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15

"Crotchet" is the British term for quarter note. A "Minim" is a half note and a "quaver" is an eighth note. 3/4 is a time signature. More specifically, it is simple, triple time. The top number in this time signature indicates that there are three beats in each measure. The bottom number (below the slash) means that one beat is defined as a quarter note, ...


13

Using only your ears, it's impossible to determine the exact time signature the composer would have used when writing the score. This is because there are many ways to write the same thing, all of which sound the same when played. For example, a piece written in 3/4 time can easily be re-written in 3/8 time by halving all the note values and playing it half ...


11

Whilst even time-sigs are far more common that odd ones, once the 'feel' of a tune is running, most people will go with the flow. Even when there is a change of time in the middle of a line, most people don't spot it. Having sung/played 'The 12 Days of Christmas' (topical !) for many years, it took me by surprise when I looked at the music; the time changed ...


8

The history goes that religious music was written in 3 time, reflecting the holy trinity.So a circle would be used. When music was written in 4 time, a BROKEN circle would be used. This over time became printed as a C. So it represents 4/4, but doesn't actually stand for 'common'.As above, when split, it means split time - 4/4 but played with a 'two' feel.


7

I believe that the person a step beyond a layman would be the most likely to interpret an odd meter as a mistake, however, there are many factors that weigh in here. First of all, we have to say that our layman is of the Western music persuasion, as odd meters are very common in other cultures (including some that fall very near the Western tradition). The ...


7

There are many more time signatures. Just use the ones in the "Popular" list, because those are probably the only popular ones that are not in your list. Popular: 2/2 (very, very popular) 3/2 6/4 (very popular) Other time signatures: 4/2 (Schuber Impromptus Op 90 No 3) 7/4, 9/4, 10/4, and 14/4 (all used in this song, but I forgot the name). x/16 (used ...


7

The purpose of "Cut Time" is not to reduce the use of eighth notes and sixteenth notes in a piece, it is to facilitate easier reading for musicians. Simple metric durations (e.g. 1-4) are much easier to calculate and respond to than, let's say, 32nd notes, which take just a moment longer to interpret because of the additional visual stimulus. When a player ...


7

The 107 defines the tempo(speed) of the song. If you see a metronome, you'll see that you can determine the speed. The speed of the specific song is 107 bpm (beats per minute). Also, you can see that the duration of the note is a quarter. That means that if you set your metronome at 107 bpm, every tic would be a quarter. So, the correct name for this would ...


7

I'm guessing this is from guitar tab, with 6 lines. The 6/8 really means 2 beats per bar, made up with 3 triplet quavers (1/8 notes). This will give each bar only 2 beats, despite numbers like 6 and 8.The tempo mark found above tells how many b.p.m. (beats per minute) the tune should be played at, In this case, 107. A metronome can be set to this, and every ...


7

I would say that the specific name is "experimental." My feeling is that it comes from the school of thought that attempts to turn the back on musical tradition and come up with something new. There's a certain arrogance to it in my opinion (famously, Schönberg said upon coming up with his rather superficial tone-row concept that he had assured the ...


6

It appears as though that piece has been recently typeset (along with quite a lot of Cima's other work) by a contributor to IMSLP. It is not a professional publication, but I believe it is meant to be as accurate to the composer's original work as possible (hence the listing of "Urtext" at the bottom of each page.) The rhythm and meter would be odd in ...


6

Yes. Is there a difference between 2/4 and 4/4 explains this using 2/4 and 4/4. However, this is a little different because it is compound meter. 12/8 has four beats divided into three equal parts. It would be counted like this: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 The primary accent is on the first beat, the secondary accent is on the seventh, and there are two ...


6

"Most popular" is subjective. There are many genres of music and over 800 years of music written in a form we'd recognize as music, though it wasn't until the 14th century that French Catholic copyists would develop the timing system most similar to what we have today, which then spread across the Roman Catholic world and across to the Americas. Even then, ...


6

Simple answer - they just count, as they do in any song. But here, they may count 1,2 -1,2 - 1,2 - 1,2,3 - 1,2. If the beat is slower, they may count 123,456 - 123,456 - 123,456,789 - 123,456 for each of the quavers (1/8 notes). The pulse is followed in that all quavers are the same length, so the count will be steady.


6

Start by finding the beat. Tap your finger for every beat, like a human metronome. Resist any urge to tap uneven rhythms; just the underlying constant pulse. Once you've got that, listen for the start of bars. There are various indicators that a bar is starting; an emphasis, a chord change, etc. Now count. "One" for the first beat, then counting upward, ...


5

On the piano we really only have loudness to work with for this sort of emphasis; other instruments may additionally use other emphasis for beats, but not typically duration. There may be styles and interpretations that mess with the durations of notes on various beats but they are not denoted by the time signature.


5

What seems to be causing the confusion here is a swing feel, used quite a lot in Jazz. It has caused me confusion in the past too. Put simply it's when you take the 2 even quavers in each beat, lengthen the first one and shorten the second to give a smoother feel. It has a very distinctive sound usually (the wiki article can explain far better than I ...


4

A harmonic minor sounds "Egyptian" or "Arabic" depending on how you use it. Use of the scale is deeply woven into the European classical music tradition. Occurrences of the scale in, for instance, Baroque music are not strikingly "Arabic" in mood. Here is an exmaple. The "Allemande" from J. S. Bach's E minor suite for guitar (BWV 996) has a quick, ...


4

The two sharp signs are the key signature. They identify the key the piece is to be played in. On the right of the time signature (that's what you call the 4/4) is an anacrusis, an incomplete measure. The curved line over the first six notes tells you to slur those notes (not hold them). This has slightly different meanings depending on the instrument. ...


4

If executed correctly, those time signatures have powerful affects and create a distinct feel. In fact, these time signatures are very common in Eastern music. Sometimes problems come when people don't create patterns that fit the style of the time signature. For example, in 7/8, the grouping is counted by the idea of 1 2 3 - 1 2 - 1 2 so it is most ...


4

Wow, what a great question! Sorry, I don't know of a specific name for this kind of time signature. Judging whether this is a useful time signature is almost a philosophical question. If the main function of a time signature is to provide performance information to the performer, then no, this isn't very useful. But, a time signature can also be used to ...


4

I think I know what you're getting at. First, a "musical passage" is just any group of notes that are organized into a single idea. It doesn't have anything to do with being on the beat or not. However... If you've lost the beat, you can stop playing, get back onto the beat, and start back in again while everyone snickers at you. Or, you can play a ...


4

Let's take a simple music sheet: As you can see, the time signature is given, and it's 4/4. That means every measure has 4 beats of quarters. I assume you know about the duration of the notes. Every measure/bar in the music sheet is defined by the vertical lines you can see in the image above. Between every two vertical lines, you must have notes whose ...


3

While, as said by the previous answers, such meters can normally be sudivided into little chunks, it is in my experience not a good idea to let this influence strumming patterns etc. to directly: this is prone to give exactly the experience that many people associate, dislikingly, with odd meters – a "jumpy" sound, as if something is just missing or ...


3

Hello I'd try to answer your question ok? First of all I can tell you that you use some grammar mistakes like 4/3 or 6/6, so maybe you should express your thoughts using a common musical language. I don't know if you're talking about the intro or other parts of the song... for example the part of "i get out..." is 4/4 for sure. more things... sometimes is ...


3

At the time, 8 beats per bar were commonplace, particularly amongst hymns.Since the breve is worth 8 beats, it can't fit into more modern music bars.Therefore we use semibreves to fill bars of 4/4.Also quite common was 6/4, not much seen now. Maybe writing in this way obviated the need for anything shorter than semiquavers in the main, probably easier to ...


3

This question is a little difficult to address for a couple reasons: 1.) A harmonic minor scale is a Western-European approximation of eastern tonal characteristics - much in the same way a pentatonic scale stereo types Eastern-Asian culture. 2.) "Traditional" Egyptian tonal materials do not fit into Western notation, so if you were honestly going to write ...


3

Define layman. A non musician? I don't think it would make a lot of difference if the listener were a musician or not. Except that the musician is more likely to have listened irregular meters before. A person who's never (rarely ever) heard odd meters or heavily syncopated music? Yes he would perceive it as mistake. Personally, I do remember hearing those ...


3

If your walk is a 1-2-3-4 (4/4) and you only step on beats 1 and 3, that means you are playing(stepping on) halves,but the time signature is still 4/4. I think it's note values/durations you don't understand. If you walk on every step (1-2-3-4), then you would play quarters. A 4/4 walk has 4 quarter notes if you step on every step. That means you'll be ...


3

You don't need to do anything special, in most cases. Just play an extra beat in the bar, or one beat less. It should be pretty obvious whether the odd beat (or beats) is a "strong" beat or not. For example, if you're doing a standard 4/4 rock beat with snare drum strokes on the 2nd and 4th beats, and you have one odd 3/4 bar, it may be that you need to play ...



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