some ...



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